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  • Sealed With A Kiss: Sara Pope’s exclusive artrepublic giveaway

    Want to win a very special original from the artist’s forthcoming showcase? Read on... The eyes get a lot of credit when it comes to expressing emotion; they are the windows to the soul, could kill with just a look and sometimes they even go a little starry. But what about the part the rest....
    Want to win a very special original from the artist’s forthcoming showcase? Read on... The eyes get a lot of credit when it comes to expressing emotion; they are the windows to the soul, could kill with just a look and sometimes they even go a little starry. But what about the part the rest of the face plays in showing, or even hiding, our feelings? One person who’s long considered this is artist Sara Pope, whose portraits don’t usually take in the whole face; instead, they focus specifically on a subject’s lips as they move through various emotions. These glossy, glittery and highly saturated pouts, mimicking the slick finish of advertising and often named for the shade of lipstick worn by her models, have become Pope’s trademark. They’ve been applied to canvases, silk screened onto paper and also used to customise shoes. And she hasn’t remotely finished exploring this seductive subject, as you’ll see at her first full showcase at artrepublic Brighton this November. Expect a series of originals that have never been shown in the UK, a brand-new lenticular print release and a very special homage to Pope’s work in fashion – a one-of-a-kind hand-painted leather jacket. This unique piece isn’t merely part of the showcase; it’s the starting point of an exciting event in its own right. Want to know why? We can now reveal that this original piece of Pope’s handiwork will be up for grabs at artrepublic. Not to buy though, and not through an auction, but via a good old competition. Anyone who has registered their tickets for the Sara Pope - Showcase Evening through Eventbrite will automatically be entered. Another way to enter is to take a photo of yourself next to one of Sara's pieces and upload to Instagram. Make sure you tag @sarapopeartist, @artrepublic and use the hashtag #sarapopejacket to be in for the chance to win. With Sara Pope's Show starting on the Thursday 15th November, what better opportunity to enter this prize draw.  A fan of Pope’s work? Then read our lips: you don’t want to miss out on this massive event. To find out more about Sara Pope’s showcase, the exclusive fashion-forward prize draw and to discover more about the limited edition prints we have in the gallery, speak to one of our personal art advisors – just stop by artrepublic Brighton or give us ring on 01273 724829.   Sara Pope Prize Draw Terms and Conditions (see section 18)   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • A Subtle Twist Of Line: Richard Berner Live Screen Printing Event

    Meet Richard Berner, the host of this month’s Live Edition Printing evening with The Private Press. What links Audrey Hepburn, Amy Winehouse, the Houses of Parliament and a tentacle-wielding creature from the deep? Unless you have any other (we’d like to say unlikely) suggestions, the answe....
    Meet Richard Berner, the host of this month’s Live Edition Printing evening with The Private Press. What links Audrey Hepburn, Amy Winehouse, the Houses of Parliament and a tentacle-wielding creature from the deep? Unless you have any other (we’d like to say unlikely) suggestions, the answer to that would be Brighton-based artist Richard Berner. A regular feature on the walls at artrepublic Brighton, Berner’s work blends fine ink work and cultural iconography with a dusting of dark humour. While some of his images are straight-up homages to famous figures, such as David Bowie, Charlie Chaplin and, erm, Storm Troopers, each finished with watercolour hues, drips and splodges, others have the hallmarks of those classic political caricatures found in famous international newspapers and journals for centuries. You know, the ones that take familiar forms and figures but toy with them just enough to make a clever commentary or subtle joke. Whether it’s a beautiful moth that turns out to be made up of hundreds of tiny skeletons and ghoulish creatures, or a King Kong-like figure ascending Big Ben, drawn in a way that references Dali’s dripping clocks, Berner’s illustrative images definitely reward close inspection. The great news is, you can get up really close to the artist’s next limited edition, as he’s producing it at this month’s Live Edition Printing evening at the gallery, run in collaboration with The Private Press. Join us at artrepublic Brighton on 26 October, from 6-8pm, as Berner unveils, hand-finishes and signs an edition of just 50 prints, which you can buy there and then. As usual, the after-work creative session will also feature drinks at the gallery and a chance to meet the artist and have a chat about his work.   To find out more about the event, and to save yourself a space at (or near) the printing press, check out our eventbrite page.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Tree Flowers And Shadows: Bruce McLean’s upcoming exhibition at artrepublic

    Discover the abstract work of one of British Conceptualism’s leading figures at artrepublic Brighton. We’d be lying if we said we didn’t have a bit of a soft spot for rebellious artists at artrepublic, which is why we decided that it’s time for those of you who aren’t already familiar....
