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  • A Conversation With Bambi

    There's No Place Like Home - Grey, 2020 by Bambi Bambi is the tag name of the anonymous London street artist famous for her gritty stencil and aerosol spray paintwork. The moniker was born from her childhood nickname, ‘Bambino,’ when she first began tagging in London. Bambi creates sten....
    There's No Place Like Home - Grey, 2020 by Bambi Bambi is the tag name of the anonymous London street artist famous for her gritty stencil and aerosol spray paintwork. The moniker was born from her childhood nickname, ‘Bambino,’ when she first began tagging in London. Bambi creates stencilled works which are frequently described as gritty and masculine in appearance even if she is exploring themes of feminism, popular and street culture. On being called the female Banksy... Bambi: Well I hate it in the way that all women dislike being compared to a successful male counterpart as opposed to their own person. On the other hand, Banksy is one of the most important artists of the 21st century, so it’s fair to say I’m flattered. It’s a double-edged sword.   What was your first piece of street art? Bambi: Between dad complaining about the smell and mum screaming about the mess, I needed to practice elsewhere, so I ventured outside onto the street. I then sprayed a trail of stars using a stencil cut out of dad’s Reader’s Digest magazine on the bonnet of a shiny Rolls-Royce parked just outside my parents’ block of flats. It looked lovely once I’d finished – then I realised what I’d done and legged it home. What work are you proudest of? Bambi/ I’m particularly proud of a piece I sprayed on a wall in Shoreditch called “Don’t Shoot”, based on the Ferguson unrest in Missouri during August 2014. The widespread protests and riots were sparked by a police officer shooting an unarmed man, Michael Brown. The text around the images reads as follows: “You abuse your powers again and again Another innocent unarmed soul is murdered in your name Filthy blue lies flow and flow You shot him six times for just jaywalking home Left in a pool of blood on the street But you think it’s just another day on the beat Come on justice must be done or anarchy will bite you on the bum.” -- Bambi Due to the work’s anti-police tones, the wall was actually cordoned-off like a crime scene and checked for fingerprints, luckily, I wear gloves so they couldn’t find any. The best thing is the piece is still up!   There's No Place Like Home - Yellow, 2020 by Bambi Why the name Bambi? Bambi: My parents’ childhood nickname for me was Bambi, short for Bambino. Does anonymity give you more freedom? Bambi: Being an artist is about creative freedom. Despite being a natural show-off, I need to keep my identity a secret in order to wander the streets of London uninterrupted and to avoid being pursued by the police for vandalism. I’ve been in a prison cell and I can tell you that it’s not very nice. There’s too many locks for my liking and a stainless steel loo with hard toilet paper. Your work is deeply rooted in political and social causes, to what extent do you believe artists have a responsibility to shine a light on the issues of today? Bambi: I think Street art has a big role to play in the movement of socially conscious art, I’m hoping to continue in this vein in the future to use my art as a call to arms for causes I feel strongly about women's rights, LGBTQ rights, climate action, etc. This isn’t to say that I won’t still do some of the light-hearted & fun street artwork that has been popular in the past.   What’s your favourite piece of art/film/song? Bambi: One of my favourite paintings is Rembrandt’s self-portrait, which hangs in Kenwood House in Hampstead. His eyes contain so much knowledge and melancholy that I get the eerie feeling Rembrandt is looking back and weighing up my failures. He was a failure when he painted this self-portrait, having been reduced to poverty by his enthusiastic spending. One of my favourite songs is “Wild is the wind.” I particularly love the following lyrics: Like a leaf clings To the tree Oh, my darling, Cling to me… Whenever I hear the Nina Simone or David Bowie version of this song, I start getting all teary. Your sense of humour shines through in your work, who or what makes you laugh? Bambi: One thing we all need in our lives is laughter. I find I can get through a day better if I can find things to make me laugh. I laugh at myself sometimes, if I say something silly or forget something obvious. Life is easier when you don’t take yourself too seriously. Also, my little dog, who thinks she’s a much bigger dog than she actually is, constantly cracks me up. Do you want to make a difference? How can graffiti help? Bambi: Graffiti and street art is controversial. But it’s also a medium for voices of social change, protest, or expressions of community desire. Look how during the women’s march and the anti-Trump, anti -Brexit marches, people proudly carried their homemade banners. Some of them were mini-masterpieces. People probably stayed up really late the night before to make these artworks, knowing they would be on public display. What give you hope?  Bambi: My mum would say to me, “where there’s life there’s hope”. Everybody hurts. Everybody loves. Everybody hopes. And, everybody dies. Mainly, art is about our own sense of mortality. Check out more of Bambi's work here.   $test =
  • Celebrating Our Female Artists

    Celebrating our female artist on International Women's Day! As it's International Women's Day, we thought we would show off some of the exceptional talent that we work with here at artrepublic online. We also asked them about how they got started as an artist and their journey through the art worl....
