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  • Live Screen Printing Event with Rob Wass

    Friday 31st August, 6-9pm, join the artist Rob Wass at artrepublic Brighton for after work fun at our special free screen printing demonstration evening.   Learn about the skill of screen printing, with new works created before your eyes. With limited edition prints, produced and signed....
    Friday 31st August, 6-9pm, join the artist Rob Wass at artrepublic Brighton for after work fun at our special free screen printing demonstration evening.   Learn about the skill of screen printing, with new works created before your eyes. With limited edition prints, produced and signed by the artist during the evening, also available for purchase. Brought to you in association with Private Press, Brighton. Rob Wass is an exceptionally gifted artist, know for his intricate and colourful abstract works featuring nature and the urban environment. To take part in this free event, simply visit our Eventbrite page to register. Hope to see you there! For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • artrepublic return to Manchester Art Fair

    The 2018 fair will run 12-14 October at Manchester Central.   We are thrilled to announce that artrepublic will be returning for this year’s Manchester Art Fair. We will be exhibiting from 12-14 October at Manchester Central, Stand 301, offering visitors to the fair a wonderful cha....
    The 2018 fair will run 12-14 October at Manchester Central.   We are thrilled to announce that artrepublic will be returning for this year’s Manchester Art Fair. We will be exhibiting from 12-14 October at Manchester Central, Stand 301, offering visitors to the fair a wonderful chance to see some of our latest, hugely collectable prints, including many new works that will be unveiled and shown for the first time.  We’ll have works from artists across our gallery roster including Sir Peter Blake, Dave White, Ben Eine, Pure Evil, Magnus Gjoen, Dan Hillier, Rob Wass, Bonnie and Clyde and Maria Rivans, plus much more! Get free weekend tickets from artrepublic! Valid on Saturday & Sunday, please contact us via events@artrepublic.com, then visit the Buy Art Fair, Manchester website and simply enter the code we'll send you.   Now recognised as one of the UK’s leading fairs of visual arts, Manchester Art Fair 2018 will bring galleries and artists to Manchester from across the UK. Over 3,000 artworks will be for sale and there will be a host of exclusive events and activities at the fair and across the city. The artrepublic stand at a previous Manchester Art Fair As always, we are really looking forward to meeting customers and followers who haven’t been able to visit our Brighton Gallery, giving them an experience of the wide variety of art we offer.  Be sure to come and say hi at our Stand number 301 and see a selection of our best and most sought-after signed limited edition prints up close. For more information contact our Brighton Gallery on 01273 724829 or email events@artrepublic.com. This year's venue Manchester Central Get your tickets at www.buyartfair.co.uk  ARTREPUBLIC WILL BE AT STAND NUMBER 301 For free weekend tickets from artrepublic - valid Saturday & Sunday, please contact us via events@artrepublic.com. Full details: Manchester Art Fair  - Manchester Central Friday 12th - Sunday 14th October 2018 Opening Times VIP Opening Night Friday 12th October 2018     17.00 - 21.00 Including a complimentary drink.  Weekend Tickets Saturday 13 October 2018      10.00 - 18.00 Sunday 14 October 2018         10.00 - 17.00  Map and Directions Visit the Buy Art Fair – Manchester website for more details and to purchase tickets For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • A Little Bird Tells US… Artist Lucy Sparrow’s set up shop in Downtown LA