    Discover the abstract work of one of British Conceptualism’s leading figures at artrepublic Brighton. We’d be lying if we said we didn’t have a bit of a soft spot for rebellious artists at artrepublic, which is why we decided that it’s time for those of you who aren’t already familiar with the work of Bruce McLean to be properly introduced.… with an exhibition of his work at our Brighton gallery this October. Don’t know much about the Glasgow-born artist? Here are the Cliffs Notes. Since upending the status quo of sculpture as a young artist in the Sixties, by using his own body to consider the value and purpose of the plinth and creating sculptural forms from rubbish and impermanent materials, Scottish sculptor Bruce McLean has continued to produce work that challenges some of the art world’s most commonly held beliefs. For instance, the idea that an artist only works in one realm, choosing his tools and mediums from the same checklist created (and used) by those who have gone before. Refusing to buy in to the art world’s long-accepted concept of the Seven Arts, McLean considers everything he produces – film-, photography- or paint-based – to be a form of sculpture. By working across disciplines, travelling back and forth between mediums that include (but are not restricted to) performance art, printmaking, painting, film installations and ceramics, he’s produced a vast body of forward-thinking work that is always evolving and changing. Approaching everything with inquiry, the result is a series of artworks that are packed with energy; organic lines bounce off block colours or solid structures within a given space, like an endless conversation between two figures with different points of view. But maybe we should pause for a moment, before we get as abstract as some of McLean’s creations (which you may have seen in the collections at the Tate, the V&A, or even in our own Brighton gallery – we’re in good company aren’t we?) and return to the point. Our forthcoming Bruce McLean exhibition. Running from 18 October – 12 November, Tree Flowers And Shadows features 40 new and archival pieces by the artist, and covers everything from limited edition prints and ceramics to a film installation. Many of the artist’s new works are influenced by his garden in Spain called Son Caragol which means Snail. ‘The latest prints are directly related to paintings I made 10 years ago,’ says McLean. ‘I’m interested in the dark shadows and how points of light appear as the sun moves around and flickers, I’m attempting to create beautiful, lush, vibrant works as a direct response to this lush, flickering environment.’ Experience McLean’s take on this environment for yourself, and hear more about the artist and his work at the Tree Flowers And Shadows Private View on 18 October, when he’ll be giving a 30-minute talk as well as unveiling the show. Spaces are limited, so please RSVP.     Keep an eye out on the artrepublic Brighton gallery page for our interview with Bruce McLean, as well as details of other upcoming events at artrepublic Brighton. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Friction Album Launch at artrepublic

    A not-to-be-missed event for drum & bass fans, catch up with Friction as he launches his new album at our gallery. On 20th September 2018 (6pm to 8pm) the artrepublic gallery in Brighton will host an album launch by Friction. This critically acclaimed drum & bass producer / DJ and Rad....
    A not-to-be-missed event for drum & bass fans, catch up with Friction as he launches his new album at our gallery. On 20th September 2018 (6pm to 8pm) the artrepublic gallery in Brighton will host an album launch by Friction. This critically acclaimed drum & bass producer / DJ and Radio 1 presenter launches ‘Connections’, his highly anticipated latest release.  Register for your FREE guest list tickets today. This project also sees the artist RYCA collaborate with  Friction on a limited edition print inspired by his album cover. Ryan Callanan (AKA RYCA) has a history of being involved in music and represents his love of it through his art from Tupac to the acid smiley faces synonymous with the acid house scene. He has also collaborated with Fatboy Slim in the past. On the night there will be a DJ and limited RYCA prints available from artrepublic at a special price, in addition to the album and t-shirts. Register for FREE guest list tickets For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Narrative beats: Bonnie and Clyde shares the stories of her art

    From gritty cities to making art with historical geniuses, there are many layers to the artist known as Bonnie and Clyde. Seamlessly stitching together personal photographs with painted, printed and textural elements, Brighton-based artist Bonnie and Clyde creates surreal dreamscapes that are s....
