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Monthly Archives: April 2019

  • Dan Hillier has us mesmerized with a brand new box set

    artrepublic Brighton has launched a brand new box set by renowned artist Dan Hillier. Famed for seamlessly blending Surrealism and Neo-Victoriana, he creates new artworks from pieces of old Victorian prints, woodcuts, engravings and various illustrations. The beautiful set of six giclée prints is....
    artrepublic Brighton has launched a brand new box set by renowned artist Dan Hillier. Famed for seamlessly blending Surrealism and Neo-Victoriana, he creates new artworks from pieces of old Victorian prints, woodcuts, engravings and various illustrations. The beautiful set of six giclée prints is presented in a bespoke archival display box, from a limited edition of 100. Hackney-based artist Dan Hillier has been busy. Over the past twelve years, he’s produced art that has stretched his explorative style and made a significant impact on the UK contemporary art scene. Mainly producing art for himself, Hillier draws upon a huge range of influences and imagery to produce works that are arresting, complex and beautiful. He has a glittering array of impressive collaborations under his belt, including Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, the Folio Society and most recently created the opening titles to BBC One’s new major drama ‘Requiem’. He was also chosen in 2015 by the British Council to represent Britain in the Giant Creator Show in Beijing. No big deal. Hillier’s works are eerily provocative. They take you on a visual journey into the realms of your subconscious, simultaneously enlightening and perplexing the viewer. Exploration is a huge cornerstone of Hillier’s working practice, leaving room for the spontaneity of his ideas to grace the pieces almost like epiphanies. His diversity of ideological influences add depth to his work, his is often found quoting Buddhist texts in relation to his work on Instagram. It is clear that themes of rebirth, death, transcendence and enlightenment pervade his work. A huge fan of Tibetan art, the intricacy of the detailing and the texture of his pieces allude to ancient tapestries whilst contributing to his creation of something otherworldly and contemporary. Full of contradictions, Hillier’s work experiments with darkness and light, the biblical and the modern and monochrome and luxurious gold leaf. Visually contrasting and thematically opposing, Hillier confronts the metaphysical ideas surrounding our reality. Submerging us into an unsettlingly immersive world of ethereal beauty, Hillier pulls no punches in captivating the viewer. Although Hillier’s technique relies upon collaging and pulling images from an array of different sources, the resulting compositions are always entirely cohesive. His ability to seamlessly blend his eclectic influences together is a tribute to his mastery of his form. To view the new set call into our gallery at 13 Bond Street, Brighton, BN1 1RD or call us for more details: +44 1273 724829.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Mixed Originals Show – new work at artrepublic Brighton

    Before our fifth annual Art Yard Sale closes the Brighton Fringe Festival on 2nd June 2019, artrepublic are hosting a showcase of work, throughout May, featuring the artists taking part. Every artist will be presenting an original specifically for our showcase. Expect to see the likes of Dan Hil....
    Before our fifth annual Art Yard Sale closes the Brighton Fringe Festival on 2nd June 2019, artrepublic are hosting a showcase of work, throughout May, featuring the artists taking part. Every artist will be presenting an original specifically for our showcase. Expect to see the likes of Dan Hillier, Maria Rivans, Bonnie and Clyde, Joe Webb, Eddy Bennett, RYCA and Evan Roberts and many more leading UK contemporary artists. It’s a fantastic opportunity to bag an original from a beloved artist.     Our Art Yard Sale is a huge success every year and whether you can or can’t make this year’s event, take a look in our gallery for a preview of new work by artists featured on the day. We love to celebrate the new in the art scene, so every year there is something different to see. The showcase kicks off with a Private View on 2nd May, where artists will be available for questions and feedback on their work on the night and you can gain unique insight into their inspirations and processes. We love the accessibility the Art Yard Sale creates around the artists and their work, giving the art the chance to speak for itself and the artists the opportunity to speak for themselves. From illustration, to print, to painting and even graffiti and sculpture we offer an edited selection of the UK’s best contemporary art. Whether you’re in Brighton for the Fringe Festival or a local, this is a showcase of creative talent not to be missed. Join us at our Brighton gallery throughout May to preview this year’s Art Yard Sale and register for free tickets to our exclusive Private View evening on 2nd May. See you there!   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Q&A with Matt Jukes

