Monthly Archives: March 2018

  • Dan Hillier Requiem Prints Out Now

    We are really excited to have the three new prints from Dan Hillier. Requiem, Moon Language and Raven are all silkscreen limited editions singed by Dan, and inspired by his artwork in the title sequence of BBC1 drama Requiem. Dan Hillier’s work explores the interface between humans and the....
    We are really excited to have the three new prints from Dan Hillier. Requiem, Moon Language and Raven are all silkscreen limited editions singed by Dan, and inspired by his artwork in the title sequence of BBC1 drama Requiem. Dan Hillier’s work explores the interface between humans and the wilder natural world, the line between our day-to-day reality and the extraordinary. Which is a perfect fit for the themes explored in this supernatural drama. You can still catch the full spooky drama series on BBC iplayer. Dan Hillier came to fame with his amazing imagery on the 'Pachamama' album cover of Brit award winners Royal Blood. His extraordinary collages are created from bits and pieces of old Victorian prints, which he sources from 1800 woodcuts, engravings, anatomical drawings and various illustrations. View all Dan Hilliers work online or call into our Brighton gallery. Requiem - Titles for BBC One by Peter Anderson Studio and Dan Hillier from Peter Anderson Studio on Vimeo. $test =
  • YBA at artrepublic: Ian Davenport’s Colour Splat editions are here!

    Ian Davenport’s name will forever be associated with the likes of Damien Hirst, Sarah Lucas and Gary Hume being, as he was, one of the 16 Goldsmiths students who hung the audacious Freeze exhibition in a London Port Authority building in Docklands in 1988. Known collectively since then as the YB....
    Ian Davenport’s name will forever be associated with the likes of Damien Hirst, Sarah Lucas and Gary Hume being, as he was, one of the 16 Goldsmiths students who hung the audacious Freeze exhibition in a London Port Authority building in Docklands in 1988. Known collectively since then as the YBA (Young British Artists), the group went on to become some of the best-known names of the British art world, both as a group and individually. Davenport picked up a Turner Prize nomination in 1991 for his abstract paintings, made up of layers of household paint poured, dripped and thrown on to tilted canvases - the final composition of each is all down to gravity and the consistency of the paint itself. A fact that’s even more striking when you consider the works that feature multiple stripes of colour. We’re surely not the only ones to ask: how is it that each shade remains so tonally pure? If we tried it ourselves, we’re almost certain we’d only produce a muddy mess. This organic creative process has continued to be central to the artist’s work, and has also been credited by Damien Hirst as the inspiration for his own ‘Spot’ series. Now though, Davenport has turned his attention more towards printmaking - in particular silkscreen printing and etching - and we are delighted to have a series of limited edition prints ready and waiting to share with you. In its original painted format the energy and power of Davenport’s ‘Colour Splat’ series is already impressive, but the technicalities of the screen printing process actually adds something else to the images. The layers of colour have to be individually applied meaning that each print pulled in the studio is unique and complex in its own way. These limited edition prints definitely need to be seen in person to fully appreciate the finer qualities of their finish. Why not drop by our Brighton gallery and ask one of our art advisors to show you the various colourful Splat pieces, each of which is signed by the artist. Just think, you have the possibility to show a YBA – who’s exhibited at the likes of the Tate in London and MoMA in New York – in your own home! We’d say that’s quite a draw. Discover these Ian Davenport prints online or visit our Brighton gallery, call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Getting to the heart of the matter: The Connor Brothers in conversation

