Monthly Archives: January 2020

  • Damien Hirst cabinet bought for £600 could fetch up to £1.8 million at auction

    Pre-sale estimate for one of the first medicine cabinets from Damien Hirst’s degree show. “I lived with that medicine cabinet for seven years with people telling me it was crap” Robert Tibbles Bought for just £600 by Robert Tibbles in 1989, ‘Bodies’ is from a set of 12 cabinets by H....
    Pre-sale estimate for one of the first medicine cabinets from Damien Hirst’s degree show. “I lived with that medicine cabinet for seven years with people telling me it was crap” Robert Tibbles Bought for just £600 by Robert Tibbles in 1989, ‘Bodies’ is from a set of 12 cabinets by Hirst each named after the twelve title tracks of the iconic Sex Pistols album, ‘Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols’. A doorless medicine cabinet packed with everything from Optrex eye drops to Dioralyte rehydration sachets, the work is set to become a landmark in British contemporary art when it goes up for auction next month at Phillips, London. Hirst’s cabinet, ‘Bodies’ set to fetch up to £1.8m at auction’ One of the YBAs (Young British Artists) who dominated the art scene in the UK during the 1990s, Damien Hirst shot to fame after winning the Turner Prize in 1995 and continues to shake up the art world with his dynamic approaches. His varied work often explores themes of art, religion, science, life and death and he works in different mediums as a sculptor, installation artist, painter and print maker. ‘Great art or good art, is when you look at it, experience it and it stays in your mind. I don’t think conceptual art and traditional art are all that different’. Damien Hirst Black Utopia 2012 by Damien Hirst. A cabinet print available in our Brighton gallery Black Heaven (Nite Time) by Damien Hirst. Available in our Brighton gallery Hirst’s exploration into our complex relationship with pharmaceuticals is one of the most enduring themes in his work. His medicine cabinet and pill prints combine the aesthetics of minimalism with Hirst’s observation that, “science is the new religion for many people. It’s as simple and as complicated as that really.” We have a selection of Damien Hirst’s ‘The Cure’ pill prints available in our Brighton gallery Amongst Hirst’s most widely recognized works, the spot series has 13 sub-categories of which the ‘Pharmaceutical’ paintings being the first and most prolific. We have two rare prints from this category available, ‘M Fluorobenzoyl Chloride’ and ‘Mannitol’ named after chemical compounds used in over the counter medicines. M Fluorobenzoyl Chloride’ by Damien Hirst. Available in artrepublic gallery. Clean, flat circles of gloss paint on a stark white and clinical background, each Hirst spot print possesses an intensity that can be as addictive and all-consuming as the controlled substances they are named after. ‘Mannitol’ by Damien Hirst. Available in artrepublic gallery Speaking on the spot series Hirst says, “It’s an assault on your senses. They grab hold of you and give you a good shaking. As adults, we’re not used to it. It’s an amazing fact that all objects leap beyond their own dimension.” One to watch For those looking to hang a similar cabinet in their home which makes a bold statement, as Mr Tibbles did with his Hirst, we recommend Lucy Sparrow as one of our most up and coming and investable artists. Taking the art world by storm with her large scale, immersive installations filled with everyday items reimagined as plush felt toys, Sparrow’s projects have included, *‘Triple Art Bypass’ – a felt depiction of an emergency operating theatre and consultation room and more recently, **‘Delicatessen on 6th’ - an upscale New York deli filled with felt foods. The 'His ’n’ Hers’ cabinets we have available at artrepublic gallery each contain gendered toiletries in felt form that both celebrate the familiarity of these items but also raises questions on the expectations placed different genders and how males and females are marketed differently in a consumerist world. For more information on any of these artworks contact our Brighton gallery. Get in touch on +44 (0) 1273 724829.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Beginners Guide To Collecting Photography - Issue 2

    Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography - Issue 2 Part 2 is here! Following on from the first part of our beginner's guide, our friends at Crane Kalman Brighton have helped us put together our beginner's guide to collecting photography. If you haven't seen our first part, check it out here. ....
    Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography - Issue 2 Part 2 is here! Following on from the first part of our beginner's guide, our friends at Crane Kalman Brighton have helped us put together our beginner's guide to collecting photography. If you haven't seen our first part, check it out here. Welcome back to the second issue in this mini-series of The Beginners Guide to Collecting Photography. The process of buying photographic prints can be confusing if you're coming to it fresh. In the first issue, we talked about why you might collect photography, where you might start and how you can identify what you like. This issue will look at print editions, price points, print papers and how to make the most of that mailing list. Penguin XL by Mark Vessey Editioning The concept of editions is a confusing one so don't worry if you don't understand it straight away. When a photographer creates an image for sale, it'll be sold in an edition. This refers to the number of prints produced of that image in that particular size and sold for that particular price, although we'll see in the following section how this can change too as more prints are sold. Editions can vary widely in size, from 7 to 100, and even 250, and are usually called "Limited Editions" because the number of prints in that edition is (you guessed it) limited to that number. For example, Mark Vessey's Penguin XL is a limited edition print consisting of only 15 prints. This means that once all 15 prints in the edition have been sold, no more will be available to purchase. Fires 10 by Ellie Davies You may see the same image in several editions, but with different prices and in different dimensions. For example, it's possible to buy Fires 10 by Ellie Davies in two different sizes from the artrepublic website. When you're scrolling through the site you'll notice that one print of Fires 10 is priced higher than the other. The difference in price can be explained by the dimensions of the print itself: the higher price refers to a physically larger print, whereas the lower price corresponds to the smaller print. Bear in mind that with larger prints the size of the edition itself will usually be smaller. If you come across a print that you like and see it labelled as an "Open Edition", this simply means that there is no limit to the number of prints produced. This is a more common practice for archives to follow rather than photographers or artists, who prefer to maintain exclusivity to their work. Of course, if you're looking to collect work that will increase in value you'll be looking for Limited Editions because their value may increase as the edition becomes sold out. But don't discount a print you like simply because it's from an Open Edition! In our first issue of this Beginners Guide, we emphasised the importance of collecting work that speaks to you, and this advice should really stay at the front your mind as you embark on your collecting journey.     Price Points Closely related to editioning is, of course, price. The prices of editioned prints may vary depending on several things. We've just seen, in the previous section, how you might expect to pay more for a larger print. Well, you can also expect to see incremental prices as the number of prints remaining in an edition shrinks. For example, if you were interested in Ellie Davies's prints you should expect to find that, as more people buy the prints in any of her editions, the prices for the prints remaining in that edition increase. This is not unusual, it reflects the rarity of the remaining prints and the importance of an artist's creative control. Printing Grand Piano XL by Gina Soden One of the most common types of print is Giclee. The word comes from the French, meaning to "spray". The print is produced by a large format inkjet printer quite literally spraying the ink on to the paper so precisely and accurately that what results is the nearest thing to the original image. The paper and ink used in Giclee printing are archival, which means that the print is made to last a long time, so it won't degrade. Another popular form of printing is C-Type, also known as Chromogenic prints. This is a digital process; light-sensitive paper is exposed to lasers or LEDs that use the original digital file of the image, and then processed in photographic developer and fixed, much like the traditional darkroom process. A C-Type will also be printed on archival paper to increase its lifespan. Paper Not all photographic printing papers are created equal! There is a huge range of papers available and they vary in finish and texture, which lends a lot to the final product. If you're interested in knowing the specific kind of paper used don't hesitate to ask if that information isn't immediately available. Varieties include glossy, matte, pearl, rag and textured, each of which provides a different viewing experience. We briefly mentioned archival paper in the previous section. Archival papers are acid-free, meaning that certain chemicals which would David Bowie Photographed by Steve Rapport degrade the quality of the paper through constant exposure to air aren't present. While archival quality paper might make the print more expensive, know that you're also purchasing reassurance that the print will last for years to come.   Mailing Lists Like we said in issue one, make the most of technology and allow it to work for you; sign up straight away to the gallery's mailing list to ensure that you're kept up to date. These email updates might include new works from photographers, news of upcoming gallery shows and art fairs or information about new additions to the gallery's roster of represented artists. The great advantage of signing up to the gallery mailing list is twofold: firstly, it provides you with useful information without having to go looking for it; and secondly, it shows the gallery that you're interested. This is the best way to keep informed and gets you in on the ground floor so you can pave the way to your future photography collection. Sign up to our mailing list here.   We hope you enjoyed reading this article about photography and all the opportunity it offers. Stay tuned to see further instalments into the ever prosperous world of photography!   Want to see some of the wonderful photography that Crane Kalman Brighton Gallery has to offer? Check out their stand at the London Art Fair. See stand 21 on the main Mezzanine floor.  London Art Fair is a showcase for the most exceptional modern and contemporary and provides an opportunity to discover and to buy. The Fair is an established destination for both museum quality modern and contemporary work, nurturing collecting at all levels, from prints, photographs and editions, to major works by internationally renowned artists. The fair runs from 22nd-26th January at the Islington Business Design Centre. Haven't got tickets?  For your chance to win 2 tickets to the London art Fair, for entry to the fair on any day, enter our give away draw here. $test =
  • Slim Aarons ‘Poolside Gossip’ 50th Anniversary

    Slim Aaron’s iconic photograph, ‘Poolside Gossip’ is still turning heads at 50. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Slim Aaron’s iconic photograph, ‘Poolside Gossip’ we will be serving up classy cocktails with a collection of fabulous photographs by the legendary Slim Aarons as our....
    Slim Aaron’s iconic photograph, ‘Poolside Gossip’ is still turning heads at 50. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Slim Aaron’s iconic photograph, ‘Poolside Gossip’ we will be serving up classy cocktails with a collection of fabulous photographs by the legendary Slim Aarons as our glamorous gallery becomes a Poolside Party! Add yourself to the guestlist at eventbrite Poolside Gossip by Slim Aarons Photographing celebrities and wealthy people for over 6 decades, Slim Aarons has produced a body of work with a luxurious feel often mimicked in advertising to sell an aspirational lifestyle. He described his photographs as, "attractive people doing attractive things in attractive places." ‘Poolside Gossip’ perfectly encapsulates this aesthetic, as the dusty desert hills of Palm Springs contrast against a meticulously landscaped lush green garden and modern glass and stone house designed by famous architect Richard Neutra for Edgar J. Kaufmann. The woman in yellow, Nelda Linsk owned the home when the photo was taken in 1970. Her friend, Helen Kaptur, lounging in the white lace was married to mid-century architect Hugh Kaptur. The third women strutting towards them is actress, Lita Baron. The elite wives and socialites with immaculate hair and outfits inspired the fashion world and ‘Poolside Gossip’ became a symbol of modernism with its combination of glamour and architecture. ‘Penthouse Pool’ by Slim Aarons Giving us a glimpse into the lives of the rich and famous, photographs by Slim Aarons are like time-capsules of a bygone era that can still spark as much envy and desire today as when they were created. Learn more about how Slim Aarons went from military to celebrity photographer as our special guest, Matthew Butson, the Vice President of the Getty Images Hulton Archive which have been the official home of the Slim Aarons Collection for more than 20 years, presents a talk on the artist. As well as a collection of classic Slim Aarons favourites, we will be showcasing some rare stamped editions, signed editions and Perspex pieces for the first time in the gallery. Catherine Wilke by Slim Aarons   Book your tickets at this unmissable event at eventbrite   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =

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