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  • Take a seat, does Yinka Ilori have your attention?

    Designer Yinka Ilori is known for his distinctive, vivacious use of bold colours and pattens in his pieces of furniture. He brings his childhood spent surrounded by intricate African Fabrics and Nigerian parables into the contemporary through his experiments with function and form. His most recent....
    Designer Yinka Ilori is known for his distinctive, vivacious use of bold colours and pattens in his pieces of furniture. He brings his childhood spent surrounded by intricate African Fabrics and Nigerian parables into the contemporary through his experiments with function and form. His most recent projects include Restoration Station, where he directly collaborated with recovering addicts in a workshop to up-cycle donated furniture. Allowing people who were also going through a transformation to create stunning work with him and to express their own narrative was a huge success. The chairs were put on display as part of the London Design Festival, and raised £2,520 for the company.   Injecting artistic exuberance through this work, he aims to work with more communities following the success of the Restoration Station. His proposal to transform a gloomy overpass in South London has been accepted and will be organised as part of the London Festival of Architecture in June. The design, entitled ‘Happy Street’, is a kaleidoscopic rainbow pattern reinvigorating a public space that previously scared the local schoolchildren. Expressing multiculturalism and diversity, IIlori’s work is vital and important within the public spaces of London, addressing issues around sexuality and class. His work is inclusive and celebratory, for everyone to enjoy. Playfully serious, beautiful and yet available to all, Ilori is re-writing the rules of the art world. Most recently, Ilori has collaborated with Universal Music to produce a special edition print in honour of the Brit Awards. The print ‘Love in a line’ is a geometric explosion of colour and clean lines, nodding to his influences of Nigerian pattern. He wanted to celebrate the bravery and beauty of being different, racially, sexually or creatively. The movement in the piece implies development, and a nod to the future. Ilori often asks questions in his work about where we are going, where we’ve come from and the constantly fluctuating nature of identity. One of this strengths as a designer is his storytelling ability. Being influenced by the power of narratives in his childhood from the African parables, he brings this dimension to his work. Whether it is print, furniture or urban landscape projects, the notion of transformation is threaded throughout. The artrepublic Brighton gallery are excited to stock his prints from the ‘Do Good Because Of tomorrow’ Exhibition. The phrase is widely used in Nigeria and is used to inspire people to participate in good deeds and catalyse positive changes. The stories inherent within his work resonate with a huge range of people, and we’re delighted to feature him. Please drop in to experience his work in person!   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Brighton graffiti artist Aroe, exhibition at artrepublic

    Aroe exhibition 'Graffiti Owes Me Money' opens at artrepublic from 29th March. artrepublic Brighton are delighted to exhibit and celebrate the work of graffiti legend Aroe at our gallery, launching on 29th March with a Private View (FREE tickets available). If you’ve not heard of him you have d....