    Working under the pseudonym The Connor Brothers – two fictional brothers from America, who were brought up in a cult before running away to experience the real world – this artistic duo play with our ideas of truth and fiction on every level. In an era that’s coined the phrase ‘post-fact w....
    Working under the pseudonym The Connor Brothers – two fictional brothers from America, who were brought up in a cult before running away to experience the real world – this artistic duo play with our ideas of truth and fiction on every level. In an era that’s coined the phrase ‘post-fact world’, their blend of retro imagery with tongue-in-cheek and thought-provoking slogans is more poignant than ever. As some of their new prints land in the gallery, we caught up with The Connor Brothers to discuss snappy slogans, political art and future plans… artrepublic: What’s been happening in the world of The Connor Brothers for the past 6 months? Connor Brothers: Babies being born. Parents dying. Moving studios. Newly discovered sobriety. Making things. Writing. And so on. AR: Which current art trends are you following? CB: We are not really following any trends as such, but currently have a small obsession with David Shrigley. AR: Who comes up with the witty slogans? CB: It’s a mixture. Some are quotes from our favourite authors – David Foster Wallace and Miranda July etc – others are our own. Ours tend to be distilled versions of conversations we’ve been having and things we are interested in, and trying to find a way to communicate those things in the most concise non-bullshitty way we can. AR: In the changing political landscape, how do you navigate the art world? CB: Oh fuck. We used to be able to make jokey political art like our Redaction series. Now everything is so surreal and dystopian that it’s difficult to send up. It already feels like a bad joke. AR: Where do you find the ideas for your artwork? CB: This is one of those ‘where-do-you-get-your-inspiration’ questions in disguise. Sort of impossible to say. ‘Through experience’ is the only meaningful answer. AR: Finally, what should we be looking out for from the Connor Brothers in 2018? CB: We have a solo exhibition coming up in May at Maddox Gallery in London. It’s our first solo show in the UK for a couple of years, so that’s exciting. We are also working on a mental health campaign with the charity CALM and Professor Green. Towards the end of the year we’re making our first attempt at a short film – a black comedy about suicide… To discover our latest Connor Brothers prints, please call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • The Sale Next Door: time to bring your favourite print home

    Art lovers, do we have a treat in store for you – well, a few in fact. It’s time to announce that we’ve got a brand-new artrepublic gallery to share with you soon. Don’t worry, we’re not going far; checking out the original artworks in our new space only involves walking through a doorw....
    Art lovers, do we have a treat in store for you – well, a few in fact. It’s time to announce that we’ve got a brand-new artrepublic gallery to share with you soon. Don’t worry, we’re not going far; checking out the original artworks in our new space only involves walking through a doorway, Narnia-style, from our existing Brighton gallery. However, before we unlock the doors to even more accessible art, we’ve got something else for you to get excited about. An artrepublic sale! Running from 16 - 25 March, the sale will include pieces by some of your favourite artrepublic artists as well as some rare works, all at unbeatable prices. And, with 5 per cent of all profits being donated to the Martlets, you’ll be doing something to give others a boost while brightening up your own home. The Own Art Scheme can be used to purchase sale pieces, as well as full-price artworks, plus we’ve got some great deals on our framing service. If there’s a piece of art that you’ve had your eye on for a while, now is the time to treat yourself – and your walls – to something special. Bring the kids and grand kids too, and enjoy a sneak peek at the three giant Snail sculptures that we’ve sponsored for this year’s Martlets Snail Trail. During the sale, these are the only things that won’t be going anywhere fast! Find our brand new gallery space at 12a Bond Street, Brighton, right next to the artrepublic Brighton gallery, call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. $test =
  • Messages From the Wild: Dave White’s Baby Gorilla

    Artist Dave White’s animal kingdom has evolved once again – after his Chimp print swiftly sold out. Various animals from Dave White’s menagerie/ studio have graced the artrepublic gallery recently, and now we are delighted to be able to share the artist’s limited edition Baby Gorilla pr....
    Artist Dave White’s animal kingdom has evolved once again – after his Chimp print swiftly sold out. Various animals from Dave White’s menagerie/ studio have graced the artrepublic gallery recently, and now we are delighted to be able to share the artist’s limited edition Baby Gorilla print with you. Available in small and extra large, the highly gestural giclee print – taken from the original oil and watercolour painting – depicts the expressive features of a young gorilla, an image that has extra pull as, on some level, we inevitably recognise something of ourselves in these primates. Not all that surprising, as they share 98.7 per cent of our genetic code (fun fact for you there!). White is known for celebrating popular culture and interpreting emotive issues within his work, and this piece is no exception; more than simply depicting the cuteness of a baby animal, or hinting at the similarities between humans and gorillas, it highlights the complex theme of endangered species. There are four species of gorillas living in the wild today, and all have either been classed as endangered or critically endangered. In painting these beautiful animals, White quite literally draws greater attention to them by confronting us with a face that we can’t (and don’t want to) look way from. It strikes us that, like the artist’s prints, baby gorillas are genuinely limited editions. How’s that for art that makes a statement? Discover our latest Dave White prints to buy online or visit of Brighton gallery, call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Michael Craig-Martin: Elevating the everyday in art, architecture and design