    Celebrating our female artist on International Women's Day! As it's International Women's Day, we thought we would show off some of the exceptional talent that we work with here at artrepublic online. We also asked them about how they got started as an artist and their journey through the art world. In no particular order: Maria Rivans Maria Rivans James Jean by Maria Rivans "Gender qualities seem to be blurring in my world and to define femininity is very much down to the individual. I tend to see people as humans, everyone with different qualities, strengths, weaknesses, beliefs, . So in answer to this question on a personal note femininity means freedom to be who I want to be. Womanhood equates to strength and nurture."   Victoria Topping Victoria Topping creates, in her own words, ‘music for the eyes’. Heavily influenced by all aspects of music - from the styling of 70s Jazz to the passion of Gospel and the groove of Disco - Topping synthesises the rhythmic and the melodic into her synaesthetic originals and limited edition prints, creating artworks with their own unique soul. Victoria's work is bold, bright and fabulous. She creates brilliant collages that not only look great but can be read like a story. It's better to derive your own stories from her work and let the piece move you in whatever way feels the most natural. Although she is a newer artist to artrepublic, she has certainly cemented herself as a force not to be reckoned with.   Sara Pope Sara Pope Kiss Glitter By Sara Pope "I did quite a few different things before starting painting; a maths degree, I had a career in magazines as a designer, also a career in fashion as a shoe designer. I loved working as a designer, especially in fashion/shoes, but there came a point where it just wasn’t enough. That’s when I felt compelled to start painting. Design can be creative and beautiful, but I love that art can be so many more things besides.. philosophical, psychological, political, … When I started painting it felt completely engaging, and I found that it resonated with me more than anything else I’d done in my life. That feeling propelled me forward, and so now I get to spend every day making art, and for that I feel very lucky."   Lene Bladbjerg I Must Not Daydream By Lene Bladbjerg Lene Bladbjerg "It wasn’t actually my plan to become an artist and when I came to London in 1996, I studied graphic design at the London College of Printing. When I finished, I worked as a freelance graphic designer for a little while, but quite quickly realised it wasn’t for me. I started painting and taking close-up photos of flowers, which I sold at craft fairs -and then it has just moved on from there. I call myself a graphic artist as my work is still very influenced by my graphic design background. My work is often text based and I love mixing the words and pictures." Gill Bustamante Gill Bustamante Summer Roaring by Gill Bustamante "Like most artists - especially female ones I suspect - I struggled to divide my time between art, raising a child, work commitments and other obligations. It was therefore not until I was almost 50, menopausal and a bit mad that I finally found myself enough time to experiment and find out what I really wanted to do as an artist." Gill's work is undeniably beautiful and would make a perfect addition to any home, or any room. Her paintings are deep and ethereal, you could easily get lost into the magical forests!     Anne-Marie Ellis "My background as a women's-wear designer has given me the appreciation of textiles such as lace and its craftsmanship, (which would have often been made by women - up to 20,000 women were employed in the making of Nottingham lace in the 1800s - obviously an unprecedented female workforce at the time) and the lingerie paintings that I make are very much with a female gaze - they aren’t intended to be seductive but sensual, a celebration of the beauty of lingerie.  I think that the bras/lingerie are ‘worthy’ enough to be the subject of a painting, the work that goes into them does make them worth celebrating - the beauty of the everyday is something that inspires me. "   Nolasean Nolasean Flamingo Ground By Nolasean Nolasean's current work centres around handmade abstract collage pieces created with a fusion of seemingly disparate and juxtaposed assemblages - combining different elements, styles and media against each other, Nikki is able to create entirely novel, bizarre, arresting or beautiful pieces. "I started to share these pieces in the hope that they bring some vibrant energy to whoever owns them." Nolasean's work is an exciting exploration into abstract artwork that makes a delightfully bold statement!   Lucy Bryant Lucy Bryant Murder on the Dancefloor by Lucy Bryant "My style is consistent but there is ALWAYS room for development. I find, whatever I do, whether it's my figurines, my 2D digital work or my originals, I have a definite modus operandi which is to place objects into places where they shouldn't be. There's a fascination I have with the ordinary, the 'banal' and the basic. I find beauty in the things which we all relate to, whether it's shopping in Ikea or wearing a tracksuit (even if you are an 18th century china figurine). I am constantly thinking about new directions in which to take my art!" Lucy Bryant's work re-imagines the ordinary and turns it into something fresh and exciting. Her work is fun and doesn't take itself too seriously. This is refreshing in a sometimes far too serious industry!     Louise McNaught Louise McNaught Tainted by Louise McNaught "I have always been drawing and painting since I was little. There’s pictures of me drawing Age 1 so I've been an artist forever really! I announced I was going to be an Artist when I was 8 - much to my parents delight(!) I’ve always loved animals too so both passions combined very early on. I think my style is always evolving, I didn't think it can possibly stay the same as it changes with me. As a person I’m not interested in doing the same thing over and over. I want new and I want something that is exciting to me - and I think that comes across in my art. "     Check out all the work of these fabulous women have produced and show your support for them this International Women's Day! $test =
  • Meet the female artists - International Women’s Day at artrepublic gallery

    To mark International Women’s Day, artrepublic is celebrating the launch of a mentoring scheme with The Girls Network, pairing female artists with girls from disadvantaged backgrounds to inspire hope and empower a generation of creative women! Thursday 12th March – Get your tickets at event....
    To mark International Women’s Day, artrepublic is celebrating the launch of a mentoring scheme with The Girls Network, pairing female artists with girls from disadvantaged backgrounds to inspire hope and empower a generation of creative women! Thursday 12th March – Get your tickets at eventbrite Rebecca Strickson will be speaking at the panel talk Statistics show there is a huge discrepancy with girls expressing an interest in the arts at school and subsequently going on to work in the industry. Whether this is due to a lack of confidence, representation or opportunity, artrepublic are getting involved and have introduced some of our female artists to become mentors with The Girls Network. By being positive role models to girls from less advantaged backgrounds, they will be helping creative young girls develop the skills and courage to realise their potential and shape their career. Hear our female artists discussing life as an artist, breaking into the art world and how they are becoming mentors to young girls interested in the arts at our upcoming panel talk at the gallery. The Girls Network will be speaking about the work they do there will be a chance to sign up on the night to become a mentor and learn more about this worthy cause. We will also be hearing from ambassadors who has completed the programme and how it has helped them. Whether you are intrigued about the life of our female artists or looking for inspiration on breaking into a creative industry, the panel talk will be an insightful discussion followed by a Q & A session and an opportunity to network with the artists, ambassadors from The Girls Network and like-minded women. Meet Jana Nicole at our upcoming panel talk International Women’s Day’s mission for creatives this year is to increase the visibility of women creatives and promote their work for commercial projects. So why do we need more female artists..? Art influences society Art which creates thought-provoking critiques on political and social systems has been shown to be one of the most dynamic methods of changing human behaviour as it is able to increase empathy and trigger reflection by challenging opinions and instilling values. If one demographic has more of a voice in the art world than another then the art that represents our society as a whole and holds such a powerful influence is not a fair representation of everyone’s experience of the world. By supporting female artists and young women who want to pursue a career in the arts we are enabling their voice to be heard as part of a fairer society. Artists record and preserve our human history Will the art dominating the artworld today be a fair representation of history when it is not a fair representation of the world population? From prehistoric cave paintings to scientific drawings, to the avant-garde movements, artists play a significant role in how human history is recorded. All forms of art from painting and sculpture to music and literature are often considered to be the source of a society's collective memory. Promoting more female artists can change the course of history and ensure one perspective is not favoured over others in the art world. At artrepublic we want the art we showcase to be a fair representation of our culture and that includes people from all genders and ethnicities. As a business, we want to increase our capacity for positive social change as we aim towards a more inclusive and sustainable business and B Corporation certification. We hope that the ongoing mentoring we have set up with The Girls Network and our female artists will help drive change and build confidence in a new generation of female creatives who will go onto work in the art sector and fulfil their potential. Ruth Mulvie will be sharing her experience of the art world at our upcoming panel talk Sign up at eventbrite to secure your place In the meantime, here’s food for thought from famous female artists on making it in the art world… “Take drawing very seriously and take photos of things that you like. Keep a visual diary. And if you have trouble getting the right qualifications to get in university or art school, go to as many evening classes as possible.” Tracey Emin “Don’t get rid of negative emotion, use it …. Like the salt in your food.” Yoko Ono “Take chances with what you do, make things that no one but you will ever see, unless it turns out so good you want to share it.” Cindy Sherman   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Women's History Month

    Women's History Month March is Women's History Month - a great time to celebrate all the inspiring women in art that have made a lasting impression not only on the art industry, but on the entire world.  Frida Khalo. We couldn't make a list of influential female artists for Women's History....
