FREE WORLDWIDE DELIVERY*

posts

  • RYCA presents his cheeky F-Word Showcase at artrepublic

    On the 28th June, arterpublic are delighted to open up our gallery from 6pm-8pm to welcome the infamous Ryan Callanan (RYCA) and his ‘F-word Showcase’. Are we excited? Absofuckinlutely. Expect a beer or a glass of bubbly, our resident DJ, the opportunity to meet RYCA himself and to sneak a ....
    On the 28th June, arterpublic are delighted to open up our gallery from 6pm-8pm to welcome the infamous Ryan Callanan (RYCA) and his ‘F-word Showcase’. Are we excited? Absofuckinlutely. Expect a beer or a glass of bubbly, our resident DJ, the opportunity to meet RYCA himself and to sneak a peak at his latest works featured publicly for the first time. Exclusive to artrepublic, his new works keep in line with his iconic style that combines contemporary pop culture with aesthetically old-fashioned elements, such as traditional typography. A master of his craft, he combines hand-etched glass and ornate frames with his street-art inspired messages, to result in a fresh yet classic piece of artwork. An homage to the lost art of pub signages, RYCA plays with traditional forms and gets away with reworking what we’ve seen before into something new and captivating. The stunning type takes the edge out of the profanity, so much so that your relatives might not even notice when they visit. Put that to the test with our wall of words and spot the swear! There will also be an opportunity to snatch some of his last prints before they are officially sold out, and the chance to purchase special editions of sold out artworks. Accomplished and vibrant, RYCA is a huge name in the contemporary art and street art scene at the moment, and we’re thrilled to have him take over artrepublic Brighton. Kicking off the weekend in style, get down to the gallery early to avoid missing out. Any questions? Please call us or pop into our gallery - 01273 724829 See you there.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Celebrate life’s milestones with the gift of art

    A heartfelt way to gift your loved ones with artworks they adore - artrepublic gallery can organise wedding, birthday and special occasion gift lists to celebrate life’s milestones. Gifting art has never easier and with wedding season just around the corner, it’s a great time to start think....
    A heartfelt way to gift your loved ones with artworks they adore - artrepublic gallery can organise wedding, birthday and special occasion gift lists to celebrate life’s milestones. Gifting art has never easier and with wedding season just around the corner, it’s a great time to start thinking about the gift list! artrepublic conveniently offers newlyweds the opportunity to buy the art they love, with a little help from their family and friends. Wedding guests can easily contribute towards an artrepublic art fund for the happy new couple, who will receive a lovely gift voucher. Call the Brighton artrepublic gallery on +44 (0) 1273 724829 to start or add to a wedding gift list. Perhaps this year has a different milestone celebration marked in the diary? A big birthday? A retirement party? A big business success? Whatever the celebration, artrepublic can help to organise a celebratory gift list on your behalf. Our team love to help new and existing clients choose their perfect artwork, especially when the said piece will be marking such a special occasion. We really believe that art is personal and when chosen that way, becomes timeless and forever loved. For further information about anything listed above, or to set up a gift list, please call the Brighton gallery artrepublic team on +44 (0) 1273 724829.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • artrepublic visits the Royal Academy Original Print Fair

