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  • Beginners Guide To Collecting Photography - Issue 2

    Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography - Issue 2 Part 2 is here! Following on from the first part of our beginner's guide, our friends at Crane Kalman Brighton have helped us put together our beginner's guide to collecting photography. If you haven't seen our first part, check it out here. ....
    Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography - Issue 2 Part 2 is here! Following on from the first part of our beginner's guide, our friends at Crane Kalman Brighton have helped us put together our beginner's guide to collecting photography. If you haven't seen our first part, check it out here. Welcome back to the second issue in this mini-series of The Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography. The process of buying photographic prints can be confusing if you're coming to it fresh. In the first issue, we talked about why you might collect photography, where you might start and how you can identify what you like. This issue will look at print editions, price points, print papers and how to make the most of that mailing list. Penguin XL by Mark Vessey Editioning The concept of editions is a confusing one so don't worry if you don't understand it straight away. When a photographer creates an image for sale, it'll be sold in an edition. This refers to the number of prints produced of that image in that particular size and sold for that particular price, although we'll see in the following section how this can change too as more prints are sold. Editions can vary widely in size, from 7 to 100, and even 250, and are usually called "Limited Editions" because the number of prints in that edition is (you guessed it) limited to that number. For example, Mark Vessey's Penguin XL is a limited edition print consisting of only 15 prints. This means that once all 15 prints in the edition have been sold, no more will be available to purchase. Fires 10 by Ellie Davies You may see the same image in several editions, but with different prices and in different dimensions. For example, it's possible to buy Fires 10 by Ellie Davies in two different sizes from the artrepublic website. When you're scrolling through the site you'll notice that one print of Fires 10 is priced higher than the other. The difference in price can be explained by the dimensions of the print itself: the higher price refers to a physically larger print, whereas the lower price corresponds to the smaller print. Bear in mind that with larger prints the size of the edition itself will usually be smaller. If you come across a print that you like and see it labelled as an "Open Edition", this simply means that there is no limit to the number of prints produced. This is a more common practice for archives to follow rather than photographers or artists, who prefer to maintain exclusivity to their work. Of course, if you're looking to collect work that will increase in value you'll be looking for Limited Editions because their value may increase as the edition becomes sold out. But don't discount a print you like simply because it's from an Open Edition! In our first issue of this Beginners Guide, we emphasised the importance of collecting work that speaks to you, and this advice should really stay at the front your mind as you embark on your collecting journey.     Price Points Closely related to editioning is, of course, price. The prices of editioned prints may vary depending on several things. We've just seen, in the previous section, how you might expect to pay more for a larger print. Well, you can also expect to see incremental prices as the number of prints remaining in an edition shrinks. For example, if you were interested in Ellie Davies's prints you should expect to find that, as more people buy the prints in any of her editions, the prices for the prints remaining in that edition increase. This is not unusual, it reflects the rarity of the remaining prints and the importance of an artist's creative control. Printing Grand Piano XL by Gina Soden One of the most common types of print is Giclee. The word comes from the French, meaning to "spray". The print is produced by a large format inkjet printer quite literally spraying the ink on to the paper so precisely and accurately that what results is the nearest thing to the original image. The paper and ink used in Giclee printing are archival, which means that the print is made to last a long time, so it won't degrade. Another popular form of printing is C-Type, also known as Chromogenic prints. This is a digital process; light-sensitive paper is exposed to lasers or LEDs that use the original digital file of the image, and then processed in photographic developer and fixed, much like the traditional darkroom process. A C-Type will also be printed on archival paper to increase its lifespan. Paper Not all photographic printing papers are created equal! There is a huge range of papers available and they vary in finish and texture, which lends a lot to the final product. If you're interested in knowing the specific kind of paper used don't hesitate to ask if that information isn't immediately available. Varieties include glossy, matte, pearl, rag and textured, each of which provides a different viewing experience. We briefly mentioned archival paper in the previous section. Archival papers are acid-free, meaning that certain chemicals which would David Bowie Photographed by Steve Rapport degrade the quality of the paper through constant exposure to air aren't present. While archival quality paper might make the print more expensive, know that you're also purchasing reassurance that the print will last for years to come.   