    We were lucky enough to get a Q&A with the latest artist to join us here at artrepublic. Get to know the amazing Matt Jukes below. Emma: Hello, Matt. Thank you for agreeing to do this Q&A. First off, I wanted to ask what inspired you to pursue art as a career? Matt: I’m not sure how to ....
    We were lucky enough to get a Q&A with the latest artist to join us here at artrepublic. Get to know the amazing Matt Jukes below. Emma: Hello, Matt. Thank you for agreeing to do this Q&A. First off, I wanted to ask what inspired you to pursue art as a career? Matt: I’m not sure how to answer this question, as I’ve never really thought of this as a career. It’s never been a choice—it’s more a way of life. The inspiration to do my first art fair came when I was cleaning out my draw in the studio, trying to find some space for new work, and throwing the old work into the bins. Only to discover my studio buddies digging through the bins for my work.  For the first time, I thought that my work would resonate with someone other than myself. Emma: So has art always been a part of your life? Matt: Art has always been part of my life. One of my earliest memories was telling my mother about painting a red car in kindergarten and being upset that it didn’t match my vision. As a child. Emma: Did you study art before you started making your beautiful monotypes? Matt: Like most wistful teens, I studied art in high school where I was attracted to the freedom from the right and wrong answers of my maths and physics classes. From here I got side-tracked by a graphic design degree and a career in advertising. Advertising gave me an understanding of emotion and human connection and how to archive it through shape and form, which I have taken into my monotypes. Emma: What has been some of the biggest inspirations for you and your work? Matt: Hazy memories. All of my work is about the search for almost forgotten memories which I capture through emotions, music and places. Most of the titles of my work are references to obscure song lyrics. This is because music along with colour, it helps shape the emotion of a piece. Music is constantly surrounding me, providing a soundtrack to my life, this means that a handful of words can fill me with emotion, take me back to a time and place in a second. In my work, I always try laying down a feeling of place and not a physical depiction. I want the viewer to share the same emotion and implant their own location from their memories. Emma: Looking at your work, you seem to capture movement across landscapes really well. Is capturing movement a key part of your creative process? Matt: Movement and depth are critical to my work and deeply built into my process. Using the Offset Lithography Press allows me to carry forward the ink, moving my work away from a simple ink or no ink approach of relief printing and allowing each image to be held on the blanket. This is where this movement comes from. Emma: Is colour choice a big part of the process when creating your work? Matt: Colour and colour theory are a huge part of my work. I see colour as liquid emotion, layered in cultural meaning. I start every piece with a search for a colour, and as I hand mix the ink together, an emotion associated with that colour starts to emerge. Emma: Is every piece of your work inspired by a specific landscape? Matt: Every piece is an emotional representation of a specific place, but I usually keep the location a secret as I don’t want to influence the viewer in finding their own place. So my question to you is: where is this place for you? Emma: What has been one of your favourite pieces to work on? Matt: I find my favourite pieces are the ones which surprise me, the ones that pop up on the way to when you are looking for something else. My current favourite is a piece called “The Endless Sea”. It is much quieter than the others, as the tones are darker but strangely incandescent. I like that it’s a little tricky and doesn’t like to be captured by the camera. It only really shows its magic when viewed in person. Emma: Thank you so much, Matt, for letting us get a glimpse into how to create your stunning works of art. Are there any up-and-coming projects you'd like to let everyone know about?  Matt: The next project I am really excited by departs from my current work and looks into the memories of the individual viewer. To do this I’m building a robot which will look at the viewer’s face and analyse their emotions before setting out to paint a representation of what they’re feeling.     Don't miss Matt's one of a kind monotypes. These beautiful pieces are now available. Check out all of his work HERE  $test =
  • Elizabeth Waggett releases new print ‘Where The Light Gets In’