    From gritty cities to making art with historical geniuses, there are many layers to the artist known as Bonnie and Clyde. Seamlessly stitching together personal photographs with painted, printed and textural elements, Brighton-based artist Bonnie and Clyde creates surreal dreamscapes that are subtly layered with deeper meanings and secret stories. Ahead of her biggest exhibition of originals in Brighton to date, starting 14th September 2018 at the artrepublic gallery, we delve into the artistʼs work to discover the processes and places that inform her meticulously crafted worlds… Starting at the beginning, why did you decide to work under a pseudonym, and why opt for ʻBonnie and Clydeʼ? Well it’s for a number of reasons, and it changes significance on different days. Today’s answer is that when I started out I felt like it was a darkly romantic and ambiguous name, and I was hoping the work could be seen without preconceptions such as gender. I could hide behind the misconception that it was two people making the work as I was a nervy character at that point. You work out of a Brighton studio, but your images evoke warmer climates. Do you feel more of an affinity with foreign landscapes? I do love to see new places and I need an element of spontaneity as I have a lot of stability and routine in my life. I get real wanderlust and need to see things from different perspectives to re-engage with myself. It’s not necessarily about warmer climates – it’s more wherever I get to go on holidays or trips. I loved visiting New York, Tokyo and Iceland as much as LA and Italy. I like to mix the beauty with the grit. It’s kind of building a dreamscape subconsciously so I understand what I want from life.   The photos you use within your work show all sorts of locations, spaces and environments. What kind of places inspire you? I think I like to visit places with a strong life force or culture. Often it’s about the people or environment – their energies excite me. I get freaked out by old distressing places that seem to have been home to misery, but I also find desolate places fascinating; I am drawn to photographing places where there is stagnant energy – I don’t know why. Maybe I’m trying to give the place some energy back in a way, or can feel it in a latent sense. My favourite cities have always been by the sea though; I feel like the sea is a leveller – it’s meditative. I also love the architecture and colours of a place. And food and music play a massive part too. The more time spent looking at your collages, the more we find within them. Have you ever hidden a secret message in your work?   Yes sure, I think there are many hidden meanings for me, but often I don’t recognise them myself for a while. A lot of pieces have an element of love and loss, fear and freedom. There was this amazing chalk rant/ statement on the ground in Venice Beach that began: ‘THIS IS NOT A GOOD MORNING MR PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. ANOTHER BLACK MAN PUT TO DEATH. 7 OUT 9 WITNESS RECANTED THEIR TESTIMONIES. NO WEAPON, NO BLOOD SPLATTER, NO POWDER RESIDUE FOUND. GEORGIA WEEPS...’ It was so impassioned and moving, and someone from the government was washing it off with a hose. That was the starting point of my piece ‘Recreation’. Off the back of that, with so many layers within your pieces, how and where do you begin? If I need to kick-start a piece, I’ll look through my photo library and pick something that jumps out at me. I often think ‘Oh, I’ll do a piece on Italy’, then I’ll end up with a pic that I’ve wanted to use for ages but from New York or somewhere. That’s it… no turning back; I just follow my feelings and mood and see where it takes me in the first days that I’m working on a piece, until it becomes something. Then it’s a matter of honing it; painting, layering and giving it life until it feels complete. It often feels like there are secret stories and threads woven into and through your images… Yes, I think its all one long thread of discovery. It’s cathartic; maybe once a problem has been solved the story shifts. I had a lot of phobias in my past, and as they are released my work changes too. You use a range of different mediums but, if you had to only work with analogue or digital… I definitely need both please! If pushed for only one though, it would have to be analogue; there’s more warmth and life. It would be a cold hard world with digital only. I often work by trying to make digital feel analogue and vice versa. Your work has a very distinct aesthetic and colour palette. Have you always worked in this way? I think I have various ongoing sections of work that I dip in and out of. They have developed in a timeline since university; I studied 3D design at Kingston Uni with a focus on furniture and lighting, and used to do paintings and collages of all my designs for the course work! When I left uni I moved into graphic design, producing work for arts venues, club nights and festivals. Then, through my partner who was a music and arts journalist, I began photographing numerous musicians and artists for magazines and newspapers, which took me to great locations as well as