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Monthly Archives: February 2019

  • Get to Know Soozy Lipsey

    Leave the dull behind and enter the wonderful world of Soozy Lipsey! We had the pleasure of sitting down with the lovely Soozy Lipsey to discuss her work, her process and more.  R: Hi Soozy. Thank you for doing this interview with us. Let's jump straight in. Your approach to art seems incredibly f....
    Leave the dull behind and enter the wonderful world of Soozy Lipsey! We had the pleasure of sitting down with the lovely Soozy Lipsey to discuss her work, her process and more.  R: Hi Soozy. Thank you for doing this interview with us. Let's jump straight in. Your approach to art seems incredibly fun and not to be taken too seriously. Is this something you feel strongly about?  S: I would say my art parallels my life in many ways. I think life is a serious business and in the same breath really not so serious. Similar to feeling significant and yet totally insignificant. I find humour really does defuse the tension of these paradoxes. So in an answer to your question, I think having a laugh in life, especially laughing at ones imperfections, is crucial and I like to show that in my work. I have a sense of humour - its a way to really connect with people. Knowing how to really laugh at life is a skill I think and so wit is something I really admire in people. R: Your work beautifully captures the unexpected to produce both whimsical and macabre emotion. How do you perceive your own work?  S: I think some of my work really plays with the tensions: life and death, light and dark and weak-strong. l think my work has different levels of interpretation but if it doesn't disturb the viewer in anyway, then I fear my work is just passing people by which isn't of much interest to me. Being disturbed keeps us awake. A 'Do not disturb ' sign is not something I would hang anywhere near my artwork. R: Re-imagining and revitalising vintage art is something you adopt within your work frequently. What’s the feeling behind it? Is there a reason you choose to do this? S: I think the past is where we draw our wisdom our guidance - it's incredibly important. One of my favourite Quotes is from a Danish philosopher, Kierkegaard. He says 'Life can only be understood backwards, but must be lived forwards.' I think anything with a sense of history has a quality about it that new things just do not have. I am drawn to these qualities intellectually, aesthetically and emotionally. I like to revisit something with a sense of age - something that has existed for sometime and then change it. Therefore, it embodies a new lease of life.   An example of that was buying an old picture of a vase of flowers and cutting it in half and hanging just half the picture. The idea behind this was to offer the viewer just half the story, the rest was up to the viewer to imagine. I liked the idea that the discarded half remains in the past. It also played on the human drive to always be desiring, and by withholding half the picture the viewer would hopefully be in a state of momentary satisfaction as I had left them desiring the other half or even imagining it. I hadn't given them everything, which hopefully captured their attention for longer than I would have had I just hung the full picture. R: What’s your process when creating a new piece? Do you have a “routine” or a method you stick to or does it flow much more naturally? S: There usually is no great plan other than trying my very best to do what I perceive is my job as an artist. This being to keep myself on the outside of most conventions, especially routine because routine and habit can dull the senses. It makes us spoilt and complacent and even entitled. I think it's the artists role to look at life with a sense of enquiry. If my work embodies that even a fraction, then whatever material or style I use is irrelevant really. R: What are you favourite mediums/materials to work with? And what are your favourite themes/subjects to capture? S: I like print as it's accessible and affordable which is a key thing for me - art can be purchased by a wider audience. I love old objects, paintings and great thinkers, philosophers and tubes of paint. My favourite themes would have to be the human condition. R: How do you keep your studio/workstation? Is it rather neat and tidy or could it be considered its own work of art? S: It's a total mess when working on something. The idea of anything 'becoming' that doesn't generate mess is a mystery to me. Birth is messy business, after all. Neat and tidy is something I like to visit once in a while just to ground myself and to pretend I have everything under control. R: You’ve previously collaborated with Dan Hillier to produce ‘The Meeting,’ beautifully capturing your unique styles together. Have you got any future collaborations in the works? Or is there an artist you would like to work with in the future? S: I have no plans to collaborate in the near future however, I think collaboration is brilliant! If there is anyone out there who fancies a collaboration, don't hesitate to get in touch! R: And finally, do you have a favourite artist? S: I can't resist giving a mention to my absolute love, Rene Magritte. He is my hero. I'm not one to put anyone on a pedestal but as far as I'm concerned, his mind and execution of  ideas never cease to disappoint and amaze me. He is a poetic genius! Soozy Lipsey re-imagines the traditional with contemporary whimsy, adding a touch of the fantastical here, and a dash of the macabre there, for visually provocative aesthetic. Re-purposing existing - or ‘found’ - objects and images, Lipsey transforms nostalgia into the uncanny though combinational techniques.  Check out all of her work HERE           Check out Soozy Lipsey's website HERE $test =
  • Review: 2019 London Art Fair

