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Monthly Archives: August 2019

  • artrepublic gallery comes to Manchester Art Fair 2019

    Attracting over 68,000 visitors each year, the Manchester Art Fair is one of the most ambitious art fairs in the UK featuring only the most prestigious galleries and artists across the contemporary art world. For a limited time artrepublic has arranged FREE tickets to the Fair, apply today! ar....
    Attracting over 68,000 visitors each year, the Manchester Art Fair is one of the most ambitious art fairs in the UK featuring only the most prestigious galleries and artists across the contemporary art world. For a limited time artrepublic has arranged FREE tickets to the Fair, apply today! artrepublic are delighted to once again be heading North to showcase a carefully curated selection of artwork that captures the essence of the artrepublic gallery. Expect exclusive prints from big names such as Peter Blake, Ryan Callanan and Dave White to name but a few, alongside the new up and coming artists we champion.   As well as the exhibiting galleries there will be artist-led spaces and a host of activities, presentations and events to watch and take part in such as a kids’ area, taster creative art courses and printmaking demos. Previous years have featured a charity auction of Damian Hirst doodles, live painting by Pure Evil and record-breaking sales of works by Tracy Emin and Grayson Perry. We can’t wait to see what 2019 brings! 11th - 13th October Manchester Central Get FREE tickets to Manchester Art Fair for limited time, with an exclusive artrepublic discount!   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Keith Haring Exhibition at Tate Liverpool

    Iconic Street Artist Keith Haring is being celebrated at Tate Liverpool in the first major exhibition of his work in the UK. Born in Pennsylvania, in 1958 Haring loved drawing cartoons with his father. This influence can be seen in his work and he retained this bold and simple style throughout hi....
    Iconic Street Artist Keith Haring is being celebrated at Tate Liverpool in the first major exhibition of his work in the UK. Born in Pennsylvania, in 1958 Haring loved drawing cartoons with his father. This influence can be seen in his work and he retained this bold and simple style throughout his life. After moving to New York he progressed to drawing chalk outlines of figures, dogs, and other stylized images onto the streets and quickly became a part of the legendary New York art scene of the 1980s. His distinctive figures were cute and playful often conveying a message that spoke a thousand words. Much of his work was a response to social and political events happening at the time, such as Apartheid, the AIDS epidemic and drug abuse. He was an activist, but the pieces remained upbeat and optimistic. Examples of Keith Haring’s work: Keith Haring’s legacy paved the way for the street artists of today. Initially being arrested multiple times for vandalism, he eventually gained celebrity status for his graffiti as his pieces became more recognised, appreciated and sought after. He bridged the gap between highbrow and lowbrow - painting the streets with fine art and bringing street art into a fine art gallery. Subway stations became art galleries and art galleries became night clubs. He always questioned the status quo. Despite his growing fame he wanted his art to be accessible and inclusive to all. Inspired by his friend Andy Warhol, he had no qualms about being a commercial brand and had his ‘Baby and Barking Dog’ designs emblazoned on a range of merchandise to bring his art to the masses. His philosophy was that art was for everyone and should be everywhere, not just inside museums and galleries. He wanted to reach more people so a more diverse range of people could appreciate the art. “Art lives through the imaginations of the people who are seeing it. Without that contact, there is no art.” Keith Haring, Flash Art, March 1984 We have been looking at some of our street artists in the artrepublic gallery to see the comparisons between their work and how Keith Haring has influenced them Banksy Gangsta Rat Keith Haring was among the first artists to embrace disseminating his imagery in different ways. Although best known for his satirical stencil graffiti, Banksy has now become the master of ingenious ways to gain attention for his work. From his Princess Diana printed £10 notes which he threw into the crowd at Notting Hill Carnival, to his ‘Dismaland’ theme park, to the sabotaging his own work being auctioned at Sotheby’s with a shredder built into the picture frame. They have all made the news and brought his artwork to the masses. Maser Translation XII Keith Haring’s street art style became so well known that he soon built a language out of the simple symbols that he used. Irish street artist Maser has a distinct palette of colours and bold shapes that he uses to build a style and is instantly recognisable as a ‘Maser’ whether the piece be a large scale mural, small print or more recently a yoga mat! Pure Evil Jane Fonda Not afraid to use art as a political, social or cultural commentary. Like Keith Haring, Pure Evil uses art as an outlet in producing visual imagery that speaks louder than words. In the same way Keith Haring had a consistent style that made his work easily identified, Pure Evil has made the tear that drips from his subjects’ eye the trade mark he is known and loved for. Eelus Alice Continues to bridge the gap between street art and fine art with ‘Alice’ available as a print but can also be seen on the streets in Brighton. In the same way Keith Haring would use playful imagery combined with an important message, Eelus balances humour with the macabre to make social commentary through his work. RYCA Love and Happy Beams Keith Haring’s artwork help shape the style of rave culture – something which is prominent in Ryca’s work. The similarities between their work can be seen in the thick outlines they both use to frame bright and bold shapes and colours.   Catch the Keith Haring exhibition at Tate Liverpool from now until the 10th November 2019. Find artists inspired at the artrepublic Brighton gallery   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Everybody Razzle Dazzle with Sir Peter Blake

