Monthly Archives: February 2018

  • Masters of War: Pure Evil’s genius

    The street artist’s latest screen prints make a striking political statement Art isn’t always political – and it doesn’t have to be, either – but the links between the two arenas can be traced back a very long way – think everything from Picasso’s ‘Guernica’ and Jacob Epstein’....
    The street artist’s latest screen prints make a striking political statement Art isn’t always political – and it doesn’t have to be, either – but the links between the two arenas can be traced back a very long way – think everything from Picasso’s ‘Guernica’ and Jacob Epstein’s ‘Rock Drill’ right up to the majority of Banksy and Ai Wei Wei’s provocative artworks. The collision of political outrage and commentary with creativity can also be seen in the latest series of screen prints by Pure Evil. Titled ‘Masters of War’, the series is inspired by President Trump’s regularly antagonistic tweets, directly referencing his access to the nuclear ‘Button’. The limited edition of 100, which are printed on Fedrigoni paper and signed and numbered by the artist, show a suited arm with a single finger hovering over a tantalising red button. Available in three different colour ways – silver, gold and royal blue – stylistically the four-colour print draws on the work produced by Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein who, like Pure Evil, enjoyed packing his images with a little Western cultural critique. If this little piece of contemporary history doesn’t quite push your buttons, but you’re a fan of Pure Evil’s own brand of Pop portraiture, why not check out the latest ‘Smiling Jackie’, which has been reworked in two fresh colour ways – red & black and soft blue. You’ve also got a chance to get your hands on one of the limited edition Box Set 1s, featuring six prints of female icons, including Marilyn Monroe, Jackie Kennedy Onassis and our very own Queen Elizabeth. Hang the entire series on your walls and, we’d say, that’s certainly one way to make an artistic (or political) statement of your own. View our current collection of Pure Evil prints, including these latest releases at our Brighton Gallery. Call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Inspired by Rauschenberg, created by Peter Blake

    Take your chance to join the art game with a highly sought-after Peter Blake edition. Even the greats have heroes who inspire them. Through the course of his life and career, Sir Peter Blake has been open about the influence of other artists on his own work. One such example is Robert Rauschenber....
    Take your chance to join the art game with a highly sought-after Peter Blake edition. Even the greats have heroes who inspire them. Through the course of his life and career, Sir Peter Blake has been open about the influence of other artists on his own work. One such example is Robert Rauschenberg, whose ‘beautiful, almost Abstract Expressionistic use of paint’ influenced Blake heavily in the 1950s.     Printed in 2011, Blake’s limited edition Homage to Rauschenbergs have largely sold out. We have, however, got our hands on one of the sought-after sets of silkscreen prints, which blend British and American paraphernalia around the theme of children’s board games. The game board grids are reflected in the patterns of windows in high-rise buildings shown on postcards, floral wallpapers juxtaposed with vast natural vistas and abstract patterns offset by textures of wood and other grainy surfaces. More formal in structure than the work of the artist who influenced them, the vintage typography and imagery that form the basis of these richly coloured silkscreen prints are elevated to another level by finishes that include gold leaf, diamond dust, embossing and glazes. Roll the dice and take your chance (while you have it) to step up another rung on the art ownership ladder. We only have a very limited number of the Homage to Rauschenberg signed prints available so be sure to call our Brighton Gallery or pop in to find out more before they're all gone! Call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Gina Soden artist interview

    We recently caught up with Gina Soden, photographer and rising star of British contemporary art. Discover our recently added collection of Gina Soden prints, by visiting the artrepublic Brighton gallery, 01273 724829, brighton@artrepublic.com.     Q. So Gina, how do you find your f....