    New-York-based fine artist Elizabeth Waggett reveals her eagerly anticipated new print, ‘Where The Light Gets In’. An exceptional, internationally renowned contemporary artist, originally from Manchester – Waggett’s style is becoming quite the collectors' favourite. Her artworks are now....
    New-York-based fine artist Elizabeth Waggett reveals her eagerly anticipated new print, ‘Where The Light Gets In’. An exceptional, internationally renowned contemporary artist, originally from Manchester – Waggett’s style is becoming quite the collectors' favourite. Her artworks are now held in many private collections in North America, Bahrain, Europe, South Africa, and the UAE. There is no doubt that her newest piece will be snapped up quickly. As a limited edition of 30 prints, ‘Where the light gets in’ is the latest print in Elizabeth's longhorn series and pays homage to her hometown of Manchester. This unique edition is hand finished with real 22 karat rose gold leaf and has hand finished elements such as ink and graphite on archival somerset 330 gsm cotton rage. "It's a celebration of my home city Manchester and my new home New York. I wanted to create a piece that symbolised my time so far living in America and particularly New York as a proud Mancunian. The two powerful creates the longhorn (America) and the bee (Manchester) felt like the perfect pairing for this piece to celebrate the confusing yet magical time living in NYC, my acceptance of it and its acceptance of me." The first 10 of the edition will be hand embellished by the artist with 22ct gold. Internationally recognised for choosing objects which have a strong social stigma associated with them, Waggett cleverly explores these stigmas through her monochromatic working methods, centred around meticulous and analytical mark making. Through the visually pleasing addition of shimmering gold leaf, her chosen object is transformed into something that feels new and quite beautiful. Through her artistic hand, Waggett asks the viewer to question the conversation about the stigma and if its attachment to the object really needs to be there. Rather than being described as hyperrealist or photorealist, her artworks reflect how her unique layering style can create an impact from afar that requires closer inspection. In an interview, she states: “I suppose my work is about accuracy and whether there are such things”. Perhaps her mark making is continually addressing the accuracy of our social constructs? We’ve put the question out there, what do you think?   To find out more about this print, pop into our Brighton gallery or call us: +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Take a seat, does Yinka Ilori have your attention?

    Designer Yinka Ilori is known for his distinctive, vivacious use of bold colours and pattens in his pieces of furniture. He brings his childhood spent surrounded by intricate African Fabrics and Nigerian parables into the contemporary through his experiments with function and form. His most recent....
    Designer Yinka Ilori is known for his distinctive, vivacious use of bold colours and pattens in his pieces of furniture. He brings his childhood spent surrounded by intricate African Fabrics and Nigerian parables into the contemporary through his experiments with function and form. His most recent projects include Restoration Station, where he directly collaborated with recovering addicts in a workshop to up-cycle donated furniture. Allowing people who were also going through a transformation to create stunning work with him and to express their own narrative was a huge success. The chairs were put on display as part of the London Design Festival, and raised £2,520 for the company.   Injecting artistic exuberance through this work, he aims to work with more communities following the success of the Restoration Station. His proposal to transform a gloomy overpass in South London has been accepted and will be organised as part of the London Festival of Architecture in June. The design, entitled ‘Happy Street’, is a kaleidoscopic rainbow pattern reinvigorating a public space that previously scared the local schoolchildren. Expressing multiculturalism and diversity, IIlori’s work is vital and important within the public spaces of London, addressing issues around sexuality and class. His work is inclusive and celebratory, for everyone to enjoy. Playfully serious, beautiful and yet available to all, Ilori is re-writing the rules of the art world. Most recently, Ilori has collaborated with Universal Music to produce a special edition print in honour of the Brit Awards. The print ‘Love in a line’ is a geometric explosion of colour and clean lines, nodding to his influences of Nigerian pattern. He wanted to celebrate the bravery and beauty of being different, racially, sexually or creatively. The movement in the piece implies development, and a nod to the future. Ilori often asks questions in his work about where we are going, where we’ve come from and the constantly fluctuating nature of identity. One of this strengths as a designer is his storytelling ability. Being influenced by the power of narratives in his childhood from the African parables, he brings this dimension to his work. Whether it is print, furniture or urban landscape projects, the notion of transformation is threaded throughout. The artrepublic Brighton gallery are excited to stock his prints from the ‘Do Good Because Of tomorrow’ Exhibition. The phrase is widely used in Nigeria and is used to inspire people to participate in good deeds and catalyse positive changes. The stories inherent within his work resonate with a huge range of people, and we’re delighted to feature him. Please drop in to experience his work in person!   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =

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