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  • Meet the Women Who Are on Top of the (Art) World

     International Women's Day 2019 International Women's Day has returned! What better way to celebrate than by showing off our finest female talent. Even though we are now in 2019, there can be an imbalance between us. Some industries still treat women like second class citizens. Artrepublic couldn'....
     International Women's Day 2019 International Women's Day has returned! What better way to celebrate than by showing off our finest female talent. Even though we are now in 2019, there can be an imbalance between us. Some industries still treat women like second class citizens. Artrepublic couldn't disagree with this more. This is why we are dedicating this blog post to all the fabulous women we work with! LOUISE MCNAUGHT Louise McNaught became a professional artist whilst doing a Degree in Fine Art. Her distinctive use of bright colour, fading upward drips shows her obvious love of nature. She has international representation and as of 2018 is also a published Author. Her artwork has also been featured at art fairs in Milan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Stockholm, Brussels and all over the UK. Recently, McNaught has been using her voice and talent to educate people about all the beautiful animals that are becoming endangered. Her book 'Survival' strongly highlights how many animals are being lost using powerful imagery. Read more about Louise McNaught and check out her upcoming shows on her website HERE SARA POPE Bold, seductive paintings of voluptuous lips is what contemporary artist, Sara Pope is known for. Pope had a successful career in the fashion industry (as a shoe designer for brands such as Paul Smith), and also work in magazines as a designer and art director. This is where Sara draws her inspiration from. She aims to capture the glamour and seductive power conveyed by the lips and mouth. 24 galleries in the UK and internationally currently represent her. She has also completed collaborations with BareMinerals makeup, PIAS music label and Saatchi&Saatchi. See more about what Sara is up to HERE MARIA RIVANS Maria Rivans is a contemporary British artist, known for her scrapbook-style collage aesthetic. A mash-up of Surrealism meets Pop-Art, Rivans’s work re-appropriates vintage ephemera to create dreamy realms. This transports the viewer into fantastical worlds of the imaginary. Each one suffused with vivid colour, arresting imagery, intricate detail, and finished with a dusting of subtle humour. Maria works from her studio in Brighton: a kooky building, purpose built as a small cinema in 1911. She exhibits work throughout the UK as well as internationally. These spaces include Hong Kong, New York and across Europe. In 2017 and 2018, her work featured in The Times newspaper. As well as this, in 2018, the Royal Academy’s 250th Summer Exhibition selected her film Still ‘Understanding Nothing.’ Have a look at what Maria Rivans is doing HERE LUCY BRYANT Lucy Bryant is a contemporary artist and graphic designer and graduated from the University of Derby. However, Bryant is less defined by her formal art training than by her loose, creative approach and varied influences. These include Pop Art and the Punk music scene. Responding to contemporary culture, Bryant’s art subverts the everyday and the banal. She's always striving to disrupt the ordinary and create something entirely new. KRISTJANA S WILLIAMS Kristjana S Williams is an Icelandic born artist who studied graphic design and illustration at Central St Martins. This led to her gaining critical acclaim as Creative Director of Beyond the Valley for 8 years. Williams has become well known in the industry. This has won an array of awards from ‘Dulux Colour Awards’, ‘D&AD’, a New York Festivals Grand Prix and First Prize. As well as this, she was shortlisted for the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity. See more from Kristjana HERE All these women are incredible artists all with their own styles, techniques and messages. Of course, we work with so many more women overflowing with talent that we wish we could have included in this list. To see our full list of artists, CLICK HERE  $test =
  • Get to Know Soozy Lipsey

    Leave the dull behind and enter the wonderful world of Soozy Lipsey! We had the pleasure of sitting down with the lovely Soozy Lipsey to discuss her work, her process and more.  R: Hi Soozy. Thank you for doing this interview with us. Let's jump straight in. Your approach to art seems incredibly f....
