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  • International Women's Day Interview with Louise McNaught

    To celebrate International Women's Day, we were lucky enough to get an interview with one of artrepublic's top female artists, Louise McNaught.    We talked about what International Women's Day meant to her, who has been an inspirational figure to her and a bit about her up and coming projec....
    To celebrate International Women's Day, we were lucky enough to get an interview with one of artrepublic's top female artists, Louise McNaught.    We talked about what International Women's Day meant to her, who has been an inspirational figure to her and a bit about her up and coming project. See the interview below. Emma: Hi Louise, thank you for doing this interview with us, especially with it currently being international women’s month. To start off, I wanted to first ask what does International Women’s Day mean to you? To be completely honest, it didn’t mean much to me previously. I initially felt that there was no need to have a specific day for women and for men. However, after having my daughter it has had more meaning to me, as I would like for my daughter to have as many possibilities in life in a world of equality. Emma: Do you feel that you are an inspiration to other female artists who might be starting out? I do often get contacted by female art students that look to me for advice and guidance. I often get asked if I can help them with projects that they have going on. It’s very flattering to say you have inspired someone as I’m just acting on what inspires me and if that speaks to others that’s fantastic! Emma: That sounds great that you are approached by young artists and that you offer advice. Do you view yourself as a role model for younger women?  Ever since I had my daughter, I now try to be a better, more responsible person! I don’t like to think of myself as a role model - that’s a very weighty title. I’d like the title ‘Inspirer’ instead, I hope I inspire women that want to pursue art, and who think the art world is male-dominated (and admittedly it still is), that they can still go for it! Having Autumn opened my eyes to the world, and it makes me think more about how life will be for her as she grows up, and I hope I can inspire her to go for whatever she is inspired by. Emma: Are there any inspirational female figures that had an impact on you while growing up and to also you currently? I would have to say my mum was a huge inspiration to me. Especially when it comes to how I want to raise my daughter. The way she raised me, makes me want to do the same for my daughter. One artist that that really inspired me growing up was the artist Susan Seddon Boulet. Her artwork isn’t very popular over here in England but in the US, she has a big following ... even though she died many years ago. Her art and career inspired me as an artist. Emma: Have you always wanted to be an artist? Yes, I have always wanted to be an artist. There are baby pictures of myself holding a pen in a very steady way from around age 1, and by the time I was 8, I definitely knew that I wanted to be an artist. My family were not artists, so this was very much a solitary pursuit. Emma: So, we know that you graduated from the University of Greenwich back in 2012. Do you have a favourite memory of when you were at the university? For me, the best thing about University was meeting other artists. Meeting more misfits like me. I didn’t know any other artists back at home, so it was great to meet more creative minds and socialise with them. Emma: You have many beautiful pieces that you have created over the years. What has been your favourite piece to work on and why? I would have to say the project I am currently working on. I am starting to incorporate elements of popular culture and consumerism mixed in with my animals. Emma: Do you have any advice for aspiring artists? Get your art online! Create your own website and promote your own work across social media. Find your audience online and make sure you to get your art in front of your following. Emma: Do you have any ongoing projects you’d like to highlight? The current project I am working on is called ‘Consume’. As a natural progression from Endangered Animals, I am creating pieces that show how these animals are going to face extinction. This will be on display in my solo show at the Royal Overseas League in  Mayfair from the 27th of June to the 9th of September 2019.    Louise McNaught is a contemporary artist with international representation and as of 2018 is also a published Author. Louise‘s creations feature animals that are God-like, sublime and ethereal in their presence and depiction.   Check out all of her work HERE  $test =
  • Meet the Women Who Are on Top of the (Art) World

     International Women's Day 2019 International Women's Day has returned! What better way to celebrate than by showing off our finest female talent. Even though we are now in 2019, there can be an imbalance between us. Some industries still treat women like second class citizens. Artrepublic couldn'....