immersing me in Manchester’s incredible nightlife/ gig culture. After all this, I got the screen-printing bug after seeing a fantastic Warhol/ Basquiat exhibition, and started a clothing design business alongside all the other aspects of design I was working on. When I moved to Brighton I started screen printing myself and then I brought my painting and photography back into the work. It does feel like a journey. I would like to get more involved with food and music – it’s all part of one creative path, all making stuff with your hands. Tell us about the work you’re exhibiting in your show at artrepublic. As well as series of small, light-hearted collages and studies that will be shown together on one wall, I'm releasing two special very limited edition prints. Printed on anodised aluminium, they are architecturally heavy images adapted from a series of small originals I made a couple of years ago. One, titled ‘BBQ Heart’, originated from a merging of buildings that I photographed as I was leaving Las Vegas. I wanted to do something with it for a while; printing it onto aluminium and playing with glitter and glazed elements against pops of colour excited me. The other piece was adapted from a few photos taken in Mexico. The colour is the main player here too. Both are quite romantic pieces. You’ll also see a recent, joyous print release called ‘The Soundscape’, which has a summery vibe. It features elements from a friend’s life, including architectural, musical and performance-based images, which are painted and spliced together with flowers and buildings shot during a trip I took to San Francisco and LA. Finally, as your pseudonym is a dynamic duo, who would be your dream collaboration? So many people, but it needs to be someone who likes to collaborate to start with! I’d say: Faile, for their sense of scale, composition and fun, Andy Warhol and Basquiat for obvious reasons… I’m also a fan of film directors such as Wim Wenders, Darren Aronofsky, Pedro Almodovar and Spike Lee, as I think their creative vision is amazing. What about a night out with The Kills, Jehnny Beth, The xx and my friends? Is that classed as a collaboration? Otherwise, take me to New York’s late 70s and early 80s No Wave scene with The Velvet Underground and Nico – I’d love to make art/ some noise with those geniuses.   Bonnie and Clydeʼs solo show will be at artrepublic Brighton from 14 September 2018.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • A Snail’s Place: catch Brighton’s latest charitable art trail this autumn

    Move over Snowdogs, the SnailSpace trail is taking to the streets of Brighton in aid of the Martlets, proudly sponsored by artrepublic.   You see plenty of interesting things on the streets of Brighton every day, and even more so during Festival season. But few things have captured the co....
    Move over Snowdogs, the SnailSpace trail is taking to the streets of Brighton in aid of the Martlets, proudly sponsored by artrepublic.   You see plenty of interesting things on the streets of Brighton every day, and even more so during Festival season. But few things have captured the community’s attention or spirit recently quite like the Snowdogs that popped up on pavements across town in 2016, drawing visitors from far and wide. After three months, the 44 artist-designed sculptural dogs were auctioned off, raising more than £300k for the Martlets Hospice. But since then we’ve missed the colour they bring to our seaside city, so we were very excited when the latest trail was announced. Yes, that’s right. A new trail based around a troop of snails – aka the SnailSpace trail – will be surfacing by the seaside from 15 September to 18 November, to show off a series of snazzy shells (is that enough alliteration in one sentence for you?). Once again each sculpture has been sponsored by a local business, with their shells designed by one of a troop of charitable artists. Of course, artrepublic Brighton signed up straight away to sponsor a snail, which has been designed by one of our very own artists, Eelus. Taking inspiration from his love of books and the storytellers that fuelled his imagination as a child, Eelus’ snail portrays his own fantastical tale: of a renowned (and feared) French chef Jacques Le Méchant, a cunning cook who has devised a way to infiltrate Snail Kingdom in search of the tastiest snails for his famous restaurant ‘L’Escargot Fantaisie’! Let’s hope his presence doesn’t make it too hard to track down the local delicacies… sorry design pieces.   To find out more about the SnailSpace trail, and how it benefits the Martlets, visit snailspacebrighton.co.uk. We can’t wait to join the snail hunt with you, Eelus and all the other local artists. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page   $test =
  • How shape-shifting plays a huge part in the contemporary artwork of Mark McClure

    We caught up with Mark McClure as his work is displayed as part of the abstract showcase at our Brighton gallery. Building up dynamic layers is something the original Abstract artists excelled at, and it’s something that artist Mark McClure knows something about too.   Artrepublic (AR....