    Leave the dull behind and enter the wonderful world of Soozy Lipsey! We had the pleasure of sitting down with the lovely Soozy Lipsey to discuss her work, her process and more.  R: Hi Soozy. Thank you for doing this interview with us. Let's jump straight in. Your approach to art seems incredibly fun and not to be taken too seriously. Is this something you feel strongly about?  S: I would say my art parallels my life in many ways. I think life is a serious business and in the same breath really not so serious. Similar to feeling significant and yet totally insignificant. I find humour really does defuse the tension of these paradoxes. So in an answer to your question, I think having a laugh in life, especially laughing at ones imperfections, is crucial and I like to show that in my work. I have a sense of humour - its a way to really connect with people. Knowing how to really laugh at life is a skill I think and so wit is something I really admire in people. R: Your work beautifully captures the unexpected to produce both whimsical and macabre emotion. How do you perceive your own work?  S: I think some of my work really plays with the tensions: life and death, light and dark and weak-strong. l think my work has different levels of interpretation but if it doesn't disturb the viewer in anyway, then I fear my work is just passing people by which isn't of much interest to me. Being disturbed keeps us awake. A 'Do not disturb ' sign is not something I would hang anywhere near my artwork. R: Re-imagining and revitalising vintage art is something you adopt within your work frequently. What’s the feeling behind it? Is there a reason you choose to do this? S: I think the past is where we draw our wisdom our guidance - it's incredibly important. One of my favourite Quotes is from a Danish philosopher, Kierkegaard. He says 'Life can only be understood backwards, but must be lived forwards.' I think anything with a sense of history has a quality about it that new things just do not have. I am drawn to these qualities intellectually, aesthetically and emotionally. I like to revisit something with a sense of age - something that has existed for sometime and then change it. Therefore, it embodies a new lease of life.   An example of that was buying an old picture of a vase of flowers and cutting it in half and hanging just half the picture. The idea behind this was to offer the viewer just half the story, the rest was up to the viewer to imagine. I liked the idea that the discarded half remains in the past. It also played on the human drive to always be desiring, and by withholding half the picture the viewer would hopefully be in a state of momentary satisfaction as I had left them desiring the other half or even imagining it. I hadn't given them everything, which hopefully captured their attention for longer than I would have had I just hung the full picture. R: What’s your process when creating a new piece? Do you have a “routine” or a method you stick to or does it flow much more naturally? S: There usually is no great plan other than trying my very best to do what I perceive is my job as an artist. This being to keep myself on the outside of most conventions, especially routine because routine and habit can dull the senses. It makes us spoilt and complacent and even entitled. I think it's the artists role to look at life with a sense of enquiry. If my work embodies that even a fraction, then whatever material or style I use is irrelevant really. R: What are you favourite mediums/materials to work with? And what are your favourite themes/subjects to capture? S: I like print as it's accessible and affordable which is a key thing for me - art can be purchased by a wider audience. I love old objects, paintings and great thinkers, philosophers and tubes of paint. My favourite themes would have to be the human condition. R: How do you keep your studio/workstation? Is it rather neat and tidy or could it be considered its own work of art? S: It's a total mess when working on something. The idea of anything 'becoming' that doesn't generate mess is a mystery to me. Birth is messy business, after all. Neat and tidy is something I like to visit once in a while just to ground myself and to pretend I have everything under control. R: You’ve previously collaborated with Dan Hillier to produce ‘The Meeting,’ beautifully capturing your unique styles together. Have you got any future collaborations in the works? Or is there an artist you would like to work with in the future? S: I have no plans to collaborate in the near future however, I think collaboration is brilliant! If there is anyone out there who fancies a collaboration, don't hesitate to get in touch! R: And finally, do you have a favourite artist? S: I can't resist giving a mention to my absolute love, Rene Magritte. He is my hero. I'm not one to put anyone on a pedestal but as far as I'm concerned, his mind and execution of  ideas never cease to disappoint and amaze me. He is a poetic genius! Soozy Lipsey re-imagines the traditional with contemporary whimsy, adding a touch of the fantastical here, and a dash of the macabre there, for visually provocative aesthetic. Re-purposing existing - or ‘found’ - objects and images, Lipsey transforms nostalgia into the uncanny though combinational techniques.  Check out all of her work HERE           Check out Soozy Lipsey's website HERE $test =
  • Review: 2019 London Art Fair

    artrepublic looks at the standout work at this year’s Fair. Kicking off the 2019 art scene, the 31st edition of the London Art Fair took over the Business Design centre in Islington in mid January. Filled from top to bottom with an impressive labyrinthine display of artwork, it was easy to get ....
