Monthly Archives: February 2016

  • Rediscovering Renaissance art

    With a major new documentary about the renaissance on BBC4 and the V&A exhibition re-imagining Botticelli opening this month we thought it was time to look again at Renaissance art. The Renaissance covers the period immediately following the Middle Ages in Europe which saw a great revival of in....
    With a major new documentary about the renaissance on BBC4 and the V&A exhibition re-imagining Botticelli opening this month we thought it was time to look again at Renaissance art. The Renaissance covers the period immediately following the Middle Ages in Europe which saw a great revival of interest in the classical learning and values of ancient Greece and Rome. Renaissance is taken from the French term for 'rebirth'. Political stability, growing prosperity, and the development of new technologies was accompanied by a flowering of philosophy, literature and especially art. Artists in Italy started to use perspective which created the illusion of depth in a flat painting, while in the Netherlands artists developed oil painting, which allowed them to achieve highly realistic effects. Renaissance art artists include Jan van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, Sandro Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael. The Renaissance produced some of our best known works of art including the Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci, the Vitiation man by Michelangelo and the Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli. It has had an enduring influence on artists throughout the decades. Botticelli’s art has a huge impact on the Pre-Raphaelite circle during the mid-19th century and Rossetti even owned an original Botticelli painting. However the name Pre-Raphaelite refers to the brotherhoods desire to embrace the classical art before Raphael that inspired the Renaissance artists. In the 1980’s Andy Warhol produced a series of silkscreen from Renaissance Paintings in including Botticelli’s Birth of Venus. Contemporary artist Magus Gjoen often uses images from Renaissance art (he studied in Milan and frequently returns to the country). He moulds these images onto objects like skulls guns and grenades. By placing these paintings in a new context he wants to change people’s relationship and preconceived notions of both the objects and the paintings. His work explores the themes of religion, war, beauty and destruction which is also often depicted in Renaissance art. Other contemporary artists using renaissance images include Andrea Visconti’s Lisa Doesn’t Smile and Chris Kettle’s Dutch Masters inspired still lives. View all renaissance art available to buy at artrepublic Read our review of the Botticelli Reimagined exhibition at the V&A Watch BBC Four The Renaissance Unchained $test =
  • Performing for the Camera at Tate Modern

    Performing for the Camera examines the relationship between photography and performance, from the invention of photography in the 19th century to the selfie culture of today. Bringing together over 500 images spanning 150 years, the exhibition engages with the serious business of art and performan....
    Performing for the Camera examines the relationship between photography and performance, from the invention of photography in the 19th century to the selfie culture of today. Bringing together over 500 images spanning 150 years, the exhibition engages with the serious business of art and performance, as well as the humour and improvisation of posing for the camera. Amalia Ulman Excellences & Perfections (Instagram Update, 8th July 2014),(#itsjustdifferent) 2015 Courtesy the Artist & Arcadia Missa The exhibition begins by considering the documentation of important performance works such as Yves Klein’s Anthropometrie de l’epoque blue 1960, a live painting event using the bodies of naked women, as well as key 60s performances by Yayoi Kusama, Marta Minujín and Niki de Saint Phalle. Drawing on an extensive collection of images by Harry Shunk and János Kender, two of the most important photographers to have worked with performance, the exhibition features iconic images and many rarely seen studies, including those revealing how the photomontage of Yves Klein’s famous Leap into the Void 1960 was made. By charting how performers and photographers have also worked collaboratively, the exhibition examines live events that happened solely for the camera. Beginning with some of the earliest works in the exhibition, photographs from Nadar’s studio in 19th century Paris show the famous mime artist Charles Deburau acting out poses as the character ‘Pierrot’. Later works drawing on this same idea include Eikoh Hosoe’s Kamataichi, a collaboration with the choreographer and founder of the Butoh movement Tatsumi Hijikata. This seminal 1969 work is one of the first to have given equal authorial credit to the performing subject and the photographer. Masahisa Fukase From Window 1974 © Masahisa Fukase Archives. Courtesy Michael Hoppen Gallery. The photographic image went on to become an arena within which to act, distinct from the live stage of theatrical or artistic performance, in works by artists like Charles Ray, Carolee Schneemann and Erwin Wurm. These artists often perform for their own cameras, either physically as in Paul McCarthy’s Face Painting – Floor, White Line 1972 or more conceptually through ideas of self-image and fantasy as in the work of Boris Mikhailov. The construction of self-identity and posing is explored through iconic works by Claude Cahun, Man Ray and Cindy Sherman, as well as more recent projects like Samuel Fosso’s African Spirits 2008, in which the artist photographs himself in the guise of iconic figures like Martin Luther King Jr and Miles Davis. The exhibition looks at the innovative and performative approaches taken to self-portraiture by Lee Friedlander, Masahisa Fukase and Hannah Wilke. Identity and self-image were also important for artists like Jeff Koons and Andy Warhol in their own marketing and promotional photographs, and in more playful works like Mike Mandel’s Baseball Photographer Trading Cards 1974 in which photographers pose as ‘collectable’ baseball players. The world of social media is addressed in a key recent work staged on Instagram by Amalia Ulman. The exhibition shows not only that photography has always been performative, but that much performance art is inherently photographic. Performing for the Camera 18 February – 12 June 2016 Tate Modern Opening Hours: Daily 10.00 – 18.00 Fri & Sat: 10.00 - 22.00 $test =
  • Botticelli Reimagined at the V&A museum London