    We caught up with Mark McClure as his work is displayed as part of the abstract showcase at our Brighton gallery. Building up dynamic layers is something the original Abstract artists excelled at, and it’s something that artist Mark McClure knows something about too.   Artrepublic (AR):Abstraction, by definition is dealing with ideas rather than events. What kind of ideas do you find yourself dealing with in your work? Mark McClure (MM): My early painted pieces originally developed from landscapes – the structural and architectural shapes around me in London. I took this further when I started using bits of wood and paper on canvas, taking the landscape to a more directly connected work that used materials found in the scenes that they represented. These ideas of abstract landscape and representing structural forms, patterns and everyday motifs – combined with using materials and textures from my daily surroundings – are the basis for all the work I do today, albeit using a more pared-down, condensed visual language. AR: Abstraction is also a state of preoccupation. In general, what do you find preoccupies you and why? MM: Challenging my own perceptions of what I like about a piece and what I don’t. It’s not always constructive to consciously think about this for too long, but I find it fascinating. If I like something immediately I often find that I don’t so much a few days later… It’s usually the works that are a struggle that become the long-term loves. It’s a hard-earned thing. There’s probably a profound life lesson in there somewhere. AR: Historically, abstract art was as much about process and materials as it was the outcome. Can you talk us through your usual making process, and the materials you feel an affinity with? MM: It varies a lot. The trigger can be one of many things; sometimes a certain piece of wood or metal will catch my eye and become the starting point of a piece, especially for the sculptural works. These then slowly develop – as a pile of changing shapes and objects on the worktop, which are added to or taken from – before they slowly settle into place and are fixed. For the mosaics I tend to sketch in a sketchbook or on the computer and take a piece to an almost finished state before cutting wood or having it cut, and then painting and assembling the work. There’s always an element of chance and the happy accidents often make a piece – either with loosely painted additions or through the way cut shapes interact with each other AR: If you could collaborate on a project with anyone – artist/ non-artist, dead or alive – who would it be and why? MM: I think it’d be someone like Joshua Davis, a creative coder and artist who has been doing amazing work for decades on Praystation. My background is in digital interactive design, and I’m slowly introducing elements of that journey back into my current work. So to do a project with someone with that knowledge and creativity could only end in kickass awesomeness. AR: Consider the Cubists as an early-20th century art collective, pushing each other’s work forward. Who’s in your art gang? MM: Good question. I don’t really have a core group who are connected through similar work. It largely depends where I am. I’m lucky enough to live near the good folk at LookUp Editions, who live and breathe abstraction and do a very good pint-based critique. After that it’s all about long boozy chats in the pub, which normally go off topic after 20 minutes and onto something entirely different. The usual suspects include the likes of Ben Slow, Dan Cimmermann, Nadeem Chughtai and the Static boys. My studio neighbours Richard Stone and Hannah Ludnow are my daily sounding boards – even though our work is hugely different to each other’s, it helps to have a completely fresh take on things.   Discover Mark McClure’s work for yourself at artrepublic Brighton, or find out more about his art and our abstract showcase by speaking to one of our personal art advisors on 01273 724829 For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Deco By Design: meet artrepublic’s newest abstract artist, Cleo Barbour

    Former fashion designer Cleo Barbour creates intricate prints that combine mechanical and human processes with Art Deco stylings. As her work goes on display as part of our Abstract showcase at our Brighton gallery, she shares some insights into her work and motivations.   artrepublic (....