    artrepublic looks at the standout work at this year’s Fair. Kicking off the 2019 art scene, the 31st edition of the London Art Fair took over the Business Design centre in Islington in mid January. Filled from top to bottom with an impressive labyrinthine display of artwork, it was easy to get lost in a good way. Ranging from Sculptures to Portraiture, contemporary art to early twentieth-century pieces, there was something for everyone. A seasoned buyer would feel very at home amongst the Henry Moore and Dali sculptures. Alongside the exuberant display of fine art from some of the most critically-acclaimed artists of the twentieth century such as Sir Anthony Caro and Ben Nicholson, the London Art Fair offers the opportunity for prospective collectors to get advice from curators as to how and where to start in collecting art. Above all, it offers an exploration into bite-sized versions of some of the most prestigious and celebrated galleries in the UK and worldwide. At first an overwhelming spectacle, typical gallery-goers will not be used to the sheer volume of art all under one roof. Navigating the maze of white walls can seem daunting but incredibly rewarding after stumbling upon excellence, which is frequent and often. artrepublic were thrilled to see the prominent print focus in this year’s London Art Fair. The contemporary print artists stood to serve as refreshing palette-cleansers amongst the swathes of fine art and sculpture. A breath of fresh air, a playful nudge or a satirical wink, these prints offer it all. David Shrigley was a headliner for the London Art Fair this year. Combining stylistic childlike innocence with an often mundane or unassuming subject, to produce a piece that is fun and engaging. He celebrates the nuances of everyday life the with the intimacy of the imperfections in his work. There’s an openness to his work that emphasises his accessibility, making his works very desirable to own. His piece ‘My Rampage Is Over’ was exhibited featuring a huge blue elephant. A naive delight, evoking memories of childhood bedtime stories; of letting your own imagination run wild. Another print heavyweight who exhibited boldly this year at the London Art Fair was the Connor Brothers. Their style is instantly recognisable, with their iconic use of vintage photography with modern type. The Connor Brothers have definitely cemented their position within the print space of the London art scene, notoriously popular and effortlessly cool. Most recently they have issued a series of book covers using a selection of their prints. Elevating the smutty form of the pulp novel, their works of art subvert the previously derogatory gender roles. As opposed to the women on these novels only serving to titillate or be murdered they are remastered as untouchable, graceful, almost statuesque. A contemporary twist on a classic. The almost-serious and almost-sensitive work of Charming Baker was another to look out for this year. Often contradictory, pulling the viewer across the emotional spectrum with his work. Disarmingly playful imagery besets an often melancholic backdrop, or is victim to violent scribbles. The resulting composition is a juxtaposition of innocence and darkness, provoking an eerie sense of nostalgia.  A master at combining texture with form, there is a distinctive layering within Baker’s work that enables him to effortlessly discuss themes such as joy, love, death and despair. The style that he has established is one of timeless eccentricity, beautifully thought provoking.   If you’d like to view any of the sensational prints by David Shrigley, The Connor Brothers or Charming Baker please visit the artrepublic gallery in Brighton, call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page   $test =
  • Save the date: artrepublic’s first Sample Sale

    We Need You! Help us fundraise for Middle Street Primary School - get up to 60% off selected works. Between 8th - 10th March, the artrepublic Brighton gallery will be hosting a sample sale at Middle Street Primary School. The school is currently experiencing a chronic funding crisis and is in....