    We recently caught up with Gina Soden, photographer and rising star of British contemporary art. Discover our recently added collection of Gina Soden prints, by visiting the artrepublic Brighton gallery, 01273 724829, brighton@artrepublic.com.     Q. So Gina, how do you find your fantastic and hidden locations? A. A variety of ways - I use Google maps and search manually for places, also if I know of a location in a town I will look for others on aerial view and street view. This is a great way to “drive” around and take a look. I also look at articles and books. Tip offs from friends too. It takes me hours to find places sometimes. Other times it is very difficult, so I am lucky to have a great network of friends I am in contact with who share information on abandoned places. The people in the group share a common interest but have different motivations behind their love of exploration. For example, I know a guy who has done a project on Italian asylums and wants the patients stories told. We’ve worked together and while he has been going through the records and speaking to the manager I have been shooting. Q. It seems like your photographic series have a strong sense of narrative - is this organic or do you create a story with each series? A. When I'm shooting I try to give a sense of place but not direct the narrative. I want people to be able to make their own stories. I don't shoot with a series in mind. I collect images and then put them together. For example, Incremento was created from various shoots in Romania, Italy and France. It can sometimes be a race to get there before a building gets renovated or demolished! Q. That sounds incredible - any hairy moments? A. To get into an abandoned asylum in Italy I had to crawl through a basement between pipes covered in fibreglass. It was boiling hot, itchy and very claustrophobic. It was all worth it- once inside I spent 12 hours there. I’ve been back three times since, each time a different way in. Q. Do you have a particular room or piece that came from that experience which stand out for you? A. A really interesting piece that is titled 'Manicomio: Operating Theatre', it was shot using a panoramic head with a wide aperture. The final image is one hundred and seventeen images stitched together. It’s a huge piece, sized at 157cm squared. It took a long time to shoot it, and a long time to stitch the images together, I had to do a lot of it manually to line it up. I wanted to portray a wide scene of the whole room but with only a certain part in focus to draw attention to the centre. I love the detail in it and the fact all that was left behind is a hospital. Q. Which of the series so far would you say is your favourite? A. Definitely Incremento, it has the most artistic freedom. Q. Any inspirations? A. I'm very inspired by Wes Anderson, his stylistic art gives me a sense of calm. The single point perspective and symmetry in his work has a soothing effect so I love to portray that in my work. Q. You have been involved in a number of really exciting projects with Soho House and the Ned, can we see your work there now? A. Yes, my work is in the Neds permanent 'Vault' Collection, in the hotel rooms there and in the Parlour and the Lounge. My work is also at the recently refurbished Soho House - 40 Greek Street. Happy to give a guided tour! ;) To discover our latest Gina Soden prints, please call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Experience our Brighton Gallery with a 3D Virtual Tour

    You can visit us digitally via your computer, smartphone or tablet. Experience the wonders of our Brighton Gallery with an immersive 3D virtual tour! Dive into our Bond Street space and view our eclectic walls from anywhere. So if you can’t make it down to our gallery in person you’ll no....
    You can visit us digitally via your computer, smartphone or tablet. Experience the wonders of our Brighton Gallery with an immersive 3D virtual tour! Dive into our Bond Street space and view our eclectic walls from anywhere. So if you can’t make it down to our gallery in person you’ll no longer miss out on the stunning selection of prints on display! To find out more about any piece, please call our gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com Take our tour at the artrepublic Brighton gallery page Here’s a brief round-up of some key pieces currently gracing our gallery walls… ‘Pink Moda’ by Bruce McLean One of the artists behind the conceptual art movement in Britain in the 1960s, Bruce McLean’s work is characterised by its balance of highly saturated colours and semi-abstract shapes. ‘Pink Moda’ – perhaps drawing meaning from the Italian for ‘fashion’ or ‘craze’ – brings together a section of a map of London, a water-like texture and a series of shapes and motifs to create an energetic image that hints at the artist’s take on the capital city. ‘Piranha’ by Dave White Think of piranhas and no doubt you’ll imagine a set of gnarling razor-sharp teeth. But Dave White’s silkscreen print, finished with diamond dust, offers a different view of the famed South American fresh-water fish. This piranha – fleshed out (no pun intended) using White’s dynamic, broad brushstrokes – isn’t baring his teeth, but still creates a powerful presence. Perhaps it’s time to take a new approach to our understanding of this family of fish, starting with this limited edition print. 