    The fully felt Sparrow Mart is home to 31,000 individual works, and they’re all for sale. Her first pop-up was a Corner Shop in London’s East End, stocked with familiar products made from felt and funded by a Kickstarter campaign but, since that initial installation, artist Lucy Sparrow....
    The fully felt Sparrow Mart is home to 31,000 individual works, and they’re all for sale. Her first pop-up was a Corner Shop in London’s East End, stocked with familiar products made from felt and funded by a Kickstarter campaign but, since that initial installation, artist Lucy Sparrow’s projects have just got bigger and better. And as nowhere is more familiar with large-scale consumerism than America, that’s where she’s been setting her sights. Having sold out her 8 Till Late bodega in New York in record time – it shut a week earlier than it was due to, as the store cupboard was quite literally bare – Sparrow has spent the past year stitching 31,000 (yes, you read that number correctly) individual pieces to sell in a new pop-up shop. This time, she’s set up Sparrow Mart, a 1980s-themed (in)stall(ation) at the Standard Hotel in Downtown LA, and the locals are going mad for it. One of our artrepublic family of artists, Sparrow is known for her felt sculptures that depict everything from bathroom cabinets to sushi sets, domestic cleaning products to famous sweet treats. Sparrow Mart pulls together the themes from her smaller-scale works, to stock an entire store – from the vegetable aisle and deli meat counter to packaged convenience foods and even an ATM. Everything is for sale, with items priced from $5 upwards, making it affordable as well as experiential art. Even street artist Shepard Fairey, aka Obey, couldn’t resist stopping by to take a spin round the aisles. If you’re not in LA and can’t make it to Sparrow Mart (which is open throughout August from 11am - 9pm daily, but closed on Mondays), why not drop into our Brighton gallery to see some of Sparrow’s other sculptural work. We have two of her editioned Cabinet series on display; the bathroom-based ‘His N Hers’, as well as ‘Such A Sad Time’, whose shelves are lined with familiar processed foods (all made out of felt, of course). The innocent-looking soft sculptures are almost guaranteed to make you rethink the way you consume (and potentially hoard) goods. Outside the States right now, and beyond the realms of the LA supermarket sweep, artrepublic Brighton is one of the few places you can stock up on Sparrow’s editioned pieces. Find out more by calling us or visiting the gallery to speak to one of our Art Advisors.   To view our  Lucy Sparrow felt art, call into our Brighton gallery, where our Art Advisors will be happy to help. Tel. 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Feel-good fronds: CJP’s pineapple prints make an environmental impact

    The artist’s Rewilding Rainforest Pineapples offer more than just a totally tropical taste. Pineapples have had an enduring appeal within the worlds of fashion and interiors since the 15th century when they became widely known in Europe, becoming Western symbols of hospitality and a warm welc....
    The artist’s Rewilding Rainforest Pineapples offer more than just a totally tropical taste. Pineapples have had an enduring appeal within the worlds of fashion and interiors since the 15th century when they became widely known in Europe, becoming Western symbols of hospitality and a warm welcome. While you can thank Christopher Columbus for introducing it to the West, it was the Maya and Aztec communities who first cultivated the obscure plant. Once in Europe, the (then) hard-to-come-by fruit charmed society – whether served up as a tropical candied treat at dinner parties or used as gilded adornments on furniture, lighting and home accents. And if recent years’ fashion and design trends are anything to go by, this plant’s natural form still maintains that same magical pull. Saying that, pineapples aren’t solely a nice decorative trend – they can carry a far deeper message. Just take a look at artist CJP’s Rainforest Rewild Pineapple prints and you’ll discover there’s more to this sweet fruit than meets the eye. Let’s be clear: the intricacies of CJP’s artwork instantly makes it more special than your average pineapple. Hidden within the bromeliad’s tightly overlapping leaves and suckers (that is actually a technical term) are representatives of Costa Rica’s animal kingdom. This particular pineapple becomes a zoology lesson in local wildlife, highlighting all sorts of creatures from a jaguar, harpy eagle and sloth to spider monkeys, toucans, a kinkajou and parrot. What you don’t necessarily know, however, is that almost all of these animals are on the list of endangered species, with one of the key reasons behind that being loss of habitat due to the destruction of the rainforests in which they live. So, you see, within CJP’s painstakingly detailed inkwork there’s a hidden message that takes us from fanciful fruit to far more serious subjects in the blink of an eye. The artist is clearly passionate about this major environmental issue and, as such, has actively chosen to donate a percentage of the profits from sales of this print to The World Land Trust, who work to protect, conserve, rewild and regenerate threatened habitats around the world. One of the organisation’s patrons is Sir David Attenborough so, by investing in one of CJP’s Rainforest  Rewild Pineapples and supporting the WLT, you’ll be in very good company. The giclee prints are available in two sizes – A3 and A2 – and five different colourways, so there should be one to suit your tastes. Take your pick and then sit back and enjoy the view from your own natural habitat. For more information about the prints, speak to one of our Art Advisors either in our Brighton gallery or by calling us on 01273 724829 or emailing brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Inked Up: the latest intriguing additions to Sir Peter Blake’s Tattooed People series