    We Need You! Help us fundraise for Middle Street Primary School - get up to 60% off selected works. Between 8th - 10th March, the artrepublic Brighton gallery will be hosting a sample sale at Middle Street Primary School. The school is currently experiencing a chronic funding crisis and is in real need of local support. The artrepublic Sample Sale will donate 25% of sales to Middle Street Primary School to help raise money for a special needs teacher. Last year, artrepublic raised over £2,000 to help renovate their arts center. This year, we hope to make a difference again. With both framed and unframed works from floor to ceiling, the artrepublic sample sale will offer a unique chance to browse for hidden gems – with up to 60% off selected works. Our gallery team will be on hand to discuss your favourite new find! If you’re tempted to spend a little more, our gallery’s Own Art scheme could make purchasing one or more pieces that little bit easier. For more information on this 0% APR payment plan, please ask one of our Art Advisors. The Brighton gallery team look forward to welcoming you at our Middle Street School sample sale fundraiser.   artrepublic Sample Sale, 8th to 10th March, 10.30am to 5.30pm Middle Street School, 37 Middle Street, Brighton, BN1 1AL   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Lawrence’s Rare Prints Showcase

    Snap up some never-seen-before rare prints at the artrepublic Brighton gallery. Lawrence Alkin, owner of the artrepublic Brighton gallery will host a special event on Friday 15th February to launch a showcase of his rare, personal print collection. This showcase will be a true representation....
    Snap up some never-seen-before rare prints at the artrepublic Brighton gallery. Lawrence Alkin, owner of the artrepublic Brighton gallery will host a special event on Friday 15th February to launch a showcase of his rare, personal print collection. This showcase will be a true representation of how contemporary art has evolved over 25 years, reflecting artrepublic’s long-standing roots at the forefront of the scene, with many rare works available to buy for the first time in years. Lawrence has always been renowned for his unique gallery curations, placing established artists next to upcoming talent. His eye for talent has been flexing its muscle since the early ’80s, opening his Brighton gallery in 1989. Since then, the gallery has seen featured urban & street art giants such as Banksy, Obey and Ben Eine become world famous, whilst at the same time documenting the importance of established artists such as Peter Blake, Damien Hirst and Grayson Perry. Having sold many iconic prints over the years, it’s not a surprise that a few special editions were held back for an exciting day like this. Lawrence’s ‘Rare Prints’ showcase will be a unique and amazing opportunity to snap up some never-seen-before prints at the artrepublic Brighton gallery. His philosophy since opening the gallery over 25 years ago remains the same: that art should be accessible to everyone. Lawrence aimed to demystify the art world, enabling enthusiasts to follow their heart when buying artwork. He truly believes that this way of buying makes art last for generations rather than just for interior styling. artrepublic proudly offer the Arts Council’s ‘Own Art’ scheme – a zero-interest payment plan, designed to make buying and collecting art more affordable. With our Brighton gallery being the largest provider of these loans in the UK, Own Art doesn't just make buying art more affordable but allows the enjoyment of curating a personal art collection more realistic and attainable than ever before. What once was a luxury, is now available to everyone. Lawrence’s Rare Prints Showcase can be viewed at the artrepublic Brighton gallery between Friday 15th February and Monday 4th March. Register today for your free tickets to our opening evening on 15th Feb. Don’t miss this opportunity to own highly collectable works that have long since sold out or have never been available before.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Lucy Sparrow exhibited her Triple Art Bypass in Miami

    December 2018 saw Lucy Sparrow exhibit her immersive installation, ‘Triple Art Bypass’ at Miami's busiest international art fair Art Basel week. Sparrow's felt depiction of an emergency operating theatre and consultation room offered Miami's art fair visitors a different perspective of thei....