'Such a Perfect Day' by David Spiller Fans of Tintin might recognise the central figures in this print by David Spiller; yes, it’s the detectives Thomson and Thompson, surrounded and scrawled over with the handwritten song lyrics, quotes and scribbles that Spiller uses to finish all of his Pop Art-style prints. This one takes its name from the Lou Reed lyrics that feature (along with some from the Beatles and The Wizard of Oz) within the final image. To find out more about any piece, please call our gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com ‘Magda’ by Gary Hume Gary Hume will be the first to tell you that the longer you spend with his work, the more you get from it. This alluring lino cut print is no exception to the internationally renowned artist’s rule. Magda’s mood, as well as the lines and colours that Hume has used, subtly alters the more you observe her, making this a truly compelling piece of art. ‘Pink Door’ by Gavin Turk One of the famed YBA, Gavin Turk caught the attention of Charles Saatchi and the wider art world when the Royal College of Art refused to award him his degree because he presented a white studio space with a blue plaque saying ‘Gavin Turk worked here 1989-91’ as his final piece. Turk continues to make provocative installations and works today, often referencing Marcel Duchamp’s Ready Mades in his own art. This print, of a neon light formed into the shape of an open door, is one such example. Its interpretation is open for you. ‘Lamp and Kuan Ware’ by Patrick Caulfield From Patrick Caulfield’s ‘White Ware’ portfolio of eight screenprints, each created at Advanced Graphics, one of London's most respected fine art print workshops, ‘Lamp and Kuan Ware’ was inspired by the collection of oriental ceramics at London’s V&A museum. The simple elegance of the Sung Dynasty-era vase in the foreground offers Caulfield a way to explore the representation of light and shadow – a regular theme within the famous British artist’s work. ‘Lesson 1 Happiness’ by Bonnie and Clyde Brighton-based artist Bonnie and Clyde creates mixed-media collages that utilise photography from her travels, as well as tactile painted layers to create atmospheric and evocative scenes. ‘Lesson 1 Happiness’ draws on contemporary architecture and the lush hues of nature, working them together to form a textural and dynamic image that is packed with details for you to discover. ‘Jane Fonda – Bubblegum Pink’ by Pure Evil This image of actress, activist and former fitness guru Jane Fonda is part of graffiti artist Pure Evil’s Nightmare series, which was inspired by a strange email the artist received from a Chinese ‘copy village’ offering to reproduce famous artworks including those by Andy Warhol. Featuring Pure Evil’s trademark teardrop that streams from one of the celebrity’s eyes, this limited edition is one of 100 that have been signed and numbered by the artist. 'Happiness' by Benjamin Thomas Taylor London-based artist Benjamin Thomas Taylor is known for juxtaposing hyperreal landscapes with typographic statements and phrases in his images. In ‘Happiness’ the artist overlays a tropical rainforest-like scene with the word from which it takes its title. The typographical element draws on the style of a paint-by-numbers image – you’re left wondering if this was filled in with the designated colours, would happiness be complete or would it disappear? ‘Six Snapshots of Julie’ by Grayson Perry Self-described as a ‘chronicler of contemporary life’, Grayson Perry makes us look at the everyday anew, often with an extra dash of wit and sentimentality. This series of six limited edition etchings, depicting snapshots from the life of someone called Julie, is a great example of Perry’s print work; he tells a story of one person’s life via six snapshots of fleeting moments, from a picnic in a park to a trip to the Taj Mahal. There is no order or explanation, only an underlying sense of a potentially colourful life. These prints would make intriguing additions to your art collection. ‘Colour Splat Cloud (black)' by Ian Davenport This limited edition print by YBA Ian Davenport definitely needs to be seen in person to fully appreciate the finer qualities of its finish. Davenport picked up a Turner Prize nomination in 1991 for his abstract paintings, made up of layers of household paint poured, dripped and thrown on to tilted canvases. His screen prints, such as ‘Colour Splat Cloud’, maintain something of the vitality of the original making process – this image has an inherent sense of energy within it. ‘Sangora’ by Albert Irvin This limited edition screen print shows the bold colours (and spontaneous application) associated with English Abstract Expressionist painter Albert Irvin’s work. The artist claims his images do not depict particular places or things; he is quoted as saying ‘I like to think that rather than being pictures of the world they are pictures about it’ (warwick.ac.uk). ‘Sangora’, like many of Irvin’s works, is named for a street located near to the place he lives in London. To find out more about any piece, please call our gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com ‘The Dazzle Alphabet’ (Box Set) by Peter Blake Sir Peter Blake has undertaken a number of series’ that focus on the letters of the alphabet over the years, but this particular typographic project takes inspiration from the razzle-dazzle painting style used to camouflage war ships in the First and Second World War. The colourful box set of the 26 letters of the alphabet, plus one blending I and J, looks incredible when hung as a complete sequence. 