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  • Gina Soden artist interview

    We recently caught up with Gina Soden, photographer and rising star of British contemporary art. Discover our recently added collection of Gina Soden prints, by visiting the artrepublic Brighton gallery, 01273 724829, brighton@artrepublic.com. Q. So Gina, how do you find your fantastic and hid....
    We recently caught up with Gina Soden, photographer and rising star of British contemporary art. Discover our recently added collection of Gina Soden prints, by visiting the artrepublic Brighton gallery, 01273 724829, brighton@artrepublic.com. Q. So Gina, how do you find your fantastic and hidden locations? A. A variety of ways - I use Google maps and search manually for places, also if I know of a location in a town I will look for others on aerial view and street view. This is a great way to “drive” around and take a look. I also look at articles and books. Tip offs from friends too. It takes me hours to find places sometimes. Other times it is very difficult, so I am lucky to have a great network of friends I am in contact with who share information on abandoned places. The people in the group share a common interest but have different motivations behind their love of exploration. For example, I know a guy who has done a project on Italian asylums and wants the patients stories told. We’ve worked together and while he has been going through the records and speaking to the manager I have been shooting. Q. It seems like your photographic series have a strong sense of narrative - is this organic or do you create a story with each series? A. When I'm shooting I try to give a sense of place but not direct the narrative. I want people to be able to make their own stories. I don't shoot with a series in mind. I collect images and then put them together. For example, Incremento was created from various shoots in Romania, Italy and France. It can sometimes be a race to get there before a building gets renovated or demolished! Q. That sounds incredible - any hairy moments? A. To get into an abandoned asylum in Italy I had to crawl through a basement between pipes covered in fibreglass. It was boiling hot, itchy and very claustrophobic. It was all worth it- once inside I spent 12 hours there. I’ve been back three times since, each time a different way in. Q. Do you have a particular room or piece that came from that experience which stand out for you? A. A really interesting piece that is titled 'Manicomio: Operating Theatre', it was shot using a panoramic head with a wide aperture. The final image is one hundred and seventeen images stitched together. It’s a huge piece, sized at 157cm squared. It took a long time to shoot it, and a long time to stitch the images together, I had to do a lot of it manually to line it up. I wanted to portray a wide scene of the whole room but with only a certain part in focus to draw attention to the centre. I love the detail in it and the fact all that was left behind is a hospital.   Q. Which of the series so far would you say is your favourite? A. Definitely Incremento, it has the most artistic freedom. Q. Any inspirations? A. I'm very inspired by Wes Anderson, his stylistic art gives me a sense of calm. The single point perspective and symmetry in his work has a soothing effect so I love to portray that in my work. Q. You have been involved in a number of really exciting projects with Soho House and the Ned, can we see your work there now? A. Yes, my work is in the Neds permanent 'Vault' Collection, in the hotel rooms there and in the Parlour and the Lounge. My work is also at the recently refurbished Soho House - 40 Greek Street. Happy to give a guided tour! ;) To discover our latest Gina Soden prints, please call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • The Places That Time Forgot: Gina Soden’s Reverie of Architectural Decay

    Written By Mae Losasso Badekultur By Gina Soden The blue tiles of an abandoned swimming pool have lost their lustre, exposed in an arid setting where rippling water has long-since drained away, paint peels from decorative arches, and only ghosts inhabit the darkened niches. In another locatio....