    December 2018 saw Lucy Sparrow exhibit her immersive installation, ‘Triple Art Bypass’ at Miami's busiest international art fair Art Basel week. Sparrow's felt depiction of an emergency operating theatre and consultation room offered Miami's art fair visitors a different perspective of their healthcare system. Her light-hearted approach to what is usually a very serious and sombre environment, injected a little comedy into her immersive medical scene. Rows upon rows of well-known medicines and an anatomical skeleton model filled with plushy felt organs made this felt experience both interesting and thought-provoking. Having worked with felt from the age of 8, her style is still somewhat child-like and uplifting; something she feels is most needed in our political climate. Even more humbling is the knowledge that every felt piece is still hand-painted. There are no printing machines or stencils in the mix, despite her installations getting bigger and bigger. Lucy Sparrow represents pure hand-craftsmanship from her self-branded ‘Felt Cave’ - her UK workshop. Currently famed as the ‘Queen of Felt’, she designed ‘Triple Art Bypass’ to offer a fully immersive experience. Felt medical procedures were undertaken at various times by her felt operating team. Likewise, her felt consultation room acted as a space for clients to ‘wait’ before their appointment to view her newly released felt work. As Miami got lost in Sparrow's charming felt creations, her next big installation is yet to be revealed. Currently one of the UK's most exciting contemporary artists, Lucy Sparrow has a loyal following of investors, keen to see what she does next. One of her most investable pieces, the 'His ’n’ Hers’ cabinet at the artrepublic gallery is a pair of bathroom cabinets, each containing gendered toiletries. In 'His', items include Brylcream, Viagra, and condoms. In 'Hers' - tampons, Canesten cream, and anti-ageing moisturiser, as well as some more gender-neutral items like VapoRub, Vaseline and vitamins. Many of Lucy Sparrow's felt medicines feature in her 'His n Hers' cabinets, now at artrepublic Brighton ‘His ’n’ Hers’ is a snippet of what gender means in today's consumerist landscape. From a limited edition of 50, the piece comes complete with signed certificate of authenticity and signed 'Felt World' book. For all enquiries, including those relating to sales, please contact the Brighton artrepublic gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Take a Brighton street art tour with REQ and artrepublic

    Right here, right now; street art has never been fresher in Brighton.   Brighton’s reputation for being a hub of creativity is no better demonstrated than with the ever-evolving street art scene. Street artist REQ and artrepublic are working together to provide a two hour guided Brigh....
    Right here, right now; street art has never been fresher in Brighton.   Brighton’s reputation for being a hub of creativity is no better demonstrated than with the ever-evolving street art scene. Street artist REQ and artrepublic are working together to provide a two hour guided Brighton street art tour so you can dive into the mysterious and eccentric world of the city's graffiti scene with a professional by your side. The tours can be booked through Eventbrite or Airbnb. With knowledge of the labyrinthine lanes like the back of his hand, REQ can guide you to the hidden street art you might otherwise miss. Instead of being just a spectator, REQ provides insight into what artists and what kind of street art are making a splash pavement-side right now. REQ has been hosting street art walks since 1984. He contributes to the scene and can illuminate the stories behind each piece that you encounter as you wander through Brighton. Similar as to how you would get a tour of the artrepublic gallery, the city of Brighton offers a huge amount of artistic talent to admire. Locals are often surprised when stumbling upon a new piece. With REQ, you’ll experience years of expertise and passion for street art, with insight that is hard to find unless you’re part of the scene itself. An exploration of the lesser-known pathways and backstreets, you’ll behold the walls through the lens of an artist, and come away from the tour with more knowledge than the most explorative locals. London and Bristol based graffiti artists often come to Brighton, where the scene flourishes, to unleash their raw talent on the streets. Its a point of pride that Brighton has the size of a small town, but the creative output of a big city. The perfect place to host one of the most exciting and colourful walkable street art tours. Book Your Tour Today and Receive a £10 artrepublic Gift Voucher Book your street art tour with REQ today and artrepublic are delighted to provide a £10 gift voucher, at the end of the tour, to spend at our Brighton gallery (one voucher per booking). Many local street artists have created limited edition prints of their work for our gallery. After the vibrant energy and talent captured on the walls of Brighton, you may be inspired to take a piece of the scene home. The tour costs £20 per person (plus booking fee), great value for a fascinating couple of hours. To book your Brighton street art tour with REQ, please visit the artrepublic page at Eventbrite or you can book it as an Airbnb Experience. As a preview for the tour, take a look at a recent street art installation taking shape in Brighton's North Laine: For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Review: how artrepublic Brighton celebrated its 25th anniversary year

    From local events and big-name exhibitions to taking art onto Brighton’s streets, here are artrepublic’s highlights of 2018. Typically, as we head towards the end of a year we start to look back at all the things we’ve seen, done and accomplished over the past 12 months. What were the hig....
