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  • Mark Rothko’s famous Four Seasons tale retold on stage

    Win tickets to see RED in the West End plus dinner and a night at One Aldwych hotel. Mark Rothko is known as one of the greatest abstract expressionists of his generation (although, we should probably say that he personally refused to be associated with any particular art movement or style). Hi....
    Win tickets to see RED in the West End plus dinner and a night at One Aldwych hotel. Mark Rothko is known as one of the greatest abstract expressionists of his generation (although, we should probably say that he personally refused to be associated with any particular art movement or style). His paintings have an incredible depth, and create the feeling that however long and hard you look at them, there is something buried within these artworks that you can’t quite reach. So you sit, and look a little longer. If you’ve ever sat in the Rothko room at the Tate Modern, surrounded by some of the artist’s vast canvases, you might recognise this sensation that he was pushing us towards with his abstract blocks, created with numerous thin coats of cleverly applied colour – it’s about finding clarity, understanding and experiencing something that is physically bigger than ourselves. For a man who had been brought up in the orthodox Jewish community in Russia, but who had given up religious practice after the death of his father, painting was a sort of act of worship. The takeaway from this gallery-based experience? Clearly, Mark Rothko was a complex man. In the 1950s, as he began to experience significant success on the New York art scene, Rothko was approached by the Four Seasons to complete a commission for their restaurant. Now known as the Seagram murals, the 40 completed paintings in dark red and brown were, at the time, the largest commission in the history of modern art. However, Rothko’s decision to accept the commission was strange – especially as he told a journalist in confidence that his hope was to create ‘something that will ruin the appetite of every son-of-a-bitch who ever eats in that room…’ Drama, obviously followed. Some of the paintings in question are now located in that room we were discussing at London’s Tate Modern rather than in New York, which tells you something. The events that ensued became notorious and, as a story, became a prime topic for a stage play. And then an actual play: John Logan’s RED. As it returns to London’s West End, for the first time since its world premiere at the Donmar Warehouse in 2009, we (the long-time Rothko fans at artrepublic) have two tickets to give away to you, our art lovers. RED has been described by the New York Times as being a play ‘with such fierce conviction that it never lets you look away.’ The plot follows Rothko’s experience when, having just received the largest commission in the history of modern art, he finds himself consumed by warring desires for integrity and success. Having headed up the original London cast, award-winning stage and screen actor Alfred Molina (Raiders of the Lost Ark; Chocolat; Frida; Spiderman 2) reprises his role as Rothko, while breakthrough British actor Alfred Enoch (How to Get Away with Murder; Harry Potter) takes the part of Rothko’s fictional young assistant, Ken, who provokes him to make an agonising discovery about the price of fame. With this cast, and six Tony Awards, including Best Play and Best Direction to its name, Red is certainly not a story to be missed. If you’d like to win a pair of tickets to the press night of RED in London’s West End, with a pre-theatre dinner and an overnight stay at One Aldwych, as well as a £100 artrepublic gift voucher, Enter our competition here. Plus 5 runners up will each win a pairs of tickets to see the play. T’s and C’s apply. Red will run at Wyndham’s Theatre form 4th May to 28th July 2018. $test =
  • All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life exhibition review

    All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life is a landmark exhibition at Tate Britain celebrating how artists have captured the intense experience of life in paint. It showcases around 100 works by some of the most celebrated modern British artists, with the work of Lucian Freud and Fr....
