Monthly Archives: February 2018

  • Masters of War: Pure Evil’s genius

    The street artist’s latest screen prints make a striking political statement Art isn’t always political – and it doesn’t have to be, either – but the links between the two arenas can be traced back a very long way – think everything from Picasso’s ‘Guernica’ and Jacob Epstein’....
    The street artist’s latest screen prints make a striking political statement Art isn’t always political – and it doesn’t have to be, either – but the links between the two arenas can be traced back a very long way – think everything from Picasso’s ‘Guernica’ and Jacob Epstein’s ‘Rock Drill’ right up to the majority of Banksy and Ai Wei Wei’s provocative artworks. The collision of political outrage and commentary with creativity can also be seen in the latest series of screen prints by Pure Evil. Titled ‘Masters of War’, the series is inspired by President Trump’s regularly antagonistic tweets, directly referencing his access to the nuclear ‘Button’. The limited edition of 100, which are printed on Fedrigoni paper and signed and numbered by the artist, show a suited arm with a single finger hovering over a tantalising red button. Available in three different colour ways – silver, gold and royal blue – stylistically the four-colour print draws on the work produced by Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein who, like Pure Evil, enjoyed packing his images with a little Western cultural critique. If this little piece of contemporary history doesn’t quite push your buttons, but you’re a fan of Pure Evil’s own brand of Pop portraiture, why not check out the latest ‘Smiling Jackie’, which has been reworked in two fresh colour ways – red & black and soft blue. You’ve also got a chance to get your hands on one of the limited edition Box Set 1s, featuring six prints of female icons, including Marilyn Monroe, Jackie Kennedy Onassis and our very own Queen Elizabeth. Hang the entire series on your walls and, we’d say, that’s certainly one way to make an artistic (or political) statement of your own. View our current collection of Pure Evil prints, including these latest releases at our Brighton Gallery. Call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Inspired by Rauschenberg, created by Peter Blake

    Take your chance to join the art game with a highly sought-after Peter Blake edition. Even the greats have heroes who inspire them. Through the course of his life and career, Sir Peter Blake has been open about the influence of other artists on his own work. One such example is Robert Rauschenber....
    Take your chance to join the art game with a highly sought-after Peter Blake edition. Even the greats have heroes who inspire them. Through the course of his life and career, Sir Peter Blake has been open about the influence of other artists on his own work. One such example is Robert Rauschenberg, whose ‘beautiful, almost Abstract Expressionistic use of paint’ influenced Blake heavily in the 1950s.     Printed in 2011, Blake’s limited edition Homage to Rauschenbergs have largely sold out. We have, however, got our hands on one of the sought-after sets of silkscreen prints, which blend British and American paraphernalia around the theme of children’s board games. The game board grids are reflected in the patterns of windows in high-rise buildings shown on postcards, floral wallpapers juxtaposed with vast natural vistas and abstract patterns offset by textures of wood and other grainy surfaces. More formal in structure than the work of the artist who influenced them, the vintage typography and imagery that form the basis of these richly coloured silkscreen prints are elevated to another level by finishes that include gold leaf, diamond dust, embossing and glazes. Roll the dice and take your chance (while you have it) to step up another rung on the art ownership ladder. We only have a very limited number of the Homage to Rauschenberg signed prints available so be sure to call our Brighton Gallery or pop in to find out more before they're all gone! Call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =
  • Gina Soden artist interview

    We recently caught up with Gina Soden, photographer and rising star of British contemporary art. Discover our recently added collection of Gina Soden prints, by visiting the artrepublic Brighton gallery, 01273 724829, brighton@artrepublic.com.     Q. So Gina, how do you find your f....
    We recently caught up with Gina Soden, photographer and rising star of British contemporary art. Discover our recently added collection of Gina Soden prints, by visiting the artrepublic Brighton gallery, 01273 724829, brighton@artrepublic.com.     Q. So Gina, how do you find your fantastic and hidden locations? A. A variety of ways - I use Google maps and search manually for places, also if I know of a location in a town I will look for others on aerial view and street view. This is a great way to “drive” around and take a look. I also look at articles and books. Tip offs from friends too. It takes me hours to find places sometimes. Other times it is very difficult, so I am lucky to have a great network of friends I am in contact with who share information on abandoned places. The people in the group share a common interest but have different motivations behind their love of exploration. For example, I know a guy who has done a project on Italian asylums and wants the patients stories told. We’ve worked together and while he has been going through the records and speaking to the manager I have been shooting. Q. It seems like your photographic series have a strong sense of narrative - is this organic or do you create a story with each series? A. When I'm shooting I try to give a sense of place but not direct the narrative. I want people to be able to make their own stories. I don't shoot with a series in mind. I collect images and then put them together. For example, Incremento was created from various shoots in Romania, Italy and France. It can sometimes be a race to get there before a building gets renovated or demolished! Q. That sounds incredible - any hairy moments? A. To get into an abandoned asylum in Italy I had to crawl through a basement between pipes covered in fibreglass. It was boiling hot, itchy and very claustrophobic. It was all worth it- once inside I spent 12 hours there. I’ve been back three times since, each time a different way in. Q. Do you have a particular room or piece that came from that experience which stand out for you? A. A really interesting piece that is titled 'Manicomio: Operating Theatre', it was shot using a panoramic head with a wide aperture. The final image is one hundred and seventeen images stitched together. It’s a huge piece, sized at 157cm squared. It took a long time to shoot it, and a long time to stitch the images together, I had to do a lot of it manually to line it up. I wanted to portray a wide scene of the whole room but with only a certain part in focus to draw attention to the centre. I love the detail in it and the fact all that was left behind is a hospital. Q. Which of the series so far would you say is your favourite? A. Definitely Incremento, it has the most artistic freedom. Q. Any inspirations? A. I'm very inspired by Wes Anderson, his stylistic art gives me a sense of calm. The single point perspective and symmetry in his work has a soothing effect so I love to portray that in my work. Q. You have been involved in a number of really exciting projects with Soho House and the Ned, can we see your work there now? A. Yes, my work is in the Neds permanent 'Vault' Collection, in the hotel rooms there and in the Parlour and the Lounge. My work is also at the recently refurbished Soho House - 40 Greek Street. Happy to give a guided tour! ;) To discover our latest Gina Soden prints, please call 01273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com. For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page. $test =

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