20% OFF FRAMING for a limited time only

Cassette Lord Artist Biography

Brighton based street artist Martin Middleton, aka Cassette Lord, transforms the urban landscape with his bright, bold and surreal stencil work. Cassette Lord's mission is to transform bland green junction boxes into giant cassette tapes... Cassette Lord is from Portsmouth. He began painting graffiti at an early age. He actually came to it through youth work, "it seemed to be a natural development from that because young people are interested in graffiti so it was something to ties my hands to and I got good at it," he explained. His first street art piece was in Gosport, near Portsmouth.Cassette Lord moved to Brighton from Portsmouth in 2001 to run the Artscape Project, a project about teaching and creating graffiti art on walls and murals with young offenders as community service. The idea to stencil the junction boxes came to Cassette Lord when he had finished painting a mural with a youth group. He noticed that the only part of the mural that wasn't covered was the ubiquitous green boxes in front of the piece. He asked his contact with the local council if he could carry on the mural over the boxes, she said "do you want to do them all?" She didn't have to ask twice! As a community artist, Cassette Lord wanted to think of an image that could be effectively stencilled on to the boxes as part of the youth arts projects he works on. "The cassette tape was the right shape for the junction boxes and the perfect retro choice for the art and music saturated landscape of Brighton. I loved the prospect of seeing these massive cassettes sticking up out of the pavement like they had been ejected from some huge subterranean cassette-playing mother ship!" explains Cassette Lord. The cassette was a natural choice for the Cassette Lord, whose name came from a cassette super hero costume he made for a house party. Over the years he's made cassette furniture, sculptures and paintings. Cassette Lord describes his style as retro, "all my artwork, even the freestyle pieces, all of them reference objects, shapes and things people recognise from their childhood". He is a fan of American artist Claes Oldenburg, who takes tiny everyday objects and makes them into massive sculptures, "I'm very inspired by pop art and I think the tapes fit the pop art style. With our cities crammed full of advertising, signs and signals I think it is really important to implant the abstract and surreal in the everyday to remind us that our visual reality and environment can be altered and doesn't always have to make sense, it's important not to lose that sense of play". (Cassette Lord)

Scroll To Top