Gallery Middle Promotions

  • Sealed With A Kiss: Sara Pope’s exclusive artrepublic giveaway

    Want to win a very special original from the artist’s forthcoming showcase? Read on... The eyes get a lot of credit when it comes to expressing emotion; they are the windows to the soul, could kill with just a look and sometimes they even go a little starry. But what about the part the rest o....
    Want to win a very special original from the artist’s forthcoming showcase? Read on... The eyes get a lot of credit when it comes to expressing emotion; they are the windows to the soul, could kill with just a look and sometimes they even go a little starry. But what about the part the rest of the face plays in showing, or even hiding, our feelings? One person who’s long considered this is artist Sara Pope, whose portraits don’t usually take in the whole face; instead, they focus specifically on a subject’s lips as they move through various emotions. These glossy, glittery and highly saturated pouts, mimicking the slick finish of advertising and often named for the shade of lipstick worn by her models, have become Pope’s trademark. They’ve been applied to canvases, silk screened onto paper and also used to customise shoes. And she hasn’t remotely finished exploring this seductive subject, as you’ll see at her first full showcase at artrepublic Brighton this November. Expect a series of originals that have never been shown in the UK, a brand-new lenticular print release and a very special homage to Pope’s work in fashion – a one-of-a-kind hand-painted leather jacket. This unique piece isn’t merely part of the showcase; it’s the starting point of an exciting event in its own right. Want to know why? We can now reveal that this original piece of Pope’s handiwork will be up for grabs at artrepublic. Not to buy though, and not through an auction, but via a good old-fashioned raffle! Albeit one with a twist. Because rather than throwing your name in the hat by purchasing a few rows of numbered paper tickets a la the local village fair, this exclusive tombola will only contain the names of those who buy one of Pope’s limited edition prints at the artrepublic gallery in Brighton before the showcase opens on 15 November 2018. A fan of Pope’s work? Then read our lips: you don’t want to miss out on this massive event. To find out more about Sara Pope’s showcase, the exclusive fashion-forward raffle and to discover more about the limited edition prints we have in the gallery, speak to one of our personal art advisors – just stop by artrepublic Brighton or give us ring on 01273 724829.   Sara Pope Prize Draw Terms and Conditions (see section 18)   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • A Subtle Twist Of Line: Richard Berner Live Screen Printing Event

    Meet Richard Berner, the host of this month’s Live Edition Printing evening with The Private Press. What links Audrey Hepburn, Amy Winehouse, the Houses of Parliament and a tentacle-wielding creature from the deep? Unless you have any other (we’d like to say unlikely) suggestions, the answe....
    Meet Richard Berner, the host of this month’s Live Edition Printing evening with The Private Press. What links Audrey Hepburn, Amy Winehouse, the Houses of Parliament and a tentacle-wielding creature from the deep? Unless you have any other (we’d like to say unlikely) suggestions, the answer to that would be Brighton-based artist Richard Berner. A regular feature on the walls at artrepublic Brighton, Berner’s work blends fine ink work and cultural iconography with a dusting of dark humour. While some of his images are straight-up homages to famous figures, such as David Bowie, Charlie Chaplin and, erm, Storm Troopers, each finished with watercolour hues, drips and splodges, others have the hallmarks of those classic political caricatures found in famous international newspapers and journals for centuries. You know, the ones that take familiar forms and figures but toy with them just enough to make a clever commentary or subtle joke. Whether it’s a beautiful moth that turns out to be made up of hundreds of tiny skeletons and ghoulish creatures, or a King Kong-like figure ascending Big Ben, drawn in a way that references Dali’s dripping clocks, Berner’s illustrative images definitely reward close inspection. The great news is, you can get up really close to the artist’s next limited edition, as he’s producing it at this month’s Live Edition Printing evening at the gallery, run in collaboration with The Private Press. Join us at artrepublic Brighton on 26 October, from 6-8pm, as Berner unveils, hand-finishes and signs an edition of just 50 prints, which you can buy there and then. As usual, the after-work creative session will also feature drinks at the gallery and a chance to meet the artist and have a chat about his work.   To find out more about the event, and to save yourself a space at (or near) the printing press, check out our eventbrite page.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • A Snail’s Place: catch Brighton’s latest charitable art trail this autumn