    All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life is a landmark exhibition at Tate Britain celebrating how artists have captured the intense experience of life in paint. It showcases around 100 works by some of the most celebrated modern British artists, with the work of Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon at its heart. The exhibition explores how their art captures personal and immediate experiences and events, distilling raw sensations through their use of paint, as Freud said: ‘I want the paint to work as flesh does’. Bringing together major works by Walter Sickert, Stanley Spencer, Michael Andrews, Frank Auerbach, R.B. Kitaj, Leon Kossoff, Paula Rego, Jenny Saville, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and many others, this exhibition will make poignant connections across generations of artists and tell an expanded story of figurative painting in the 20th century. The exhibition will also shed light on the role of women artists in the traditionally male-dominated field of figurative painting. Paula Rego explores the condition of women in society and the roles they play over the course of their lives, while always referring to autobiographical events, as in The Family 1988. Her work underwent a particularly profound change in the late 1980s and 1990s when she returned to working from life. The exhibition will also celebrate a younger generation of painters who continue to pursue the tangible reality of life in their work. Contemporary artists like Cecily Brown, Celia Paul, Jenny Saville and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye work in dialogue with this tradition while also taking the painting of figures in new directions. All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life Tate Britain 28 February – 27 August 2018 Image Credits: Lucian Freud, 1922-2011, Girl with a White Dog, 1950-1, Oil paint on canvas, 762 x 1016 mm, © Tate Francis Bacon, 1909-1992, Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud, 1964, Oil paint on canvas, 1980 x 1476 mm, The Lewis Collection, © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. DACS, London, Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd. Paula Rego, born 1935, The Family, 1988, Acrylic paint on canvas backed paper, 2134 x 2134 mm, Marlborough International Fine Art, © Paula Rego Jenny Saville (b.1970), Reverse, 2002-3, Oil paint on canvas, 2134 x 2438 mm, © Jenny Saville. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.   $test =
  • Urban Nation Museum for Urban Contemporary Art opens in Berlin

    We loved catching up with some of our favourite artists at the opening of Urban Nation Museum for Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin last week. The vibrant city has long been a mecca for street art and creative projects. Urban Nation, led by Yasha Young, invited 150 of street art’s leading lights....
    We loved catching up with some of our favourite artists at the opening of Urban Nation Museum for Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin last week. The vibrant city has long been a mecca for street art and creative projects. Urban Nation, led by Yasha Young, invited 150 of street art’s leading lights to create work for the inaugural show and transformed the museum’s surrounding walls and outdoor spaces. Set in lively Schöneberg, the museum itself is ultra modern and spacious, designed in collaboration with GRAFT architects. Murals, installations and paste-ups by graffiti artists from all over the world can be seen everywhere you look outside the museum from the likes of Anthony Lister, Marina Zumi, Herakut, Ron English, Blek le Rat and Sandra Chevrier. Artists from all over the world transformed the area into a live exhibition. "Urban contemporary art is the logical next step to follow what is happening on the street. This house can be an archive that tells the story [of street art] for the first time, from the beginning until now." Yasha Young, Director of Urban Nation Berlin. Inside the museum, the only one of its kind in the world, there are works from street art greats from all over the world and a library dedicated to street art photography legend Martha Cooper. Here are five of our favourite artists featured in Urban Nation’s museum. Blek Le Rat Blek le Rat is a Pioneering French graffiti artist, one of the Godfather’s of the European street art movement. Using stencils instead of stylised lettering for graffiti, Blek le Rat was one of the first true street artists. During Blek’s career, his art prints have become more and more political, focusing on the homeless, the environment, and other social causes. Blek le Rat has inspired hundreds of artists around the world – including the infamous ‘Banksy’. Despite the enormous role he has played in street art, Blek le Rat has kept a low profile through most of his career to avoid public harassment. He just substituted his surname ‘Roc’ with ‘Rat’ because rats symbolise a lot for him “they create fear, they are synonymous with invasion and they are the Stencil outside the Urban Nation museum Ben Eine Originally a writer, influential artist Ben Eine is now one of London’s most prolific artists, specialising in typographical art. The archetype of contemporary UK street-art, Eine’s ‘21st Century City’ was famously gifted to Barack Obama by David Cameron in 2010, and can be seen daily on his canvas of choice: the walls and shutters of shops around London. ‘Alphabet Street’, his most iconic work to date, is an unbounded mural, filling the concrete spaces of Middlesex Street, London, with his characteristically colourful lettering. Installation inside the museum Ron English You can’t miss Ron English: one of the most prolific and distinctive artists working today, English is best known for combining expert craftsmanship with a cynical, humorous critique of American culture, his work includes art prints, billboards, and sculptures. English coined the term ‘POPaganda’ to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superheroes and comic strips, to art-historical iconography. English has imagined a vast (and still growing) roster of characters, including MC Supersized, his obese fast-food mascot, featured in the documentary ‘Supersize Me’ (2004), and Abraham Obama, a fusion of America’s 16th and 44th Presidents. Temper Tot mural, Berlin Eelus Balancing the opposing forces of the humorous and macabre, vivid color and stark monochrome, Eelus’ work brings the beautiful and sometimes caustic realities of the world together. It all started when he was a kid, drawing posters of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to sell in the schoolyard so he could buy chocolate. Some years later, he’d sold enough posters and art prints to leave his day job behind, turning a lifelong hobby into a full-time profession. Since then, he’s exhibited his art works worldwide alongside some of the biggest names in the urban art scene, with the majority of his releases selling out incredibly fast. Handidan The art of Dutch artist Handiedan involves a complex cut and paste mixture of computer montage and highly detailed sculptural hand cut collages, complimented by conscientiously collected antique ornamental frames. Build out of multiple classic pin-up body parts, the female form stands out over a backdrop of baroque and Victorian Neo-Classicism designs. The artist often uses international currencies and stamps, antique sheet music ornaments, playing cards, cigar bands, Asian papers with personal items and drawings. Intricate and meticulously crafted, the collages represent the gradual accumulation of both the layers in her work and her work process self. Urban Nation, Bülowstraße 7, 10783 Berlin, Germany   Enjoyed this article? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest art news SUBMIT $test =
  • Basquiat: Boom for Real at the Barbican, 21 September 2017 – 28 January 2018

    “I don’t listen to what art critics say.  I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is”  Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) Barbican’s Boom for Real is the first major retrospective of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s dynamic, naïve, paintings in the UK. Unbelievably, the Ba....