    Discover an art form within an artwork, as the prolific British artist takes another look at the intricacies of decorative tattoos, and the vivid characters of those who have them. Most of us think that the popularity and acceptance of tattoos is a relatively recent phenomenon, and that prior t....
    Discover an art form within an artwork, as the prolific British artist takes another look at the intricacies of decorative tattoos, and the vivid characters of those who have them. Most of us think that the popularity and acceptance of tattoos is a relatively recent phenomenon, and that prior to the contemporary surge in inked skin, only sailors, bikers and criminals underwent the needle. But that assumption is very wrong. If you saw last year’s exhibition Tattoo: British Tattoo Art Revealed at the National Maritime Museum in Cornwall, you’ll have a better idea about the practice and origins of tattooing, including the fact that in some form, it reaches back as far as the Neolithic period. In different cultures, tattooing has different meanings and motives – from the spiritual to the decorative, and it has even been used as a form of punishment (Ancient Rome and Greece, we’re looking at you). It’s pretty fascinating to delve into, especially if you travel right up to the present day, where artists like Sir Peter Blake are drawing on tattoo culture within their artwork, and tattoo artists are, in turn, taking inspiration from the work of other visual artists (we’ve discussed Audrey Kawasaki’s impact on the Californian ink studios before). But back to Sir Peter Blake and his ink-based story. Long associated with portraiture, Blake started creating his Tattooed People series around 2015. The originals are small watercolours on paper, which depict a number of figures, of all genders, races, shapes and sizes, but the focus is on the intricate details that mark/ decorate their skin. Blake has recently added some new figures to the series, releasing a limited run of 75 prints of his ‘Tattooed Ladies’, some of which our artrepublic curators have secured for you. The print depicts two women – one black, one white – standing side-by-side and directly facing the viewer. They are clothed only by the inked images that adorn their skin; there’s all manner of cultural references here, from native American Indians to cowboys and pin-ups, cartoon characters to Chinese-influenced dragons. Considering the size of the originals, the detail is spectacular. There’s so much to take in that it’s hard to pull your gaze away. But tear yourself away you must, if you want to bring one of these prints home. Fans of the playful Tattooed People series will need to act fast to secure this print, as the signed giclee editions are in short supply. Drop by the gallery and speak to one of our art advisors, or call us on 01273 724829 to talk inked skin...or inked paper with us, alternatively email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Introducing artrepublic’s Modern Masters: Dave White

    As part of our new exhibition, artist Dave White talks groundbreaking sneakers, life beyond convention and the benefits of years of hard work. Dave White’s expressive work might not immediately call to mind Dutch still lifes or Renaissance scenes, but he’s mastered and updated traditional p....
    As part of our new exhibition, artist Dave White talks groundbreaking sneakers, life beyond convention and the benefits of years of hard work. Dave White’s expressive work might not immediately call to mind Dutch still lifes or Renaissance scenes, but he’s mastered and updated traditional paint-to-canvas techniques to create paintings that are packed with energy and meaning. Ahead of artrepublic’s Modern Masters exhibition, we posed a few questions to find out a bit more about the man behind the artworks. AR: In an ideal world, what Master – modern or historic, dead or alive, well-known or lesser-known – would you want to exhibit your work alongside? DW: Van Gogh. He’s my favourite artist; a man who did it his way, ignored convention, found his style, loved life and found beauty in everything. I have a great affinity with that. AR: What about beyond the art world – who do you think is a master of their industry? DW: Tinker Hatfield is one of the most incredible designers in the world, he has created some of the most iconic and groundbreaking sneakers for Nike and Jordan over the past 30 years. Incredibly humble, incredibly talented and a true master of his craft. AR: When it comes to mastering your own craft, are there any rituals you carry out when you get into your studio space each day? DW: I turn on my Macs, select my Sonos playlists for the day, make an Earl Grey tea and play a game of Super Street Fighter II Turbo before I paint. AR: And what about days when you’re feeling uninspired – what do you do to regain your creative mojo? DW: I love what I do and am incredibly grateful – I never feel uninspired. AR: What is the best piece of advice you were ever given in relation to your work? DW: Jarvis Cocker once said ‘An overnight success is 20 years of hard work.’ I’d stand by that. AR: Finish this sentence: When I was little, I always wanted to… DW: ...fight for the Rebel Alliance. Dave White's work will be exhibited as part of our Modern Masters exhibition, 13th July to 15th August 2018 at artrepublic Brighton. Visit our main Modern Masters exhibition page for full details or pick up our latest printed artzine during your next visit to our gallery. Read other interviews by artists taking part in the Modern Masters exhibition: Iva Troj Dylan Floyd Chris Kettle Sarah Shaw Cosmo Sarson   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page.   $test =
  • Introducing artrepublic’s Modern Masters: Cosmo Sarson