    Move over Snowdogs, the SnailSpace trail is taking to the streets of Brighton in aid of the Martlets, proudly sponsored by artrepublic.   You see plenty of interesting things on the streets of Brighton every day, and even more so during Festival season. But few things have captured the co....
    Move over Snowdogs, the SnailSpace trail is taking to the streets of Brighton in aid of the Martlets, proudly sponsored by artrepublic.   You see plenty of interesting things on the streets of Brighton every day, and even more so during Festival season. But few things have captured the community’s attention or spirit recently quite like the Snowdogs that popped up on pavements across town in 2016, drawing visitors from far and wide. After three months, the 44 artist-designed sculptural dogs were auctioned off, raising more than £300k for the Martlets Hospice. But since then we’ve missed the colour they bring to our seaside city, so we were very excited when the latest trail was announced. Yes, that’s right. A new trail based around a troop of snails – aka the SnailSpace trail – will be surfacing by the seaside from 15 September to 18 November, to show off a series of snazzy shells (is that enough alliteration in one sentence for you?). Once again each sculpture has been sponsored by a local business, with their shells designed by one of a troop of charitable artists. Of course, artrepublic Brighton signed up straight away to sponsor a snail, which has been designed by one of our very own artists, Eelus. Taking inspiration from his love of books and the storytellers that fuelled his imagination as a child, Eelus’ snail portrays his own fantastical tale: of a renowned (and feared) French chef Jacques Le Méchant, a cunning cook who has devised a way to infiltrate Snail Kingdom in search of the tastiest snails for his famous restaurant ‘L’Escargot Fantaisie’! Let’s hope his presence doesn’t make it too hard to track down the local delicacies… sorry design pieces.   To find out more about the SnailSpace trail, and how it benefits the Martlets, visit snailspacebrighton.co.uk. We can’t wait to join the snail hunt with you, Eelus and all the other local artists. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page   $test =
  • Join the monthly artrepublic Kids Club