    “I don’t listen to what art critics say.  I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is”  Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) Barbican’s Boom for Real is the first major retrospective of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s dynamic, naïve, paintings in the UK. Unbelievably, the Barbican say, absolutely none of his work is even held in a public UK collection - despite that he is one of the most widely celebrated and well recognised painters of the 21st century. As the late artist’s sisters, Lisane and Jeanine Basquiat said “We are delighted to be working with the Barbican on this important exhibition, which is so long overdue” Basquiat: Boom For Real Installation view Barbican Art Gallery 21 September 2017 – 28 January 2018 © Tristan Fewings / Getty Images Artworks: © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) came of age in post-punk New York and by 1982 was internationally known. This self-taught, young black artist was making unprecedented waves with his bold and colourful, text-laden artworks up to his tragic and untimely death in 1988. Drawn from museums and private holdings around the world, Basquiat: Boom for Real has brought together more than 100 works – resulting in a powerful and comprehensive view of this enigmatic, rebellious, artist. Basquiat: Boom For Real Installation view Barbican Art Gallery 21 September 2017 – 28 January 2018 © Tristan Fewings / Getty Images Artwork: Jean-Michel Basquiat King of the Zulus, 1984-85 © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York The show focuses on Basquiat’s many influences; music, writing, performance, TV and film. The young artist expressed himself in a range of artforms – his creativity flowing through his many paintings, drawing and notebooks, photography and music. Basquiat: Boom For Real Installation view Barbican Art Gallery 21 September 2017 – 28 January 2018 © Tristan Fewings / Getty Images Artwork: Jean-Michel Basquiat A Panel of Experts, 1982 Courtesy The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York. Basquiat began graffitiing on the streets of New York City with classmate Al Diaz under the name SAMO© and was soon drawing with his own blood, collaging baseball cards and postcards and painting on clothing and anything else to hand. An outpouring on creativity that led to him collaborating with Andy Warhol, working on murals for outrageous New York nightclub the Mudd Club, Area and Palladium. A famously self-taught artist with little respect for the opinion of critics, Basquiat was inspired by an extraordinary range of subjects – from anatomical drawings to bebop jazz to silent film. This wonderful exhibition shows how he melded these, and the people and experiences of 80s downtown New York into his own, unique style. Basquiat: Boom for Real runs at the Barbican from 21 September 2017 – 28 January 2018. Enjoyed this article? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest art news SUBMIT $test =
  • Grayson Perry Opens ‘The Most Popular Art Exhibition Ever’

    The award winning artist returns with his summer blockbuster. The Serpentine Gallery in London’s Hyde Park has invited British artist Grayson Perry to present a major exhibition of new work. Perry touches on many themes in the show including popularity, masculinity and society, acting as an a....