    Written By Mae Losasso Badekultur By Gina Soden The blue tiles of an abandoned swimming pool have lost their lustre, exposed in an arid setting where rippling water has long-since drained away, paint peels from decorative arches, and only ghosts inhabit the darkened niches. In another location, a wheezing bed crouches at the centre of a decaying room, pocked with mould and mildew, black spots spreading across once-white walls, as caving mattresses heave themselves from the forlorn setting. Whoever inhabited this boudoir in better times has long been gone, their history traced across the space, their presence palpable in their silent absence. Welcome to the world of Gina Soden: photographer, urban explorer, and rising star of the contemporary British art scene. Who is Gina Soden? Based in London, Soden scours Europe for abandoned, man-made sites, focusing her lens to capture their ethereal qualities. This is ‘urban exploration’ - AKA ‘urbex’ - at its very best: pushing beyond factual documentation of ruinous structures, Soden suffuses every photograph with a painterly lyricism that breathes life into decrepit spaces with haunting allure. Romantic with a capital ‘R’, Soden's work is a reverie of architectural decay, exploring the transcendental possibilities of entropy and transiency, the slow, creeping passage of time, and all of the beauty that accompanies spatial decrepitude. Bedroom By Gina Soden Soden graduated from Thames Valley University in 2007, before being swept up in a string of group shows, which took her from Windsor to Hong Kong. In July 2012, Peter Blake spotted the rising talent, featuring two of her artworks in ‘Things I Love at The Fine Art Society’, a show at London’s oldest commercial dealership, curated by Blake to mark his 80th birthday. For the exhibition, Blake selected nearly 100 works of art, resulting in one of best attended shows on record for The Fine Art Society, with features appearing in The Times and on BBC News. From here, Soden's career exploded: a succession of prestigious awards poured in, from Emerging Artist of the Year, National Open Art, in October 2013, to finalist for Sky Arts Master of Photography TV competition, in May 2016. Meanwhile, group shows accelerated, allowing Soden’s work to seep across the continent, from London to Paris to Russia. Solo shows gathered in the spaces in-between until, in May 2017 ‘Art in Ruins’ was revealed, Soden’s flagship solo show at Blacks Club, London. The press were enraptured, with features appearing in Financial Times, Dazed and Confused, Aesthetica, CNN, and GQ. Today, Soden’s work can be found in a number of high profile London haunts, including The Ned, Groucho Club, Goldman Sachs, Century Club, and Home House. In other words, Soden’s career soared form strength to strength in a heartbeat: and there’s no mystery as to why. From derelict asylums to long disused schools, ex-military complexes to crumbling chapels, Soden draws out the haunting character of the empty space, in a way that implicates the viewer: here you are, alone in this silent setting, lost and forgotten. An experience of Soden’s work gives you one of those rare moments of transcendence, as you find yourself shifting beyond the surface of the frame, the reality around you falling away as the image reels you in. History of Urban Exploration ’Urbex’ may be a contemporary term, in its relation to photographic documentation, but a fascination with abandoned space stretches far back across history. In the seventeenth century, a European obsession with Greek and Roman ruins inspired the work of pastoral painters Claude Lorrain and Nicolas Poussin. This was the dawn of a preoccupation that would carry firmly through into the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries: faux ruins, in the shape of grottos and follies, popped up in landscaped gardens, while Romantic poets roamed the countryside, seeking out “the darksome windings of a broken stair,” or “ridge of fractured wall,” as William Wordsworth wrote in ‘Monastic Ruins’. Though staunchly contemporary, Soden’s work is in direct dialogue with these historical musings, lending it the depth and conceptual complexity that sets it apart from documentary urbex photography. Yet the question remains: why are we so fascinated by abandoned spaces? Why do artists find themselves drawn to these sites, gathering inspiration from their emptiness? As Soden’s oeuvre testifies, the abandoned space mingles fear with beauty, humanity with the inanimate. We are compelled by the controversies that surround these spaces - not only the public failure to maintain and conserve striking works of architectural importance, but the artistic audacity in gaining unlicensed access to off limits areas. Quattro By Gina Soden The sites remain anonymous in Soden’s work: nameless and placeless, all love and purpose has drained from these once-convivial corners. Aesthetically, as Soden’s work highlights, decay softens the textures and colours of the images: plumes of sunlit smoke dance on piano tops, wreaths of ivy wrap themselves around stolid pillars, and layers of dust besmear surfaces that used to shine. In the abandoned space, the spectacle is not only notional, but emphatically visual, too. Looking at these moments, stilled in time by Soden’s powerful lens, we confront our deep-set enchantment with the places that time forgot, revealing something of our own humanity, and our need to create lasting and lively impressions. Soden's pictures tell a story of human histories, suffused with the presence of all those whose absence is writ large on these decaying spaces. $test =
  • Ben Eine Unveils His Biggest Mural To Date

    We have some exciting news about one of our artists Ben Eine. He has created his largest work to date in Stratford, London! Whilst creating the mural, the only way he could check his progress was by using drone footage. He commented that: ''Painting on the ground was a challenge because you can....