    **Please note, our October Kids Club is now sold out and our November Club is booking up fast**.   Sat 20th Oct 10-11:30am, Event host Benjamin Thomas Taylor talks painting by numbers and unicorn sounds​. Join us for an hour and a half of creative fun, with loads of great activitie....
    **Please note, our October Kids Club is now sold out and our November Club is booking up fast**.   Sat 20th Oct 10-11:30am, Event host Benjamin Thomas Taylor talks painting by numbers and unicorn sounds​. Join us for an hour and a half of creative fun, with loads of great activities for the kids to enjoy. Apply for your FREE tickets today!   Did you know that Leonardo da Vinci taught his apprentices basic painting theory and techniques by numbering patterns on a canvas and designating a specific colour to each number? And did you also know that this was the basis for the original Paint-By-Number kits, which were developed in America in the 1950s? No, we didn’t either until we started thinking about the work of artrepublic artist Benjamin Thomas Taylor, which often references the retro paint kits, and went off on a slight tangent wondering where that whole learn-to-paint-without-technically-learning-to-paint thing began. (Thanks to 'Mental Floss' for clearing that one up for us – we could have disappeared down an internet rabbit hole otherwise!)  But back to the point we started at – the work of British artist Benjamin Thomas Taylor, who happens to be the guest host at artrepublic’s Kids Club session in the gallery this month. We weren’t sure what he had planned for the workshop, and we were overdue a chat with him, so we decided to ask him a few questions about his own art-school education, fantastical imagery (and imagination) as well as his role in this year’s Martlet’s Snail Trail, among other things. We love the snail that you were commissioned to create for the Martlet’s Snail Trail - it sort of carries its environment on its back! Tell us little bit about how you created the design/ got involved with the project. I used a previous painting as a template for the design. This helped me form a loose composition before painting colourful flowers and plants intuitively over the top. The title of the piece alludes to the hotel Matisse lived and worked in while creating his cut-out series. You often use natural forms and landscapes in your work, but give them a highly coloured and slightly fantastical twist. Have you always been drawn to landscape painting? And are these based on specific places or is it all from your imagination? I grew up surrounded by a very dramatic landscape in North Wales. It will always be a subject that fascinates me, mainly because of the sense of possibility I feel when I look at an expanse of space. The first proper painting I did when I was 13 was of a landscape. My art teacher used to take photographs in Snowdonia at the weekend and bring them in for me to paint in my art lessons. However these days my landscapes are created more from the imagination. The blank/ uncoloured areas (that form the text) in your images create this idea of us not quite seeing the full picture. Do these sections in your work hold a particular significance or message? Or is it all really about highlighting the text? The uncoloured areas are used to create a sense of possibility – a sense that the viewer could add their own colours to the work. How do you choose the phrases that are picked out in your hyperreal landscapes? They are often words or phrases that I’ve picked up on and I play with in my mind. This process can take weeks, months or even years. They can come from anywhere and mean anything. I like the way artist Ed Ruscha describes his process of finding words: “Some words are found ready-made, some are from dreams, some come from newspapers,” Ruscha says. “I don't stand in front of a blank canvas waiting for inspiration.” For example ‘What Sound Do Unicorns Make?’ arrived from reading an alphabet picture book with my young twin boys. On each page we’d replicate the noise each animal makes: D is for dog….whoof, E is for elephant...trump, U is for unicorn….ummmm what sound does a unicorn make? I really like the word ‘Happiness’! It contains the word ‘pines’, which links to a lot of my imagery. Happiness is also a very subjective word. Everyone has their own idea of what happiness is? Did you know that Paint-by-numbers kits were originally inspired by an employee at a paint manufacturers, who discovered that Leonardo da Vinci taught apprentices the basics of painting using numbered patterns on a canvas? How does it feel to… follow in da Vinci’s footsteps?! Like da Vinci, Jeff Koons uses the same process with his assistants. So in a way these masterpieces we see by both artists are actually just paint by numbers. This irony is important in my own pieces. Underneath the joyous, colourful, paint by numbers exterior I’m poking a bit of fun at pretentiousness. We saw your attempt to get the public painting by numbers at the Art Yard Sale… based on the collective efforts there, would you say Paint-by-Numbers is actually quite difficult?  That was hilarious! I’m not sure people were really concentrating too much. It was a very hot, busy day. When I paint in that style I really try to make each individual shape a really pleasing form. If I’m painting them on Photoshop I’ll often zoom in really close so you can’t see the overall image. It’s like being an abstract painter, working with just colour and form, which I love. Off the back of that, what do you think is the best way to learn to paint? There is no one way to learn to paint. I think the most important thing is dedication and that can only arise from an absolute love of wanting to make something. When I teach art students who haven’t done much painting before, I always start off by showing them how to mix colours and blend tones together. After that I ask them to look at artists who interest them to figure out and experiment with the techniques and processes they have used. You taught fine art for eight years – what did you learn about your own practice and work during that time? (And why did you leave teaching behind?) I taught Art in school for 8 years. Mostly in East London. It was an incredible experience. Obviously working with young people is hugely rewarding but for my own practice too. Having to figure out the most effective ways of teaching also helped me define and improve the most important parts of my own practice. I’ve left schools now but I’m still teaching. I now a lecture at a college a couple of days a week. As you’re hosting the Kids Club this month, we have to ask who has been your best/ favourite teacher and why? (Can be any level of education/ or out of formal education. And doesn’t have to be art) I’ve had lots of inspiring teachers in my life. The passionate ones are always the best! When I was at school I had a lot of problems with my reading and writing because of my dyslexia. When I started high school my English teacher was a man called Melvin Jones. He was an older teacher and sounded far too posh to be teaching in our school. It was almost as if he had been placed there from another world. He was so interesting and knowledgeable, he seemed to know everything. From someone who really struggled in English it soon became one of my favourite lessons. My mum was having a clear out a few weeks ago and I found my old report from that year. In it he wrote “Even though Benjamin continues to make basic errors with his writing, he has a magical imagination”. He made me believe and see something in myself that I hadn’t seen before. And, if you had the opportunity to learn from a master (alive or dead, contemporary or historical) who would it be and why? I’d love to make a wood cut with Hokusai in 19th-century Japan, that would be interesting! Taking your pieces as prompts: Where do you wish you were? I’ve often fantasised about stepping into one of my pictures and having a walk around. Probably ‘Reunited With Everything You’ve Ever Lost’ would be my favourite. Happiness is… Spending the whole day with my wife and twin boys What sound does a unicorn make? I’m really not sure, though it probably involves glitter!   To take part in this free event, simply visit our Eventbrite page to register. Hope to see you there! Please note: These events are very popular and have limited availability so please register early. Also, please be aware that there will be photography and video of the event which will be used for marketing purposes by artrepublic and our affiliates.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =

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