    artrepublic looks at the standout work at this year’s Fair. Kicking off the 2019 art scene, the 31st edition of the London Art Fair took over the Business Design centre in Islington in mid January. Filled from top to bottom with an impressive labyrinthine display of artwork, it was easy to get ....
    artrepublic looks at the standout work at this year’s Fair. Kicking off the 2019 art scene, the 31st edition of the London Art Fair took over the Business Design centre in Islington in mid January. Filled from top to bottom with an impressive labyrinthine display of artwork, it was easy to get lost in a good way. Ranging from Sculptures to Portraiture, contemporary art to early twentieth-century pieces, there was something for everyone. A seasoned buyer would feel very at home amongst the Henry Moore and Dali sculptures. Alongside the exuberant display of fine art from some of the most critically-acclaimed artists of the twentieth century such as Sir Anthony Caro and Ben Nicholson, the London Art Fair offers the opportunity for prospective collectors to get advice from curators as to how and where to start in collecting art. Above all, it offers an exploration into bite-sized versions of some of the most prestigious and celebrated galleries in the UK and worldwide. At first an overwhelming spectacle, typical gallery-goers will not be used to the sheer volume of art all under one roof. Navigating the maze of white walls can seem daunting but incredibly rewarding after stumbling upon excellence, which is frequent and often. artrepublic were thrilled to see the prominent print focus in this year’s London Art Fair. The contemporary print artists stood to serve as refreshing palette-cleansers amongst the swathes of fine art and sculpture. A breath of fresh air, a playful nudge or a satirical wink, these prints offer it all. David Shrigley was a headliner for the London Art Fair this year. Combining stylistic childlike innocence with an often mundane or unassuming subject, to produce a piece that is fun and engaging. He celebrates the nuances of everyday life the with the intimacy of the imperfections in his work. There’s an openness to his work that emphasises his accessibility, making his works very desirable to own. His piece ‘My Rampage Is Over’ was exhibited featuring a huge blue elephant. A naive delight, evoking memories of childhood bedtime stories; of letting your own imagination run wild. Another print heavyweight who exhibited boldly this year at the London Art Fair was the Connor Brothers. Their style is instantly recognisable, with their iconic use of vintage photography with modern type. The Connor Brothers have definitely cemented their position within the print space of the London art scene, notoriously popular and effortlessly cool. Most recently they have issued a series of book covers using a selection of their prints. Elevating the smutty form of the pulp novel, their works of art subvert the previously derogatory gender roles. As opposed to the women on these novels only serving to titillate or be murdered they are remastered as untouchable, graceful, almost statuesque. A contemporary twist on a classic. The almost-serious and almost-sensitive work of Charming Baker was another to look out for this year. Often contradictory, pulling the viewer across the emotional spectrum with his work. Disarmingly playful imagery besets an often melancholic backdrop, or is victim to violent scribbles. The resulting composition is a juxtaposition of innocence and darkness, provoking an eerie sense of nostalgia.  A master at combining texture with form, there is a distinctive layering within Baker’s work that enables him to effortlessly discuss themes such as joy, love, death and despair. The style that he has established is one of timeless eccentricity, beautifully thought provoking.   If you’d like to view any of the sensational prints by David Shrigley, The Connor Brothers or Charming Baker please visit the artrepublic gallery in Brighton, call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page   $test =
  • Save the date: artrepublic’s first Sample Sale