    Be inspired by the work of Michael Craig-Martin, the conceptual artist who influenced a whole generation of young British artists – we’re not kidding, he has links to three decades-worth of famous Goldsmiths art graduates! However, it’s Craig-Martin’s own catalogue of contemporary art work....
    Be inspired by the work of Michael Craig-Martin, the conceptual artist who influenced a whole generation of young British artists – we’re not kidding, he has links to three decades-worth of famous Goldsmiths art graduates! However, it’s Craig-Martin’s own catalogue of contemporary art work that we’re focused on. We’re excited to be able to share three small editions of Craig-Martin’s work with you. They do, however come with a warning: the Royal Academician’s pieces always get snapped up quickly so, if you want to enjoy this artwork at your leisure, you’ll have to move quickly. Born in Ireland, Craig-Martin studied Fine Art in the States at Yale’s School of Art and Architecture in the Sixties before moving to London, where he developed his now-famous pared-back depictions of everyday objects. His elegant linework drew on everything from items of clothing to the built environment. A recent example of this can be seen in his limited edition “Design and Architecture” silkscreen prints. Across a four-piece set, Craig-Martin depicts the work of four renowned Twentieth century architects, placing one of their buildings side-by-side with an interior design classic that they also created. Modernists Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe come under highly saturated scrutiny, alongside Gerrit Rietveld of the De Stijl movement. The joy? That Craig-Martin highlights the linear similarities between each designer’s large and small-scale structures, and messes with our minds a little by making us consider them together rather than in isolation. Speaking of sets of objects, we also have 15 limited edition sets of Craig-Martin’s “Quotidian 2017”; eight laser-etched acrylic panels that each focuses on a single quotidian (or everyday object). The high-contrast white-on-black images move from the mundane – a stiletto, a pair of glasses, a steering wheel – to quite literally throw a little heat into the work, via a hand grenade. What is Craig-Martin saying about everyday life in 2017? Take a closer look at the set in our Brighton gallery and make up your own mind. Finally, if you’re focused on finding an artwork that’s a little more playful, “The Planets” limited edition silkscreen print is definitely worth checking out. At first glance, it’s a Pop-style depiction of a solar system, but look again: the planets are, in fact, reimagined as sports balls. This is one piece that never fails to bring a smile to our faces. What do you think? If you want to find out more, have a chat with one of our art advisors - they’re always on hand in the gallery or online to share their knowledge and advice with you. Discover our latest Michael Craig-Martin prints to buy online or visit our Brighton gallery, call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life exhibition review

    All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life is a landmark exhibition at Tate Britain celebrating how artists have captured the intense experience of life in paint. It showcases around 100 works by some of the most celebrated modern British artists, with the work of Lucian Freud and Fr....
    All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life is a landmark exhibition at Tate Britain celebrating how artists have captured the intense experience of life in paint. It showcases around 100 works by some of the most celebrated modern British artists, with the work of Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon at its heart. The exhibition explores how their art captures personal and immediate experiences and events, distilling raw sensations through their use of paint, as Freud said: ‘I want the paint to work as flesh does’. Bringing together major works by Walter Sickert, Stanley Spencer, Michael Andrews, Frank Auerbach, R.B. Kitaj, Leon Kossoff, Paula Rego, Jenny Saville, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and many others, this exhibition will make poignant connections across generations of artists and tell an expanded story of figurative painting in the 20th century. The exhibition will also shed light on the role of women artists in the traditionally male-dominated field of figurative painting. Paula Rego explores the condition of women in society and the roles they play over the course of their lives, while always referring to autobiographical events, as in The Family 1988. Her work underwent a particularly profound change in the late 1980s and 1990s when she returned to working from life. The exhibition will also celebrate a younger generation of painters who continue to pursue the tangible reality of life in their work. Contemporary artists like Cecily Brown, Celia Paul, Jenny Saville and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye work in dialogue with this tradition while also taking the painting of figures in new directions. All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life Tate Britain 28 February – 27 August 2018 Image Credits: Lucian Freud, 1922-2011, Girl with a White Dog, 1950-1, Oil paint on canvas, 762 x 1016 mm, © Tate Francis Bacon, 1909-1992, Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud, 1964, Oil paint on canvas, 1980 x 1476 mm, The Lewis Collection, © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. DACS, London, Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd. Paula Rego, born 1935, The Family, 1988, Acrylic paint on canvas backed paper, 2134 x 2134 mm, Marlborough International Fine Art, © Paula Rego Jenny Saville (b.1970), Reverse, 2002-3, Oil paint on canvas, 2134 x 2438 mm, © Jenny Saville. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.   $test =

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