    500 years after death of Sandro Botticelli this major exhibition at the V&A will explore the variety of ways artists and designers from the Pre-Raphaelites to the present have responded to his artistic legacy. Venus, 1490s by Sandro Botticelli, Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin Pre....
    500 years after death of Sandro Botticelli this major exhibition at the V&A will explore the variety of ways artists and designers from the Pre-Raphaelites to the present have responded to his artistic legacy. Venus, 1490s by Sandro Botticelli, Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Photo: Volker-H. Schneider Botticelli is now recognised as one of the greatest artists of all time. His celebrated images are firmly embedded in public consciousness and his influence permeates art, design, fashion and film. However, although lauded in his lifetime, Botticelli was largely forgotten for more than 300 years until his work was progressively rediscovered in the 19th century. Telling a story 500 years in the making, Botticelli Reimagined will be the largest Botticelli exhibition in Britain since 1930. Including painting, fashion, film, drawing, photography, tapestry, sculpture and print, the exhibition will explore the myriad of ways that artists and designers have reinterpreted Botticelli. It will include over 50 original works by Botticelli, alongside works by artists such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris, René Magritte, Elsa Schiaparelli, Andy Warhol and Cindy Sherman. Botticelli Reimagined will be divided into three major sections, entitled: Global, Modern, Contemporary; Rediscovery and Botticelli in his own Time. Rebirth of Venus, 2009 by David LaChapelle, Creative Exchange Agency, New York, Steven Pranica / Studio LaChapelle, (c) David LaChapelle Global, Modern, Contemporary will show how Botticelli’s imagery attained its present level of acclaim. This section is dominated by The Birth of Venus, depicting the naked Venus emerging from a shell on the seashore, which cannot leave its permanent display in the Uffizi Gallery, Florence. Andy Warhol’s Details of Renaissance Paintings (Sandro Botticelli, Birth of Venus, 1482) (1984) accommodates the face and flowing hair of Botticelli’s icon in his signature flat style and bold palette, while Yin Xin’s Venus After Botticelli (2008) reinterprets Venus with an Asian appearance. The familiar pose of Botticelli’s figure can be seen in David LaChapelle’s saturated and artificial Rebirth of Venus (2009), and Reineke Dikjstra’s Beach Portraits (1992) show adolescents as monumental figures against the water’s edge. A dress and trouser suit of patchwork panels from The Birth of Venus from Dolce & Gabbana’s S/S 1993 collection will be shown with two Elsa Schiaparelli evening dresses (1938) ornamented with embroidered foliage, inspired by Pallas and the Centaur. Botticelli’s influence on film includes the sequence of Ursula Andress emerging from the sea clasping a conch shell from Dr No (1962) and an excerpt from The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988) in which Uma Thurman re-enacts The Birth of Venus. Functioning like the large-scale frescoes he studied in Italy, Bill Viola’s Going forth by Day is a digital image cycle inspired by Botticelli’s inventions. In 5th surgery performance - Operation opera (1994) ORLAN has plastic surgery to mimic Botticelli’s Venus as part of a performance series rewriting Western art through her own body. This section will also include Tamara de Lempicka’s trompe-l’oeil Painting with a Botticelli (1946) which presents Botticelli as the key to art, as well as key works by Robert Rauschenberg, René Magritte and Maurice Denis. La Ghirlandata, 1873 by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, © Guildhall Art Gallery 2015, Photo: Scala, Florence/Heritage Images Rediscovery will trace the impact of Botticelli’s art on the Pre-Raphaelite circle during the mid-19th century. Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Ruskin and Edward Burne-Jones all collected Botticelli’s work, and his aesthetic was reinterpreted in Rossetti’s La Ghirlandata (1873) and Burne-Jones’ The Mill: Girls Dancing to Music by a River (1870-82). The Florentine master’s celebrated Primavera haunts this section, as is shown by William Morris’ The Orchard (1890), a tapestry depicting medieval ladies in a bountiful scene, Evelyn De Morgan’s Flora (1894) illustrating the nymph of flowers, and the only surviving film of Isadora Duncan dancing (c.1900). Copies of The Birth of Venus by Edgar Degas and Gustave Moreau (1859) as well as Etienne Azambre’s Two Women copying Botticelli’s fresco of Venus and the Graces (1894) demonstrate the vogue for copying his work. Botticelli’s European influence is manifest in major paintings by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Arnold Böcklin and Giulio Aristide Sartorio. Pallas and the Centaur, c.1482 by Sandro Botticelli, © Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence, 2015, Photo: Scala, Florence - courtesy of the Ministero Beni e Att. Cultura The final section of the exhibition arrives at Botticelli in his Own Time. This will show that Botticelli was both a supremely skilled artist and a designer of genius who ran a highly successful workshop. Exhibits will include his only signed and dated painting The Mystic Nativity (1500), three portraits supposedly of the legendary beauty Simonetta Vespucci, and the exquisitely detailed Pallas and the Centaur (1482), travelling to London for the first time. A number of variations on the Virgin and Child thematic in different formats will illustrate Botticelli’s creativity as a designer, while a spectacular group of his rare graphic corpus including five of his drawings of Dante’s Divine Comedy reflect his skill as a draughtsman. The show will close with two monumental fulllength paintings of Venus, reprising the heroine of The Birth of Venus, and will also feature the V&A’s Portrait of a Lady known as Smeralda Bandinelli (c. 1470-5), formerly owned by Rossetti and restored especially for this exhibition. Victoria and Albert Museum London Opening Hours: Daily: 10.00 – 17.45 Fri: 10.00 – 22.00 $test =
  • Street Art and Beauty Combine: Ben Eine drops at The Body Shop