    From local events and big-name exhibitions to taking art onto Brighton’s streets, here are artrepublic’s highlights of 2018. Typically, as we head towards the end of a year we start to look back at all the things we’ve seen, done and accomplished over the past 12 months. What were the highs and the lows? What do we want more or less of, and what exciting plans and experiences can we carry with us into the sparkling new year? For artrepublic, this has been a truly special and spectacular year. Our 25th anniversary year has offered up almost too many gems to mention. Early in 2018 we launched our brand-new gallery area, doubling the wall space at our Bond Street location to bring you even more of the art and artists that you love. And, with that space came a whole new events calendar, featuring monthly activities for kids hosted by our artists, evenings of edition screen printing with The Private Press (and a few more of our artists), and even some live real-life storytelling with Spark. We had a fair few parties too, with bubbles flowing to celebrate exclusive print launches, including an exclusive launch with Mark Vessey, where we were treated to a spin on the desks from legendary Brighton DJ & producer, Fatboy Slim. There were also solo exhibitions from the likes of Bruce McLean, collective showcases – taking in everything from abstraction to our Modern Masters – and even an album launch for  drum & bass legend, Friction. And that was just inside the four walls of the gallery itself. Out in Brighton, beyond the gallery doors, our annual Art Yard Sale had people queuing round the block in the blazing sunshine, all waiting to get their hands on original art, at great prices, direct from the artists themselves. Some of the newest additions to the artrepublic family were there, right alongside some of the gallery’s veterans (not in terms of physical age, but in terms of long-held creative friendships) and, wandering among them all, was the host of our freshly-launched podcast, Art-related Nonsense, collecting stories from some of the best in the art business to share with you all. Check the first series out on iTunes. Elsewhere on Brighton’s streets, a little later in the year, the gallery was represented in the Martlets Snail Trail with a design created for us specially by Eelus. Unlike that snail (who was very much rooted to the spot), for us this year has sped by.   We’re so grateful to be able to share all this with the art lovers out there – each of you has brought something to the artrepublic story in 2018, a big thank you to you all and we look forward to seeing you at plenty more of the gallery’s events, openings and occasions in the year to come. From everyone at artrepublic Brighton, season’s greetings and we wish you a very Happy New Year. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Call collect: artist Mark Vessey’s new non-traditional portrait of Norman Cook

    The Brighton-based photographer and the international DJ have collaborated on a limited edition artwork. Back in 2015, the Barbican gallery in London hosted an exhibition titled Magnificent Obsessions: The Artist As Collector, the premise of which was looking at the personal objects and ideas....