     International Women's Day 2019 International Women's Day has returned! What better way to celebrate than by showing off our finest female talent. Even though we are now in 2019, there can be an imbalance between us. Some industries still treat women like second class citizens. Artrepublic couldn't disagree with this more. This is why we are dedicating this blog post to all the fabulous women we work with! LOUISE MCNAUGHT Louise McNaught became a professional artist whilst doing a Degree in Fine Art. Her distinctive use of bright colour, fading upward drips shows her obvious love of nature. She has international representation and as of 2018 is also a published Author. Her artwork has also been featured at art fairs in Milan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Stockholm, Brussels and all over the UK. Recently, McNaught has been using her voice and talent to educate people about all the beautiful animals that are becoming endangered. Her book 'Survival' strongly highlights how many animals are being lost using powerful imagery. Read more about Louise McNaught and check out her upcoming shows on her website HERE SARA POPE Bold, seductive paintings of voluptuous lips is what contemporary artist, Sara Pope is known for. Pope had a successful career in the fashion industry (as a shoe designer for brands such as Paul Smith), and also work in magazines as a designer and art director. This is where Sara draws her inspiration from. She aims to capture the glamour and seductive power conveyed by the lips and mouth. 24 galleries in the UK and internationally currently represent her. She has also completed collaborations with BareMinerals makeup, PIAS music label and Saatchi&Saatchi. See more about what Sara is up to HERE MARIA RIVANS Maria Rivans is a contemporary British artist, known for her scrapbook-style collage aesthetic. A mash-up of Surrealism meets Pop-Art, Rivans’s work re-appropriates vintage ephemera to create dreamy realms. This transports the viewer into fantastical worlds of the imaginary. Each one suffused with vivid colour, arresting imagery, intricate detail, and finished with a dusting of subtle humour. Maria works from her studio in Brighton: a kooky building, purpose built as a small cinema in 1911. She exhibits work throughout the UK as well as internationally. These spaces include Hong Kong, New York and across Europe. In 2017 and 2018, her work featured in The Times newspaper. As well as this, in 2018, the Royal Academy’s 250th Summer Exhibition selected her film Still ‘Understanding Nothing.’ Have a look at what Maria Rivans is doing HERE LUCY BRYANT Lucy Bryant is a contemporary artist and graphic designer and graduated from the University of Derby. However, Bryant is less defined by her formal art training than by her loose, creative approach and varied influences. These include Pop Art and the Punk music scene. Responding to contemporary culture, Bryant’s art subverts the everyday and the banal. She's always striving to disrupt the ordinary and create something entirely new. KRISTJANA S WILLIAMS Kristjana S Williams is an Icelandic born artist who studied graphic design and illustration at Central St Martins. This led to her gaining critical acclaim as Creative Director of Beyond the Valley for 8 years. Williams has become well known in the industry. This has won an array of awards from ‘Dulux Colour Awards’, ‘D&AD’, a New York Festivals Grand Prix and First Prize. As well as this, she was shortlisted for the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity. See more from Kristjana HERE All these women are incredible artists all with their own styles, techniques and messages. Of course, we work with so many more women overflowing with talent that we wish we could have included in this list. To see our full list of artists, CLICK HERE  $test =
  • Get to Know Soozy Lipsey

    Leave the dull behind and enter the wonderful world of Soozy Lipsey! We had the pleasure of sitting down with the lovely Soozy Lipsey to discuss her work, her process and more.  R: Hi Soozy. Thank you for doing this interview with us. Let's jump straight in. Your approach to art seems incredibly f....