    Aroe exhibition 'Graffiti Owes Me Money' opens at artrepublic from 29th March. artrepublic Brighton are delighted to exhibit and celebrate the work of graffiti legend Aroe at our gallery, launching on 29th March with a Private View (FREE tickets available). If you’ve not heard of him you have definitely seen his work. For years his graffiti has dominated the streets of Brighton, cementing himself as a cultural force and public figure. He was often seen spraying up a wall of his choice in broad daylight, letting his natural charisma placate the startled public, and his faux-blasé attitude confound the police. It seems that he ran out of walls here in Brighton and turned to canvas. Not before continuing his work internationally from Brazil to Syria. Most recently a collection of his canvases was placed in the ‘Aroe Suite’ in the Palms Hotel Casino in Las Vegas. He’s come a long way from being shot at by the Milano police for painting trains, and artrepublic are thrilled to have his work featured in the gallery. In the words of Andy Warhol, ‘Art is what you can get away with.’, and Aroe just keeps on doing just that.   Aroe’s work is the refreshing antithesis to the norm of what is usually seen in the art world. He didn’t come from privilege, with a working class background and relatively dysfunctional home life. The medium which he has perfected is technically illegal. He didn’t ask for permission, his works were not projects that underwent multiple revisions and they weren’t planned. He began with cheap spray paint, raw talent and pure tenacity. His success is due to his persistence and his courage, realising from a young age that a can of spray paint was what he was going to work with for the rest of his life. Not letting anyone or anything stop him is part of his legacy and who he is as a person. The work isn’t politicised, romanticised or commercialised. It just is. What his work unintentionally does is break down the barriers between class and art. He didn't reach his success through lofty connections or an expensive tuition, he simply worked until it came. It has been exciting to witness Aroe’s artistic development. He secured his position on the streets stylistically with his block type as opposed to the traditional wild style usually opted for by artists. This gave his work - which was mainly his name - readability. He was influenced by types that he saw in advertising, such as the one of the Yorkie bar. The boldness and simplicity suited him, he wanted everyone to see his name everywhere. Aroe used the familiarity that the advertising type to then experiment with form. Putting the letters on a slant, inverting the colour scheme or having lasers cut through the words is now beheld with an acceptability from the viewers. In a way, Aroe lured us into a false sense of security with what we’ve seen before, just to subvert it entirely and make it his own. Influenced by the British b-boy culture in the eighties, hip hop and fashion, these electrify his work with a freshness and an energy rarely seen. Now Aroe is exhibiting his most recent collection ‘Graffiti Owes Me Money’ at artrepublic Brighton from 29th March.  A celebration of hip hop culture and his own focused style and use of colour. Now experimenting with dimension, shape and geometric lines, the work is futuristically abstract. Dynamic, powerful and beautiful, the pieces have the impact of a graffiti blockbuster and the finesse of fine art. Aroe is merging the world on the street and the often inaccessible art world to produce work that is engaging to a wider audience, and stunning. If you'd like to attend the Private View of Aroe 'Graffiti Owes Me Money’ on 29th March at the artrepublic gallery in Brighton, please visit our Eventbrite page for FREE tickets. We will have special limited editions of the ‘Grace Jones’ pieces available on the night, alongside the highly sought after original canvases too. In true Aroe fashion he’ll also have a 1979 vintage Porsche covered his graffiti parked outside the exhibition, because he can.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • artrepublic support an art project for the homeless, Justlife Brighton

    We've sponsored a studio to help boost the wellbeing of homeless people. As part of our ongoing community efforts, we’re always looking for ways to help our city thrive. This year, we sponsored the folk over at JustLife Creative Studio so they could take part in this year’s Artist Open Hous....
    We've sponsored a studio to help boost the wellbeing of homeless people. As part of our ongoing community efforts, we’re always looking for ways to help our city thrive. This year, we sponsored the folk over at JustLife Creative Studio so they could take part in this year’s Artist Open Houses festival. Winning ‘Best Newcomer’ in 2018, it was our pleasure to sponsor their application to take part again in the Artist Open House’s ‘trail’ – a celebration of over 1,500 artists and makers exhibiting their work in artist’s homes and studios across Brighton and Hove. People come from all over the country to walk the ‘trail’ from house to house, looking and buying artwork from the local art community. JustLife Creative Studio, based in Brighton’s Open Market on London Road, is an art studio that works with the homeless community to share the expression of art through inspirational and creative means. The aim is to create a safe environment, enriching their experience, helping them flourish. The studio delivers weekly programs, diverse activities, and guided workshops, which allows the community to practice their passions whilst becoming professionals in a variety of artistic mediums. One of the artists said: “Coming to JustLife Studio and receiving the kind words and guidance, has helped me find the confidence to be more than I thought I could be. Now I can look people in the eye and say, ‘this is me’!” At the start of May, the studio hosted their launch party, celebrating their opening show as part of this year’s Artist Open Houses festival. We went along to see the array of paintings, print work, sculpture and photography. The gallery is a true reflection of what it means to find inspiration in the darkest and hardest of times. It was amazing to hear that the studio works with emergency