    The Brighton-based photographer and the international DJ have collaborated on a limited edition artwork. Back in 2015, the Barbican gallery in London hosted an exhibition titled Magnificent Obsessions: The Artist As Collector, the premise of which was looking at the personal objects and ideas accumulated by contemporary artists, and how they were used by to inspire their work. Artists’ archives were laid bare for us to see, giving us an idea of the motifs and influences of the likes of Andy Warhol, Sol Le Witt, Damien Hirst and Peter Blake. Seen together, and in isolation, the exhibition was eye-opening. Unlikely objects gave us the opportunity to view a highly personal (and in some cases impersonal) side to some of the art world’s most famous figures. Something that occurred to me before I met Brighton-based photographer Mark Vessey for a chat about his upcoming print release at artrepublic – a limited edition collaboration with local (and global) legend Fatboy Slim/ Norman Cook. The link between Vessey and this past exhibition is pretty direct: the local artist’s work has a very clear focus on collections. You could say he is a collector of collections. 'Norman' limited edition print by Mark Vessey From his first stack, taking Attitude magazine as its subject matter, through The Face, Vogue and Playboy to Penguin books, Absolut vodka and Chanel perfume, Vessey has explored the ideas and aesthetics created by combining thoughtfully curated and carefully grouped objects. There is nothing accidental about these stacks and arrangements – they are all purposeful, considered, layered. But this latest collection is a slight sideways step from previous works. Because, while all his works have been based around an individual’s unique collection, this one feels more personal; very much like a portrait in fact. Perhaps that has something to do with the fact that the figure at its heart is very well known. Rather than an anonymous (to us, at least) collector, this latest exclusive print offers an insight into DJ and producer Norman Cook aka Fatboy Slim, via his archive of vinyl. We wanted to know more about Vessey’s latest project, which launches at the Brighton gallery on 28 November, so we tracked him down between shoots to ask him a few questions.   Mark, your work is all about collections – it’s the thread running through your work... After I finished university, I photographed my collection of Attitude magazine – it felt like a timeline of my own history, coming out, and independence from home – and after that, people started suggesting projects. Like my dad’s friend sent his Playboy magazines to me from New York, then that led on to me shooting stacks of The Face, then Vogue, and then I decided to collect every edition of British Vogue where Kate Moss had been on the cover...   Those works seem to be more general, rather than about specific individuals. Can you tell us how this particular piece ‘Norman’ came about? Basically, ever since I’ve been in Brighton I’ve had an interest in people’s collections. I have a hit list of people whose collections I want to shoot. There are always people that you’re drawn to, and Norman Cook was one of those people. I love music and how it ties into everything culturally, so the whole premise for this was to take a look at Norman’s influences and his collection. I asked him through Lawrence [Alkin, CEO of artrepublic] if he’d like to do a piece, and he came back and said yes. It was 20 years since the original release of ‘You’ve Come A Long Way Baby’ this year, but the collaboration wasn’t about that. It’s not about trying to hype my name up with someone else – this is very much my work. It just happened that the timing was right.   The image features a selection of vinyl from Norman Cook’s archive. How much input did he have in the records that are part of the stack? I went to his house – initially I was going to photograph it there, but then I thought ‘you know what, this is going to be a nightmare’ so I asked him if he minded me taking the vinyl to my studio, shooting it there and then bringing it back, and he didn’t; he’s not precious, which I love. I’d asked him if he would select three boxes of vinyl, and he thought that was quite a lot. But then he spent about two hours going through it and, by the time we finished all the shelves, it was more or less three boxes. It was perfect. It was interesting because when Norman was choosing the records I was peering over his shoulder, going ‘I feel really out of control. Are you picking the right things?’. And Norman was saying ‘That’s the whole point of me picking them Mark!’.   Were you surprised by the selection? It’s was quite an eclectic mix. It’s not just House music: there’s blues, Beastie Boys, The Clash, Donna Summer... It’s not one genre of music, and that’s why I find it interesting. It’s quite a curveball, because normally I shoot very specific groups of things.   