    Leave the dull behind and enter the wonderful world of Soozy Lipsey! We had the pleasure of sitting down with the lovely Soozy Lipsey to discuss her work, her process and more.  R: Hi Soozy. Thank you for doing this interview with us. Let's jump straight in. Your approach to art seems incredibly fun and not to be taken too seriously. Is this something you feel strongly about?  S: I would say my art parallels my life in many ways. I think life is a serious business and in the same breath really not so serious. Similar to feeling significant and yet totally insignificant. I find humour really does defuse the tension of these paradoxes. So in an answer to your question, I think having a laugh in life, especially laughing at ones imperfections, is crucial and I like to show that in my work. I have a sense of humour - its a way to really connect with people. Knowing how to really laugh at life is a skill I think and so wit is something I really admire in people. R: Your work beautifully captures the unexpected to produce both whimsical and macabre emotion. How do you perceive your own work?  S: I think some of my work really plays with the tensions: life and death, light and dark and weak-strong. l think my work has different levels of interpretation but if it doesn't disturb the viewer in anyway, then I fear my work is just passing people by which isn't of much interest to me. Being disturbed keeps us awake. A 'Do not disturb ' sign is not something I would hang anywhere near my artwork. R: Re-imagining and revitalising vintage art is something you adopt within your work frequently. What’s the feeling behind it? Is there a reason you choose to do this? S: I think the past is where we draw our wisdom our guidance - it's incredibly important. One of my favourite Quotes is from a Danish philosopher, Kierkegaard. He says 'Life can only be understood backwards, but must be lived forwards.' I think anything with a sense of history has a quality about it that new things just do not have. I am drawn to these qualities intellectually, aesthetically and emotionally. I like to revisit something with a sense of age - something that has existed for sometime and then change it. Therefore, it embodies a new lease of life.   An example of that was buying an old picture of a vase of flowers and cutting it in half and hanging just half the picture. The idea behind this was to offer the viewer just half the story, the rest was up to the viewer to imagine. I liked the idea that the discarded half remains in the past. It also played on the human drive to always be desiring, and by withholding half the picture the viewer would hopefully be in a state of momentary satisfaction as I had left them desiring the other half or even imagining it. I hadn't given them everything, which hopefully captured their attention for longer than I would have had I just hung the full picture. R: What’s your process when creating a new piece? Do you have a “routine” or a method you stick to or does it flow much more naturally? S: There usually is no great plan other than trying my very best to do what I perceive is my job as an artist. This being to keep myself on the outside of most conventions, especially routine because routine and habit can dull the senses. It makes us spoilt and complacent and even entitled. I think it's the artists role to look at life with a sense of enquiry. If my work embodies that even a fraction, then whatever material or style I use is irrelevant really. R: What are you favourite mediums/materials to work with? And what are your favourite themes/subjects to capture? S: I like print as it's accessible and affordable which is a key thing for me - art can be purchased by a wider audience. I love old objects, paintings and great thinkers, philosophers and tubes of paint. My favourite themes would have to be the human condition. R: How do you keep your studio/workstation? Is it rather neat and tidy or could it be considered its own work of art? S: It's a total mess when working on something. The idea of anything 'becoming' that doesn't generate mess is a mystery to me. Birth is messy business, after all. Neat and tidy is something I like to visit once in a while just to ground myself and to pretend I have everything under control. R: You’ve previously collaborated with Dan Hillier to produce ‘The Meeting,’ beautifully capturing your unique styles together. Have you got any future collaborations in the works? Or is there an artist you would like to work with in the future? S: I have no plans to collaborate in the near future however, I think collaboration is brilliant! If there is anyone out there who fancies a collaboration, don't hesitate to get in touch! R: And finally, do you have a favourite artist? S: I can't resist giving a mention to my absolute love, Rene Magritte. He is my hero. I'm not one to put anyone on a pedestal but as far as I'm concerned, his mind and execution of  ideas never cease to disappoint and amaze me. He is a poetic genius! Soozy Lipsey re-imagines the traditional with contemporary whimsy, adding a touch of the fantastical here, and a dash of the macabre there, for visually provocative aesthetic. Re-purposing existing - or ‘found’ - objects and images, Lipsey transforms nostalgia into the uncanny though combinational techniques.  Check out all of her work HERE           Check out Soozy Lipsey's website HERE $test =
  • Mark Rothko’s famous Four Seasons tale retold on stage

    Win tickets to see RED in the West End plus dinner and a night at One Aldwych hotel. Mark Rothko is known as one of the greatest abstract expressionists of his generation (although, we should probably say that he personally refused to be associated with any particular art movement or style). Hi....