    Women's History Month March is Women's History Month - a great time to celebrate all the inspiring women in art that have made a lasting impression not only on the art industry, but on the entire world.  Frida Khalo. We couldn't make a list of influential female artists for Women's History Month without mentioning possibly the most iconic faces in art herself, Frida Khalo. Frida Khalo's self portraits have become so iconic, they are instantly recognisable by many people. She's often even recognised by those who have no interest in the art world at all. After an accident that left her bed bound, Khalo had very little subject inspiration and so turned to producing paintings in her own image. She has provided inspiration for many artists up to this day. Many have followed in her footsteps by creating images of her, featuring her iconic mono-brow and thick, dark hair.   Fiesta De Frida Khalo by Angel London 2. Georgia O'Keeffe Georgia O'Keeffe is best known for her stunning paintings of flowers and natural landscapes which pioneered the American modernism movement in the 20th Century. She was known as the "mother of American modernism" and has therefore become somewhat of a feminist icon due to her success in a male dominated industry. O'Keeffe created thousands of works over the course of her career which are still celebrated and used as a source of inspiration by young artists.     3.  Käthe Kollwitz Käthe Kollwitz's work focuses on the devastating effects of war. Her work often emits a sombre and melancholic aura and can therefore be empathetic for those who have been affected by the horrors of war. The use of negative space allows more room for emotion to move around her pieces which then adds further depth to her pieces.                         Abschied und Tod,                                           Selbstporträt im Profil,                                            Mulher pensando 4. Kara Walker  Kara Walker is more of a modern choice for this list. Walker explores a huge range of subjects in her work from race and sexuality. She delves into even deeper subjects such as peoples identity. She creates beautiful silhouette cut outs of figures. These pieces manage to tell complex stories even though they are limited by a lack of facial detail and colours.   5. Nancy Grossman Nancy Grossman is perhaps best known for her sculptures of heads using wood and leather. Her work was/is rather ahead of it's time as it discusses themes of gender fluidity and identity. The pieces are made from found materials and are often described as self portraits despite the masculine appearance of them.   If you have a chance, make sure to check out the fabulous artists we have mentioned. Also have a look at some other female artists. both historical and contemporary. There so much inspiration and talent possessed by the women of the world, you don't want to miss out on it! $test =
  • Rob Wass Answers YOUR Questions!

    Rob Wass Answers YOUR Questions! We asked YOU to send in some questions for brilliant contemporary artist Rob Wass to answer. Keep reading to gain some insight into Rob! Q: How did your work evolve from a more urban graffiti style to the style you have now? Rob: From painting graffiti back in m....
    Rob Wass Answers YOUR Questions! We asked YOU to send in some questions for brilliant contemporary artist Rob Wass to answer. Keep reading to gain some insight into Rob! Q: How did your work evolve from a more urban graffiti style to the style you have now? Rob: From painting graffiti back in my teens I learnt how to use a can of paint and what could be achieved with it. I put these techniques back into my illustration work and went from there. Q: How does the process start when creating a new piece? Rob: It depends what I’m making but usually I jot an idea down, let it sit there (if it's not time sensitive) for a while and try to build ideas off of it. If the idea still seems good then I’ll do a load of sketches trying to push the idea in different directions until hopefully coming across something that is visually striking or meaningful. Jackdaws Colour By Rob Wass   Q: How long did it take you to develop your style/process? Or is it still a work in progress? Rob: I think when it comes to style, that came from quite a young age. I was always interested in geometric shapes and bright colours and today these 2 core components are still crucial in my work. Its definitely a work in progress, I think of style like a formula now, I have my core elements that I try and incorporate in most of the work I make so there’s a cohesion between old and new but then I'll try new things or take some things away until if find an updated style that works. Q: What's your favourite part of the art process? What's the hardest? Rob: My favourite part is still the making for makings sake just playing with no goals in mind. The hardest is probably working on an idea for a month and at the end of the month saying to myself it's still not good enough start again. Q: What's your studio space like? Do you keep it tidy? What kind of space do you work best in? Rob: Messy most of the time but I do try to have a little tidy up after each project. I think I'm happy working in most spaces really but I’ve always wanted a warehouse to run wild in.   Winter Treescape By Rob Wass   Check out Rob's latest collection of treescapes here - you won't regret it! $test =
  • artrepublic Pop Up Cinema! Film Screenings in our Brighton gallery

    Join us for the screening of a true cult classic with a rebellious spirit and a pop art soul in our Brighton gallery. Sunday 22nd March at 7.15pm – Get your tickets here This month are hosting a very special, ‘Secret Movie Club’ with White Wall Cinema in our gallery space for an immers....