    Former fashion designer Cleo Barbour creates intricate prints that combine mechanical and human processes with Art Deco stylings. As her work goes on display as part of our Abstract showcase at our Brighton gallery, she shares some insights into her work and motivations.   artrepublic (AR): Abstraction, by definition is dealing with ideas rather than events. What kind of ideas do you find yourself dealing with in your work? CB: My work is lighthearted and designed to give pleasure through beauty and detail. It incorporates a set of signature visual principles that are combined to bring aesthetic pleasure. Through the combination of well-considered shapes and colour palettes I aim to achieve a satisfying feeling of simplicity. I apply hand-embellished details to my work, which brings further depth and encourages the viewer to engage and consider the process of creation. This detailing also gives the work a sense of being human made – an intentional ‘backlash’ to our existence in a world that is heavily influenced by mass production and lacking in authenticity. AR: Abstraction is also a state of preoccupation. In general, what do you find preoccupies you? CB: I am often preoccupied by society’s obsessive relationship with material things and how overconsumption and our throwaway culture is affecting the earth, and causing humans unhappiness. These ideas stem from having worked in the fast-moving fashion world for a decade, with it’s superficial inclinations. Since moving away from this industry I find myself wondering what we can individually do to make these issues better and change mindsets. Nowadays these ideas drive me to consider what I am putting into the world and how it can hold its value. I strive to create authentic and high-quality artwork that is accessible and collectible. I hope and wish that it is treasured and passed down through generations to bring happiness to as many people as possible. AR: Historically, abstract art was as much about process and materials as it was the outcome. Can you talk us through your usual making process, and the materials you feel an affinity with? CB: My hand-embellished geometric series takes inspiration from Art Deco patterns and motifs. I design the artworks digitally, experimenting with shapes and colour combinations before the printing process begins. The works are giclée printed first and then treated with various screen-printed glazes to achieve different textures and finishes. I then carefully hand-stitch golden thread to certain parts of the prints. Hand-embellishing my artworks has provided me with a way of combining my love of embroidery with my signature graphic style. I spent a considerable amount of time honing my technique so that I can flawlessly apply threads onto the delicate paper; the gold stitching adds a special element to the sections of the artwork, creating eye-catching reflections alongside the various glossy and matte textures of the screen prints. AR: If you could collaborate on a project with anyone – artist/ non-artist, dead or alive – who would it be and why? CB: My dream collaboration isn’t with another artist – I’d love to be given a large wall space within an iconic Art Deco building and asked to create contemporary artwork to suit the space and reflect its history. The challenge would be to find the balance between the traditional detailing of the building and the modern style of my art. AR: Consider the Cubists as an early-20th century art collective, pushing each other’s work forward. Who’s in your art gang/ who is your sounding board? CB: Being quite a new artist, I am still working on my gang. On a daily basis I try to channel a balance between my commercial approach (honed in my fashion days!) and a new, freer attitude that breaks down barriers and allows artistic exploration. These days I am careful who I take advice from, but would like to build up a well-considered gang.     Find out more about the artists in our Abstract showcase – and their work – on our blog. See Cleo Barbour’s prints alongside new work by Mark McClure and Dave Towers at artrepublic Brighton, or call us on 01273 724829 to find out more about her work from one of our personal art advisors. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Building Towers: discover the abstract work of artist Dave Towers at our gallery

    As his work is hung as part of our Abstract showcase, one of artrepublic Brighton’s newest additions, Dave Towers, answers a few of our burning questions.   artrepublic (AR): Abstraction, by definition is dealing with ideas rather than events. What kind of ideas do you find yourself dea....