    Win tickets to see RED in the West End plus dinner and a night at One Aldwych hotel. Mark Rothko is known as one of the greatest abstract expressionists of his generation (although, we should probably say that he personally refused to be associated with any particular art movement or style). His paintings have an incredible depth, and create the feeling that however long and hard you look at them, there is something buried within these artworks that you can’t quite reach. So you sit, and look a little longer. If you’ve ever sat in the Rothko room at the Tate Modern, surrounded by some of the artist’s vast canvases, you might recognise this sensation that he was pushing us towards with his abstract blocks, created with numerous thin coats of cleverly applied colour – it’s about finding clarity, understanding and experiencing something that is physically bigger than ourselves. For a man who had been brought up in the orthodox Jewish community in Russia, but who had given up religious practice after the death of his father, painting was a sort of act of worship. The takeaway from this gallery-based experience? Clearly, Mark Rothko was a complex man. In the 1950s, as he began to experience significant success on the New York art scene, Rothko was approached by the Four Seasons to complete a commission for their restaurant. Now known as the Seagram murals, the 40 completed paintings in dark red and brown were, at the time, the largest commission in the history of modern art. However, Rothko’s decision to accept the commission was strange – especially as he told a journalist in confidence that his hope was to create ‘something that will ruin the appetite of every son-of-a-bitch who ever eats in that room…’ Drama, obviously followed. Some of the paintings in question are now located in that room we were discussing at London’s Tate Modern rather than in New York, which tells you something. The events that ensued became notorious and, as a story, became a prime topic for a stage play. And then an actual play: John Logan’s RED. As it returns to London’s West End, for the first time since its world premiere at the Donmar Warehouse in 2009, we (the long-time Rothko fans at artrepublic) have two tickets to give away to you, our art lovers. RED has been described by the New York Times as being a play ‘with such fierce conviction that it never lets you look away.’ The plot follows Rothko’s experience when, having just received the largest commission in the history of modern art, he finds himself consumed by warring desires for integrity and success. Having headed up the original London cast, award-winning stage and screen actor Alfred Molina (Raiders of the Lost Ark; Chocolat; Frida; Spiderman 2) reprises his role as Rothko, while breakthrough British actor Alfred Enoch (How to Get Away with Murder; Harry Potter) takes the part of Rothko’s fictional young assistant, Ken, who provokes him to make an agonising discovery about the price of fame. With this cast, and six Tony Awards, including Best Play and Best Direction to its name, Red is certainly not a story to be missed. If you’d like to win a pair of tickets to the press night of RED in London’s West End, with a pre-theatre dinner and an overnight stay at One Aldwych, as well as a £100 artrepublic gift voucher, Enter our competition here. Plus 5 runners up will each win a pairs of tickets to see the play. T’s and C’s apply. Red will run at Wyndham’s Theatre form 4th May to 28th July 2018. $test =
  • All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life exhibition review

    All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life is a landmark exhibition at Tate Britain celebrating how artists have captured the intense experience of life in paint. It showcases around 100 works by some of the most celebrated modern British artists, with the work of Lucian Freud and Fr....