    Ben Eine collaborates with internationally renowned Cosmetic and skincare brand The Body Shop and to celebrate the launch we’re running our own little give away. So what’s the score? What has iconic street artist Ben Eine been up to at the The Body Shop? Don’t fear, he hasn’t popped into ....
    Ben Eine collaborates with internationally renowned Cosmetic and skincare brand The Body Shop and to celebrate the launch we’re running our own little give away. So what’s the score? What has iconic street artist Ben Eine been up to at the The Body Shop? Don’t fear, he hasn’t popped into his local brand for a mini-make over, a touch of contouring or to pick up a Lip Butter (his favourite is Coconut by the way). In fact Ben Eine has just launched a Limited Edition Hemp Hand Cream named ‘CHANGE’ to help raise 300K for Charity. The Body Shop turns 40 this year so to celebrate, in style, they turned to Eine to redesign the packaging for their iconic Hemp Hand Protector for a Charity Fundraiser. They aim to raise the money to protect the planet, animals, oceans and people and allow customers to choose how they money is divided! 4 years ago Ben Eine took to the walls of ‘Old Street, London and painted to work ‘Change’ in his unmissable lettering which is inspired by a book he read when he was a young boy called ‘Subway Art’, which he deems to have helped him become the success he is today. The ‘Body Shop’ Campaign strives to make change and to respect the communities you work with, a thought and idea that was in fact behind his ‘Change’ Street Piece. The Body Shop cream uses ‘Hemp’ as an ingredient – one of the most productive plants on the planet and previously was branded as an evil product due to its connection with the West’s War on drugs. In an interview with The Body Shop Ben Eine quotes, when talking about their latest commitment ‘it’s so positive - supporting producers and global issues that really need to be on the agenda’ and that The Body Shop as a company is ‘ground breaking, boundary-pushing, they were talking about Fair Trade and environmental issues way before it was on the global agenda. A global company with a very big and vocal conscience’. The new Limited Edition Hand Cream ‘CHANGE’ can be purchased for £11 (RRP) from Body Shop Shops and £1.50 will be donated to support the Foundation’s goal of raising £300K to protect and enrich the planet, the oceans or animals and people. GIVEAWAY TIME! To coincide with the launch of the ‘CHANGE’ Hand Cream we are running our very own little give-away. You could be in with the chance to win 5x Body Shop Goody Bags worth over £60 including: Change Hemp Hand Cream which is signed by Eine himself, Drops of Youth Concentrate, Mini Shea Body Butter, Italian Summer fig EDT, Born Lippy Lip Balm, Tea Tree Oil, Peppermint Footspray. How do I enter we hear you say? Simply head over to our Facebook page to find out more. $test =
  • Introducing Danad Design