housing charities in the city too. One of the artists we spoke with, who’s intricate and abstract photography really interested us, smiled as he told us he was only able to exhibit 6 of his 6,000 photographs! He laughed with us and shared how difficult it was to choose only 6 for the show. Another of the artists we spoke with had just started working with a new medium: a mixture of paint and PVC, which she hand-poured over her expressive paintings. A member of the studio’s team explained how incredible it was to watch her, as she learned how to ‘control and guide’ the flow of liquid, achieving her unique look - slanted and expressive marks of black, red and white. Bold ‘flashes’ of both colour and shine. Justlife creative studio are currently fundraising to help bosst the studio funds, without any funding it wouldn’t exist – the impact on these artists would be huge. The space and purpose of it is relied upon as a place of sanctuary and support. If you have a spare moment do follow the link below to donate to this cause and ensure that the studio can continue. Please support the work of Justlife Brighton and follow them on Facebook and Instagram.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • International Women's Day Interview with Louise McNaught

    To celebrate International Women's Day, we were lucky enough to get an interview with one of artrepublic's top female artists, Louise McNaught.    We talked about what International Women's Day meant to her, who has been an inspirational figure to her and a bit about her up and coming projec....
    To celebrate International Women's Day, we were lucky enough to get an interview with one of artrepublic's top female artists, Louise McNaught.    We talked about what International Women's Day meant to her, who has been an inspirational figure to her and a bit about her up and coming project. See the interview below. Emma: Hi Louise, thank you for doing this interview with us, especially with it currently being international women’s month. To start off, I wanted to first ask what does International Women’s Day mean to you? To be completely honest, it didn’t mean much to me previously. I initially felt that there was no need to have a specific day for women and for men. However, after having my daughter it has had more meaning to me, as I would like for my daughter to have as many possibilities in life in a world of equality. Emma: Do you feel that you are an inspiration to other female artists who might be starting out? I do often get contacted by female art students that look to me for advice and guidance. I often get asked if I can help them with projects that they have going on. It’s very flattering to say you have inspired someone as I’m just acting on what inspires me and if that speaks to others that’s fantastic! Emma: That sounds great that you are approached by young artists and that you offer advice. Do you view yourself as a role model for younger women?  Ever since I had my daughter, I now try to be a better, more responsible person! I don’t like to think of myself as a role model - that’s a very weighty title. I’d like the title ‘Inspirer’ instead, I hope I inspire women that want to pursue art, and who think the art world is male-dominated (and admittedly it still is), that they can still go for it! Having Autumn opened my eyes to the world, and it makes me think more about how life will be for her as she grows up, and I hope I can inspire her to go for whatever she is inspired by. Emma: Are there any inspirational female figures that had an impact on you while growing up and to also you currently? I would have to say my mum was a huge inspiration to me. Especially when it comes to how I want to raise my daughter. The way she raised me, makes me want to do the same for my daughter. One artist that that really inspired me growing up was the artist Susan Seddon Boulet. Her artwork isn’t very popular over here in England but in the US, she has a big following ... even though she died many years ago. Her art and career inspired me as an artist. Emma: Have you always wanted to be an artist? Yes, I have always wanted to be an artist. There are baby pictures of myself holding a pen in a very steady way from around age 1, and by the time I was 8, I definitely knew that I wanted to be an artist. My family were not artists, so this was very much a solitary pursuit. Emma: So, we know that you graduated from the University of Greenwich back in 2012. Do you have a favourite memory of when you were at the university? For me, the best thing about University was meeting other artists. Meeting more misfits like me. I didn’t know any other artists back at home, so it was great to meet more creative minds and socialise with them. Emma: You have many beautiful pieces that you have created over the years. What has been your favourite piece to work on and why? I would have to say the project I am currently working on. I am starting to incorporate elements of popular culture and consumerism mixed in with my animals. Emma: Do you have any advice for aspiring artists? Get your art online! Create your own website and promote your own work across social media. Find your audience online and make sure you to get your art in front of your following. Emma: Do you have any ongoing projects you’d like to highlight? The current project I am working on is called ‘Consume’. As a natural progression from Endangered Animals, I am creating pieces that show how these animals are going to face extinction. This will be on display in my solo show at the Royal Overseas League in  Mayfair from the 27th of June to the 9th of September 2019.    Louise McNaught is a contemporary artist with international representation and as of 2018 is also a published Author. Louise‘s creations feature animals that are God-like, sublime and ethereal in their presence and depiction.   Check out all of her work HERE  $test =
  • Contemporary female artists are celebrated at artrepublic Brighton

    As part of International Women’s Day artrepublic throws the spotlight on our leading female artists. Women in the art world have been historically swept under the proverbial rug in favour of their male counterparts. It was a widely held belief that women were simply incapable of artistic genius....