    All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life is a landmark exhibition at Tate Britain celebrating how artists have captured the intense experience of life in paint. It showcases around 100 works by some of the most celebrated modern British artists, with the work of Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon at its heart. The exhibition explores how their art captures personal and immediate experiences and events, distilling raw sensations through their use of paint, as Freud said: ‘I want the paint to work as flesh does’. Bringing together major works by Walter Sickert, Stanley Spencer, Michael Andrews, Frank Auerbach, R.B. Kitaj, Leon Kossoff, Paula Rego, Jenny Saville, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and many others, this exhibition will make poignant connections across generations of artists and tell an expanded story of figurative painting in the 20th century. The exhibition will also shed light on the role of women artists in the traditionally male-dominated field of figurative painting. Paula Rego explores the condition of women in society and the roles they play over the course of their lives, while always referring to autobiographical events, as in The Family 1988. Her work underwent a particularly profound change in the late 1980s and 1990s when she returned to working from life. The exhibition will also celebrate a younger generation of painters who continue to pursue the tangible reality of life in their work. Contemporary artists like Cecily Brown, Celia Paul, Jenny Saville and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye work in dialogue with this tradition while also taking the painting of figures in new directions. All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life Tate Britain 28 February – 27 August 2018 Image Credits: Lucian Freud, 1922-2011, Girl with a White Dog, 1950-1, Oil paint on canvas, 762 x 1016 mm, © Tate Francis Bacon, 1909-1992, Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud, 1964, Oil paint on canvas, 1980 x 1476 mm, The Lewis Collection, © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. DACS, London, Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd. Paula Rego, born 1935, The Family, 1988, Acrylic paint on canvas backed paper, 2134 x 2134 mm, Marlborough International Fine Art, © Paula Rego Jenny Saville (b.1970), Reverse, 2002-3, Oil paint on canvas, 2134 x 2438 mm, © Jenny Saville. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.   $test =
  • Urban Nation Museum for Urban Contemporary Art opens in Berlin

    We loved catching up with some of our favourite artists at the opening of Urban Nation Museum for Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin last week. The vibrant city has long been a mecca for street art and creative projects. Urban Nation, led by Yasha Young, invited 150 of street art’s leading lights....
    We loved catching up with some of our favourite artists at the opening of Urban Nation Museum for Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin last week. The vibrant city has long been a mecca for street art and creative projects. Urban Nation, led by Yasha Young, invited 150 of street art’s leading lights to create work for the inaugural show and transformed the museum’s surrounding walls and outdoor spaces. Set in lively Schöneberg, the museum itself is ultra modern and spacious, designed in collaboration with GRAFT architects. Murals, installations and paste-ups by graffiti artists from all over the world can be seen everywhere you look outside the museum from the likes of Anthony Lister, Marina Zumi, Herakut, Ron English, Blek le Rat and Sandra Chevrier. Artists from all over the world transformed the area into a live exhibition. "Urban contemporary art is the logical next step to follow what is happening on the street. This house can be an archive that tells the story [of street art] for the first time, from the beginning until now." Yasha Young, Director of Urban Nation Berlin. Inside the museum, the only one of its kind in the world, there are works from street art greats from all over the world and a library dedicated to street art photography legend Martha Cooper. Here are five of our favourite artists featured in Urban Nation’s museum. Blek Le Rat Blek le Rat is a Pioneering French graffiti artist, one of the Godfather’s of the European street art movement. Using stencils instead of stylised lettering for graffiti, Blek le Rat was one of the first true street artists. During Blek’s career, his art prints have become more and more political, focusing on the homeless, the environment, and other social causes. Blek le Rat has inspired hundreds of artists around the world – including the infamous ‘Banksy’. Despite the enormous role he has played in street art, Blek le Rat has kept a low profile through most of his career to avoid public harassment. He just substituted his surname ‘Roc’ with ‘Rat’ because rats symbolise a lot for him “they create fear, they are synonymous with invasion and they are the Stencil outside the Urban Nation museum Ben Eine Originally a writer, influential artist Ben Eine is now one of London’s most prolific artists, specialising in typographical art. The archetype of contemporary UK street-art, Eine’s ‘21st Century City’ was famously gifted to Barack Obama by David Cameron in 2010, and can be seen daily on his canvas of choice: the walls and shutters of shops around London. ‘Alphabet Street’, his most iconic work to date, is an unbounded mural, filling the concrete spaces of Middlesex Street, London, with his characteristically colourful lettering. Installation inside the museum Ron English You can’t miss Ron English: one of the most prolific and distinctive artists working today, English is best known for combining