'There Are Some Dead Who Are More Alive Than The Living' by Magnus Gjoen Exclusive to artrepublic, this porcelain sculpture is the latest piece from artist Magnus Gjoen, whose work often blends the beautiful with the terrible, the powerful with the fragile. Here, a delftware-style pattern is overlaid on a ceramic skull, asking questions about the fine line between life and death, the physical and the spiritual. Each of the edition of 50 comes with a handmade presentation case. 'Caspian' by Brian Eno Known for his fusion of music and painting, Brian Eno’s images play with the senses – almost confusing the lines between them. ‘Caspian’ depicts a royal blue cube on an aqua-blue background, but with an aura around the smaller square which has the effect of adding depth and greater tactility. This etching – you might have assumed from the colour and subject matter that it was a giclee or screenprint – is from a limited edition of 25. 'Golden Requiem' by Dan Hillier An original (rather than a screen print or giclee print) by the well-known British artist Dan Hillier, ‘Golden Requiem’ is a glowing example of his intricate ink work and collage. Featuring a female figure who is interlaced with a forest-like canopy and the constellations in the sky above, and finished with gold leaf, this artwork carries a sense of a mysterious and mystical story waiting to be revealed. 'Mrs Smith' by Maria Rivans Think of holograms, and you get a sense of the finish of this 3D lenticular print by contemporary artist Maria Rivans, which depicts 1940s movie star Lana Turner adorned in an outfit and headdress embellished with creatures and organisms from the natural world. Referencing 1950s Pop Art, Rivans’ work is inscribed with her own playful sophistication. 'Fragility of Power' by Elizabeth Waggett Elizabeth Waggett’s work explores the relationship between value and purpose. Depicting animals, skulls and personal trinkets with photorreal finishes, Waggett’s images force us to look harder and more carefully to decipher what we see. Featuring a bull’s skull, its horns finished with gold leaf, ‘Fragility of Power’ shows the strength and vulnerability of its subject simultaneously. 'Untitled' by Minty Brighton locals may well be familiar with street artist Minty’s colourful paste-ups, which can be seen springing up around the city, often with the words ‘I love you’ worked into the image. ‘Untitled’ (from a limited edition of 15) pays homage to the work of Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein via its central character – a blonde woman – vibrant colour and use of Ben-Day dots. 'Rewild' by CJP A monochromatic palette focuses your attention on the intricate details of this work by CJP, which at first glance looks like a study of a pine cone. Well it is, but it’s also so much more – hidden in the layers of the pines there’s a tiny universe of animals waiting to be discovered. Take a closer look and tell us what you see. 'Capture' by Dan Baldwin Blending the innocent and the sinister, the world of reality and that of imagination, Baldwin’s artworks are filled with layers of detail – some of which only become visible when you become really familiar with each piece. In ‘Capture’ ferns and palm leaves, cacti and florals circle (or are circled by) deadly creatures and violent means of capture, all inked up in tones that we perceive as innocent. Visual trickery is at play here, and nothing is quite as it seems. 'Hell is Empty and All The Devils Are Here' by the Connor Brothers Working under the pseudonym and fictional backstory of The Connor Brothers, the two artists responsible for this piece play with familiar visual references/ book covers from the 1650s and 1960s, adding their own tongue-in-cheek titles to alter the original message. Fans of satire should pay attention to the large-scale works and limited edition prints that these artists produce. 'The Planets 2017' by Michael Craig-Martin Known for his distinctive pared-back depictions of everyday objects (and much more, besides) conceptual artist Michael Craig-Martin’s work is endowed with a playfulness that can’t be ignored. At first glance this limited-edition silkscreen print is a Pop-style depiction of a solar system, but you may want to revise that initial thought: the planets are, in fact, reimagined as sports balls. This piece never fails to bring a smile to our faces. To find out more about any piece, please call our gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com 'His ‘N’ Hers' by Lucy Sparrow These three-dimensional cabinets of curiosity, crafted by artist Lucy Sparrow, are filled with meaning, as well as ‘products’. Although the colourful felt-crafted pieces have a childlike charm, Sparrow’s work travels with messages of desire – both consumer and sexual. ‘His ‘N’ Hers’ offers a side-by-side view of the gendered nature of bathroom cabinets, and the industries beyond that create them. Compare and contrast. 