    As part of International Women’s Day artrepublic throws the spotlight on our leading female artists. Women in the art world have been historically swept under the proverbial rug in favour of their male counterparts. It was a widely held belief that women were simply incapable of artistic genius. We at the artrepublic Brighton gallery wanted to take the opportunity to celebrate the successes of a few of our featured female artists as part of International Women’s Day on 8th March 2019. The future is female and at artrepublic, the future is now.   One of the most exciting names in art at the moment is Sara Pope. Pope has had previous experience in the fashion industry as a shoe designer and also as an art director. Taking inspiration from glossy glamour of the fashion industry she uses live models to initially start her process of producing the perfect lips. She asks the models to express different emotions using their lips and works from there. From this she produces an intimately realistic portrayal of femininity. The finished work is sensual and provocative, providing a focal point for the viewer to imagine a moment which these lips are capturing. Exuding effortless eroticism, her work empowers women through their sexuality. How much of an impact can one part of a woman’s face have? Through the eyes of Sara Pope: a lot. Bonnie and Clyde’s cinematic compositions are a creation of a space somewhere between a dream and reality. She uses mixed media to create a collage that blends fine art with photography. The new space that she creates is a point between being awake and asleep, the conscious and the unconscious, and is simultaneously nostalgic and refreshing. Her use of abstract textures alongside parts of a scene in LA evoke the process of memory. How we often remember unrelated parts of things, images melt with colours and textures with a surreal softness come together to evoke an experience. She suspends the rules of dimensions and form just as she suspends the viewer’s sense of reality, her work is a tribute to the power of stylistic originality. Despite playfully toying with the notion of perception, she opts for pastel colours and clean lines to ensure that above all else, her work is aesthetically stunning. Maria Rivan’s work with iconography and pop culture elevates the classic into the contemporary. She often works with the faces of old Hollywood female actresses, using a starlet to ease the viewer into a false sense of familiarity. Rivan subverts the traditional by adoring her starlets with a beautiful bloom of oddness. Birds, branches, flowers, and tiny figurines burst around their faces from the tops of their heads. These surreal embellishments add complexity to the often one-dimensional nature of pop art. The women that she uses were worshipped for their beauty, and Rivan’s explosion of strangeness from their heads evokes the notion of a complex inner world. Her work is particularly empowering as it coveys the sense that their minds are as vivaciously stunning as they themselves were. Presenting multi-dimensional female icons, Rivan brings the classic into the now, and we love it. Master of the juxtaposition, Elizabeth Waggett takes monochromatic, often gothic subject matter and adds gold. Simplistic and arresting, she effortlessly confronts themes of death, superficiality and value. Her trademark use of skulls provides an intensely raw backdrop for her 23 carat champagne gold adornment. One of her most celebrated works, ‘It’s My Party’, is a human skull topped with a golden party hat. Bewildering the viewer with a reminder of our own mortality, the playfulness of a golden party hat is uncomfortable. The gold itself is a contrast, and the viewer is confronted with the ridiculousness of superfluous embellishments after death. Waggett’s skulls look closely like an x-ray, emphasising the fragility and majesty of our human form. Her pieces ask bold questions, ‘what do you value?’. Despite working with dark themes, Waggett’s work are a celebration of equality, and urge us to celebrate each other as human beings instead of material wealth.   artrepublic are delighted to showcase works by all of these exceptional female artists and more in our Brighton gallery, if you’d like to take a look at their work, please visit us!   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Meet the Women Who Are on Top of the (Art) World

     International Women's Day 2019 International Women's Day has returned! What better way to celebrate than by showing off our finest female talent. Even though we are now in 2019, there can be an imbalance between us. Some industries still treat women like second class citizens. Artrepublic couldn'....