expert craftsmanship with a cynical, humorous critique of American culture, his work includes art prints, billboards, and sculptures. English coined the term ‘POPaganda’ to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superheroes and comic strips, to art-historical iconography. English has imagined a vast (and still growing) roster of characters, including MC Supersized, his obese fast-food mascot, featured in the documentary ‘Supersize Me’ (2004), and Abraham Obama, a fusion of America’s 16th and 44th Presidents. Temper Tot mural, Berlin Eelus Balancing the opposing forces of the humorous and macabre, vivid color and stark monochrome, Eelus’ work brings the beautiful and sometimes caustic realities of the world together. It all started when he was a kid, drawing posters of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to sell in the schoolyard so he could buy chocolate. Some years later, he’d sold enough posters and art prints to leave his day job behind, turning a lifelong hobby into a full-time profession. Since then, he’s exhibited his art works worldwide alongside some of the biggest names in the urban art scene, with the majority of his releases selling out incredibly fast. Handidan The art of Dutch artist Handiedan involves a complex cut and paste mixture of computer montage and highly detailed sculptural hand cut collages, complimented by conscientiously collected antique ornamental frames. Build out of multiple classic pin-up body parts, the female form stands out over a backdrop of baroque and Victorian Neo-Classicism designs. The artist often uses international currencies and stamps, antique sheet music ornaments, playing cards, cigar bands, Asian papers with personal items and drawings. Intricate and meticulously crafted, the collages represent the gradual accumulation of both the layers in her work and her work process self. Urban Nation, Bülowstraße 7, 10783 Berlin, Germany   Enjoyed this article? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest art news SUBMIT $test =
  • Basquiat: Boom for Real at the Barbican, 21 September 2017 – 28 January 2018

    “I don’t listen to what art critics say.  I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is”  Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) Barbican’s Boom for Real is the first major retrospective of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s dynamic, naïve, paintings in the UK. Unbelievably, the Ba....
    “I don’t listen to what art critics say.  I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is”  Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) Barbican’s Boom for Real is the first major retrospective of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s dynamic, naïve, paintings in the UK. Unbelievably, the Barbican say, absolutely none of his work is even held in a public UK collection - despite that he is one of the most widely celebrated and well recognised painters of the 21st century. As the late artist’s sisters, Lisane and Jeanine Basquiat said “We are delighted to be working with the Barbican on this important exhibition, which is so long overdue” Basquiat: Boom For Real Installation view Barbican Art Gallery 21 September 2017 – 28 January 2018 © Tristan Fewings / Getty Images Artworks: © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) came of age in post-punk New York and by 1982 was internationally known. This self-taught, young black artist was making unprecedented waves with his bold and colourful, text-laden artworks up to his tragic and untimely death in 1988. Drawn from museums and private holdings around the world, Basquiat: Boom for Real has brought together more than 100 works – resulting in a powerful and comprehensive view of this enigmatic, rebellious, artist. Basquiat: Boom For Real Installation view Barbican Art Gallery 21 September 2017 – 28 January 2018 © Tristan Fewings / Getty Images Artwork: Jean-Michel Basquiat King of the Zulus, 1984-85 © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York The show focuses on Basquiat’s many influences; music, writing, performance, TV and film. The young artist expressed himself in a range of artforms – his creativity flowing through his many paintings, drawing and notebooks, photography and music. Basquiat: Boom For Real Installation view Barbican Art Gallery 21 September 2017 – 28 January 2018 © Tristan Fewings / Getty Images Artwork: Jean-Michel Basquiat A Panel of Experts, 1982 Courtesy The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York. Basquiat began graffitiing on the streets of New York City with classmate Al Diaz under the name SAMO© and was soon drawing with his own blood, collaging baseball cards and postcards and painting on clothing and anything else to hand. An outpouring on creativity that led to him collaborating with Andy Warhol, working on murals for outrageous New York nightclub the Mudd Club, Area and Palladium. A famously self-taught artist with little respect for the opinion of critics, Basquiat was inspired by an extraordinary range of subjects – from anatomical drawings to bebop jazz to silent film. This wonderful exhibition shows how he melded these, and the people and experiences of 80s downtown New York into his own, unique style. Basquiat: Boom for Real runs at the Barbican from 21 September 2017 – 28 January 2018. Enjoyed this article? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest art news SUBMIT $test =
  • Grayson Perry Opens ‘The Most Popular Art Exhibition Ever’

    The award winning artist returns with his summer blockbuster. The Serpentine Gallery in London’s Hyde Park has invited British artist Grayson Perry to present a major exhibition of new work. Perry touches on many themes in the show including popularity, masculinity and society, acting as an a....