    Join us for the screening of a true cult classic with a rebellious spirit and a pop art soul in our Brighton gallery. Sunday 22nd March at 7.15pm – Get your tickets here This month are hosting a very special, ‘Secret Movie Club’ with White Wall Cinema in our gallery space for an immersive evening of art and culture. The theme will be, ‘The Art of Rebellion’ as we present a true cult classic with a rebellious spirit and a pop art soul, keeping the identity of the movie a secret until the opening credits roll! . The rebellious spirit of the artist manifests itself in many forms but film making is so notoriously rigid it it’s production that finding a truly rebellious (yet still watchable) film is hard to find. This film is one of the rule breakers! A hidden gem that breaks the mould and has fun while doing it, it has all the cinematic ingredients of a classic but cooked up to create something entirely fresh and new. Put your trust in the art experts and join our Secret Movie Club for a unique cinema experience in the heart of Brighton. Book your tickets!   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • In The Darkest Hour There May Be Light. A Rare Box Set Curated by Damien Hirst

    The artrepublic archive presents an exciting opportunity to own a collection of the most established and influential artists of the contemporary art world. Add yourself to the guestlist at Eventbrite   Displayed at London’s Serpentine Gallery in 2006, ‘In the darkest hour there may b....
    The artrepublic archive presents an exciting opportunity to own a collection of the most established and influential artists of the contemporary art world. Add yourself to the guestlist at Eventbrite   Displayed at London’s Serpentine Gallery in 2006, ‘In the darkest hour there may be light: Works from Damien Hirst's Murderme collection’ remains one of Hirst’s most influential exhibitions to date. Curated by the artist himself, this critically acclaimed show brought together the works of Hirst’s friends and contemporaries, forerunners and followers, the inspirers as well as the inheritors. From Francis Bacon to Sarah Lucas, Andy Warhol to Gavin Turk, Hirst’s exhibition included paintings, sculptures, photographs and installations that situated his own practice within an ongoing tradition of radical postmodernism and unflinching existential contemplation. To coincide with the show, The Serpentine Gallery and Other Criteria co-published a limited edition of 50 signed print portfolios, specially produced for the occasion by featured artists: Banksy, Don Brown, Angela Bulloch, John Currin, Tracey Emin, Angus Fairhurst, Steven Gregory, Marcus Harvey, Damien Hirst, Rachel Howard, John Isaacs, Michael Joo, Jeff Koons, Jim Lambie, Sean Landers, Tim Lewis, Sarah Lucas, Nicholas Lumb, Tom Ormond, Lawrence Owen, Richard Prince, Haim Steinbach, and Gavin Turk. Hirst’s exhibition (and the accompanying print collection) takes its title from the Hans Christian Anderson fairytale, ‘The Galoshes of Fortune’ (1838). Typically morbid, Hirst chose the line to reflect the “entropic collection” of “just amassing stuff while you’re alive.” Yet if this is a comment on the darker side of material culture and the marketisation of the art world, Hirst’s choice of title also contains seeds of hope: ‘In the darkest hour there may be light’ rings like a clarion call for politicised art at the start of our new decade, where confrontations with the ecological and economic impacts of materialism must be staged at every turn. In 2020, these special edition prints assume all-new relevance and even stronger resonance, proving that the value of political art is more pressing now than ever before. Today, few of the limited edition collections remain intact: most have been split apart and sold as individual prints. This special event at artrepublic offers a rare opportunity to see the complete selection of prints, from the private collection of artrepublic’s founder, Lawrence Alkin, framed and hung together before they are made available to buy. Showcasing the work of household names alongside artists previously unseen in the gallery, the event promises exposure to new names and themes, an opportunity to explore the works that orbit the legendary Damien Hirst, and a timely reflection on the state of the world today. THE BOX SET: This limited edition box set was co-published by The Serpentine Gallery and Other Criteria in 2006, to coincide with the exhibition ‘In the darkest hour there may be light: Works from Damien Hirst's Murderme collection’. This rare set is one of an edition of only 50 and contains specially produced works by 23 of exhibition’s contributing artists: Banksy, Don Brown, Angela Bulloch, John Currin, Tracey Emin, Angus Fairhurst, Steven Gregory, Marcus Harvey, Damien Hirst, Rachel Howard, John Isaacs, Michael Joo, Jeff Koons, Jim Lambie, Sean Landers, Tim Lewis, Sarah Lucas, Nicholas Lumb, Tom Ormond, Lawrence Owen, Richard Prince, Haim Steinbach, and Gavin Turk. Each work is signed in pencil or ink. The pieces are loose in paper wrappers (as published). Each is sold separately. The Banksy in this lot is offered with the Certificate of Authenticity from Pest Control. WORKS INCLUDED: Banksy ‘Napalm (Can’t beat the feeling)’ is a limited edition Digital Pigment Print by acclaimed contemporary artist Banksy. Part of The Serpentine and Other Criteria’s 2006 set ‘In the darkest hour there may be light’, the print is hand signed by the artist.   Banksy ‘Napalm (Can’t beat the feeling) Banksy: anonymous, elusive, absolutely innovative. Little is known about Banksy’s biography but one thing remains certain: his stencils and acts of urban graffiti across the streets of the UK have been nothing short of revolutionary, inspiring a generation of street artists around the globe. First appearing in 2004, Banksy has reproduced ‘Napalm (Can’t beat that feeling)’ in black, grey and yellow with red ‘blood splatter’ for Hirst’s limited edition collection. ‘Napalm’ remains one of Banksy’s most iconic works to date, reworking Nick Ut’s Pulitzer Prize winning photograph The Terror of War with profound impact. The print depicts Phan Thi Kim Phuc, the victim of a napalm explosion in Vietnam in 1972. Here, Banksy replaces Vietnam Army soldiers with the twin figures of Mickey Mouse and Ronald McDonald: mascots of global capitalism the world over. Deeply unsettling, the smiling faces and colourful clothing of these capitalist clowns mask the horrors of consumer culture and its total disregard for humanity. Powerful and provocative, this masterpiece of political art is hand signed and numbered by the elusive artist himself and is sold with the Certificate of Authenticity from Pest Control. Damien Hirst  ‘Blue Butterfly’ is a limited edition Screenprint with Glaze by acclaimed contemporary artist Damian Hirst. Part of The Serpentine and Other Criteria’s 2006 set ‘In the darkest hour there may be light’ and is hand signed and numbered by the artist.   ‘Blue Butterfly’ by Damien Hirst Damien Hirst: diamond encrusted skulls; animals exposed in formaldehyde; decomposing butterflies. There’s a reason why Hirst is one of the most celebrated British artists of our time. His work never stops innovating, ceaselessly pushing conceptual boundaries, confronting the nature of art head-on, and dazzling his viewers with existential provocation. Hirst has always been bewitched by butterflies: in his ambitious 1991 installation ‘In and Out of Love’, the 26 year old artist mapped the duration of the exhibition onto the lifespan of the winged insects, inviting viewers to watch them emerge from their cocoons, make the gallery space their home and, finally, to end their delicate lives in time with the end of the show. Symbolic of death and resurrection, butterflies have continued to pervade Hirst’s work. Here, the wings of a butterfly are revealed in all their gossamer fragility, as sections of blue glaze gives way to the candy-pink background beneath. Bold, brilliant, and beautiful. ‘Blue Butterly’ continues to speak to contemporary audiences, reflecting the endangered status of organic life as natural habitats face the threat of extinction. Jeff Koons ‘Dolphin (Bicycle Rack)’ is a limited edition Lithograph in Colours by acclaimed contemporary artist Jeff Koons. Part of The Serpentine and Other Criteria’s 2006 set ‘In the darkest hour there may be light’, the print is hand signed by the artist. Jeff Koons bicycle rack  American artist Jeff Koons has had a firm hand in shaping the postmodern art of the postwar period. Known for his ‘inflatable’ animals (towering balloon creatures, cast in shiny stainless steel) and his upscaling of kitsch porcelain knick-knacks, Koons has twice broken the record auction price for a work by a living artist—most recently in May 2019, when his Rabbit sculpture sold for a staggering $91.1 million. Claiming that his work contains no hidden meanings or cultural critiques, Koons nevertheless continues to captivate the art world. Whether or not the pieces themselves are designed with critical commentary in mind, the fact remains: Koons’ artworks may have sparked more controversy than those of any other contemporary artist in recent years. As part of his Popeye collection, Koons produced a series of stainless steel poolside inflatables, intersecting with various forms of utilitarian equipment (a Dalmatian-shaped lifesaver, thrown over a painter’s ladder; a blow-up caterpillar suspended from industrial chains). This contribution to the Serpentine set, ‘Dolphin (Bicycle Rack)’, features a sketch for an unrealised mash-up of inflatable-equipage: a blow-up dolphin affixed to a bike rack. Loosely sketched, in blue and green felt-tip, the print offers a rare glimpse into the artists’ procedure; or is this just another smoke-and-mirrors move, the pretence of off-hand draughtsmanship concealing a more complex artistic process? Whatever the reality, one thing’s for sure: this hand signed lithograph is a once-in-a-lifetime collectible from one of the world’s most desirable contemporary artists. ALSO FEATURING:  Tracey Emin Best known for installing her unmade bed in the Tate, contemporary artist Tracey Emin has enjoyed well-deserved notoriety as one of Britain’s most acclaimed artists of the twenty-first century. Moving from installation to illustration to neon signage with artistic agility, Emin is ceaseless: her work never stops breaking our hearts with its sheer honesty and untold intimacy. Gavin Turk Internationally acclaimed artist Gavin Turk is known for his post-Pop aesthetic, which delights in questing the value of authenticity, authorship, and originality in contemporary art. Working in a range of media - from bronze and wax sculpting, to screen printing and photography - Turk’s approach may vary from piece to piece, but his commitment to conceptual provocation remains unwavering. Sarah Lucas Part of the generation of Young British Artists, Sarah Lucas rose to prominence in the 1990s. Her work is known for its sexually provocative content, treading the fine line between bawdy humour and unsettling provocation. Straddling sculpture, collage, photography and objet d’art, Lucas’ work is ceaselessly pioneering and enduringly relevant, speaking as lucidly to today’s audiences as it did to its initial viewers over three decades ago. John Currin American artist John Currin is known for his sexually provocative and often off-kilter paintings, pulling together diverse influences, from Renaissance masterworks to pop culture, contemporary fashion models to pornographic magazines. His work is held in permeant collections around the world, including the Tate Modern, and he has had retrospective exhibitions at both the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York and Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art. Angela Bulloch Part of the generation of Young British Artists, Angela Bulloch is known for her light and sound installations which explore the mechanics of pre-digital systems. Nominated for the Turner Prize in 1997, Bullock has exhibited at galleries across the world, including: The Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; The Hayward Gallery, London; Tate Liverpool; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Bulloch works across medias, incorporating video, installation, sculpture and painting into her practice for a varied and consistently wide-ranging aesthetic. Angus Fairhurst One of the Young British Artists, Angus Fairhurst graduated in Fine Art at Goldsmith’s college in 1989, where he studied alongside fellow YBA, Damian Hirst. With Hirst, Fairhurst was instrumental in the organisation of ‘Freeze’, the exhibition that would launch the careers of the Young British Artists. Like his some-time collaborator, Sarah Lucas, Fairhurst’s work is characterised by a penchant for visual distortion and tom-foolery, upsetting the familiar to introduce the uncanny and tipping from the comical to the unnerving with easy confidence. Working across a variety of media, including video, photography and painting, Fairhurst is best known for his gorilla sculptures, which depict the primates in various states of existential confrontation. Steven Gregory South-African born artist Steven Gregory is known for his mischievous brand of sculptural humour. With a penchant for mortal remains, Gregory creates sculptures from human bones, often encrusting skulls with malachite, pearl or lapis lazuli and inserting eyes that stare back at their viewer with death-defying presence. These pieces are a comment on the human condition, and they ask us to think about the fine lines that thread between the natural and the manmade, the abstract and the figurative, the comic and the tragic, for an aesthetic with profound and poignant consequence. Rachel Howard  British artist Rachel Howard is known for her materially-reflexive artworks; pieces that confront their own physicality and presence, by privileging the surfaces and textures of a given medium, above its ability to represent or depict. Her work explores the interstices between conventional dichotomies—chaos and control, creation and destruction, beauty and brutality—to tease out possibilities latent in the visual process. Haim Steinbach American artist Haim Steinbach is known for his contemporary approach to the tradition of objet d’art, or ‘found art’, as pioneered in the work of Marcel Duchamp and Pablo Picasso. Steinbach’s practice focuses on arrangement, exploring the ways in which context influences meaning. “My work,” he notes, “is about the all-too-frequent disconnect between looking and seeing, between being aware that something is there and knowing what it means.” Placing mass-produced as well as hand made objects—from children’s toys to cereal boxes, musical instruments to ancient pottery—on colourful shelves, Steinbach stimulates new associations between these disparate items. In this way, his approach is analogous to poetic composition: the placing of words in a particular order, to speak to the social and the cultural. Steinbach has said of his work that it is “about vernacular, which is a common form of language: things that we make, express and produce.” Sean Landers Contemporary American artist Sean Landers is known for his self-referential and semi-autobiographical works of art, which experiment across diverse media including painting, sculpture, photography, drawing, writing, video and audio. Landers’ work focuses on the process of artistic creation, rather than the finished product. Known