But the photograph doesn’t show all three boxes that Norman selected, so how did you decide what made the cut? Were you looking at it in terms of the music itself or was it more about aesthetics? After he gave me the vinyl, I sat there for a week! (A week and a half probably) I turned it into a drama because I’m so emotionally connected to what I’m doing. My friends were telling me to just get the vinyl out and start. When I did, I was looking at what the spines said, how they fit together, how the colour moves throughout the piece of work and then it kind of came together. So, there’s the original ‘You’ve Come A Long Way Baby’ that Norman mixed his version from. He did give me the original ‘Praise You’ but it had nothing on the spine, which was frustrating. I put it in, thinking ‘it needs to be in there’, but then rethought it because no one would know what it was. There are a couple of doubles in there… The Ultimate Breaks & Beats / Various Artists and Bob James. That’s because when Norman was selecting them he told me: ‘When I’ve put in two of them, it means when I was DJing I had them both spinning at the same time.’ I think it was important to respect details like that.   Were you tempted to swipe any of the vinyl that Norman selected for you? I would love to have one of the Donna Summer records, or Prince… but I would never have taken them. My friends all wanted me to open up the boxes for them and play the records, but I wouldn’t let them near it – I don’t think Norman would have been precious about it, but for me, it’s just not respectful to do that.   Your typical subject matter – vinyl, books and magazines for example – are analogue products in an increasingly digital world. Norman, as Fatboy Slim, switched over to using digital technology for his DJ sets a few years back. How do you prefer to work? All my stuff is shot on film, medium format film. I do use a digital camera for my commercial work, but for my artwork it’s all film-based, developed and then scanned. I have friends who have cameras and they treat them like these precious things; mine is pretty bashed around, but then it’s used. It’s such a big camera it makes the work feel really special, more considered; you have to compose it, so the image is not so throwaway.   You’re a big fan of documentaries – do you think your work is a form of documentary?   I love documentaries. I realised recently that my prints are starting to talk to each other. I can have a shot of a stack of House music and one of The Face magazine, and culturally they are part of the same era and time. All of a sudden they are starting to communicate with each other. It’s a thread of our time. I hadn’t really thought about it before, but it’s all about tapping in to a period of time, or a magazine or movement and what it represented. It makes people see it in different way – like how Pop Art enlarges things and they take on a new meaning. An everyday object can be transformed into something that holds emotion; it stirs up memories. This print is kind of like a collision of sounds – it’s got blues, there’s funk in there, House. I suppose that’s what Norman created from. It’s part of his story. I love that they’re talking pieces.   Interview by Alanna Freeman   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page   $test =
  • Lucy Sparrow creates a festive felt wonderland for Hermes shoppers

    Lucy Sparrow transforms the Hermés storefront in Beverly Hills with a wonderfully festive display. Working with artrepublic, Lucy Sparrow has featured her sought-after felt creations from her infamous LA Supermarket exhibition in the Brighton Gallery. The exclusive His ’n’ Hers felt display ....
    Lucy Sparrow transforms the Hermés storefront in Beverly Hills with a wonderfully festive display. Working with artrepublic, Lucy Sparrow has featured her sought-after felt creations from her infamous LA Supermarket exhibition in the Brighton Gallery. The exclusive His ’n’ Hers felt display cabinet, from a limited edition of 50, features soft toothbrushes and a hand-stitched bottle of Old Spice. Published by artrepublic this summer and now working with Hermés, she’s gone from Kickstarting a corner shop in London to Rodeo Drive, Beverley Hills - and we’re excited. Lucy, following from her huge successes including the Felt Supermarket in LA this summer and the Felt Erotic Emporium in London in 2015 offers a fresh take on a decadent classic: the Festive Window Display. A celebration of playful fun and luxury, we are taken into her felt world of wonder, discovering those luxurious purses in the midst of a multitude of jars filled with felt bonbons. Childlike glee is what Lucy inspires in passer-bys. From seasoned fashionistas, to families returning from a meal together, no-one is safe from being stopped in their tracks with delight. The traditional lavishness of Hermés gets taken on a trip to the funfair, complete with a felt carousel horse and a felt covered crane-game to pick up fuzzy handbags. Lucy named the horse Herman, and he is serving equine royalty with gorgeous Hermés bracelets on his ankles just above the hooves, and he doesn’t deny himself a silk scarf either. The interactive nature of the displays is what Lucy has always provided, how we can pick up, feel and play with her art has added a new dimension of fun and intimacy to her work. The Hermés felt crane-game elevates this further, inviting shoppers to have some fun picking up a felt wallet before seriously considering the real deal. If you'd like to have your own Lucy Sparrow installation in your home, artrepublic are showcasing her intricate felt display cabinets in our Brighton Gallery. An opportune time to grab one before her next highly anticipated exhibition at Context in Miami, get in touch. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =

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