    We have some exciting news about one of our artists Ben Eine. He has created his largest work to date in Stratford, London! Whilst creating the mural, the only way he could check his progress was by using drone footage. He commented that: ''Painting on the ground was a challenge because you can't just stand back and see what you're doing.'' This work required 2850 liters of paint mixed in a bath tub! This painted mural spells the word 'create'. His intention is to capture the essence of east London. Lee Bofkin, co-founder and CEO of Global Street Art, who helped produce the mural commented: ''The last decade has seen an explosion in the number of street art murals around the world.'' We have limited edition prints by Ben Eine available now at the artrepublic Brighton gallery. Love Lenticular 1 - Edition of 75 - 60 x 60cm Circus Alphabet Black and White- Edition of 75 - 60 x 60 / 100 x 100cm To discover our latest Ben Eine prints, please call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • 25 Years of artrepublic

    2018 sees artrepublic celebrate 25 years as an independent gallery in Brighton. In recognition, we thought we’d take a look at our colourful history. artrepublic gallery 2018 It all started with the selling of contemporary art posters (a very important market back in 1993). We were (as we st....
    2018 sees artrepublic celebrate 25 years as an independent gallery in Brighton. In recognition, we thought we’d take a look at our colourful history. artrepublic gallery 2018 It all started with the selling of contemporary art posters (a very important market back in 1993). We were (as we still are) rooted in the heart of Brighton’s iconic North Laine, where independent businesses and community driven projects are the lifeblood. Bomb Hugger By Banksy Pretty soon, we were in touch with a whole new generation of street artists who had something important to say. Instead of confining their messages to their favourite canvases of choice - concrete walls, shopfront shutters - they started to produce limited edition prints, which we started to sell, and you started to buy. And it’s not hard to see why: with a first wave of artists including Banksy, James Cauty, Jamie Hewlett, Dan Baldwin, Dave White, and Peter Blake, it became clear that small run editions by brilliantly talented, up and coming artists, at affordable prices, were in high demand.   Marcel Duchamp’s World Tour – DC Thomson Reunion at the Tower Ballroom Blackpool By Peter Blake The ethos has always been important to us: Our artists have a voice, and it’s important that we make that voice heard. Often driven by politics - think Shepard Fairey, Billy Childish, Blek le Rat - and always conceived with breathtaking visual prowess, it’s the art flowing through our veins that makes artrepublic the success that it is today. Obey Lotus Crescent- White and Gold By Shepard Fairey But it’s also very much you - our visitors, our viewers, and our buyers - and that’s precisely why we called it artrepublic. Creating a space in which everyone is of equal status: a republic, in other words, that would re-democratise art, and where everybody who walks through our doors could feel welcome. Cosmo Sarson and his Angel mural in Regent Street, Brighton Maybe you’re just after something to be framed; perhaps you want a limited edition print; or even a full scale original from a well-known contemporary artist - in any case, our aim is, and always has been, to make art accessible and enjoyable to all. Cherry Blossom II By Dan Baldwin But we didn’t stop there. The last twenty-five years has seen a constant drive to find new artists, to keep thinking one step ahead, and to keep innovating. We’re always keeping up with the latest releases, and its key to our business that we keep discovering fresh and exciting new forms, that we keep changing, and that we keep opening new spaces, for new types of art. Always, our aim is to introduce to you more artists - not just the ones whose names you’ve already heard, but those who are still looking to get their voices heard. As the main sponsor of the acclaimed Brighton Fringe Arts Festival, we have spent the last 25 years investing in Brighton’s vibrant art sector, because we think it’s one of the most important parts of the city’s creative character. Every year, we run the artrepublic Art Yard Sale - an opportunity to buy specially produced prints, often from the artists themselves - and every year it gets bigger and better, with people travelling in from far and wide. Who knows what the next twenty-five years may bring. Our aim is to make it even more exciting, even more colourful, and ever more encompassing. Here’s to a very bright future - we hope you’ll be joining us. Keep checking our artrepublic Brighton gallery page for details of special 25 years celebratory events. $test =
  • Staff Recommendations

    Take a look at our staff recommendations for some insider perspective on our favourite prints in the Brighton gallery. Things come and go quickly however, so call the gallery on 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com to avoid missing out! ‘MOTHER AND CHILD’ BY DAN HILLER Fast asc....