Mailing Lists Like we said in issue one, make the most of technology and allow it to work for you; sign up straight away to the gallery's mailing list to ensure that you're kept up to date. These email updates might include new works from photographers, news of upcoming gallery shows and art fairs or information about new additions to the gallery's roster of represented artists. The great advantage of signing up to the gallery mailing list is twofold: firstly, it provides you with useful information without having to go looking for it; and secondly, it shows the gallery that you're interested. This is the best way to keep informed and gets you in on the ground floor so you can pave the way to your future photography collection. Sign up to our mailing list here.   We hope you enjoyed reading this article about photography and all the opportunity it offers. Stay tuned to see further instalments into the ever prosperous world of photography!   Want to see some of the wonderful photography that Crane Kalman Brighton Gallery has to offer? Check out their stand at the London Art Fair. See stand 21 on the main Mezzanine floor.  London Art Fair is a showcase for the most exceptional modern and contemporary and provides an opportunity to discover and to buy. The Fair is an established destination for both museum quality modern and contemporary work, nurturing collecting at all levels, from prints, photographs and editions, to major works by internationally renowned artists. The fair runs from 22nd-26th January at the Islington Business Design Centre. Haven't got tickets?  For your chance to win 2 tickets to the London art Fair, for entry to the fair on any day, enter our give away draw here. $test =
  • The Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography - Issue 1

    Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography - Issue 1 May is officially Photography month. Our friends at Crane Kalman Gallery have helped us put together a beginners guide to collecting photography.  Beauty And The Beast by Slim Aarons   Why collect photography? The best reason to buy a....
    Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography - Issue 1 May is officially Photography month. Our friends at Crane Kalman Gallery have helped us put together a beginners guide to collecting photography.  Beauty And The Beast by Slim Aarons   Why collect photography? The best reason to buy anything is that you cannot imagine living without it. Photography is still a relative newcomer to the collecting scene, having only really come to the fore in the 1970s, due to serious collectors began to notice its value. Since the 1980s, the market for art photography has been steadily accelerating. With a sharply growing status in the art market, today it is recognised as an established artistic medium. In a fifteen-year period starting in 2000, photography’s price index grew by 48%. By the end of 2017, art-market analysis showed that art photography sales were up 54% overall. Photographs by emerging and even established photographers are incredibly reasonable in comparison with the astronomical and ever-rising costs of contemporary art, which means that it is possible to build an exceptional photography collection for the equivalent price of one good piece of contemporary art. Did you know that the average auction price for a photograph is $10,000, compared with $60,000 for a painting? This makes it an appealing and exciting medium to be collecting, not to mention infinitely more accessible. And if you look at collecting work by emerging and mid-career photographers, or those in the 19-35 age group, it is highly likely that you will be investing early in great artists of the future. Where to start? There is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to something as subjective as taste and art. A personal touch is key. Think about what you like; maybe you have a penchant for vintage cars. You could start with a well-defined field, like landscape photography or portraiture, and explore the ways in which different photographers approach their subject matter. Some experts suggest creating a narrative through a selection of works by individual photographers. If you identify a noticeable theme driving your desires and interests, you can source works that respond to that theme. Grow your collection from there.  