    The award winning artist returns with his summer blockbuster. The Serpentine Gallery in London’s Hyde Park has invited British artist Grayson Perry to present a major exhibition of new work. Perry touches on many themes in the show including popularity, masculinity and society, acting as an astute commentator. Perry recently presented the Channel 4 documentary ‘Grayson Perry: Divided Britain’, which focused on the fallout of last year’s EU referendum. Perry visited members of the public from the ‘leave’ and ‘remain’ camps and then went about crowdsourcing imagery from both groups to be used on his impressive pair of ceramic pots, which forms the centerpiece of the exhibition. Grayson Perry on the exhibition: “I am in the communication business and I want to communicate to as wide an audience as possible. Nothing pleases me more than meeting someone at one of my exhibitions from what museum people call ‘a non- traditional background.’ The new works I am making all have ideas about popularity hovering around them. What kind of art do people like? What subjects? Why do people like going to art galleries these days? What is the relationship of traditional art to social media?” In the new exhibition, Perry presents work in a variety of traditional media such as ceramics, cast iron, bronze, printmaking and tapestry. Also shown in the exhibition is his customised pink Harley-Davidson motorbike complete with a rear-mounted shrine to his teddy bear mascot Alan Measles. According to Perry, the bike is a cross between “Mexican Day of the Dead meets Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.” Another stand out piece from the exhibition is the monumentally sized woodcut self-portrait “Reclining Artist”, which depicts the artist nude, as his alter ego Claire relaxing in his cluttered studio and his trusty cat Kevin.  Perry created the work simply because “I just fancied doing a big nude”. The objects surround Perry all reflect his life and work as an artist. The image evokes Manet’s ‘Olympia’, and Perry has filled the surrounding space of the portrait with a wealth of other cultural allusions, from a book on acclaimed architect Zaha Hadid to a leafed copy of Viz magazine. Rendered in Perry’s unique aesthetic of clashing, saturated colours and flat, juvenile perspective, ‘Reclining Artist’ is a truly powerful work of contemporary art. We are thrilled to announce that we have a select number of “Reclining Artist” prints by Grayson Perry available through artrepublic. Produced as colour etching, signed on the reverse from a very low edition of 58, these fantastically detailed prints present a brilliant investment into one of the titans of the art world. We only have a very limited number of “Reclining Artist” prints available so be sure to get in contact with us quickly if you’d like to add to your collection. More more information or to purchase the new Grayson Perry print please contact the gallery by calling us on 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. GRAYSON PERRY PRESENTS  THE MOST POPULAR ART EXHIBITION EVER!  8 June – 10 September 2017 Serpentine Gallery $test =
  • Artist Interview – Maria Rivans

    Maria Rivans has created an amazing room at the artists residence hotel, so we caught up with her to find out more about how it was created and her life as an artist. What inspired you in creating the Artist Residence room? The room was created around the idea of the long lost tradition of sending....
    Maria Rivans has created an amazing room at the artists residence hotel, so we caught up with her to find out more about how it was created and her life as an artist. What inspired you in creating the Artist Residence room? The room was created around the idea of the long lost tradition of sending picture postcards. I found some beautiful vintage postcards of Brighton and Florida and the collage grew from these. How was creating work on a wall different or similar to creating your other artworks? It was similar in the way that I create all of my collages on a canvas which is attached to my studio wall, so work upright. The challenge with this project was to fit the collage to the dimension of the hotel room walls. Your works are incredibly detailed – how long did it take to create the room in the Artist Residence? The room took a good few months, from the collecting and cutting of all the imagery to finally installing the collage in the room. Once all the images were cut I made an exact mock up of the hotel walls in my studio and from there I began to create the composition. Once I was happy with the design everything was recorded before dismantling and finally reassembled in the hotel. Has it always been your dream to be an artist? Yes totally, as a child I would sit and draw for hours. I was watching the Bette Davis movie  ‘Stolen Life’ where she played an artist and when I saw her painting in her magnificent studio I knew that’s what I wanted to be. Five years later I found myself at art college. Which other artists do you admire? Is there one artist you would love to do a collaboration with? There are so many it’s very hard to chose…but at the moment I am enjoying reading Sarah Lucas’ book about her Venice Biennale exhibition “I Scream Dadio’. I loved that show, it totally knocked me out. What kind of environment do you like to work in? I love my studio, it’s very tidy and organised and I like to work to music all day. If you weren’t an artist, what career path would you have chosen? Astronaut If you could be one person for a day, who would you be? Chan Marshall of Cat Power If you were stranded on a desert island, what one item would you take? My guitar (I can’t play by the way but I’m learning) View Maria's work available to buy at artrepublic.com Competition time! You could win a nigh in Maria's room and the Artists Residence Hotel in Brighton and a fantastic limited edition print by Maria click here to find out how to enter Competition closes 22/04/17   Enjoyed this article? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest art news Submit $test =
  • Spotlight on Peter Blake’s ‘Found Art’ Series

    Peter Blake has produced an amazing range of work throughout his career. Today we are taking a closer look at his stunning ‘Found Art’ series started in the early 2000's using cutting edge technology to create a new form of art. The series is based upon one of the earliest tenets of pop art: th....