    It was a joy and privilege to attend and we wanted to bring you some of the highlights. The 2019 London Original Print Fair gives visitors the opportunity to engage with and buy original prints spanning five centuries. From Picasso to Grayson Perry, there was something for everyone. On the day....
    It was a joy and privilege to attend and we wanted to bring you some of the highlights. The 2019 London Original Print Fair gives visitors the opportunity to engage with and buy original prints spanning five centuries. From Picasso to Grayson Perry, there was something for everyone. On the day, we saw some of our favourite featured artists from the Brighton gallery and some of their new original work. Following on from ‘Present Sense’, his three-year long collaboration with the Royal Academy, Michael Craig-Martin’s work made a welcome appearance at this year’s Original Print Fair. His fixation on ordinary objects stabilises his use of eclectic, often highly saturated colours.  He elevates what is usually considered the mundane, providing an outline or a particular angle in order to play around with perspective and detail. Most of the objects that he has featured in his works have gone out of fashion or production since. At first glance his work might seem simplistic, but Craig-Martin provides an important social commentary on the rapid rate that we consume items. By encapsulating an aspect of our present in art, we can see how quickly an everyday object becomes a relic of design history. His cool, minimalist style puts all of the emphasis on the interpretation of the viewer and our own personal nostalgia. Disconnected yet profound, simplistic yet vivid, Craig-Martin has redefined abstract-minimalism for modern times. Legendary pop culture artist Peter Blake’s most recent prints were also on display on the day. His collection, ‘Reclaimed Icons’ celebrates an often-overlooked aspect of popular culture: the circus. Taking inspiration from vintage circus advertisements, Blake plays with the traditional to produce something much more decadent. Embellishing with metallic glitters and stunningly vibrant inks, Blake breathes a new life into what used to be images seen everyday. His trademark fascination with nostalgia is given a new avenue to explore within this series. The pieces feature clowns, flamenco dancers, pin-ups and more. Harking back to the entertainment culture of another era, Blake effortlessly evokes our own personal memories of childhood without being sentimental. The pieces are how we’d like to remember the circus, the glittering gorgeousness and majestic performances. Signed by Blake, from a limited edition, these pieces are a delightful blast from a nearly-forgotten past. artrepublic were delighted to find Bruce McLean’s works on the day too. His instantly recognisable dynamic style combines the luminosity of colour with the unpredictability of his shapes. The resulting compositions are bold, expressive and vibrant. McLean’s work demonstrates how his style is in a constant state of flux. There’s a restlessness to his pieces, as black ‘scribbles’ cut through the prints, that indicate his desire to challenge the concepts around what defines ‘art’. The layering of textures and colours demonstrate the spontaneity within his creative process, the evolving nature of his works. Giving the pieces a sense of movement and fun, crucial within McLean’s work. What marks him as one of the key contemporary artists of our times is the energy that he permeates throughout his works, which are electrifying displays of his anti-establishment creativity. Last but definitely not least, we saw some of print legend David Shrigley’s work. Shrigley’s style is often unnervingly childlike, as it simultaneously celebrates and satirises aspects of everyday adult life. The imperfections within his works, the wobbly letters, the unevenly hand-painted words, give his pieces a sense of openness and intimacy. ‘Its All Your Fault’ features a huge hand pointing directly at the viewer. Whether we’re thinking about that time we forgot to turn the oven off, or about our shambolic government, we can’t help but be charmed by his playful provocativeness. $test =
  • Buy affordable art at the eagerly anticipated 2019 Art Yard Sale

    Sunday 2nd June, don't miss the 2019 Art Yard Sale in Brighton.   Our eagerly anticipated Art Yard Sale will return again on 2nd June 2019 in the heart of Brighton’s North Laines - Jubilee Square. Now in its fourth year, this spectacular event draws huge crowds, keen to meet their favou....
    Sunday 2nd June, don't miss the 2019 Art Yard Sale in Brighton.   Our eagerly anticipated Art Yard Sale will return again on 2nd June 2019 in the heart of Brighton’s North Laines - Jubilee Square. Now in its fourth year, this spectacular event draws huge crowds, keen to meet their favourite artist from the artrepublic gallery. A fantastic opportunity to buy affordable, exclusive artworks from leading, contemporary artists - this event is one for your diary. Expect an array of artworks for sale from both emerging and established artists alike. Discover brand new print releases whilst taking part in impromptu workshops with artists at their stalls. The day is full of inspiring opportunities. We are pleased to welcome the following artists for Art Yard Sale 2019: Anders Coolnnice, Aroe, Art & Believe, Bonnie and Clyde, Chloe Rox, CJP, Clive Sefton, Cosmo Sarson, Dan Hillier, Dave Buonaguidi, Dirty Hans, Eddy Bennett, Eelus, Euan Roberts, Jayson Lilley, Joe Webb, Louise Mcnaught, Lucy Bryant, Magnus Gjoen, Maria Rivans, Mike Edwards, Pure Evil, Rebecca Strickson, Richard Berner, Ryan Callanan, Sara Pope, Sarah Arnett, Sinna1, Soozy Lipsey On the day artists will only accept artrepublic Money, you can exchange your cash at the artrepublic stall that will be at the entrance of Jubilee Square. To avoid the queues, the artrepublic gallery on Bond Street will be open 2 hours earlier so you cans swap your cash for artrepublic money between 9am and 11am only. Created with the objective of bringing together our gallery's artists with their fan base in one spectacular art-filled place; our event runs alongside Brighton's creative festival season - the Brighton Fringe. artrepublic has been the official sponsor of the Visual Arts Programme at the Brighton Fringe for many years now – and our Art Yard Sale fits perfectly with the local and creative ethos of the festival. Founder and curator Lindsay Alkin shares: “It’s a really fun day, where everyone can meet their favorite artists, learn about their creative process and watch them hand finish exclusive works. It’s best to get down early as a lot of the releases sell out as they are at special prices for the day and no one likes to miss out. We have a really wide selection this year from photography to ceramics from exciting new artists.” Find out more at the Art Yard Sale website. $test =
  • The Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography

    Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography May is officially Photography month. Our friends at Crane Kalman Gallery have helped us put together a beginners guide to collecting photography.  Beauty And The Beast by Slim Aarons   Why collect photography? The best reason to buy anything is....
    Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography May is officially Photography month. Our friends at Crane Kalman Gallery have helped us put together a beginners guide to collecting photography.  Beauty And The Beast by Slim Aarons   Why collect photography? The best reason to buy anything is that you cannot imagine living without it. Photography is still a relative newcomer to the collecting scene, having only really come to the fore in the 1970s, due to serious collectors began to notice its value. Since the 1980s, the market for art photography has been steadily accelerating. With a sharply growing status in the art market, today it is recognised as an established artistic medium. In a fifteen-year period starting in 2000, photography’s price index grew by 48%. By the end of 2017, art-market analysis showed that art photography sales were up 54% overall. Photographs by emerging and even established photographers are incredibly reasonable in comparison with the astronomical and ever-rising costs of contemporary art, which means that it is possible to build an exceptional photography collection for the equivalent price of one good piece of contemporary art. Did you know that the average auction price for a photograph is $10,000, compared with $60,000 for a painting? This makes it an appealing and exciting medium to be collecting, not to mention infinitely more accessible. And if you look at collecting work by emerging and mid-career photographers, or those in the 19-35 age group, it is highly likely that you will be investing early in great artists of the future. Where to start? There is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to something as subjective as taste and art. A personal touch is key. Think about what you like; maybe you have a penchant for vintage cars. You could start with a well-defined field, like landscape photography or portraiture, and explore the ways in which different photographers approach their subject matter. Some experts suggest creating a narrative through a selection of works by individual photographers. If you identify a noticeable theme driving your desires and interests, you can source works that respond to that theme. Grow your collection from there.  If you have a fondness for icons of our recent history, look at Richard Heeps’ work. In Indian Coca Cola, Heeps depicts the immediately recognisable, cursive, white Coca Cola script locked in a losing battle with fading red paint on wood boards. The once vivid colours recall the glowing Golden Age of Coca-Cola. This is when it was linked with relaxation and an American way of life. Now, the sign has deteriorated. That Golden Age is just a distant memory held in our collective cultural consciousness. Heeps creates a powerful and deeply nostalgic evocation of fifties American life to contrast the immediacy of our contemporary lives. Indian Coca-Cola by Richard Heeps If you have an interest in American style, look no further than Michael Schachtner’s elegant images of the iconic American sports shoe: Converse’s All Star. Schachtner's individual images of pairs of battered All Stars, one of the most iconic footwear silhouettes of all time, against a pure white background elevate the humble rubber-soled sports shoe to a museum object. The ingenuity behind this series is the way Schachtner depicts these shoes as portraits of their owners; every grain of dirt, every crease in the fabric, every hole in the sole represents a journey or adventure taken by the wearer, and vicariously by us. Converse, Stars and Stripes by Michael Schachtner What next? All Is Not Lost by Jeremy Gibbs AKA RomanyWG Consider your personality: do you prefer to plan or are you led purely by instinct? If you like to plan, think about creating a mood-board, bringing together your interests in an immediately visual way. From the simplest approach of collating images that you like, to a more in-depth method, like identifying the aesthetic of a decade, nothing is off limits to you. Why a mood-board? The process of physically pinpointing what you like or what interests you through a mood-board can stimulate fresh ideas. Make the most of technology; use Instagram to search hashtags that will inspire new ideas, and collect your interests digitally. The benefit of creating a mood-board, is that it will enable you to see how works will look together in one space. What suits you? Trips to art galleries and fairs are a good idea if you are guided by instinct. This is because you can look at work in the flesh. Visiting a gallery and being surrounded by images is a valuable way of gauging your reaction to an artwork the moment you see it. It will also enable you to visualise how pieces will look in your home. Consider size, space and style; you will know what suits you and your home best. You can then use artrepublic's website to find available works. Which photographers? Consider supporting early-career photographers as their work will be more affordable than the big names. You may discover a gem that speaks to you. Try following photographers on Instagram; this will bring you closer to seeing their creative process and what happens behind the scenes. It will also prompt you to research the photographer, their background, interests, or previous series. Summing up Let your instincts and tastes guide you. Know the background of the photographer, the series, the edition size and pricing ladder, and have conversations with the gallery; research is key. But ultimately buy what you like. Think with your head, but buy with your heart.   We hope you enjoyed reading this article about photography and all the opportunity it offers. Stay tuned throughout the month to see further instalments into the ever prosperous world of photography! $test =
  • Pure Evil and Ben Eine host a panel talk in Brighton