    In April, artrepublic gallery artist, Sir Peter Blake created a stunning moving artwork commissioned by Liverpool Biennial and Mersey Ferries as part of this year’s First World War commemorations. Dazzle Ferry The striking pattern of the Dazzle Ferry in both vibrant colours and monochrome is....
    In April, artrepublic gallery artist, Sir Peter Blake created a stunning moving artwork commissioned by Liverpool Biennial and Mersey Ferries as part of this year’s First World War commemorations. Dazzle Ferry The striking pattern of the Dazzle Ferry in both vibrant colours and monochrome is reminiscent of the designs that were painted on vessels in WWI to dazzle the enemy and baffle the eye so it was more difficult for them to gauge the target’s range, speed and direction so they didn’t know if the boat was coming or going! Each vessel was also painted in a unique pattern, so it was not immediately obvious who it belonged to. Visitors can learn more about this fascinating story whilst sailing the River Mersey with the Dazzle Ferry’s on-board display curated by Merseyside Maritime Museum and Tate Liverpool. WWI Ferry Hailed as ‘The Godfather of Pop Art’ Sir Peter Blake was instrumental in the Pop Art movement which emerged in the UK following post World War II manufacturing and the associated media boom. Pop artists celebrated the new capitalist market and the goods it circulated. Everyday objects and mass produced items and images became art. His work is still prominent in the contemporary art world and in 2002 he was knighted at Buckingham palace for his services to art. The first world war anti-submarine gunboat HMS Kildangan, pictured in its dazzle camouflage in 1918. Photograph: IWM/Getty Images At our artrepublic gallery in Brighton we have a range of Peter Blake artwork including his Dazzle Alphabet Letter Set available to recreate a Pop Art Dazzle in your home! Signed Limited Edition of 100, Silkscreen with glazes by Sir Peter Blake Each letter is individually priced according to popularity as the set sell outs and prices are subject to change at any time. Letters can be purchased together as a set for an eye-catching alphabet wall or as individual letters. Why not gift a loved one their initial for a dazzling birthday present? Have you signed up to our next gallery eventon Friday 6th September? Sign up at our Eventbrite page for your tickets to our ‘Sources of Pop Art’ showcase - a celebration of Peter Blake’s iconic works and how they have influenced artists across the artrepublic gallery. We look at some never exhibited before prints from the pioneer of Pop Art as well as other contemporary artists that continue to captivate us with sources of popular culture. Expect dazzling displays of eye-popping colour, charming pin up girls and iconic advertising that has weaved its way into the art world. ‘100 Sources of Pop Art’ Signed Limited Edition of 175, Silkscreen by Sir Peter Blake   Join us for our Peter Blake 'Sources of Pop Art' showcase evening on Friday 6th September. Visit our Eventbrite page for FREE tickets. View our collection of Sir Peter Blake prints at the artrepublic Brighton gallery or call us for more details: +44 (0)1273 724829.     For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Yinka Ilori's Colour Palace 'does good'