    As his work is hung as part of our Abstract showcase, one of artrepublic Brighton’s newest additions, Dave Towers, answers a few of our burning questions.   artrepublic (AR): Abstraction, by definition is dealing with ideas rather than events. What kind of ideas do you find yourself dealing with in your work? Dave Towers (DT): I'm trying to walk the line between something controlled and disciplined yet also organic and free form. The lines in the ‘Cosmic Blob’ work are unique in every painting but the intention is always to form a circle in the end. AR: Abstraction is also a state of preoccupation. What preoccupies you? DT: I'm preoccupied with trying to learn new techniques. My career as a graphic designer has informed my painting and vice versa. The crossover of techniques is what excites me. AR: Talk us through your usual making process, and the materials you feel an affinity with... DT: I'm concerned with the interaction of colour, and how overlaying colour alters texture and form. I use wide nib acrylic ink pens. Traditionally these have been used by 'calligraffiti'  writers. The instinctive way to use these pens seems to be in a calligraphy style, the nature of the nib gives the the thick and thin form of a calligraphy line. I tried to use the pen in a simpler, purer way with a single thick line width. The texture of the ink and imperfections of the nib as it dries gives each painting its own unique feel. AR: If you could collaborate on a project with anyone, who would it be? DT: I'd have liked to have spent some time studying at the Bauhaus. AR: Consider the Cubists as an early-20th century art collective, pushing each other’s work forward. Who’s in your art gang/ who is your sounding board? DT: Instagram has been my inspiration and sounding board. It allows me to gauge reaction and also encourages me. Particularly when I began to make these paintings in my spare time around 6 years ago. People reacting to my work gave me the confidence to continue.   Find out more about the artists in our Abstract showcase – and their work – on our blog, by dropping into the artrepublic gallery or calling to speak to one of our personal Art Advisors on 01273 724829. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page   $test =
  • Abstract ideas: meet the new artists making waves (and other shapes) at artrepublic

    We put a spotlight on contemporary abstraction, as created by artists Cleo Barbour, Dave Towers and Mark McClure. Have you ever become so familiar with something that you stop even seeing it properly? For instance, your home; when it’s freshly decorated it feels like a whole new space, but on....
    We put a spotlight on contemporary abstraction, as created by artists Cleo Barbour, Dave Towers and Mark McClure. Have you ever become so familiar with something that you stop even seeing it properly? For instance, your home; when it’s freshly decorated it feels like a whole new space, but once you get used to furniture sitting in a certain place or walls and floors being a particular colour or pattern, it’s easy to begin to take it for granted. This has happened (stylistically speaking) in the art world again and again through the centuries, but one of the most distinctive periods of renewal (and, for some, upset) came with the advent of the Cubists at the turn of the 20th century. Quite literally breaking down their scenery and setups, removing perspective and  reformatting what they saw to create flat planes containing numerous viewpoints, the artists at the forefront of these movements – think Picasso, Braque, Leger and Gris – forced themselves and those viewing their work, to stop taking their experience for granted and look at it anew. Albeit in a slightly jumbled, disjointed and at times uncomfortable way. But those artists recognised the need to try and see things with fresh eyes, or from a different angle or perspective in order to be present and engage with whatever was in front of them. Abstraction may not take on quite the same form these days, but it still operates on the same basic principle: dealing with ideas rather than actual events. So, with that in mind – and knowing that a change of scenery is good for the soul – we’re shaking things up down at artrepublic Brighton with a rehang throughout our space. And, while we’re at it, we’re showcasing the work of some new artists who we are adding to the artrepublic mix – Cleo Barbour, Dave Towers and Mark McClure – each of whose work (coincidentally) is based in abstraction. From bespoke surface design and hand-embellished prints to textural and typographical paint applications, let us introduce you to the latest trio to join our artrepublic family of artists.   Cleo Barbour Taking inspiration from tropical travels, architecture and Art Deco design, among other things, Brighton-based artist (and shoe designer) Cleo Barbour is known for her strong colour palettes, geometric compositions and hand-embroidered finishes. Mark McClure A respect for materials runs through Marc McClure’s dynamic abstract work. Whether executed on a grand scale in a public space or on smaller surfaces, the artist’s sculptural (even in 2D) geometric pieces draws attention to scale, structure and the space in which they are displayed. Dave Towers A career in graphic design, has seen Dave Towers heading up design teams at some of the UK’s best advertising agencies and picking up a number of awards for his work. And this background underpins Towers’ artwork too – layered colours, attention to line and typographical processes showcase an abstraction of ideas as well as form.   We spoke to each of the three artists for a quick Q&A about their work and take on abstraction. Read more about them on the artrepublic blog, at the links below and why not drop into the artrepublic Brighton gallery to see their work in person (displayed in a special presentation until 12th September 2018), or give us a call on +44 (0)1273 724829 to speak to one of our Art Advisors about their pieces. Cleo Barbour Mark McClure Dave Towers   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =

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