    artrepublic are excited to announce the launch of season 2 of our podcast ‘art related noise’ Hosted by Inspiring City, specialising in all things arty and interesting, focuses on bringing some of the most genuine and unique artist interviews from across the UK. To kick off the new season, ....
    artrepublic are excited to announce the launch of season 2 of our podcast ‘art related noise’ Hosted by Inspiring City, specialising in all things arty and interesting, focuses on bringing some of the most genuine and unique artist interviews from across the UK. To kick off the new season, artrepublic are celebrating the unveiling of new artworks from Ben Eine and Pure Evil (Charlie) on the walls of the Brighton’s Artists Residence Hotel in style. We’re hosting a four-course tasting menu at The Set restaurant, which will precede a panel talk with Ben and Pure Evil themselves. The panel discussion will be recorded live for episode one of the new season of podcasts from Inspiring City.  After the panel talk, guests will be invited to explore the rooms and the new artwork with the artists. Tickets are £75 per person, including a welcome drink. Book your place at our panel talk with Ben Eine and Pure Evil The aim is to bring the admirers of art and the artists closer together, to create the opportunity for open discussion of their works and influences. To be able to meet world-class contemporary artists in such an intimate setting and hear first-hand about their work is a rare opportunity, and artrepublic are very excited to make this happen! The panel talk will be kicking off with a discussion about street art vs fine art, the influences the two have had respectively on the work of Ben and Charlie and debating their places within our society at the moment. With 25 years in the game, Ben Eine is often regarded as a pioneer in the type space. Innovating the form with his own exploration of graffiti, he developed his unique typographic style that can be seen within our gallery and on the streets of Brighton and London respectively. Charlie was also heavily influenced by graffiti culture, his ‘most important artistic discovery’, one that is still prevalent within his best-known work. The iconic blotch of dripping paint underneath the eye of his muses lends itself to the influence of street art, a trademark that is now globally recognised as his. The conversations look to get under the skin of the art world and see what makes it tick. Season one featured huge names of beloved artists such as Sara Pope, Jason Lilley and most recently Mark Vessey. We’re excited to see what season two has in store. Tune in for equal parts arty banter, insightful discussion and fascinating facts from two of the leading contemporary artists in the UK! Download our 'Art Related Noise' podcast   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Dan Hillier has us mesmerized with a brand new box set

    artrepublic Brighton has launched a brand new box set by renowned artist Dan Hillier. Famed for seamlessly blending Surrealism and Neo-Victoriana, he creates new artworks from pieces of old Victorian prints, woodcuts, engravings and various illustrations. The beautiful set of six giclée prints is....
    artrepublic Brighton has launched a brand new box set by renowned artist Dan Hillier. Famed for seamlessly blending Surrealism and Neo-Victoriana, he creates new artworks from pieces of old Victorian prints, woodcuts, engravings and various illustrations. The beautiful set of six giclée prints is presented in a bespoke archival display box, from a limited edition of 100. Hackney-based artist Dan Hillier has been busy. Over the past twelve years, he’s produced art that has stretched his explorative style and made a significant impact on the UK contemporary art scene. Mainly producing art for himself, Hillier draws upon a huge range of influences and imagery to produce works that are arresting, complex and beautiful. He has a glittering array of impressive collaborations under his belt, including Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, the Folio Society and most recently created the opening titles to BBC One’s new major drama ‘Requiem’. He was also chosen in 2015 by the British Council to represent Britain in the Giant Creator Show in Beijing. No big deal. Hillier’s works are eerily provocative. They take you on a visual journey into the realms of your subconscious, simultaneously enlightening and perplexing the viewer. Exploration is a huge cornerstone of Hillier’s working practice, leaving room for the spontaneity of his ideas to grace the pieces almost like epiphanies. His diversity of ideological influences add depth to his work, his is often found quoting Buddhist texts in relation to his work on Instagram. It is clear that themes of rebirth, death, transcendence and enlightenment pervade his work. A huge fan of Tibetan art, the intricacy of the detailing and the texture of his pieces allude to ancient tapestries whilst contributing to his creation of something otherworldly and contemporary. Full of contradictions, Hillier’s work experiments with darkness and light, the biblical and the modern and monochrome and luxurious gold leaf. Visually contrasting and thematically opposing, Hillier confronts the metaphysical ideas surrounding our reality. Submerging us into an unsettlingly immersive world of ethereal beauty, Hillier pulls no punches in captivating the viewer. Although Hillier’s technique relies upon collaging and pulling images from an array of different sources, the resulting compositions are always entirely cohesive. His ability to seamlessly blend his eclectic influences together is a tribute to his mastery of his form. To view the new set call into our gallery at 13 Bond Street, Brighton, BN1 1RD or call us for more details: +44 1273 724829.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Mixed Originals Show – new work at artrepublic Brighton