    Take a look at our staff recommendations for some insider perspective on our favourite prints in the Brighton gallery. Things come and go quickly however, so call the gallery on 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com to avoid missing out! ‘MOTHER AND CHILD’ BY DAN HILLER Fast ascending the ranks of artistic ambition, Dan Hillier has wowed us again with his latest Giclée print, ‘Mother and Child’. Merging the old with the new, Hillier re-purposes scraps of Victorian art - from wood cuts to etchings, engravings to anatomical drawings - layering up pieces of the past through digital collage process, to tread a line somewhere in the intersection of surrealism and neo-Victoriana. ‘Mother and Child’ represents something of a divergence from Hillier’s signature style: where his nineteenth century inspired prints were characterised by sketchy monochrome, the religious Renaissance overtones of this latest work explode in a cacophony of colour, from rich, lapis lazuli blue, studded with golden stars, to a shimmering halo of hand applied gold leaf. The result? All of the beauty and intensity of Renaissance iconography has been given a new lease of life, with unmistakable, twenty-first century flare. Yet if you thought that this was Christian revivalism, think again. The piece is a celebration not of the Holy Mother, but of mother earth herself, as the crowns of colourful flowers hint. To complicate religious distinctions, Hillier has printed words from the Metta Sutta - Buddhist discourse on loving kindness - onto the reverse of the image, as if to remind us that true spirituality crosses all boundaries, and is best expressed through the beauty of visual art. With such conceptually provocative and visually powerful prints, it’s no surprise that Hillier’s career has gone from strength to strength in a tiny burst of time. One of our most popular artists in the gallery, Hillier has also exhibited at the Saatchi Gallery and was commissioned to design pieces for the Globe Theatre, prominently displayed along London’s South Bank in 2017. Close to selling out, ‘Mother and Child’ is one to watch. But be quick - it’s not unusual for the artist to increase prices towards the end of the edition run, so be sure to snap up one of these gems at its original starting price. 'LOST FABLES' (GICLEE SIGNED LIMITED EDITION OF 50) BY COPYRIGHT Helen in our Brighton Gallery: "Copyright always comes up trumps with the depiction of fierce women in his breathtaking print editions. Combining the simplicity and graphic look of stencils with detailed hand painted flowers, Copyright makes work that is perfectly weighted and is hugely popular. This print is loaded with symbolism like much of Copyright’s artwork and is the kind of picture you can easily find yourself getting lost in. At under £200 for the print, it also presents fantastic value for money." 'FRAMED FOR THE LOVE OF GOD 2012' (LENTICULAR SIGNED LIMITED EDITION OF 5000) BY DAMIEN HIRST   Jake from our Brighton Gallery: “I’m a big fan of Damien Hirst and think this lenticular is one of the best editions by the artist in our gallery. By using advanced printing techniques Hirst has really captured the 3D qualities of his infamous diamond skull piece ‘For The Love of God’. Damien Hirst's original diamond skull When moving past this piece it creates the visual illusion of the skull laughing in a really sinister yet comedic way. The original skull was valued in the region of £50m and featured over 8,000 flawless diamonds, so it’s great to be able to own a homage to the original for a much more affordable price. This is one print that pictures cannot do justice and must be seen in the flesh. It can give the impression of following you around the room and there aren’t many editions that you can say that about! If you are interested in any of our staff recommendations, please call the gallery on 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com for enquiries or more information. $test =
  • Collector's Corner

    Our Collector's Corner is a treasure trove of highly collectable, awe-inspiring artwork. Things come and go quickly however and are snapped up by avid collectors, so call the gallery on 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com to avoid missing out! ‘A ROSE IS A ROSE IS A ROSE’ BY THE GO....