for his performative art, as well as the early body of written work that launched his career, Landers blurs the lies between fact and fiction by incorporating his own experiences while simultaneously developing alter egos that trouble the sincerity of confession. In this way, Landers’ work consistently encourages the viewer’s identification, which in turn promotes a deeper reflection of the self and with their own sense of humanity. Socially engaged, Landers’ work seeks to reveal raw truths about the contemporary art world, always pushing at convention to pioneer new approaches to visual practice. Lawrence Owen Lawrence Owen is contemporary British artist, known for his paintings and ceramics that explore the lasting value of Folklore, Paganism and early Mythology in contemporary culture. Through his work, Owen has developed a language reminiscent of artefact and relic, placing him in a tradition of contemporary ceramicists, alongside the likes of Grayson Perry and Elisabeth Kley. In the production of these art objects, Owen looks at primordial themes of ritual and worship, and asks the extent to which these systems still hold sway in consumerist cultures. His aesthetic is characterised by their use of bright colour and bold composition, and the fluid merging of the abstract with the figurative. Nicholas Lumb Contemporary artist Nicholas Lumb has developed a contemporary approach to objet d’art, or ‘found art’, as pioneered by the likes of Marcel Duchamp and Pablo Picasso. His work focusses on the conventionally ignored or overlooked, demanding that viewers contemplate quotidian or useless items in all of their banality, to foster new meanings. Through the confrontation of material form, Lumb transforms these quiet objects into 'images of themselves’ and, in so doing, challenges our expectations of the value of art and its role in consumer society. Richard Prince Contemporary American painter and photographer Richard Prince is best known for his ‘re-photography’: the practice of rephotographing an existing image to question the value of artistic appropriation. A refashioning of the twentieth century tradition of objet d’art, Prince developed his ‘re-photography’ while working in the tear sheet department of Time magazine, where he would repurpose advertising photographs in his own practice. According to Prince, “I don’t see any difference now between what I collect and what I make. It’s become the same.” It is this audacious approach, along with his unique painterly aesthetic, that has earned Prince a reputation as "one of the most revered artists of his generation,” according to the New York Times. Jim Lambie  Shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2005, Scottish artist Jim Lambie is known for his colourful sculptural installations. Lambie’s work is often site-sensitive: he locates found object sculptures in unexpected places or repositions pop culture references in high-art contexts. He is perhaps best known for his brightly coloured vinyl work, covering the floors and walls of large spaces with striated patterns to trace the shapes and explore the idiosyncrasies of the architecture. Questioning the limits of use, Lambie’s work asks that we reconsider the conventional function of an object or a site, in order to appreciate its material and sensuous presence in the world. Tom Ormond  Contemporary British artist Tom Ormond is known for his depictions of utopian landscapes and fantastical structures that defy the limits of reality. Like the sketches of classic visionary architects Giovanni Battista Piranesi or Étienne-Louis Boullée, Ormond creates vistas of impossibility, which unfold through a surreal aesthetic. His work reflects on the impact of the built environment, questioning the power of place and the role of the artist in shaping contemporary society. Michael Joo Science graduate turned artist Michael Joo blurs the boundaries between art and science through his investigations into ontology and epistemology, opening interdisciplinary and multi-sensory channels which probe the realities of perception. More interested in how we perceive than in what we perceive, Joo’s work foregrounds questions of fluid identity and knowledge, through a non-linear, process-driven approach. Blending sculpture, painting, photography and print-making, and placing the abstract in dialogue with the figurative, Joo’s work generates loose narratives that explore interactions between places, people and objects with profound effect. Tim Lewis Contemporary British artist Tim Lewis is known for his mechanical sculptures, which explore the intersections between art and science. A graduate of the Royal College of Art in London, Lewis’ work consistently pushes conceptual boundaries, bringing electronic programming and physicality to bear on artistic design. Process is key for Lewis: each work is envisioned in its entirety, and realised in its material form only after an extensive period of development and discovery. His animated pieces ask us to consider the use of mechanics in visual art as analogous to the use of genetic engineering in the field of science, throwing up questions of ethics and social responsibility, while producing visually compelling immersive installations. John Isaacs Contemporary British artist John Isaacs is known for his confrontational works of art, which challenge the “fast-food guzzling, consumer-driven, resource-eating, air-polluting, earth-poisoning, prozac-popping” reality of contemporary society. Working across a range of different media, Isaacs is best known for his large-scale wax sculptures, which critique base human instincts of greed and consumerism, in fleshy, visceral and often grotesque forms. Yet, while these works appear pessimistic, Isaacs’ lens is often fitted to the utopian, using art to challenge stereotypes, confound expectation, and to explore visions of a more optimistic future. Don Brown Contemporary British artist Don Brown is known for his figurative sculptural works, usually depicting his wife Yoko in various states of undress. Harking back to the muse of classical sculpture, Brown modernises the antiquated form by eschewing idealisation: these are intimate and sensuous renderings of Yoko, often produced at three-quarter or half-scale, in a variety of smooth surfaces, from bronze to acrylic. Celebrated for their technical skill, Brown’s works are exemplars of verisimilitude, capturing the subject with a vivid sense of presence. Other recent projects have included oversized sculptural still life and pastel drawings. Marcus Harvey  Contemporary British artist Marcus Harvey is part of the generation of Young British Artists who rose to prominence in the late 1980s. Combining painting, photography, and sculpture, Harvey explores the cult of iconography in British pop culture, producing depictions of well-known faces, figures, and landscapes in thick gestural style. He is perhaps best known for his contentious, monumental portrayals of moors murderer Myra Hindley, created from plaster casts of a child’s’ hands, which went on display at the Royal Academy of Art in 1997. His work continues to innovate and to politically agitate, and can be seen in public and private collections around the world.   See the full collection of prints at our event on Wednesday 12th February. Tickets at eventbrite.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Damien Hirst cabinet bought for £600 could fetch up to £1.8 million at auction

    Pre-sale estimate for one of the first medicine cabinets from Damien Hirst’s degree show. “I lived with that medicine cabinet for seven years with people telling me it was crap” Robert Tibbles Bought for just £600 by Robert Tibbles in 1989, ‘Bodies’ is from a set of 12 cabinets by H....