    The award winning artist returns with his summer blockbuster. The Serpentine Gallery in London’s Hyde Park has invited British artist Grayson Perry to present a major exhibition of new work. Perry touches on many themes in the show including popularity, masculinity and society, acting as an astute commentator. Perry recently presented the Channel 4 documentary ‘Grayson Perry: Divided Britain’, which focused on the fallout of last year’s EU referendum. Perry visited members of the public from the ‘leave’ and ‘remain’ camps and then went about crowdsourcing imagery from both groups to be used on his impressive pair of ceramic pots, which forms the centerpiece of the exhibition. Grayson Perry on the exhibition: “I am in the communication business and I want to communicate to as wide an audience as possible. Nothing pleases me more than meeting someone at one of my exhibitions from what museum people call ‘a non- traditional background.’ The new works I am making all have ideas about popularity hovering around them. What kind of art do people like? What subjects? Why do people like going to art galleries these days? What is the relationship of traditional art to social media?” In the new exhibition, Perry presents work in a variety of traditional media such as ceramics, cast iron, bronze, printmaking and tapestry. Also shown in the exhibition is his customised pink Harley-Davidson motorbike complete with a rear-mounted shrine to his teddy bear mascot Alan Measles. According to Perry, the bike is a cross between “Mexican Day of the Dead meets Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.” Another stand out piece from the exhibition is the monumentally sized woodcut self-portrait “Reclining Artist”, which depicts the artist nude, as his alter ego Claire relaxing in his cluttered studio and his trusty cat Kevin.  Perry created the work simply because “I just fancied doing a big nude”. The objects surround Perry all reflect his life and work as an artist. The image evokes Manet’s ‘Olympia’, and Perry has filled the surrounding space of the portrait with a wealth of other cultural allusions, from a book on acclaimed architect Zaha Hadid to a leafed copy of Viz magazine. Rendered in Perry’s unique aesthetic of clashing, saturated colours and flat, juvenile perspective, ‘Reclining Artist’ is a truly powerful work of contemporary art. We are thrilled to announce that we have a select number of “Reclining Artist” prints by Grayson Perry available through artrepublic. Produced as colour etching, signed on the reverse from a very low edition of 58, these fantastically detailed prints present a brilliant investment into one of the titans of the art world. We only have a very limited number of “Reclining Artist” prints available so be sure to get in contact with us quickly if you’d like to add to your collection. More more information or to purchase the new Grayson Perry print please contact the gallery by calling us on 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. GRAYSON PERRY PRESENTS  THE MOST POPULAR ART EXHIBITION EVER!  8 June – 10 September 2017 Serpentine Gallery $test =
  • Artist Interview – Maria Rivans

    Maria Rivans has created an amazing room at the artists residence hotel, so we caught up with her to find out more about how it was created and her life as an artist. What inspired you in creating the Artist Residence room? The room was created around the idea of the long lost tradition of sending....