    Our Collector's Corner is a treasure trove of highly collectable, awe-inspiring artwork. Things come and go quickly however and are snapped up by avid collectors, so call the gallery on 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com to avoid missing out! ‘A ROSE IS A ROSE IS A ROSE’ BY THE GODFATHER OF BRITISH POP ART, SIR PETER BLAKE Two of the twentieth century’s greatest artists come together in this highly collectable, limited edition box set. Taking Gertrude Stein’s infamous aphorism as his starting point, Peter Blake has crafted three rose inspired Silkscreens, each one hand signed and numbered. Showcasing his signature styles, Blake deploys watercolour, collage, and Pop Art, to give us three, visually contrasting - yet conceptually linked - manifestations of the blossoming beauty: because, after all, ‘a rose is a rose is a rose’. A true collector’s item and potential investment, Blake’s new, box set edition is set to sell out fast. ‘FOUR SEASONS’ BY SIR PETER BLAKE With a print for every season, Blake’s ‘Four Seasons’ box set is the gift that keeps giving - all year round. With a mash-up of kitsch iconography, the ‘Four Seasons’ prints merge classic Victoriana with 1950s imagery, for an off-beat and unexpected aesthetic. Using collage processes, the prints’ use of anachronism feels effortlessly contemporary. If you’re quick, you might still catch it at its starting price – before it increases in value - the ‘Four Seasons’ box set is an unmissable collector’s opportunity. NEW IN: ORIGINALS BY CONTEMPORARY ARTIST BONNIE AND CLYDE Hot on the heels of her 45 Park Lane solo show, we’re very excited to announce that Bonnie and Clyde’s iconic originals have hit our Brighton gallery. The exhibition, ‘This Place’, was designed to “speak to ‘The Uplifting Power of Art’ - Roy Ackerman’s curatorial angle for this year’s Dorchester Collection - with its beautiful and bizarre cityscapes that transport us to dizzying realms of the imaginary.” With their unique application of photomontage and bricolage technique, Bonnie and Clyde’s artworks are singular in their ability to create a sense of vertiginous space, always immersing the viewer with breathtaking visual prowess. From LA to Brighton, Lanzarote to Coney Island, Bonnie and Clyde works with the scenic and the architectural, fusing elements of painted or printed collage, to create dreamlike hyperscapes. Large in scale and heavily textured, nothing quite substitutes seeing Bonnie and Clyde’s originals in the flesh: A perfect opportunity to pop down to the gallery and peruse (and just maybe invest in a collectable…). For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. Call our Brighton Gallery on 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com for further information on this or any of the other artworks featured in our Collector's Corner. $test =
  • How to Buy Art Prints

    A guide to buying Artwork When purchasing a piece of art, there is a lot of terminology that come into play which you may not have come across before, with a lot of aspects to consider. In this guide, we break down each feature of the artwork and briefly describe the key features of each. ....
    A guide to buying Artwork When purchasing a piece of art, there is a lot of terminology that come into play which you may not have come across before, with a lot of aspects to consider. In this guide, we break down each feature of the artwork and briefly describe the key features of each. A visual guide to art print terminology Contents 10 Tips for buying art online Own Art Edition Type Limited Editions Artist / Printers Proof Open Edition Originals Timed Release Box Sets Hors Commerce Edition Size Paper & Image Size Paper Edge Print Types Giclee Silkscreen Etching Lenticular Photography / C-Type Lino Cut Mixed Media Paper Types Finishes How to Store Your Art Work Sleeve Storage Framed Storage 10 Tips for Buying Art Online 1. Get to know what you’re buying – Brush up on key terms like Limited Editions, Paper types and finishes so you know exactly what you’re buying. An Open Edition Giclée and a Limited Edition Silkscreen can be entirely different, but may look similar to the untrained eye! 2. Research the Artist – Every artist is different and will have a personal story with their work. Researching their style and evolution will bring understanding and value to the artwork you are considering. 3. Where is the piece going? – Are you after Square, Portrait or Landscape piece? How big does it need to be? This will help you refine your search. 4. Be Open – There’s so many different styles out there, it’s hard to pin artwork into a single box. Browse around, using categories and filters to hone your budget and tastes. 5. Budget – Consider Own Art Finance if a piece you’ve found isn’t within your budget. It can spread costs of artwork over many months at no additional cost. 6. Consider newer artists – The big names attract big money. However supporting emerging artists can secure you a similar style of work at a lower price. 7. Don’t try to guess the market – It’s difficult to know whether artwork will increase in value, and it’s best to purchase for your own pleasure and enjoyment. 8. Consider Framing – Framing protects your print against damage. If purchasing a piece to put on your wall, purchase framing at the same time to have your piece professionally handled and framed. 