    Before our fifth annual Art Yard Sale closes the Brighton Fringe Festival on 2nd June 2019, artrepublic are hosting a showcase of work, throughout May, featuring the artists taking part. Every artist will be presenting an original specifically for our showcase. Expect to see the likes of Dan Hil....
    Before our fifth annual Art Yard Sale closes the Brighton Fringe Festival on 2nd June 2019, artrepublic are hosting a showcase of work, throughout May, featuring the artists taking part. Every artist will be presenting an original specifically for our showcase. Expect to see the likes of Dan Hillier, Maria Rivans, Bonnie and Clyde, Joe Webb, Eddy Bennett, RYCA and Evan Roberts and many more leading UK contemporary artists. It’s a fantastic opportunity to bag an original from a beloved artist.     Our Art Yard Sale is a huge success every year and whether you can or can’t make this year’s event, take a look in our gallery for a preview of new work by artists featured on the day. We love to celebrate the new in the art scene, so every year there is something different to see. The showcase kicks off with a Private View on 2nd May, where artists will be available for questions and feedback on their work on the night and you can gain unique insight into their inspirations and processes. We love the accessibility the Art Yard Sale creates around the artists and their work, giving the art the chance to speak for itself and the artists the opportunity to speak for themselves. From illustration, to print, to painting and even graffiti and sculpture we offer an edited selection of the UK’s best contemporary art. Whether you’re in Brighton for the Fringe Festival or a local, this is a showcase of creative talent not to be missed. Join us at our Brighton gallery throughout May to preview this year’s Art Yard Sale and register for free tickets to our exclusive Private View evening on 2nd May. See you there!   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Q&A with Matt Jukes