If you have a fondness for icons of our recent history, look at Richard Heeps’ work. In Indian Coca Cola, Heeps depicts the immediately recognisable, cursive, white Coca Cola script locked in a losing battle with fading red paint on wood boards. The once vivid colours recall the glowing Golden Age of Coca-Cola. This is when it was linked with relaxation and an American way of life. Now, the sign has deteriorated. That Golden Age is just a distant memory held in our collective cultural consciousness. Heeps creates a powerful and deeply nostalgic evocation of fifties American life to contrast the immediacy of our contemporary lives. Indian Coca-Cola by Richard Heeps If you have an interest in American style, look no further than Michael Schachtner’s elegant images of the iconic American sports shoe: Converse’s All Star. Schachtner's individual images of pairs of battered All Stars, one of the most iconic footwear silhouettes of all time, against a pure white background elevate the humble rubber-soled sports shoe to a museum object. The ingenuity behind this series is the way Schachtner depicts these shoes as portraits of their owners; every grain of dirt, every crease in the fabric, every hole in the sole represents a journey or adventure taken by the wearer, and vicariously by us. Converse, Stars and Stripes by Michael Schachtner What next? All Is Not Lost by Jeremy Gibbs AKA RomanyWG Consider your personality: do you prefer to plan or are you led purely by instinct? If you like to plan, think about creating a mood-board, bringing together your interests in an immediately visual way. From the simplest approach of collating images that you like, to a more in-depth method, like identifying the aesthetic of a decade, nothing is off limits to you. Why a mood-board? The process of physically pinpointing what you like or what interests you through a mood-board can stimulate fresh ideas. Make the most of technology; use Instagram to search hashtags that will inspire new ideas, and collect your interests digitally. The benefit of creating a mood-board, is that it will enable you to see how works will look together in one space. What suits you? Trips to art galleries and fairs are a good idea if you are guided by instinct. This is because you can look at work in the flesh. Visiting a gallery and being surrounded by images is a valuable way of gauging your reaction to an artwork the moment you see it. It will also enable you to visualise how pieces will look in your home. Consider size, space and style; you will know what suits you and your home best. You can then use artrepublic's website to find available works. Which photographers? Consider supporting early-career photographers as their work will be more affordable than the big names. You may discover a gem that speaks to you. Try following photographers on Instagram; this will bring you closer to seeing their creative process and what happens behind the scenes. It will also prompt you to research the photographer, their background, interests, or previous series. Summing up Let your instincts and tastes guide you. Know the background of the photographer, the series, the edition size and pricing ladder, and have conversations with the gallery; research is key. But ultimately buy what you like. Think with your head, but buy with your heart.   We hope you enjoyed reading this article about photography and all the opportunity it offers. Stay tuned to see further instalments into the ever prosperous world of photography! $test =
  • How to Buy Art Prints

    A guide to buying Artwork When purchasing a piece of art, there is a lot of terminology that come into play which you may not have come across before, with a lot of aspects to consider. In this guide, we break down each feature of the artwork and briefly describe the key features of each. ....
    A guide to buying Artwork When purchasing a piece of art, there is a lot of terminology that come into play which you may not have come across before, with a lot of aspects to consider. In this guide, we break down each feature of the artwork and briefly describe the key features of each. A visual guide to art print terminology Contents 10 Tips for buying art online Edition Type Limited Editions Artist / Printers Proof Open Edition Originals Timed Release Box Sets Hors Commerce Edition Size Paper & Image Size Paper Edge Print Types Giclee Silkscreen Etching Lenticular Photography / C-Type Lino Cut Mixed Media Paper Types Finishes How to Store Your Art Work Sleeve Storage Framed Storage 9 Tips for Buying Art Online 1. Get to know what you’re buying – Brush up on key terms like Limited Editions, Paper types and finishes so you know exactly what you’re buying. An Open Edition Giclée and a Limited Edition Silkscreen can be entirely different, but may look similar to the untrained eye! 2. Research the Artist – Every artist is different and will have a personal story with their work. Researching their style and evolution will bring understanding and value to the artwork you are considering. 3. Where is the piece going? – Are you after Square, Portrait or Landscape piece? How big does it need to be? This will help you refine your search. 4. Be Open – There’s so many different styles out there, it’s hard to pin artwork into a single box. Browse around, using categories and filters to hone your budget and tastes. 5. Consider newer artists – The big names attract big money. However supporting emerging artists can secure you a similar style of work at a lower price. 