     International Women's Day 2019 International Women's Day has returned! What better way to celebrate than by showing off our finest female talent. Even though we are now in 2019, there can be an imbalance between us. Some industries still treat women like second class citizens. Artrepublic couldn't disagree with this more. This is why we are dedicating this blog post to all the fabulous women we work with! LOUISE MCNAUGHT Louise McNaught became a professional artist whilst doing a Degree in Fine Art. Her distinctive use of bright colour, fading upward drips shows her obvious love of nature. She has international representation and as of 2018 is also a published Author. Her artwork has also been featured at art fairs in Milan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Stockholm, Brussels and all over the UK. Recently, McNaught has been using her voice and talent to educate people about all the beautiful animals that are becoming endangered. Her book 'Survival' strongly highlights how many animals are being lost using powerful imagery. Read more about Louise McNaught and check out her upcoming shows on her website HERE SARA POPE Bold, seductive paintings of voluptuous lips is what contemporary artist, Sara Pope is known for. Pope had a successful career in the fashion industry (as a shoe designer for brands such as Paul Smith), and also work in magazines as a designer and art director. This is where Sara draws her inspiration from. She aims to capture the glamour and seductive power conveyed by the lips and mouth. 24 galleries in the UK and internationally currently represent her. She has also completed collaborations with BareMinerals makeup, PIAS music label and Saatchi&Saatchi. See more about what Sara is up to HERE MARIA RIVANS Maria Rivans is a contemporary British artist, known for her scrapbook-style collage aesthetic. A mash-up of Surrealism meets Pop-Art, Rivans’s work re-appropriates vintage ephemera to create dreamy realms. This transports the viewer into fantastical worlds of the imaginary. Each one suffused with vivid colour, arresting imagery, intricate detail, and finished with a dusting of subtle humour. Maria works from her studio in Brighton: a kooky building, purpose built as a small cinema in 1911. She exhibits work throughout the UK as well as internationally. These spaces include Hong Kong, New York and across Europe. In 2017 and 2018, her work featured in The Times newspaper. As well as this, in 2018, the Royal Academy’s 250th Summer Exhibition selected her film Still ‘Understanding Nothing.’ Have a look at what Maria Rivans is doing HERE LUCY BRYANT Lucy Bryant is a contemporary artist and graphic designer and graduated from the University of Derby. However, Bryant is less defined by her formal art training than by her loose, creative approach and varied influences. These include Pop Art and the Punk music scene. Responding to contemporary culture, Bryant’s art subverts the everyday and the banal. She's always striving to disrupt the ordinary and create something entirely new. KRISTJANA S WILLIAMS Kristjana S Williams is an Icelandic born artist who studied graphic design and illustration at Central St Martins. This led to her gaining critical acclaim as Creative Director of Beyond the Valley for 8 years. Williams has become well known in the industry. This has won an array of awards from ‘Dulux Colour Awards’, ‘D&AD’, a New York Festivals Grand Prix and First Prize. As well as this, she was shortlisted for the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity. See more from Kristjana HERE All these women are incredible artists all with their own styles, techniques and messages. Of course, we work with so many more women overflowing with talent that we wish we could have included in this list. To see our full list of artists, CLICK HERE  $test =
  • Get to Know Soozy Lipsey

    Leave the dull behind and enter the wonderful world of Soozy Lipsey! We had the pleasure of sitting down with the lovely Soozy Lipsey to discuss her work, her process and more.  R: Hi Soozy. Thank you for doing this interview with us. Let's jump straight in. Your approach to art seems incredibly f....