    Maria Rivans has created an amazing room at the artists residence hotel, so we caught up with her to find out more about how it was created and her life as an artist. What inspired you in creating the Artist Residence room? The room was created around the idea of the long lost tradition of sending picture postcards. I found some beautiful vintage postcards of Brighton and Florida and the collage grew from these. How was creating work on a wall different or similar to creating your other artworks? It was similar in the way that I create all of my collages on a canvas which is attached to my studio wall, so work upright. The challenge with this project was to fit the collage to the dimension of the hotel room walls. Your works are incredibly detailed – how long did it take to create the room in the Artist Residence? The room took a good few months, from the collecting and cutting of all the imagery to finally installing the collage in the room. Once all the images were cut I made an exact mock up of the hotel walls in my studio and from there I began to create the composition. Once I was happy with the design everything was recorded before dismantling and finally reassembled in the hotel. Has it always been your dream to be an artist? Yes totally, as a child I would sit and draw for hours. I was watching the Bette Davis movie  ‘Stolen Life’ where she played an artist and when I saw her painting in her magnificent studio I knew that’s what I wanted to be. Five years later I found myself at art college. Which other artists do you admire? Is there one artist you would love to do a collaboration with? There are so many it’s very hard to chose…but at the moment I am enjoying reading Sarah Lucas’ book about her Venice Biennale exhibition “I Scream Dadio’. I loved that show, it totally knocked me out. What kind of environment do you like to work in? I love my studio, it’s very tidy and organised and I like to work to music all day. If you weren’t an artist, what career path would you have chosen? Astronaut If you could be one person for a day, who would you be? Chan Marshall of Cat Power If you were stranded on a desert island, what one item would you take? My guitar (I can’t play by the way but I’m learning) View Maria's work available to buy at artrepublic.com Competition time! You could win a nigh in Maria's room and the Artists Residence Hotel in Brighton and a fantastic limited edition print by Maria click here to find out how to enter Competition closes 22/04/17   Enjoyed this article? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest art news Submit $test =
  • Spotlight on Peter Blake’s ‘Found Art’ Series

    Peter Blake has produced an amazing range of work throughout his career. Today we are taking a closer look at his stunning ‘Found Art’ series started in the early 2000's using cutting edge technology to create a new form of art. The series is based upon one of the earliest tenets of pop art: th....
    Peter Blake has produced an amazing range of work throughout his career. Today we are taking a closer look at his stunning ‘Found Art’ series started in the early 2000's using cutting edge technology to create a new form of art. The series is based upon one of the earliest tenets of pop art: that everyday objects can become the subject matter for fine art, from Warhol’s Soup cans to Jeff Koons Hoovers. Every work in the Found Art series takes its starting point as a piece of ephemera drawn from Peter Blake’s extensive personal collection. His fascination with arcane and unusual objects is at the centre of his collecting instinct and his studio is famed for being closer to a museum of popular culture objects and printed ephemera than a typical artist’s studio. From this Peter Blake works with the latest digital technology which enables him to blow an object up to 50 times its normal size. In doing this he wants us to see these objects in a new way and transform them from found objects, that most people would consider to be valueless, into works of art. The sheer scale of the works draws us into the beauty of their design, their fragility and their textural qualities. Some of the first items Peter Blake transformed into works of art were fag packets and match boxes. Produced using the silkscreen printing method and embellished with foil, these super-scaled cigarette packets have a real impact. The original packets are torn and battered, and essentially rubbish, yet Peter Blake has used these elements to create points on interest and detail in the work. Other small objects transformed by the ‘Found Art’ treatment include embroidery buttons and badges. View all of Peter Blake’s ‘Found Art’ limited edition prints   Enjoyed this article? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest art news Submit $test =

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