    From bizarre newspaper cuttings to Renaissance influences, Cosmo Sarson walks us through the ideas behind – and forerunners to – his painting for artrepublic’s Modern Masters exhibition. Having gained global news coverage for his ‘Break-dancing Jesus’ mural – painted opposite a well....
    From bizarre newspaper cuttings to Renaissance influences, Cosmo Sarson walks us through the ideas behind – and forerunners to – his painting for artrepublic’s Modern Masters exhibition. Having gained global news coverage for his ‘Break-dancing Jesus’ mural – painted opposite a well-known Banksy in Bristol back in 2013 – Cosmo Sarson brought his (literally) glittering work to Brighton at the start of this year, sharing his ‘Angel of Brighton’ mural in the heart of the North Laines. Bringing classical style to the streets (and other mediums) with work that like the Old Masters often features religious figures and iconography, Sarson fit the bill for our Modern Masters exhibition. Here he shares some insights into his old-meets-new imagery and tells us the story behind his work for the show at the artrepublic gallery. ‘I studied fine art at the Byam Shaw School of Art and was taught and mentored by two of Britain’s best artists – Peter Kennard and Peter Doig. Both very different artists, they influenced me in diverse ways, in terms of my ideas and my love of paint itself as this sexy, gooey substance. The Byam Shaw was the sister school to the Slade and had a great life drawing and painting tradition, but it also had a very conceptual edge to it. The principal at the time had just come from directing the Serpentine Gallery and had a fantastic address book that brought in the most cutting-edge artists as visiting lecturers that you just wouldn't get in any other art school. So while I come from a very traditional schooling it has also given me a contemporary outlook. This I try to keep in my own work by mixing the old with the new, so the idea of 'modern masters' I find very appealing. I scour the papers every day for the bizarre and shocking, tearing out images and have a large box of cuttings and my studio walls are covered in them. I try to find things that remind me of old paintings or images that I can appropriate and lift in combination with something else to create something new. I suppose this reminds me of Peter Kennard’s work in a way, the idea of collaging, but I also remember Peter Doig telling me he did this too and had a suitcase full of them. I'll sit on these images for years and then one day remember something I cut out and use it for a painting. My ‘Break-dancing Jesus’ painting came about this way, from an old scrap I saved about a Polish youth group being invited to dance for Pope John Paul in the Vatican. The painting I'm exhibiting as part of artrepublic’s Modern Masters exhibition is a play on two ideas; that of my ‘Break-dancing Jesus’ and the reference to Francis Bacon’s 'Screaming Pope', who was actually referencing another painting by Velasquez – ‘Portrait of Innocent X’ combined with a still from the film Battleship Potemkin. I've re imagined Bacon’s version and attempted to bring it back into the classical figurative tradition from which Bacon was trying to escape. If you look at the composition you'll also notice that the window forms a cross above Jesus' head, to be seen as a sign of his impending crucifixion or as the cross he has just gotten down from to dance in front of the Pope. It's as if Christ has come back to life to show the church the way. I suppose if I could hang this alongside any Master the obvious choice would be the paintings I've just referenced by Velasquez and Bacon. Maybe an El Greco too, perhaps 'Christ Driving The Trades From The Temple' might be apt for the chaos caused by Christ in that scene. Having said that, they are Masters for good reason and I'm not worthy of hanging alongside them just yet.’ Cosmo Sarson’s work will be exhibited as part of our Modern Masters exhibition, 13th July to 15th August 2018 at artrepublic Brighton. Visit our main Modern Masters exhibition page for full details or pick up our latest printed artzine during your next visit to our gallery. Read other interviews by artists taking part in the Modern Masters exhibition: Iva Troj Dylan Floyd Chris Kettle Sarah Shaw Dave White   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Introducing artrepublic’s Modern Masters: Sarah Shaw