'Alphabet - Circus XL' by Ben Eine A feature on the streets and shutters of London (particularly the east of the city) Ben Eine’s creative, recognisable typographies have made him a well-known figure on the Street Art scene – Barack Obama even owns one of his works. This particular alphabet (which in Eine tradition misses out the letter ‘W’) uses his Circus style lettering and gains extra depth from its lenticular printing. 'The Cure - Powder Pink/Lollypop Red/Golden Yellow' by Damien Hirst A limited edition from the boundary pushing British artist Damien Hirst, ‘The Cure’ depicts a single pharmaceutical capsule, marked with the direction ‘This way up.’ The silkscreen print is printed using three inks – powder pink, lollypop red and golden yellow – colours whose names are as suggestive as the image itself. 'From Primrose Hill' by Jason Lilley The view from London’s Primrose Hill is pretty jaw-dropping in real life, but it’s just as beautiful in Jason Lilley’s limited edition print. The desaturated foreground, and warm gold-finished sky blend to create an image of the UK’s capital city that conjures up ideas of the futuristic visions of the past. Think mid-century sci-fi and you’re with us. 'Pop Goes New York II' by Dirty Hans Superheroes – both fictional and real – walk the streets of New York, or look down from billboards, in this complex and eye-opening Pop-style piece from contemporary artist Dirty Hans. We’d almost believe it was a photograph of the Big Apple, if not for the collection of film characters found in the scene! 'God Save Us All' by Jamie Reid You may have recognised the hand of Jamie Reid in this piece before you clocked his name in the caption – there are links with his famous Sex Pistols cover art, depicting Queen Elizabeth II with a safety pin through her nose to offset some of the crown jewels! Now, Donald Trump gets a Reid makeover – with swastika buttons for eyes – in this powerful and politically-charged limited edition print. 'Marilyn' by David Studwell Nostalgia for the world-renowned stars of the Sixties and Seventies are brought to life in the work of David Studwell, who endows his prints with star quality and bold colours. Marilyn Monroe receives this treatment in this limited edition print, which combines lines with a soft midnight blue background. 'Magritte' by Mr Brainwash Created by the star of Street Art film Exit Through The Gift Shop Mr Brainwash (who is also known as Banksy’s protege), this print plays on a famous image by one of the original surrealists, Rene Magritte. A portrait of the Belgian artist is silkscreened over a mixed-media collage, created using cartoon strips – perhaps a homage to the famed image where mini Magrittes float in the sky with umbrellas behind the man himself. 'Rainbow Target' by Peter Blake Bringing his prints and 2-D collages into the third dimension, Sir Peter Blake’s ‘Rainbow Target’ draws on some of his favoured motifs – hearts and rainbows. The limited edition relief disc, which is vacuum formed using plastic before being hand-painted, is signed by the artist. 'Armageddon' by Harland Miller Hinting at the scuffed covers of well-loved Penguin books, Harland Miller’s work is plays with his two passions – the visual and the linguistic. ‘Armageddon’ uses both block printing and etching to create a striking, vibrant image, complete with a (we hope) tongue-in-cheek question about the end of the world as we know it: ‘Is it too much to ask?’ To find out more about any piece, please call our gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com 'Copper Beech Web Purple & Pink' by Rob Wass With work that centres around and focuses in on the natural world, Rob Wass is known for his organic-looking images. 'Copper Beech Web’ is a two-colour screen print of a gnarly tree trunk, which the artist has hand-finished with coloured inks, to create the foliage. 'L-Isoleucine T-Butyl Ester' by Damien Hirst Named for a chemical, this limited edition wood cut print forms part of Damien Hirst’s wider Spot series – each featuring a series of colourful spots arranged in a gridded pattern. This piece is from an edition of only 55. 'Crossed Wave' by Kai & Sunny A series of mesmerising lines draw the eye right to the heart of this piece by duo Kai & Sunny, who create all of their intricate works by hand. The longer you look at this screenprint, the more patterns emerge, so you go from seeing the rings of a tree trunk’s cross-section to something altogether different. 'New Musical Express XL' by Mark Vessey Inspired by the design and strong visual identity of the now-extinct NME magazine, Vessey created a limited edition print for artrepublic. The spines of the magazine provided a unique way to tell the story of music culture – you’ll find the likes of The Clash, Nirvana, Radiohead, The Manic Street Preachers, Bob Dylan and The Who referenced in this stack of back issues. To find out more about any piece, please call our gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =

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