    Peter Blake has produced an amazing range of work throughout his career. Today we are taking a closer look at his stunning ‘Found Art’ series started in the early 2000's using cutting edge technology to create a new form of art. The series is based upon one of the earliest tenets of pop art: that everyday objects can become the subject matter for fine art, from Warhol’s Soup cans to Jeff Koons Hoovers. Every work in the Found Art series takes its starting point as a piece of ephemera drawn from Peter Blake’s extensive personal collection. His fascination with arcane and unusual objects is at the centre of his collecting instinct and his studio is famed for being closer to a museum of popular culture objects and printed ephemera than a typical artist’s studio. From this Peter Blake works with the latest digital technology which enables him to blow an object up to 50 times its normal size. In doing this he wants us to see these objects in a new way and transform them from found objects, that most people would consider to be valueless, into works of art. The sheer scale of the works draws us into the beauty of their design, their fragility and their textural qualities. Some of the first items Peter Blake transformed into works of art were fag packets and match boxes. Produced using the silkscreen printing method and embellished with foil, these super-scaled cigarette packets have a real impact. The original packets are torn and battered, and essentially rubbish, yet Peter Blake has used these elements to create points on interest and detail in the work. Other small objects transformed by the ‘Found Art’ treatment include embroidery buttons and badges. View all of Peter Blake’s ‘Found Art’ limited edition prints   Enjoyed this article? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest art news Submit $test =
  • Turner Prize 2016 Winner Announced

    After months of anticipation, 2016’s Turner Prize winner has been announced: Helen Marten - the youngest of this year’s nominees - is the latest to claim one of the contemporary art world’s most prestigious prizes, for the "poetic and enigmatic qualities which reflect the complexities and chal....
    After months of anticipation, 2016’s Turner Prize winner has been announced: Helen Marten - the youngest of this year’s nominees - is the latest to claim one of the contemporary art world’s most prestigious prizes, for the "poetic and enigmatic qualities which reflect the complexities and challenges of being in the world today,” as the jury described. Her breathtakingly beautiful sculptural work, with its “extraordinary range of materials and form,” defied expectation and convention, bringing a compelling and novel approach to aesthetic modes for a twenty-first century audience. Marten, along with Michael Dean, Anthea Hamilton, and Josephine Pryde, was shortlisted back in September, and this year’s exhibition proved to be a thought provoking and stimulating immersive experience: from a miniature train set, to abstract installations, surrealist-inspired sculptures and a symbolic sea of pennies, each of the Turner Prize nominated artists brought something fresh, innovative and exceptional to the ever evolving art world, forever placing their stamp on twenty-first century’s ongoing contribution to the story of art. The Turner Prize has been a cornerstone of the art world since it was established in 1984, and its roll-call of winners includes household names, who have risen to fame thanks to the achievement of the prestigious award: from Gilbert and George, to Anish Kapoor, to Gillian Wearing, the list of both winners and nominees is an impressive assemblage of some of the very best in diverse strands of contemporary art. 1995 - just over ten years after the first ever Turner Prize event - saw Britain’s most acclaimed contemporary artist Damien Hirst take the prize, rocketing both his career, and the YBA movement to which he belonged, skyward. What followed would become some of the most iconic pieces of art the world has ever known, from sharks, to sheep to skulls. At artrepublic, we stock a number of very special, signed, limited edition prints by Damien Hirst, each one a highly collectable component of the artist’s extraordinary and far-reaching portfolio. From a lithograph print of the inimitable, diamond encrusted skull For the Love of God,  to photographic prints of Hirst’s signature pill sculptures, to bright butterflies on colourful canvases, we’ve got a stunning array of work from one of the Turner Prize’s most shining stars. Less than a decade later, in 2003, controversial ceramicist and famous cross-dresser Grayson Perry, won the distinguished award. Taking the podium in a dress, Perry became one of the country’s most memorable and expressive artists, creating a body of work that challenged societal norms and expectations through a deeply distinctive aesthetic. Our range of limited edition Grayson Perry prints at artrepublic showcase his genre-defining style, depicting femininity in unconventional and unexpected forms, to spectacular effect. See the collection here. Yet, as with 2016, although we might remember Hirst and Perry as winners of their years, both had their work featured amongst a number of other artists, also dripping with exceptional talent. The same year that Grayson Perry won the Turner Prize, iconic artist brothers Jake and Dinos Chapman (following in the footsteps of earlier Prize winning duo Gilbert and George) were nominated, and their erotic, inflatable installation Death was shown at the exhibition. Although known for their esoteric sculptural work, their prints are suffused with a dark surreality, that only the Chapman brothers can achieve with such panache. Explore the limited edition range that we stock at artrepublic here. If you’ve still yet to see the Turner Prize winner and nominees, the exhibition lasts until January 2 - head to London’s Tate Britain for an unmissable opportunity to see some of the very best in contemporary art. $test =
  • Christmas gift ideas

    Our gift shop has launched! And just in time for the festive season… At artrepublic, we think that art is the best gift you can give - pick the right piece and it becomes a treasure, a special symbol of friendship or love, that they’ll keep forever. Picking the piece, though, isn’t always easy....