    Yinka Ilori is a London-based artist of Nigerian heritage, who specialises in creating artwork that blends Nigerian traditions with contemporary design. This Summer Yinka Ilori designed, ‘The Colour Palace’ - a temporary outdoor structure currently at the Dulwich Picture Gallery. It was the....
    Yinka Ilori is a London-based artist of Nigerian heritage, who specialises in creating artwork that blends Nigerian traditions with contemporary design. This Summer Yinka Ilori designed, ‘The Colour Palace’ - a temporary outdoor structure currently at the Dulwich Picture Gallery. It was the winning design for a competition run through the gallery and the London Festival of Architecture. Crafted from pieces of timber, each side of the timber louvres forming the façade is painted a different colour, creating shifting layers of pattern when viewed from different angles. The Colour Palace by Yinka Ilori is being displayed at the Dulwich Picture Gallery this Summer. Yinka’s colour palace is a celebration of colour, pattern and light and draws upon both European and African cultural traditions in creating a design that is relevant to and representative of today’s multicultural London. A model of the winning competition entry - Currently on display at the Royal Academy Inspired by the traditional African fabrics he was surrounded with as a child, his work features the pops of colourful geometric lines that feature in Nigerian patterned prints with a hint of playful 1980s retro nostalgia. The artrepublic Brighton gallery are excited to stock his prints from the ‘Do Good Because Of tomorrow’ Exhibition. The phrase is widely used in Nigeria and is used to inspire people to participate in good deeds and catalyse positive changes. 'Do Good Because of Tomorrow Side A' – Signed limited edition of 15 – Silkscreen Hand Finished Print: 'Do Good Because of Tomorrow Side B' – Signed limited edition of 15 – Silkscreen Hand Finished Print: View these prints today at the artrepublic Brighton gallery or call us for more details: +44 (0)1273 724829.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • New Episodes of our Art Related Noise Podcast

    Have you heard the latest Art Related Noise? Join artrepublic’s regular podcast for a fascinating insight into our artists and the art world. Ever wondered why contemporary art is considered art at all? Or stood in a gallery pondering the story behind a famous artist’s life or the meaning....
    Have you heard the latest Art Related Noise? Join artrepublic’s regular podcast for a fascinating insight into our artists and the art world. Ever wondered why contemporary art is considered art at all? Or stood in a gallery pondering the story behind a famous artist’s life or the meaning of their piece de resistance? Let us debunk some artistic myths and weave you some stories as we discuss with the people who make creativity their life’s work. In our latest installment, legendary street artist Pure Evil aka Charlie Edwards and one half of popular art duo Art + Believe, Dan Doherty joined us at the Artist Residence Hotel in Brighton for a panel talk on Street Art Vs Fine Art. Hosted by Stuart from the award-winning art blog, Inspiring City. Exchanging stories and anecdotes, Charlie and Dan provide a personal insight into the urban art scene and how street art has become more accessible to everyone. They discuss the influences both street art and fine art have had on their work and debate their place within society today. Charlie was heavily influenced by graffiti culture, his ‘most important artistic discovery’, one that is still prevalent within his best-known work. The iconic blotch of dripping paint underneath the eye of his muses lends itself to the influence of street art, a trademark that is now globally recognised as his. The Set restaurant which hosted the 4 course tasting menu accompanying this panel talk, also have an instantly recognisable Pure Evil mural residing in their beer garden; Art + Believe have been working as a duo for over 10 years and have been heavily influenced by street art around the world within different cultures and collaborate with other street artists on a range of projects whilst keeping their vibrant geometric signature style. They capture the essence of street art by transforming outside spaces with colourful, emotive pieces to be shared with everyone. Listen in to this fascinating panel talk and subscribe to ‘Art Related Noise’ at either iTunes or Android and let us know what you think! Which of our artists would you like to hear on our podcast? Let us know at @art_yard_sale on Instagram. $test =

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