    Creating art with heart and authenticity isn’t always easy, but Sarah Shaw has mastered her process. She talks to artrepublic about everything from morning studio rituals to painting through the darkness. Citing influences from Francis Bacon to Goya, artist Sarah Shaw paints scenes that feel ....
    Creating art with heart and authenticity isn’t always easy, but Sarah Shaw has mastered her process. She talks to artrepublic about everything from morning studio rituals to painting through the darkness. Citing influences from Francis Bacon to Goya, artist Sarah Shaw paints scenes that feel simultaneously specific and incomplete. Like the work produced by the Old Masters, the longer you spend looking at one of Shaw’s paintings the more you see… and the more you appreciate her skill and ability with paint. Ahead of the exhibition at artrepublic Brighton, we grabbed a few minutes of this Modern Master’s time to find out a little about what makes her tick. AR: You are one of artrepublic's Modern Masters. What Master (modern or historic, dead or alive, well-know or lesser-known) would you want to exhibit your work alongside, and why? SS: I’m very flattered to be asked to be part of this show! It’s an honour so thank you. One of the highlights of my career so far was showing work in a room which also housed Victor Willing and Frank Auerbach paintings – this was part of the winner’s art show for the National Open at Pallant House in Chichester. I’m still pinching myself about that one. There are far too many historic painters I could mention that I’d love to exhibit with, but top of the list would be Francis Bacon, Goya and Peter Doig; I find them phenomenal and ever-inspiring painters. In terms of living painters, my dream list would include two American painters Alex Kanevsky and Martin Campos, also Adrian Ghenie and Justin Mortimer. All of whom blow my tiny little mind. AR: That’s quite a list Sarah! What about beyond the art world? Who do you think is a master of their industry? SS: No-one who knows me will be very surprised to hear this. It’s got to be Nick Cave and PJ Harvey. Uncompromising, original musicians and artists with the greatest conviction in themselves and their muse. Conviction is a huge thing. It’s a difficult thing to define but when you see it, hear it, sense it, you know it and trust it. That is, to me, what any kind of master of their industry has to have – conviction in their art. AR: When it comes to your own art, do you have any studio rituals that you practice? SS: I’ve recently begun meditating every day to clear my mind and get focused on the work ahead. I do have a little ritual also – I have a little shelf by my window on which are my ancient candle holder, a ceramic heart a friend made me, the aorta of which acts as a handy incense holder and a piece of card which has a beautiful Seamus Heaney quote – ‘I rhyme to see myself: to set the darkness echoing’ – and a line from Robert Burns – ‘Now’s the day and now’s the hour’. I light my candle, light my heart and remind myself of the quotes, find some good music, then paint. AR: And what about if you're feeling uninspired? How do you regain your creative mojo? SS: Good question! I think by its very nature creativity is cyclical. The ups and downs involved are very much part of any process which has any heart and authenticity. The documentation of this cyclical process can often lead to a better piece of work but, like everyone, I struggle with it sometimes.   When I’m going through the darker side of the cycle I sometimes choose to work in an entirely different medium than my usual to try to fire off different synapses in the brain – coming back to painting circuitously through drawing, printing or writing. Sometimes it’s better to turn all the canvases faces to the wall, sometimes it’s better to truck on and put up a fight with them. Occasionally it’s better to just take a walk. But I think it’s important to keep showing up to work; you have to be in the process of making work for inspiration to strike. I think the key thing is not to worry about it too much – just keep showing up. AR: That’s solid advice, too. What is the best piece of advice you were ever given in relation to your work? SS: Hmm, difficult question! I was always advised by my tutors to trust myself, my aesthetic, my process. To be brave and have conviction in my work. When having difficulties with any one painting I was advised to just start another – just keep making and making. I’ve stuck with that – the result of which is a hell of a lot of work on the go at once!   AR: And finally, how would you finish this sentence: When I was little, I always wanted to... SS: Quite honestly – when I was little, I always painted, and it’s all I ever wanted to do.   Sarah Shaw’s work will be exhibited as part of our Modern Masters exhibition, 13th July to 15th August 2018 at artrepublic Brighton. Visit our main Modern Masters exhibition page for full details or pick up our latest printed artzine during your next visit to our gallery. Read other interviews by artists taking part in the Modern Masters exhibition: Iva Troj Dylan Floyd Chris Kettle Dave White Cosmo Sarson   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Masters of art: Introducing artrepublic’s Modern Masters