    Leave the dull behind and enter the wonderful world of Soozy Lipsey! We had the pleasure of sitting down with the lovely Soozy Lipsey to discuss her work, her process and more.  R: Hi Soozy. Thank you for doing this interview with us. Let's jump straight in. Your approach to art seems incredibly fun and not to be taken too seriously. Is this something you feel strongly about?  S: I would say my art parallels my life in many ways. I think life is a serious business and in the same breath really not so serious. Similar to feeling significant and yet totally insignificant. I find humour really does defuse the tension of these paradoxes. So in an answer to your question, I think having a laugh in life, especially laughing at ones imperfections, is crucial and I like to show that in my work. I have a sense of humour - its a way to really connect with people. Knowing how to really laugh at life is a skill I think and so wit is something I really admire in people. R: Your work beautifully captures the unexpected to produce both whimsical and macabre emotion. How do you perceive your own work?  S: I think some of my work really plays with the tensions: life and death, light and dark and weak-strong. l think my work has different levels of interpretation but if it doesn't disturb the viewer in anyway, then I fear my work is just passing people by which isn't of much interest to me. Being disturbed keeps us awake. A 'Do not disturb ' sign is not something I would hang anywhere near my artwork. R: Re-imagining and revitalising vintage art is something you adopt within your work frequently. What’s the feeling behind it? Is there a reason you choose to do this? S: I think the past is where we draw our wisdom our guidance - it's incredibly important. One of my favourite Quotes is from a Danish philosopher, Kierkegaard. He says 'Life can only be understood backwards, but must be lived forwards.' I think anything with a sense of history has a quality about it that new things just do not have. I am drawn to these qualities intellectually, aesthetically and emotionally. I like to revisit something with a sense of age - something that has existed for sometime and then change it. Therefore, it embodies a new lease of life.   An example of that was buying an old picture of a vase of flowers and cutting it in half and hanging just half the picture. The idea behind this was to offer the viewer just half the story, the rest was up to the viewer to imagine. I liked the idea that the discarded half remains in the past. It also played on the human drive to always be desiring, and by withholding half the picture the viewer would hopefully be in a state of momentary satisfaction as I had left them desiring the other half or even imagining it. I hadn't given them everything, which hopefully captured their attention for longer than I would have had I just hung the full picture. R: What’s your process when creating a new piece? Do you have a “routine” or a method you stick to or does it flow much more naturally? S: There usually is no great plan other than trying my very best to do what I perceive is my job as an artist. This being to keep myself on the outside of most conventions, especially routine because routine and habit can dull the senses. It makes us spoilt and complacent and even entitled. I think it's the artists role to look at life with a sense of enquiry. If my work embodies that even a fraction, then whatever material or style I use is irrelevant really. R: What are you favourite mediums/materials to work with? And what are your favourite themes/subjects to capture? S: I like print as it's accessible and affordable which is a key thing for me - art can be purchased by a wider audience. I love old objects, paintings and great thinkers, philosophers and tubes of paint. My favourite themes would have to be the human condition. R: How do you keep your studio/workstation? Is it rather neat and tidy or could it be considered its own work of art? S: It's a total mess when working on something. The idea of anything 'becoming' that doesn't generate mess is a mystery to me. Birth is messy business, after all. Neat and tidy is something I like to visit once in a while just to ground myself and to pretend I have everything under control. R: You’ve previously collaborated with Dan Hillier to produce ‘The Meeting,’ beautifully capturing your unique styles together. Have you got any future collaborations in the works? Or is there an artist you would like to work with in the future? S: I have no plans to collaborate in the near future however, I think collaboration is brilliant! If there is anyone out there who fancies a collaboration, don't hesitate to get in touch! R: And finally, do you have a favourite artist? S: I can't resist giving a mention to my absolute love, Rene Magritte. He is my hero. I'm not one to put anyone on a pedestal but as far as I'm concerned, his mind and execution of  ideas never cease to disappoint and amaze me. He is a poetic genius! Soozy Lipsey re-imagines the traditional with contemporary whimsy, adding a touch of the fantastical here, and a dash of the macabre there, for visually provocative aesthetic. Re-purposing existing - or ‘found’ - objects and images, Lipsey transforms nostalgia into the uncanny though combinational techniques.  Check out all of her work HERE           Check out Soozy Lipsey's website HERE $test =
  • Review: 2019 London Art Fair

    artrepublic looks at the standout work at this year’s Fair. Kicking off the 2019 art scene, the 31st edition of the London Art Fair took over the Business Design centre in Islington in mid January. Filled from top to bottom with an impressive labyrinthine display of artwork, it was easy to get ....