    We Need You! Help us fundraise for Middle Street Primary School - get up to 60% off selected works. Between 8th - 10th March, the artrepublic Brighton gallery will be hosting a sample sale at Middle Street Primary School. The school is currently experiencing a chronic funding crisis and is in....
    We Need You! Help us fundraise for Middle Street Primary School - get up to 60% off selected works. Between 8th - 10th March, the artrepublic Brighton gallery will be hosting a sample sale at Middle Street Primary School. The school is currently experiencing a chronic funding crisis and is in real need of local support. The artrepublic Sample Sale will donate 25% of sales to Middle Street Primary School to help raise money for a special needs teacher. Last year, artrepublic raised over £2,000 to help renovate their arts center. This year, we hope to make a difference again. With both framed and unframed works from floor to ceiling, the artrepublic sample sale will offer a unique chance to browse for hidden gems – with up to 60% off selected works. Our gallery team will be on hand to discuss your favourite new find! If you’re tempted to spend a little more, our gallery’s Own Art scheme could make purchasing one or more pieces that little bit easier. For more information on this 0% APR payment plan, please ask one of our Art Advisors. The Brighton gallery team look forward to welcoming you at our Middle Street School sample sale fundraiser.   artrepublic Sample Sale, 8th to 10th March, 10.30am to 5.30pm Middle Street School, 37 Middle Street, Brighton, BN1 1AL   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =
  • Lawrence’s Rare Prints Showcase

    Snap up some never-seen-before rare prints at the artrepublic Brighton gallery. Lawrence Alkin, owner of the artrepublic Brighton gallery will host a special event on Friday 15th February to launch a showcase of his rare, personal print collection. This showcase will be a true representation....
    Snap up some never-seen-before rare prints at the artrepublic Brighton gallery. Lawrence Alkin, owner of the artrepublic Brighton gallery will host a special event on Friday 15th February to launch a showcase of his rare, personal print collection. This showcase will be a true representation of how contemporary art has evolved over 25 years, reflecting artrepublic’s long-standing roots at the forefront of the scene, with many rare works available to buy for the first time in years. Lawrence has always been renowned for his unique gallery curations, placing established artists next to upcoming talent. His eye for talent has been flexing its muscle since the early ’80s, opening his Brighton gallery in 1989. Since then, the gallery has seen featured urban & street art giants such as Banksy, Obey and Ben Eine become world famous, whilst at the same time documenting the importance of established artists such as Peter Blake, Damien Hirst and Grayson Perry. Having sold many iconic prints over the years, it’s not a surprise that a few special editions were held back for an exciting day like this. Lawrence’s ‘Rare Prints’ showcase will be a unique and amazing opportunity to snap up some never-seen-before prints at the artrepublic Brighton gallery. His philosophy since opening the gallery over 25 years ago remains the same: that art should be accessible to everyone. Lawrence aimed to demystify the art world, enabling enthusiasts to follow their heart when buying artwork. He truly believes that this way of buying makes art last for generations rather than just for interior styling. artrepublic proudly offer the Arts Council’s ‘Own Art’ scheme – a zero-interest payment plan, designed to make buying and collecting art more affordable. With our Brighton gallery being the largest provider of these loans in the UK, Own Art doesn't just make buying art more affordable but allows the enjoyment of curating a personal art collection more realistic and attainable than ever before. What once was a luxury, is now available to everyone. Lawrence’s Rare Prints Showcase can be viewed at the artrepublic Brighton gallery between Friday 15th February and Monday 4th March. Register today for your free tickets to our opening evening on 15th Feb. Don’t miss this opportunity to own highly collectable works that have long since sold out or have never been available before.   For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page $test =

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