    The latest exhibition in our Brighton gallery looks at the contemporary artists who draw inspiration from the Old Masters...and then make it modern. When it comes to art, how do you define a ‘master’? If you’re talking about the Old Masters – renowned artists such as Rembrandt, Leonardo....
    The latest exhibition in our Brighton gallery looks at the contemporary artists who draw inspiration from the Old Masters...and then make it modern. When it comes to art, how do you define a ‘master’? If you’re talking about the Old Masters – renowned artists such as Rembrandt, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Willem Kalf and Vermeer – then they’re the skilled painters, working in Europe between the Renaissance and the 1800s, who created some of the most incredible, realistic portraiture and juicy-looking still-lifes that had – and still have – ever existed. But in contemporary terms…? We’ve got a few ideas. And you can discover exactly what those are at our upcoming exhibition, Modern Masters, which runs at artrepublic’s Brighton gallery from 13-24 July 2018. Why Modern Masters? Well, we really couldn’t overlook the fact that among artrepublic’s family of artists we have some contemporary masters – artists whose work offers a nod to the work of the historical greats (see above) but moves it forward into the present day. Within the work of Iva Troj, Chris Kettle, Sarah Shaw, Jake Wood-Evans, Dylan Floyd, Cosmo Sarson and Dave White (and others) you can see threads of reference to the Old Masters’ imagery, styles or themes. From semi-abstract paintings feature glowing embers of colour that pop off the image’s surface in the manner of a Dutch still life to fantastical creatures and Renaissance-style nudes placed in wholly new settings, there’s a visual feast waiting to be discovered. And, because we don’t believe in anonymous or inaccessible art, we’ve spent some time getting to know the artists whose work we’re showcasing – covering everything from their Old Master inspirations to their contemporary studio rituals. Keep an eye on the gallery page in the run up to the exhibition, to read our interviews and find out a little more about our Modern Masters.   Visit the Modern Masters exhibition, between 13th July to 15th August 2018 at artrepublic Brighton. If you’re quick, you might also join the guest list for our preview evening on 12th June, visit our Eventbrite page for details. Read our interviews with artists taking part in the Modern Masters exhibition: Chris Kettle Iva Troj Dylan Floyd Sarah Shaw Dave White Cosmo Sarson   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Art At Your Fingertips: Marc Quinn’s latest prints are unique portraits of modern life

    The contemporary British artist’s ‘Prismatic Labyrinth’ series offers a thought-provoking social commentary on identity in the 21st century, in a highly unexpected way. Making a statement has never really been an issue for Marc Quinn. The artist first made waves in the art world back in....
    The contemporary British artist’s ‘Prismatic Labyrinth’ series offers a thought-provoking social commentary on identity in the 21st century, in a highly unexpected way. Making a statement has never really been an issue for Marc Quinn. The artist first made waves in the art world back in the Nineties with his self-portrait, ‘Self’, which was crafted from 10 pints of his own blood in a frozen silicone mould. Because of the nature of Quinn’s chosen material, the sculpture is reliant on electricity to maintain its form, thus making a statement about contemporary society’s need to always be plugged in, switched on and connected. Not bad for an opening gambit, right? Since then Quinn’s continued to make work that acts as a social commentary, covering everything from man’s dependency on, and troubled relationship with, technology (see ‘Garden’) to beauty and the widely-held desire for transformation (check out his sculptures ‘Alison Lapper Pregnant’ and ‘Siren’). Clearly, if you want to enter into a discourse about what it means to be human in today’s world, Marc Quinn may well be the artist to speak to. His latest work isn’t shy about saying something about current issues in society either. Through ‘Prismatic Labyrinth’, a trio of limited-edition prints, Quinn considers the tensions between the biological and the man-made – specifically, how one of our unique human markers has become a tool of surveillance culture. Drawing on the paintings and bronze casts that make up Quinn’s ‘Labyrinth’ series, the prints alter the way that we see our fingerprints. In his hands, the labyrinthine pathways that make up the tips of our fingers – and which are almost certainly unique to each of us – become a form of portraiture; the vitality and marbled colours within each line, or pathway, hint at the stories and experiences of the person who the prints belong to. But, because of their abstract nature, we can only guess at their meaning. The longer you think about these prints and what they represent, the easier it is to get drawn into (and lost in) a maze of questions: how much can we really know from a set of fingerprints? Are we talking about the labyrinths that mark out our fingertips, or the complex networks of society? Maps of our identity, or mapping out where we’ve been and what we’ve done? All of these seem quite relevant if you consider the contactless nature of contemporary society. As Quinn himself says ‘we (have) become encoded into a unique abstraction which is also profoundly figurative.’ Basically, we’re teetering on the edge of a rabbit hole of questions, many of which you may want to ponder when you see the prints in person, and some of which you may not want to tackle at all! So let’s step back to the artworks themselves. These thought-provoking talking points, are also interesting in terms of the process used to create them; the trio of giclee prints play with the tactile nature of their subject matter. Each of the edition of 60 is finished with a spot glaze, which is screen printed over the digital image to create a subtle ridge, similar to those found on our own fingertips. It all sounds very simple but, as we’ve seen, there is so much more to these prints than meets the eye. To experience Quinn’s prints in person, call into our Brighton gallery, where our Art Advisors will be happy to help. Tel. 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =

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