    artrepublic looks at the standout work at this year’s Fair. Kicking off the 2019 art scene, the 31st edition of the London Art Fair took over the Business Design centre in Islington in mid January. Filled from top to bottom with an impressive labyrinthine display of artwork, it was easy to get lost in a good way. Ranging from Sculptures to Portraiture, contemporary art to early twentieth-century pieces, there was something for everyone. A seasoned buyer would feel very at home amongst the Henry Moore and Dali sculptures. Alongside the exuberant display of fine art from some of the most critically-acclaimed artists of the twentieth century such as Sir Anthony Caro and Ben Nicholson, the London Art Fair offers the opportunity for prospective collectors to get advice from curators as to how and where to start in collecting art. Above all, it offers an exploration into bite-sized versions of some of the most prestigious and celebrated galleries in the UK and worldwide. At first an overwhelming spectacle, typical gallery-goers will not be used to the sheer volume of art all under one roof. Navigating the maze of white walls can seem daunting but incredibly rewarding after stumbling upon excellence, which is frequent and often. artrepublic were thrilled to see the prominent print focus in this year’s London Art Fair. The contemporary print artists stood to serve as refreshing palette-cleansers amongst the swathes of fine art and sculpture. A breath of fresh air, a playful nudge or a satirical wink, these prints offer it all. David Shrigley was a headliner for the London Art Fair this year. Combining stylistic childlike innocence with an often mundane or unassuming subject, to produce a piece that is fun and engaging. He celebrates the nuances of everyday life the with the intimacy of the imperfections in his work. There’s an openness to his work that emphasises his accessibility, making his works very desirable to own. His piece ‘My Rampage Is Over’ was exhibited featuring a huge blue elephant. A naive delight, evoking memories of childhood bedtime stories; of letting your own imagination run wild. Another print heavyweight who exhibited boldly this year at the London Art Fair was the Connor Brothers. Their style is instantly recognisable, with their iconic use of vintage photography with modern type. The Connor Brothers have definitely cemented their position within the print space of the London art scene, notoriously popular and effortlessly cool. Most recently they have issued a series of book covers using a selection of their prints. Elevating the smutty form of the pulp novel, their works of art subvert the previously derogatory gender roles. As opposed to the women on these novels only serving to titillate or be murdered they are remastered as untouchable, graceful, almost statuesque. A contemporary twist on a classic. The almost-serious and almost-sensitive work of Charming Baker was another to look out for this year. Often contradictory, pulling the viewer across the emotional spectrum with his work. Disarmingly playful imagery besets an often melancholic backdrop, or is victim to violent scribbles. The resulting composition is a juxtaposition of innocence and darkness, provoking an eerie sense of nostalgia.  A master at combining texture with form, there is a distinctive layering within Baker’s work that enables him to effortlessly discuss themes such as joy, love, death and despair. The style that he has established is one of timeless eccentricity, beautifully thought provoking.   If you’d like to view any of the sensational prints by David Shrigley, The Connor Brothers or Charming Baker please visit the artrepublic gallery in Brighton, call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page   $test =
  • Save the date: artrepublic’s first Sample Sale

    We Need You! Help us fundraise for Middle Street Primary School - get up to 60% off selected works. Between 8th - 10th March, the artrepublic Brighton gallery will be hosting a sample sale at Middle Street Primary School. The school is currently experiencing a chronic funding crisis and is in....