    We have just started working with the amazing British design company Danad design on some interesting and exciting new works. The first project we have work from is 'Danad V’. Using its amazing archive of source images Danad design is giving a select few modern day artists and street artists acce....
    We have just started working with the amazing British design company Danad design on some interesting and exciting new works. The first project we have work from is 'Danad V’. Using its amazing archive of source images Danad design is giving a select few modern day artists and street artists access to their remarkable image library for them use to create something new. Rekindling the Danad design flame in an exciting clash of Pop Art with Street Art in the spirit of the contemporary music mash-up and remix culture. The first 'Danad V’ collaborator is artist and poet 'Dissent'. We have three striking prints from Dissent who writes simple, unpretentious poetry about simple, unpretentious things that happen to simple, unpretentious people. These three images contrast the simple innocence of children’s book illustrations with darker images commenting on the wider geopolitical issues at work in the world. Danad Design was a trailblazing, iconoclastic and experimental art/ design company founded in 1958 by six seminal British artists: Robyn Denny, Peter Blake, Tom Adams, Bernard Cohen, Barry Daniels and Edward Wright. The collective was considered a defining force in the Pop Art movement. For more than half a century Danad has been dormant – but now with the unearthing of a previously unseen body of work and a remarkable image archive they are looking at a number of exciting projects to celebrate Danads important history. Watch this space for more things to come… $test =
  • Magnus Gjoen launches exclusive new lenticular

    Last night saw the launch of Magnus Gjoen’s spectacular new lenticular print ‘He Lived Like A Devil And Died Like A Saint’. This amazing new signed limited edition if just 50 is EXCLUSIVE to artrepublic. Magnus Gjoen was at our Brighton gallery to launch this new print giving customers th....
    Last night saw the launch of Magnus Gjoen’s spectacular new lenticular print ‘He Lived Like A Devil And Died Like A Saint’. This amazing new signed limited edition if just 50 is EXCLUSIVE to artrepublic. Magnus Gjoen was at our Brighton gallery to launch this new print giving customers the chance to meet the man himself as well as see his new release. It was a great evening with everyone involved having a wonderful time. ‘He Lived Like A Devil And Died Like A Saint’ lenticular brings to life a skull which has been overlaid with a Dutch floral still life. As you walk past this striking work you can see the skull move giving the illusion of being a 3D object within the frame. Skull’s often feature in Dutch still lives along with flowers they are symbols of the transience of life. Lenticular printing is a technique which uses several images which are sliced into strips and interlaced together. A plastic sheet containing a set amount of linear prism-like lenses is then placed on top, perfectly aligned with the images for the 3-dimensional effect to work. It has been used by artists from seventeenth century Royal portraits, to early corporate advertising, and kitsch memorabilia. Buy the print framed and ready to hang here. $test =
  • Vogue 100: A Century of Style is at the National Portrait Gallery