9. Pay attention to size – Unlike in a gallery, getting an idea of size can be extremely difficult with a 20 x 20cm piece looking similar to a 80 x 80cm when viewed on a screen! We list paper sizes for all our pieces and provide mock-ups where possible. 10. Buy what you love – Remember, art you buy will be on your walls for a long time! Make sure you enjoy the art you buy above all else. Own Art - Affordable Art Financing Scheme Own Art is a scheme which makes art from contemporary artists more affordable by spreading the cost out over 10 months. It is backed by the Arts Council via the UK Government, and is available on a wide range of selected works. For more information on availability and eligibility, please see our full guide. Edition Type These are the most common edition types that you can find on artrepublic: Limited Edition Artist / Printers Proof Open Edition Original Timed release Box Set Limited Editions These are prints that, unsurprisingly, are limited in their production. The amount they are limited by depends entirely on the edition. Limited editions are always numbered but not always signed by the artist. Special edition prints, such as those with Gold Leaf, Diamond dust or other finishes, are usually limited to smaller edition sizes compared to the main edition, such as 5 or 10. Sometimes they will be the first 5 or 10 releases of an edition. Edition Numbers – Edition numbers are normally written in the format xx/yy. The first number is the number of the print in the series. The second number is the total number of prints in that edition. Special edition prints, such as those with Gold Leaf, Diamond dust or other finishes, are usually limited to smaller edition sizes compared to the main edition, such as 5 or 10. Sometimes they will be the first 5 or 10 releases of an edition. Artist / Printers Proof When producing limited editions, an extra number of prints, excluded from the main edition size, are printed as an additional proofing for the artist and / or printers to ensure the intended results are achieved. These can be around 10% of the edition size, and can vary in appearance from the main edition. They can include blemishes or colour variations that were “fixed” for the main edition, due to the proofing process. Open Edition These are editions that have no fixed production volume – and can run indefinitely. For this reason they are usually not signed. Originals Originals are artworks produced by the artists. They can be 1/1 hand finished prints. These are 1 of 1s, originally produced by the artist and include hand-finished details. It may be that limited edition prints are produced from this original piece. Timed Release Timed releases are a new format that has taken off in recent years, especially for online retailers. A print is made available for a set time – usually 24 or 48 hours, and the edition size is then determined by how many prints are ordered and produced. Box Sets Box Sets are collections of limited edition works, in a special presentation “box” which is often a piece of work in itself! The collections can be available as individual prints or they may only be available as a set. Sometimes only part of an edition is in a set with matching numbers. Hors Commerce (HC) Prints printed not for commercial sale will be marked with HC. They are often the same as the original edition, but were not originally printed for sale. Edition Size As the name suggests, this is the amount of prints that have been produced in a set edition. It’s important to note that variations on a print will have their own edition sizes. For example an artist may produce a standard edition with a size of 50, while also releasing special gold leaf or diamond dust editions at smaller edition sizes and print sizes. So the image used may have a total print run of 90 plus, consisting of 50 standard editions, 20 gold and 20 diamond versions. Paper Size + Image Size All of our paper sizes are displayed in the format Width x Height, in cm. If the first number is larger than the second, the print is in landscape format, and vice versa is portrait. The image size will sometimes be smaller than the paper size, suggesting a border around the image. Where possible we try to show this through the product image. Paper Edge Papers will have either straight cut edges, or “deckled”, hand torn edges. This mostly influences how you may frame the print. Straight cut edges can be framed to the edge, where as deckled prints will look impressive with a shadow float mount. Deckled edge with Float mount Straight cut paper, Framed to the paper edge   Print Types Artists work using a wide variety of print methods, all producing slightly different styles. Giclée (Archival Print) Giclée’s are a digital form of printing, using high resolution inkjet printers to produce quality archival prints which can last for decades. These can be finished with hand-applied details, or hand finished silkscreens and finishes. Silkscreen Silkscreen, also referred to as screen printing or serigraph, is a process where screens made of stretched silk are exposed to light to produce certain patterns, through which ink is then pressed onto paper. It is a manual process where each colour is applied by hand, often involving many layers. A fabulous example of an artist who pushes