Staff Recommendations

Take a look at our staff recommendations for some insider perspective on our favourite prints in our Brighton gallery. Things come and go quickly however, so call the gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com to avoid missing out!

Frontiers by Dan Hillier

Space: the final frontier. Wait, that’s the Star Trek opening credits, which (as far as we know) has nothing to do with the work of Dan Hillier. However, even if Hillier’s diptych ‘Frontiers’ doesn’t take direct inspiration from the long-running television series, it does have something of the heavens about it. Perhaps it’s the swirling, cloud-like shapes that both define and blur the figures the artist depicts. Or maybe it’s the fact that, in terms of physical features, only two sets of eyes and a section of a nose are visible within the whirl of texture and negative space that make up this pair of prints: soulful, godlike beings who are not of this world.

Frontiers by Dan Hillier

This duo of Hillier’s, which is always sold as a pair, features one male and one female form who appear to face off across an ice-white void. A frontier of sorts, the empty backdrop is emphasised by the physical distance and restrictions created by the frames the two images are set in. On the left, the male figure sits (?), grounded by a dark suit and his densely textured smokiness, looking toward the female form that, without a body and entering the frame at an angle, has a lighter and more ethereal feel. It’s a powerful contrast: dark v light; man v woman; physical v spiritual. These are just the first of a multitude of binaries to consider, ponder and wonder at with these prints. All manner of opposing views and ideas, directly challenging each other but with a vast frontier between them. That’s just the starting point we took with this dynamic duo. You may have a whole other take on Hillier’s ‘Frontiers’ – and we’d love to hear your thoughts.

To share your ideas and find out more about this piece and other works by Dan Hillier at artrepublic Brighton, call us on 01273 724829 and speak to one of our personal art advisors.

BBQ Heart and Over The Blue by Bonnie and Clyde

The sparkle of a scene, based on a travel memory, is at the heart of the latest limited edition prints by Bonnie and Clyde. Screen printed on to anodised aluminium and finished with glazed and glitter elements, the scenes – inspired by a vista spotted on the journey out of  Las Vegas, as well as a series of photos taken in Mexico – are denser and more architecturally heavy than other works in the artist’s catalogue. They are, however, just as vibrant and full of life.

Over the Blue by Bonnie and Clyde

Mixed in with Bonnie and Clyde’s photographic collages and gestural brushstrokes, the dark glitter surfaces offer a new dimension – both technically and metaphorically – to the works. So, regardless of whether you read these sections as a hint at a starry night sky or a means of creating a weightier, more moody atmosphere, when seen in person these prints make a real impact. Especially if you hang them alongside one of the artist’s lighter-hued collage-based images. Just saying.

Read more about Bonnie and Clyde on our blog, and find out more about the artist’s new limited edition prints at artrepublic Brighton, by calling us on +44 (0)1273 724829 and speaking to one of our personal art advisors.

Pearl Moon by Cleo Barbour

If you were moved by the recent blood moon eclipse seen in the summer night sky, take a look at Cleo Barber’s latest print ‘Pearl Moon’, which is just as beautiful and somewhat more enduring.

Pearl Moon by Cleo Barbour

The giclee print, finished with screen glazes and hand-embellished with golden thread, is the latest edition from the Brighton-based designer, and features geometric shapes and abstract lines that offer subtle nods to the solar system.

A golden moon (like a pearl in a clam shell) fixed on a velvety black backdrop, hints at the natural satellite’s orbit around our own ‘blue’ planet. The simplified scene is depicted in colours drawn directly from Barber’s favourite design era, 1920s Art Deco, making it an elegant and timeless piece.

Don’t hang around waiting for the next partial (or full) solar eclipse though, as this piece will disappear faster than you can say ‘once in a blue moon’.

  

If you are interested in any of our staff recommendations, please call the gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com for enquiries or more information.

For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page

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