    Vogue 100: A Century of Style is at the National Portrait Gallery, London, from 11 February – 22 May 2016, sponsored by Leon Max. This major new exhibition at the National Portrait gallery celebrates 100 years of cutting-edge fashion, beauty and portrait photography by British Vogue. Linda E....
    Vogue 100: A Century of Style is at the National Portrait Gallery, London, from 11 February – 22 May 2016, sponsored by Leon Max. This major new exhibition at the National Portrait gallery celebrates 100 years of cutting-edge fashion, beauty and portrait photography by British Vogue. Linda Evangelista by Patrick Demarchelier, 1991 ©The Condé Nast Publications Ltd Vogue 100: A Century of Style will showcases the remarkable range of photography that has been commissioned by British Vogue since it was founded in 1916, telling the story of one of the most influential fashion magazines in the world.Theamed by decades the exhibitions explores British Vogue’s unfaltering position at the forefront of new fashion, its dedication to the best in design, and its influence on the UK’s wider cultural stage. Exquisite vintage prints from the early twentieth century, ground-breaking photographs from renowned fashion shoots, unpublished work and original magazines will be brought together in this first retrospective survey of the celebrated magazine. Fashion is Indestructible by Cecil Beaton, 1941 ©The Condé Nast Publications Ltd Included in the exhibition are works by many of the leading twentieth-century photographers, including Cecil Beaton, Lee Miller, Irving Penn and Snowdon as well as more recent work by celebrated photographers David Bailey, Corinne Day, Patrick Demarchelier, Nick Knight, Herb Ritts and Mario Testino. I the photographs You can also see many of the faces that have shaped the cultural landscape of the twentieth century, from Henri Matisse to Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and Damien Hirst; Marlene Dietrich to Gwyneth Paltrow; Lady Diana Cooper to Lady Diana Spencer; and Fred Astaire to David Beckham. Also featured in the exhibition will be the fashion designers that defined the looks of the century, including Dior, Saint Laurent and McQueen. Highlights of the exhibition include the entire set of prints from Corinne Day’s controversial Kate Moss underwear shoot, taken in 1993 at the pinnacle of the ‘grunge’ trend; Peter Lindbergh’s famous 1990 cover shot that defined the supermodel era; a series of exceptional Second World War photographs by Vogue’s official war correspondent, Lee Miller; a rare version of Horst’s famous ‘corset’ photograph from 1939, which inspired the video for Madonna’s hit song Vogue; and vintage prints by the first professional fashion photographer, Baron de Meyer. The National Portrait Gallery, London Opening Hours: Daily 10.00 – 18.00 Turs & Fri: 10.00 – 21.00 $test =
  • Spotlight on Jean-Michel Basquiat

    We have just added some amazing new prints from graffiti artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Jean-Michel Basquiat worked in the worlds of New York street graffiti and the fine art gallery. His short but prolific career began in the 1970’s with his SAMO tagged graffiti images. By the 1908’s he was sh....
    We have just added some amazing new prints from graffiti artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Jean-Michel Basquiat worked in the worlds of New York street graffiti and the fine art gallery. His short but prolific career began in the 1970’s with his SAMO tagged graffiti images. By the 1908’s he was showing in main stream commercial galleries and even collaborated with Andy Warhol. His career was bought to a tragic end when he died of a heroin overdose in 1988. His work often incorporated text and featured his signature three pointed crown. He also used found objects such as wood panels as a canvas for his art enhancing the raw feel of his work and linking with his origins as a street artist.  Jean-Michel Basquiat was fascinated by the greys anatomy book his mother gave him as a child and many of his works feature images of the body and its workings. These high quality prints of his amazingly strong and colourful images make a great statement on any wall. View all Jean-Michel Basquiat prints $test =
  • Jackson Pollock at MoMA

    Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954 This exhibition covers Jackson Pollock’s work from the 1930s until his 1956 death at the age of 44. The works are taken from the Museum of Modern Art’s unparalleled collection of Jackson Pollock’s works. 50 works representing every phase of ....
    Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954 This exhibition covers Jackson Pollock’s work from the 1930s until his 1956 death at the age of 44. The works are taken from the Museum of Modern Art’s unparalleled collection of Jackson Pollock’s works. 50 works representing every phase of the artist’s career and the wide range of materials and techniques that he employed are on show in the exhibition. Jackson Pollock (American, 1912-1956). One: Number 31, 1950. 1950. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 8′ 10″ x 17′ 5 5/8″ (269.5 x 530.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection Fund (by exchange), 1968. © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Over the course of two decades, Pollock’s work progressed from mythical, primal figures and scenes; to imagery that combines elements of representation and abstraction; to the radical “drip” paintings that mark the climax of his career. With these culminating works, which envelop the viewer through their monumental scale and all over markings, Pollock emerged at the forefront of the post-World War II movement known as Abstract Expressionism. His innovations helped make this the first American art movement to wield international influence. They had an explosive effect on the traditions of painting and opened up new avenues for sculpture and performance art as well. Jackson Pollock (American, 1912-1956). The She-Wolf. 1943. Oil, gouache, and plaster on canvas, 41 7/8 x 67″ (106.4 x 170.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1944 © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York In addition to One: Number 31, 1950 (1950)—arguably Pollock’s greatest masterpiece and one of his largest canvases—the exhibition also features drawings and exceedingly rare and little-known engravings, lithographs, and screenprints, highlighting an underappreciated side of one of the most important and influential American artists of the 20th century. Bringing these works together underscores the relentless search for new expressive means and the emphasis on experimentation and process that were at the heart of Pollock’s creativity. Now until Sunday, May 1 The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) New York Opening Hours Daily 10:30 – 17:30, Friday 10:30 – 20:00 View all Jackson Pollock prints available on artrepublic.com $test =

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