6. Don’t try to guess the market – It’s difficult to know whether artwork will increase in value, and it’s best to purchase for your own pleasure and enjoyment. 7. Consider Framing – Framing protects your print against damage. If purchasing a piece to put on your wall, purchase framing at the same time to have your piece professionally handled and framed. 8. Pay attention to size – Unlike in a gallery, getting an idea of size can be extremely difficult with a 20 x 20cm piece looking similar to a 80 x 80cm when viewed on a screen! We list paper sizes for all our pieces and provide mock-ups where possible. 9. Buy what you love – Remember, art you buy will be on your walls for a long time! Make sure you enjoy the art you buy above all else. Edition Type These are the most common edition types that you can find on artrepublic: Limited Edition Artist / Printers Proof Open Edition Original Timed release Box Set Limited Editions These are prints that, unsurprisingly, are limited in their production. The amount they are limited by depends entirely on the edition. Limited editions are always numbered but not always signed by the artist. Special edition prints, such as those with Gold Leaf, Diamond dust or other finishes, are usually limited to smaller edition sizes compared to the main edition, such as 5 or 10. Sometimes they will be the first 5 or 10 releases of an edition. Edition Numbers – Edition numbers are normally written in the format xx/yy. The first number is the number of the print in the series. The second number is the total number of prints in that edition. Special edition prints, such as those with Gold Leaf, Diamond dust or other finishes, are usually limited to smaller edition sizes compared to the main edition, such as 5 or 10. Sometimes they will be the first 5 or 10 releases of an edition. Artist / Printers Proof When producing limited editions, an extra number of prints, excluded from the main edition size, are printed as an additional proofing for the artist and / or printers to ensure the intended results are achieved. These can be around 10% of the edition size, and can vary in appearance from the main edition. They can include blemishes or colour variations that were “fixed” for the main edition, due to the proofing process. Open Edition These are editions that have no fixed production volume – and can run indefinitely. For this reason they are usually not signed. Originals Originals are artworks produced by the artists. They can be 1/1 hand finished prints. These are 1 of 1s, originally produced by the artist and include hand-finished details. It may be that limited edition prints are produced from this original piece. Timed Release Timed releases are a new format that has taken off in recent years, especially for online retailers. A print is made available for a set time – usually 24 or 48 hours, and the edition size is then determined by how many prints are ordered and produced. Box Sets Box Sets are collections of limited edition works, in a special presentation “box” which is often a piece of work in itself! The collections can be available as individual prints or they may only be available as a set. Sometimes only part of an edition is in a set with matching numbers. Hors Commerce (HC) Prints printed not for commercial sale will be marked with HC. They are often the same as the original edition, but were not originally printed for sale. Edition Size As the name suggests, this is the amount of prints that have been produced in a set edition. It’s important to note that variations on a print will have their own edition sizes. For example an artist may produce a standard edition with a size of 50, while also releasing special gold leaf or diamond dust editions at smaller edition sizes and print sizes. So the image used may have a total print run of 90 plus, consisting of 50 standard editions, 20 gold and 20 diamond versions. Paper Size + Image Size All of our paper sizes are displayed in the format Width x Height, in cm. If the first number is larger than the second, the print is in landscape format, and vice versa is portrait. The image size will sometimes be smaller than the paper size, suggesting a border around the image. Where possible we try to show this through the product image. Paper Edge Papers will have either straight cut edges, or “deckled”, hand torn edges. This mostly influences how you may frame the print. Straight cut edges can be framed to the edge, where as deckled prints will look impressive with a shadow float mount. Deckled edge with Float mount Straight cut paper, Framed to the paper edge   Print Types Artists work using a wide variety of print methods, all producing slightly different styles. Giclée (Archival Print) Giclée’s are a digital form of printing, using high resolution inkjet printers to produce quality archival prints which can last for decades. These can be finished with hand-applied details, or hand finished silkscreens and finishes. Silkscreen Silkscreen, also referred to as screen printing or serigraph, is a process where screens made of stretched silk are exposed to light to produce certain patterns, through which ink