    Our gift shop has launched! And just in time for the festive season… At artrepublic, we think that art is the best gift you can give - pick the right piece and it becomes a treasure, a special symbol of friendship or love, that they’ll keep forever. Picking the piece, though, isn’t always easy. It can be hard to trawl through volumes of prints, without that specific something in mind. Fortunately, at artrepublic, our gift shop has been expertly curated to give you a carefully hand selected range of the very best. And to make things even simpler, we’ve broken down the selection of our favourite pieces into bitesize categories. So whether you’re looking for him or for her, for the kids, or with a budget in mind, we’ve got it covered. Christmas shopping just got creative… Here’s a peek at some of the pieces we’ve chosen for you. To see the full range, don’t forget to head to the gift shop. For Her: ‘Making a Bee-Line’, by sought after contemporary artist Louise McNaught, is one of our favourite pieces at artrepublic, with its innovative approach to found materials and its aptitude for colour and compositional technique. Both eye-catching and conceptually provocative, while brimming with charm and a little tongue-in-cheek frivolity, ‘Making a Bee-Line’ is the perfect piece for her, whether she’s art lover or novice. For Him: Contemporary artist Dave White is known for his exceptional animal prints, which have won him widespread acclaim across the art world. We defy anyone not to adore his magnificent ‘Lion’ print. Rich in detail and brimming with texture, White brings the figurative and the abstract into perfect union, reworking the raw energy of Abstract Expressionism - with dynamic paint splatters, drips and strokes - into stunning representation. This is contemporary print making at its best - and he’s sure to fall in love with it. For Kids: ‘I am not a bunny’, by Simone Lia, makes the perfect Christmas gift for the kids. Both boys and girls will love the cute-sy aesthetic, and it’s a great introduction to contemporary art: although Lia is indulging in a naive charm, her work is carefully tuned to the power of minimalist composition and the role of humour in modern art. Just make sure you do hand it over to the kids on Christmas day - the temptation to keep this one for the grown-ups is all too great… Limited Editions Under 100: At artrepublic we specialise in limited edition prints by well known artists, each one hand signed and dated. It’s also important to us that these pieces are affordable and accessible, so we've put together a range of beautiful limited edition prints that come in at under £100. ‘Proud Trooper’ by contemporary illustrator Richard Berner is from a limited edition of just 50 and is available for only £85. Bold, bright and beautiful, Berner’s print is oozing aesthetic charm - the perfect gift on a budget. Still concerned about the risk of investing in that beautiful piece of art and it being just not quite right? We completely understand - which is why you can purchase gift vouchers from us for as little as £10. With 12 months to redeem them, your special someone will have the wonderful experience of exploring our extensive catalogue of originals, limited editions and prints by contemporary and historical artists. We also have a fantastic range of art books for sale, if you're looking for stocking fillers - a great way to give art without the price tag! Visit our gift shop $test =
  • Eelus: Uncovered

    Earlier this year we caught up with street artist Eelus to talk painting walls new works and which artists he would most like to have dinner with. Earlier this year you released your out lenticular with artrepublic - a truly impressive feat of printing and design. How did that project come about? ....