this to the limit is Bonnie and Clyde who have produced 30-layered screen-prints.Silkscreens can also used to finish / glaze other types of print. Close up of a Silkscreen Close up of a Giclee Etching Etching is a method of placing an image onto a metal plate using acid. The plate is covered in an acid-ground or wax, protecting the plate from the acid bath. Into this, the artist scratches a design. When submerged the acid eats away at the exposed metal, leaving an indented area to which ink can be applied for printing. As a method it dates back to the 14th century, and was widely used for printing in the 16th century. Lenticular A lenticular is a technology that allows the viewed image to alter, based on viewing angle. This is achieved through a layer of lenses (lenticules) on the surface of the print which only allows the viewing of one of the interlaced images. This creates prints that change based on where the viewer is standing.Artists use this effect to make images appear 3 dimensional, convey movement or change the colours in a print entirely. Photography / C-Type Photography prints use a different printing process. The result is a more analogue feel to the prints, due to the chemical process that prints are exposed to. They are preferred due to the glossy and metallic results achievable with certain paper types not available for Giclée. Note that silkscreens may be used to apply finishes such as diamond dust, varnishes or glazes to Photography prints, but are rarely used to print the image itself. Linocut Linocuts are produced through ink flowing into a relief carved within a sheet of linoleum. Mixed Media Mixed media works are produced using a variety of mediums / methods. For example a print may be a Giclée print with a silkscreen varnish, along with spray painted and hand drawn elements. Some artists may use 3D objects to enhance an image. Glitter, plastic models, glass, spray paint, oils and more can all be utilised to create a unique hand finished artwork. Or an artist can create an original work with oilpaint collage and spray stencils. Paper Types The paper type is specified where available on our prints. The style or make of paper usually varies based on artist preference, with different paper types creating different end results due to the absorption of inks.It is important to wrap prints in tissue paper that is acid free to prevent the yellowing of the paper.We always describe paper used in the following format: “300gsm Somerset Tub” – “Weight, Make, Style”. Weight Weight refers to the paper weight, with many of the prints being produced on paper between 300 and 400gsm. This makes for an extremely thick, quality paper which absorbs inks much better than thinner papers and lasts much longer. GSM stands for Grams per Square Meter. Standard office printer paper is around 80gsm. Make There are several makers of paper, with Somerset and Hahnemühle and Fabriano the most popular. Style The last piece of information is the style, such as Satin, Cotton Rag, Satin, Smooth, Velvet etc. These all vary on the production process of the paper. Finishes Prints may be finished with varnishes, glazes and other layers to give a piece a special finish. This can be to highlight certain areas of the print or to give the whole print a certain aesthetic. They can be applied by Hand or as a Silkscreen layer. How to Store Your Art Work Effective storage of your prints ensures protects your prints and lets you rotate and freshen up the art you display on your walls. The best way to store prints is either in a sleeve, or framed. Sleeve Storage Folders or Sleeves are a safe way to store prints long term, as they ensure flat, separated storage in an easy to manage form. Portfolio sleeves are relatively inexpensive, and can be purchased with firm separators to keep prints flat. Once sleeved, ideally store in a large metal cabinet, as metal is cleaner won’t harbor any organic materials which may damage your print. Things to be aware of: Humidity – Keep in an area with good air flow and stable temperatures. Avoid basements or similar areas where excessive heat or mould can warp or discolour / eat the print Light – UV Glass for framed items is highly recommended as it protects from discolouring and fading of colours. If storing long term, try to avoid direct sunlight Heat – Like humidity, heat can cause prints to warp or go brittle if the air is too dry. Keep at a stable temperature and avoid placing artwork above radiators. Acid – Make sure packaging and framing is all acid free Framed Storage Once work has been framed and cannot safely be removed from the frame, the best option for storage is to wrap in protective packaging such as bubble wrap, and tightly tape sealed shut.Top tips: Avoid storing prints near / above radiators Avoid storing prints in direct sunlight (use UV glass in frames where available) Do not store in areas without airflow that may attract humidity. Use acid free storage / tissue paper when wrapping $test =
  • Peter Blake’s stunning ‘Union Flag’ in our Brighton Gallery

    A patriotic homage by the God Father of Pop Art. Our Brighton Gallery is a treasure trove or rare and collectable prints by the world renowned Pop Artist Sir Peter Blake. ‘Union Flag’ is a magnificent limited edition silkscreen print that has been embellished with the highest qualit....