    We Need You! Help us fundraise for Middle Street Primary School - get up to 60% off selected works. Between 8th - 10th March, the artrepublic Brighton gallery will be hosting a sample sale at Middle Street Primary School. The school is currently experiencing a chronic funding crisis and is in real need of local support. The artrepublic Sample Sale will donate 25% of sales to Middle Street Primary School to help raise money for a special needs teacher. Last year, artrepublic raised over £2,000 to help renovate their arts center. This year, we hope to make a difference again. With both framed and unframed works from floor to ceiling, the artrepublic sample sale will offer a unique chance to browse for hidden gems – with up to 60% off selected works. Our gallery team will be on hand to discuss your favourite new find! If you’re tempted to spend a little more, our gallery’s Own Art scheme could make purchasing one or more pieces that little bit easier. For more information on this 0% APR payment plan, please ask one of our Art Advisors. The Brighton gallery team look forward to welcoming you at our Middle Street School sample sale fundraiser.   artrepublic Sample Sale, 8th to 10th March, 10.30am to 5.30pm Middle Street School, 37 Middle Street, Brighton, BN1 1AL   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Lawrence’s Rare Prints Showcase

    Snap up some never-seen-before rare prints at the artrepublic Brighton gallery. Lawrence Alkin, owner of the artrepublic Brighton gallery will host a special event on Friday 15th February to launch a showcase of his rare, personal print collection. This showcase will be a true representation....
    Snap up some never-seen-before rare prints at the artrepublic Brighton gallery. Lawrence Alkin, owner of the artrepublic Brighton gallery will host a special event on Friday 15th February to launch a showcase of his rare, personal print collection. This showcase will be a true representation of how contemporary art has evolved over 25 years, reflecting artrepublic’s long-standing roots at the forefront of the scene, with many rare works available to buy for the first time in years. Lawrence has always been renowned for his unique gallery curations, placing established artists next to upcoming talent. His eye for talent has been flexing its muscle since the early ’80s, opening his Brighton gallery in 1989. Since then, the gallery has seen featured urban & street art giants such as Banksy, Obey and Ben Eine become world famous, whilst at the same time documenting the importance of established artists such as Peter Blake, Damien Hirst and Grayson Perry. Having sold many iconic prints over the years, it’s not a surprise that a few special editions were held back for an exciting day like this. Lawrence’s ‘Rare Prints’ showcase will be a unique and amazing opportunity to snap up some never-seen-before prints at the artrepublic Brighton gallery. His philosophy since opening the gallery over 25 years ago remains the same: that art should be accessible to everyone. Lawrence aimed to demystify the art world, enabling enthusiasts to follow their heart when buying artwork. He truly believes that this way of buying makes art last for generations rather than just for interior styling. artrepublic proudly offer the Arts Council’s ‘Own Art’ scheme – a zero-interest payment plan, designed to make buying and collecting art more affordable. With our Brighton gallery being the largest provider of these loans in the UK, Own Art doesn't just make buying art more affordable but allows the enjoyment of curating a personal art collection more realistic and attainable than ever before. What once was a luxury, is now available to everyone. Lawrence’s Rare Prints Showcase can be viewed at the artrepublic Brighton gallery between Friday 15th February and Monday 4th March. Register today for your free tickets to our opening evening on 15th Feb. Don’t miss this opportunity to own highly collectable works that have long since sold out or have never been available before.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =

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