    Earlier this year we caught up with street artist Eelus to talk painting walls new works and which artists he would most like to have dinner with. Earlier this year you released your out lenticular with artrepublic - a truly impressive feat of printing and design. How did that project come about? I was approached years ago by someone else asking if I wanted to do a lenticular release of Not Everything Is So Black & White and at the time I just wasn’t interested, but it did plant a seed in my mind as to the possibilities of what the image could look like in 3D. Since then I thought about it on and off and thought it could look great but was always too busy to follow it up, then Art Republic approached me about doing something, anything, as a lenticular release so it seemed the perfect opportunity. For that release it was great to breathe new life into an older image and put a new angle on it. The results were better than I expected and I’m excited to explore the medium further in the future. Now I’m familiar with the process and what’s possible I have all kinds of ideas that I’m excited about. What else have you been working on recently? It’s been a busy 6 months. I painted a permanent mural at Vandal, a recently opened restaurant in NYC. It’s an amazing space with walls by Hush (who curated the art for the Tao Group, the guys behind the restaurant), Will Barras, Tristan Eaton, Vhils, Shepard Fairey and Apexer. In February I flew out to San Francisco to sign and release a new print edition with Spoke Gallery who I also have a solo show with in July. In March I flew to Dubai to paint a wall for the first stage of the Dubai Walls project. It’s a 13m high monster, way bigger than anything I’ve done in the past so it was a great learning experience and I got to hang out with a great team of other artists like Ron English, The London Police, D*Face, Rone and Roa to name a few. Fun in the sun! Right now I’m working full steam ahead for my show ‘The Dark Side of the Rainbow’ at Spoke Gallery which opens June 30th. The artrepublic Art Yard Sale is coming up in June. You were without a doubt the main attraction of last year’s event. What can Eelus fans expect from the 2016 installment? I shall indeed be peddling my wares at this years’ sale. You can expect a small new print release that we’ll be working on throughout the day as well as some more classic images and a few new surprises, all at ‘yard sale’ prices, so come grab yourself a bargain for, your collection. If you could have dinner with any three artists who would you choose? Great question. Well, it’s important to surround yourself with people you can learn from. So the first would probably Gustav Klimt. I’d ring him dry of any advice, tips and mentoring he could offer. Secondly, someone like Caravaggio would be good. Not only an incredible painter but a total pirate with an incredible life story. Hopefully he’d take me drinking after we get kicked out of the restaurant. Last one is very tricky, there’s so many I want to choose, H.R. Giger, Van Gogh, Leonardo, William Blake, Arnold Böcklin, Matisse, Jamie Hewlett. But I think I’d have to go for the guy who started it all off for me, Banksy. When not busy working away in the studio what else do you enjoy doing? I like to fuel my imagination by immersing myself in other worlds and stories, so I try to read as much as possible and I watch a lot of films. Other than that, walking my dog gives me time and space to think in quiet, which is important to me. I’m trying to teach myself to play the guitar, that’s a lot of fun but I’m struggling to find time at the moment. And who doesn’t love a few ales and a bag of crisp with good friends? If you could have any work of art hanging in your home what would you choose? Ouch, another killer question. Maybe The Garden of Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch. That’s like three for the price of one and there’s so much to look at! Failing that, The Vision of Faust by Falero or one of Böcklin's The Island of the Dead paintings would do very nicely, thank you. What’s the best piece of art related advice you’ve ever received? When I was at school, a teacher told me there was no money to be made in art, which made follow the path of graphic design instead. And now, every person outside of my family who’s important to me I either met at design college or through working in the design industry. My design career moved me to London where I discovered street art, and it was my boredom in the design industry that pushed me towards making my own street art. That one piece of throwaway advice changed everything. I’d like to find that teacher and thank him for being such a pessimistic bastard. Do you have a work that you are most proud of? A couple of years ago I painted a tribute mural to our daughter Ruby who was stillborn quite late into the pregnancy. It was my first freehand mural that didn’t involved stencils, projectors or grids, just a piece of chalk taped to a bamboo cane and some paint. Not a massive feat for a lot of people, I understand that. But it was a first for me, and was the first wall I’d painted after a 7-year break. It’s not the best looking thing I’ve painted, but the process was pivotal and personal. Finally, what else do you have in store his year? As much fun as possible. I advise you to do the same. $test =

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