    We were lucky enough to get a Q&A with the latest artist to join us here at artrepublic. Get to know the amazing Matt Jukes below. Emma: Hello, Matt. Thank you for agreeing to do this Q&A. First off, I wanted to ask what inspired you to pursue art as a career? Matt: I’m not sure how to ....
    We were lucky enough to get a Q&A with the latest artist to join us here at artrepublic. Get to know the amazing Matt Jukes below. Emma: Hello, Matt. Thank you for agreeing to do this Q&A. First off, I wanted to ask what inspired you to pursue art as a career? Matt: I’m not sure how to answer this question, as I’ve never really thought of this as a career. It’s never been a choice—it’s more a way of life. The inspiration to do my first art fair came when I was cleaning out my draw in the studio, trying to find some space for new work, and throwing the old work into the bins. Only to discover my studio buddies digging through the bins for my work.  For the first time, I thought that my work would resonate with someone other than myself. Emma: So has art always been a part of your life? Matt: Art has always been part of my life. One of my earliest memories was telling my mother about painting a red car in kindergarten and being upset that it didn’t match my vision. As a child. Emma: Did you study art before you started making your beautiful monotypes? Matt: Like most wistful teens, I studied art in high school where I was attracted to the freedom from the right and wrong answers of my maths and physics classes. From here I got side-tracked by a graphic design degree and a career in advertising. Advertising gave me an understanding of emotion and human connection and how to archive it through shape and form, which I have taken into my monotypes. Emma: What has been some of the biggest inspirations for you and your work? Matt: Hazy memories. All of my work is about the search for almost forgotten memories which I capture through emotions, music and places. Most of the titles of my work are references to obscure song lyrics. This is because music along with colour, it helps shape the emotion of a piece. Music is constantly surrounding me, providing a soundtrack to my life, this means that a handful of words can fill me with emotion, take me back to a time and place in a second. In my work, I always try laying down a feeling of place and not a physical depiction. I want the viewer to share the same emotion and implant their own location from their memories. Emma: Looking at your work, you seem to capture movement across landscapes really well. Is capturing movement a key part of your creative process? Matt: Movement and depth are critical to my work and deeply built into my process. Using the Offset Lithography Press allows me to carry forward the ink, moving my work away from a simple ink or no ink approach of relief printing and allowing each image to be held on the blanket. This is where this movement comes from. Emma: Is colour choice a big part of the process when creating your work? Matt: Colour and colour theory are a huge part of my work. I see colour as liquid emotion, layered in cultural meaning. I start every piece with a search for a colour, and as I hand mix the ink together, an emotion associated with that colour starts to emerge. Emma: Is every piece of your work inspired by a specific landscape? Matt: Every piece is an emotional representation of a specific place, but I usually keep the location a secret as I don’t want to influence the viewer in finding their own place. So my question to you is: where is this place for you? Emma: What has been one of your favourite pieces to work on? Matt: I find my favourite pieces are the ones which surprise me, the ones that pop up on the way to when you are looking for something else. My current favourite is a piece called “The Endless Sea”. It is much quieter than the others, as the tones are darker but strangely incandescent. I like that it’s a little tricky and doesn’t like to be captured by the camera. It only really shows its magic when viewed in person. Emma: Thank you so much, Matt, for letting us get a glimpse into how to create your stunning works of art. Are there any up-and-coming projects you'd like to let everyone know about?  Matt: The next project I am really excited by departs from my current work and looks into the memories of the individual viewer. To do this I’m building a robot which will look at the viewer’s face and analyse their emotions before setting out to paint a representation of what they’re feeling.     Don't miss Matt's one of a kind monotypes. These beautiful pieces are now available. Check out all of his work HERE  $test =
  • Elizabeth Waggett releases new print ‘Where The Light Gets In’

    New-York-based fine artist Elizabeth Waggett reveals her eagerly anticipated new print, ‘Where The Light Gets In’. An exceptional, internationally renowned contemporary artist, originally from Manchester – Waggett’s style is becoming quite the collectors' favourite. Her artworks are now....
    New-York-based fine artist Elizabeth Waggett reveals her eagerly anticipated new print, ‘Where The Light Gets In’. An exceptional, internationally renowned contemporary artist, originally from Manchester – Waggett’s style is becoming quite the collectors' favourite. Her artworks are now held in many private collections in North America, Bahrain, Europe, South Africa, and the UAE. There is no doubt that her newest piece will be snapped up quickly. As a limited edition of 30 prints, ‘Where the light gets in’ is the latest print in Elizabeth's longhorn series and pays homage to her hometown of Manchester. This unique edition is hand finished with real 22 karat rose gold leaf and has hand finished elements such as ink and graphite on archival somerset 330 gsm cotton rage. "It's a celebration of my home city Manchester and my new home New York. I wanted to create a piece that symbolised my time so far living in America and particularly New York as a proud Mancunian. The two powerful creates the longhorn (America) and the bee (Manchester) felt like the perfect pairing for this piece to celebrate the confusing yet magical time living in NYC, my acceptance of it and its acceptance of me." The first 10 of the edition will be hand embellished by the artist with 22ct gold. Internationally recognised for choosing objects which have a strong social stigma associated with them, Waggett cleverly explores these stigmas through her monochromatic working methods, centred around meticulous and analytical mark making. Through the visually pleasing addition of shimmering gold leaf, her chosen object is transformed into something that feels new and quite beautiful. Through her artistic hand, Waggett asks the viewer to question the conversation about the stigma and if its attachment to the object really needs to be there. Rather than being described as hyperrealist or photorealist, her artworks reflect how her unique layering style can create an impact from afar that requires closer inspection. In an interview, she states: “I suppose my work is about accuracy and whether there are such things”. Perhaps her mark making is continually addressing the accuracy of our social constructs? We’ve put the question out there, what do you think?   To find out more about this print, pop into our Brighton gallery or call us: +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =

1-10 of 704

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. ...
  7. 71
Scroll To Top