    A patriotic homage by the God Father of Pop Art. Our Brighton Gallery is a treasure trove or rare and collectable prints by the world renowned Pop Artist Sir Peter Blake. ‘Union Flag’ is a magnificent limited edition silkscreen print that has been embellished with the highest quality archival glitter. The work continues in Blake’s career-long fascination and love of flags, a repeated motif that has long since served the artist from the beginning of his career in the 1960s. The edition also proclaims Blake’s love of his country and the union of the British Isles. He has explored his own patriotism in other works including his recent 'Brighton' and 'Four Seasons' box sets. Union Flag- signed limited edition silkscreen print with glitter by Peter Blake. Edition Size: 75 Image Size: 830 x 555mm Paper Size: 890 x 720mm ‘I am very patriotic and I love the Union Flag; the sense of history it gives, the union between four great countries that it represents. Over the years I have used printmaking to explore and experiment with the flag in various ways; making large-scale digital prints from Union Flag badges (sewn or enamel) or illustrations that I have collected." “The new works are not based on ‘found’ images of the flag. I wanted to use the variety of hand-applied finishes available when you make a silkscreen, to play with the colours and textures of this simple geometric pattern that is so familiar to us. The prints also celebrate The Queen’s 90th birthday.” – Sir Peter Blake We only have a very limited number of the Union flag prints available so be sure to call our Brighton Gallery or pop in to find out more before they're all gone! Call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. $test =
  • What A Night! Our Dave White Print Launch

    Another memorable art event in our Brighton Gallery. We’d like to say a big thank you to everyone that attended our recent print launch with Dave White in our Brighton Gallery. It was a fantastic night that saw our Bond Street space filled to the rafters with eager art fans, follower, frien....
    Another memorable art event in our Brighton Gallery. We’d like to say a big thank you to everyone that attended our recent print launch with Dave White in our Brighton Gallery. It was a fantastic night that saw our Bond Street space filled to the rafters with eager art fans, follower, friends of the gallery and fellow artists. It was an honour and a pleasure to have the main man himself Dave White in our gallery, kindly signing and dedicated prints whilst posing for selfies. We had a number of Dave's current editions on the walls, showcasing the breadth of different animals the artist has explored over the years. From tropical and exotic creatures to native endangered species, each expertly rendered with expressive brush strokes and energetic marks. The first 25 people to purchase one of the new ‘Stag’ and ‘Doe’ print each received a special goodie bag containing our latest artzine, a pair of patches, stickers and a very special limited edition charcoal study print. If you missed out the launch we still have a few of the new prints available in our Brighton Gallery. A must-have piece for any wildlife fans and a classic pair of editions from one of our most popular artists. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Banksy’s Latest ‘Street Party’ At Walled Off Hotel

    The artist's Bethlehem event marks 100 years since the Balfour Declaration. The surreptitious street artist Banksy has recently created a satirical “street party” at his Bethlehem Walled Off hotel to commemorate the centenary anniversary of the Balfour declaration, which promised a Jewish....
    The artist's Bethlehem event marks 100 years since the Balfour Declaration. The surreptitious street artist Banksy has recently created a satirical “street party” at his Bethlehem Walled Off hotel to commemorate the centenary anniversary of the Balfour declaration, which promised a Jewish homeland in Palestine and support from the British Government. The street artist stated that the West Bank tea party was created to apologise for Britain’s role in the carving up of the holy land and subsequent years of turmoil and conflict between Israel and Palestine. A statement by Banksy said: "This conflict has brought so much suffering to people on all sides. It didn't feel appropriate to 'celebrate' the British role in it." "The British didn't handle things well here - when you organise a wedding, it's best to make sure the bride isn't already married." The street party was official opened by an actor dressed up as the Queen accompanied by dozens of local Palestinian children. The fake Queen unveiled Banksy’s new carved public artwork "Er... Sorry". The controversial piece of performance art took place just metres away from Banksy’s latest installation, his ingenious Walled Off Hotel. Opening earlier this year the boutique hotel presents Banksy’s subversive artwork in a unique setting, offering visitors the chance to stay in differently themed rooms. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =

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