    Pre-sale estimate for one of the first medicine cabinets from Damien Hirst’s degree show. “I lived with that medicine cabinet for seven years with people telling me it was crap” Robert Tibbles Bought for just £600 by Robert Tibbles in 1989, ‘Bodies’ is from a set of 12 cabinets by Hirst each named after the twelve title tracks of the iconic Sex Pistols album, ‘Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols’. A doorless medicine cabinet packed with everything from Optrex eye drops to Dioralyte rehydration sachets, the work is set to become a landmark in British contemporary art when it goes up for auction next month at Phillips, London. Hirst’s cabinet, ‘Bodies’ set to fetch up to £1.8m at auction’ One of the YBAs (Young British Artists) who dominated the art scene in the UK during the 1990s, Damien Hirst shot to fame after winning the Turner Prize in 1995 and continues to shake up the art world with his dynamic approaches. His varied work often explores themes of art, religion, science, life and death and he works in different mediums as a sculptor, installation artist, painter and print maker. ‘Great art or good art, is when you look at it, experience it and it stays in your mind. I don’t think conceptual art and traditional art are all that different’. Damien Hirst Black Utopia 2012 by Damien Hirst. A cabinet print available in our Brighton gallery Black Heaven (Nite Time) by Damien Hirst. Available in our Brighton gallery Hirst’s exploration into our complex relationship with pharmaceuticals is one of the most enduring themes in his work. His medicine cabinet and pill prints combine the aesthetics of minimalism with Hirst’s observation that, “science is the new religion for many people. It’s as simple and as complicated as that really.” We have a selection of Damien Hirst’s ‘The Cure’ pill prints available in our Brighton gallery Amongst Hirst’s most widely recognized works, the spot series has 13 sub-categories of which the ‘Pharmaceutical’ paintings being the first and most prolific. We have two rare prints from this category available, ‘M Fluorobenzoyl Chloride’ and ‘Mannitol’ named after chemical compounds used in over the counter medicines. M Fluorobenzoyl Chloride’ by Damien Hirst. Available in artrepublic gallery. Clean, flat circles of gloss paint on a stark white and clinical background, each Hirst spot print possesses an intensity that can be as addictive and all-consuming as the controlled substances they are named after. ‘Mannitol’ by Damien Hirst. Available in artrepublic gallery Speaking on the spot series Hirst says, “It’s an assault on your senses. They grab hold of you and give you a good shaking. As adults, we’re not used to it. It’s an amazing fact that all objects leap beyond their own dimension.” One to watch For those looking to hang a similar cabinet in their home which makes a bold statement, as Mr Tibbles did with his Hirst, we recommend Lucy Sparrow as one of our most up and coming and investable artists. Taking the art world by storm with her large scale, immersive installations filled with everyday items reimagined as plush felt toys, Sparrow’s projects have included, *‘Triple Art Bypass’ – a felt depiction of an emergency operating theatre and consultation room and more recently, **‘Delicatessen on 6th’ - an upscale New York deli filled with felt foods. The 'His ’n’ Hers’ cabinets we have available at artrepublic gallery each contain gendered toiletries in felt form that both celebrate the familiarity of these items but also raises questions on the expectations placed different genders and how males and females are marketed differently in a consumerist world. For more information on any of these artworks contact our Brighton gallery. Get in touch on +44 (0) 1273 724829.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Beginners Guide To Collecting Photography - Issue 2

    Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography - Issue 2 Part 2 is here! Following on from the first part of our beginner's guide, our friends at Crane Kalman Brighton have helped us put together our beginner's guide to collecting photography. If you haven't seen our first part, check it out here. ....
    Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography - Issue 2 Part 2 is here! Following on from the first part of our beginner's guide, our friends at Crane Kalman Brighton have helped us put together our beginner's guide to collecting photography. If you haven't seen our first part, check it out here. Welcome back to the second issue in this mini-series of The Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography. The process of buying photographic prints can be confusing if you're coming to it fresh. In the first issue, we talked about why you might collect photography, where you might start and how you can identify what you like. This issue will look at print editions, price points, print papers and how to make the most of that mailing list. Penguin XL by Mark Vessey Editioning The concept of editions is a confusing one so don't worry if you don't understand it straight away. When a photographer creates an image for sale, it'll be sold in an edition. This refers to the number of prints produced of that image in that particular size and sold for that particular price, although we'll see in the following section how this can change too as more prints are sold. Editions can vary widely in size, from 7 to 100, and even 250, and are usually called "Limited Editions" because the number of prints in that edition is (you guessed it) limited to that number. For example, Mark Vessey's Penguin XL is a limited edition print consisting of only 15 prints. This means that once all 15 prints in the edition have been sold, no more will be available to purchase. Fires 10 by Ellie Davies You may see the same image in several editions, but with different prices and in different dimensions. For example, it's possible to buy Fires 10 by Ellie Davies in two different sizes from the artrepublic website. When you're scrolling through the site you'll notice that one print of Fires 10 is priced higher than the other. The difference in price can be explained by the dimensions of the print itself: the higher price refers to a physically larger print, whereas the lower price corresponds to the smaller print. Bear in mind that with larger prints the size of the edition itself will usually be smaller. If you come across a print that you like and see it labelled as an "Open Edition", this simply means that there is no limit to the number of prints produced. This is a more common practice for archives to follow rather than photographers or artists, who prefer to maintain exclusivity to their work. Of course, if you're looking to collect work that will increase in value you'll be looking for Limited Editions because their value may increase as the edition becomes sold out. But don't discount a print you like simply because it's from an Open Edition! In our first issue of this Beginners Guide, we emphasised the importance of collecting work that speaks to you, and this advice should really stay at the front your mind as you embark on your collecting journey.     Price Points Closely related to editioning is, of course, price. The prices of editioned prints may vary depending on several things. We've just seen, in the previous section, how you might expect to pay more for a larger print. Well, you can also expect to see incremental prices as the number of prints remaining in an edition shrinks. For example, if you were interested in Ellie Davies's prints you should expect to find that, as more people buy the prints in any of her editions, the prices for the prints remaining in that edition increase. This is not unusual, it reflects the rarity of the remaining prints and the importance of an artist's creative control. Printing Grand Piano XL by Gina Soden One of the most common types of print is Giclee. The word comes from the French, meaning to "spray". The print is produced by a large format inkjet printer quite literally spraying the ink on to the paper so precisely and accurately that what results is the nearest thing to the original image. The paper and ink used in Giclee printing are archival, which means that the print is made to last a long time, so it won't degrade. Another popular form of printing is C-Type, also known as Chromogenic prints. This is a digital process; light-sensitive paper is exposed to lasers or LEDs that use the original digital file of the image, and then processed in photographic developer and fixed, much like the traditional darkroom process. A C-Type will also be printed on archival paper to increase its lifespan. Paper Not all photographic printing papers are created equal! There is a huge range of papers available and they vary in finish and texture, which lends a lot to the final product. If you're interested in knowing the specific kind of paper used don't hesitate to ask if that information isn't immediately available. Varieties include glossy, matte, pearl, rag and textured, each of which provides a different viewing experience. We briefly mentioned archival paper in the previous section. Archival papers are acid-free, meaning that certain chemicals which would David Bowie Photographed by Steve Rapport degrade the quality of the paper through constant exposure to air aren't present. While archival quality paper might make the print more expensive, know that you're also purchasing reassurance that the print will last for years to come.   Mailing Lists Like we said in issue one, make the most of technology and allow it to work for you; sign up straight away to the gallery's mailing list to ensure that you're kept up to date. These email updates might include new works from photographers, news of upcoming gallery shows and art fairs or information about new additions to the gallery's roster of represented artists. The great advantage of signing up to the gallery mailing list is twofold: firstly, it provides you with useful information without having to go looking for it; and secondly, it shows the gallery that you're interested. This is the best way to keep informed and gets you in on the ground floor so you can pave the way to your future photography collection. Sign up to our mailing list here.   We hope you enjoyed reading this article about photography and all the opportunity it offers. Stay tuned to see further instalments into the ever prosperous world of photography!   Want to see some of the wonderful photography that Crane Kalman Brighton Gallery has to offer? Check out their stand at the London Art Fair. See stand 21 on the main Mezzanine floor.  London Art Fair is a showcase for the most exceptional modern and contemporary and provides an opportunity to discover and to buy. The Fair is an established destination for both museum quality modern and contemporary work, nurturing collecting at all levels, from prints, photographs and editions, to major works by internationally renowned artists. The fair runs from 22nd-26th January at the Islington Business Design Centre. Haven't got tickets?  For your chance to win 2 tickets to the London art Fair, for entry to the fair on any day, enter our give away draw here. $test =
  • Slim Aarons ‘Poolside Gossip’ 50th Anniversary

    Slim Aaron’s iconic photograph, ‘Poolside Gossip’ is still turning heads at 50. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Slim Aaron’s iconic photograph, ‘Poolside Gossip’ we will be serving up classy cocktails with a collection of fabulous photographs by the legendary Slim Aarons as our....
    Slim Aaron’s iconic photograph, ‘Poolside Gossip’ is still turning heads at 50. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Slim Aaron’s iconic photograph, ‘Poolside Gossip’ we will be serving up classy cocktails with a collection of fabulous photographs by the legendary Slim Aarons as our glamorous gallery becomes a Poolside Party! Add yourself to the guestlist at eventbrite Poolside Gossip by Slim Aarons Photographing celebrities and wealthy people for over 6 decades, Slim Aarons has produced a body of work with a luxurious feel often mimicked in advertising to sell an aspirational lifestyle. He described his photographs as, "attractive people doing attractive things in attractive places." ‘Poolside Gossip’ perfectly encapsulates this aesthetic, as the dusty desert hills of Palm Springs contrast against a meticulously landscaped lush green garden and modern glass and stone house designed by famous architect Richard Neutra for Edgar J. Kaufmann. The woman in yellow, Nelda Linsk owned the home when the photo was taken in 1970. Her friend, Helen Kaptur, lounging in the white lace was married to mid-century architect Hugh Kaptur. The third women strutting towards them is actress, Lita Baron. The elite wives and socialites with immaculate hair and outfits inspired the fashion world and ‘Poolside Gossip’ became a symbol of modernism with its combination of glamour and architecture. ‘Penthouse Pool’ by Slim Aarons Giving us a glimpse into the lives of the rich and famous, photographs by Slim Aarons are like time-capsules of a bygone era that can still spark as much envy and desire today as when they were created. Learn more about how Slim Aarons went from military to celebrity photographer as our special guest, Matthew Butson, the Vice President of the Getty Images Hulton Archive which have been the official home of the Slim Aarons Collection for more than 20 years, presents a talk on the artist. As well as a collection of classic Slim Aarons favourites, we will be showcasing some rare stamped editions, signed editions and Perspex pieces for the first time in the gallery. Catherine Wilke by Slim Aarons   Book your tickets at this unmissable event at eventbrite   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =

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