is then pressed onto paper. It is a manual process where each colour is applied by hand, often involving many layers. A fabulous example of an artist who pushes this to the limit is Bonnie and Clyde who have produced 30-layered screen-prints.Silkscreens can also used to finish / glaze other types of print. Close up of a Silkscreen Close up of a Giclee Etching Etching is a method of placing an image onto a metal plate using acid. The plate is covered in an acid-ground or wax, protecting the plate from the acid bath. Into this, the artist scratches a design. When submerged the acid eats away at the exposed metal, leaving an indented area to which ink can be applied for printing. As a method it dates back to the 14th century, and was widely used for printing in the 16th century. Lenticular A lenticular is a technology that allows the viewed image to alter, based on viewing angle. This is achieved through a layer of lenses (lenticules) on the surface of the print which only allows the viewing of one of the interlaced images. This creates prints that change based on where the viewer is standing.Artists use this effect to make images appear 3 dimensional, convey movement or change the colours in a print entirely. Photography / C-Type Photography prints use a different printing process. The result is a more analogue feel to the prints, due to the chemical process that prints are exposed to. They are preferred due to the glossy and metallic results achievable with certain paper types not available for Giclée. Note that silkscreens may be used to apply finishes such as diamond dust, varnishes or glazes to Photography prints, but are rarely used to print the image itself. Linocut Linocuts are produced through ink flowing into a relief carved within a sheet of linoleum. Mixed Media Mixed media works are produced using a variety of mediums / methods. For example a print may be a Giclée print with a silkscreen varnish, along with spray painted and hand drawn elements. Some artists may use 3D objects to enhance an image. Glitter, plastic models, glass, spray paint, oils and more can all be utilised to create a unique hand finished artwork. Or an artist can create an original work with oilpaint collage and spray stencils. Paper Types The paper type is specified where available on our prints. The style or make of paper usually varies based on artist preference, with different paper types creating different end results due to the absorption of inks.It is important to wrap prints in tissue paper that is acid free to prevent the yellowing of the paper.We always describe paper used in the following format: “300gsm Somerset Tub” – “Weight, Make, Style”. Weight Weight refers to the paper weight, with many of the prints being produced on paper between 300 and 400gsm. This makes for an extremely thick, quality paper which absorbs inks much better than thinner papers and lasts much longer. GSM stands for Grams per Square Meter. Standard office printer paper is around 80gsm. Make There are several makers of paper, with Somerset and Hahnemühle and Fabriano the most popular. Style The last piece of information is the style, such as Satin, Cotton Rag, Satin, Smooth, Velvet etc. These all vary on the production process of the paper. Finishes Prints may be finished with varnishes, glazes and other layers to give a piece a special finish. This can be to highlight certain areas of the print or to give the whole print a certain aesthetic. They can be applied by Hand or as a Silkscreen layer. How to Store Your Art Work Effective storage of your prints ensures protects your prints and lets you rotate and freshen up the art you display on your walls. The best way to store prints is either in a sleeve, or framed. Sleeve Storage Folders or Sleeves are a safe way to store prints long term, as they ensure flat, separated storage in an easy to manage form. Portfolio sleeves are relatively inexpensive, and can be purchased with firm separators to keep prints flat. Once sleeved, ideally store in a large metal cabinet, as metal is cleaner won’t harbor any organic materials which may damage your print. Things to be aware of: Humidity – Keep in an area with good air flow and stable temperatures. Avoid basements or similar areas where excessive heat or mould can warp or discolour / eat the print Light – UV Glass for framed items is highly recommended as it protects from discolouring and fading of colours. If storing long term, try to avoid direct sunlight Heat – Like humidity, heat can cause prints to warp or go brittle if the air is too dry. Keep at a stable temperature and avoid placing artwork above radiators. Acid – Make sure packaging and framing is all acid free Framed Storage Once work has been framed and cannot safely be removed from the frame, the best option for storage is to wrap in protective packaging such as bubble wrap, and tightly tape sealed shut.Top tips: Avoid storing prints near / above radiators Avoid storing prints in direct sunlight (use UV glass in frames where available) Do not store in areas without airflow that may attract humidity. Use acid free storage / tissue paper when wrapping $test =

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