Monthly Archives: December 2014

  • Man punches million pound Monet

    A man who punched a hole in an £8million Claude Monet painting has been jailed this month for 6 years and subsequently banned from all art galleries and museums. Way back in 2012 Andrew Shannon calmly strolled into the Nation Gallery in Dublin and viscously attacked the 1874 painting ‘Arge....
    A man who punched a hole in an £8million Claude Monet painting has been jailed this month for 6 years and subsequently banned from all art galleries and museums. Way back in 2012 Andrew Shannon calmly strolled into the Nation Gallery in Dublin and viscously attacked the 1874 painting ‘Argenteuil Basin with a Single Sail Boat' by the French Impressionist artist. Shannon initially said his motive was “to get back at the stateâ€ but during the trial he changed his story, saying that he had felt faint and accidentally fell into the artwork. Shannon was carrying a can of paint stripper with him at the time and had previously been eyeing up the ‘Taking of Christ' by Caravaggio before settling on the Monet. The artwork was ripped apart with a devastation three-branch tear being made by Shannon's fist. The painting has just gone back on display after an epic restoration process, which took nearly two years to complete. Before the damaged painting was removed from the gallery conservators examined the area for any signs of loose or flaking paint with the fragments being collected from the floor. The fragments were then examined at a microscopic level to determine what paint Monet had used. The broken fibres of the canvas were then painstaking aligned with the use of high-powered microscopes and glued back together. Over 100 miniscule piece of paint measuring between 0.3mm and 1mm were delicately reinserted into the painting, returning the masterpiece to its former glory. Its not the first major work to be vandalised and subsequently restored, earlier this year a famous Rothko painting that had be tagged went back on display at the Tate Modern after undergoing a similarly lengthy process.  View all Claude Monets prints View all Mark Rothko prints $test =
  • The Eagle has landed: Dave White's majestic new edition

    Dave White's latest limited edition print has just swooped down in our gallery. The most recent offering from the master painter is a stunning 30-layer silkscreen of a magnificent golden eagle, which has been finished with an exquisite, sparkling, diamond dust background. The print begs to be vie....
    Dave White's latest limited edition print has just swooped down in our gallery. The most recent offering from the master painter is a stunning 30-layer silkscreen of a magnificent golden eagle, which has been finished with an exquisite, sparkling, diamond dust background. The print begs to be viewed in the flesh to fully appreciate its shimmer brilliance so make you sure you pop in the Brighton gallery to see it for your self. The dignified bird continues from Dave White's Albion' series, where he has looked to native British wildlife for inspiration, painting a number of endangered species. In this latest body of work Dave White has encouraged the public to reconnect with the creatures that inhabit our countryside. By featuring well known as well as more obscure animals in the series he highlights the sheer span of indigenous wildlife on these shores. However it is not the first time an Eagle has cropped up in Dave White's work. Back in 2011 artrepublic exclusively released his first eagle print, which originated from his ‘Americana' show. Much like all of his editions it quickly sold and was very well received when it was launched in our London sister gallery.  2014 has been an incredibly successful year for the artist with two major exhibitions and a number of highly anticipated print editions being released. Back in June of this year Dave White had his debut solo show in Los Angeles further confirming his international appeal and reputation. Apex' featured a number of oil paintings of great white sharks, brilliantly capturing the dynamism and elegance of the predator. Dave White has long been one of our most popular artists at artrepublic for good reason and we cannot wait to see what 2015 holds in store for the gifted painter. $test =
  • Grande Dame has blown us away with her exciting new hot releases down at the Brighton Gallery...

    Grande Dame, otherwise known as Tiff McGinnis, a self taught multimedia artist, passionate about creating animations, writing music, and a creator of audio/visual storytelling.Her work is joyful, psychedelic and energetic and we can’t get enough of it down at our Brighton gallery! Grande ....
    Grande Dame, otherwise known as Tiff McGinnis, a self taught multimedia artist, passionate about creating animations, writing music, and a creator of audio/visual storytelling.Her work is joyful, psychedelic and energetic and we can’t get enough of it down at our Brighton gallery! Grande Dame is originally from the Deep South of Columbus, Georgia, but has been based in the UK since early 2001 and is currently living locally in Hastings. Ever since Tiff can remember, she has been afflicted with synaesthesia – an acute sensitivity to sound, which in her case creates colourful images in her mind upon hearing music. Her work printmaking kicked off after producing prints from her music video 'The Shakes'. She recently showcased her work at our sister gallery Ink_d which was a great success. These wonderful vibrant prints are all limited edition runs, signed and numbered. Don’t miss out on these wonderful limited editions! View all Grande Dame prints View all Brighton Blogs $test =
  • David Walker drops 'Alana' at artrepublic

    At artrepublic we are all thrilled about the arrival of David Walker’s hot new edition ‘Alana’, which comes fresh from his sensational London show. The exhibition titled ‘A Blank Canvas is a White Flag’ was held by our sister gallery Lawrence Alkin Gallery in a pop-up space in London’....
    At artrepublic we are all thrilled about the arrival of David Walker’s hot new edition ‘Alana’, which comes fresh from his sensational London show. The exhibition titled ‘A Blank Canvas is a White Flag’ was held by our sister gallery Lawrence Alkin Gallery in a pop-up space in London’s uber cool Shoreditch. The event was hands down the street art hit of season and saw the Berlin based artist return to his native East London to show work in the capital for the first time in nearly 3 years. In the show Walker debuted his brand new way of displaying paintings, where he divided the canvases into different section exploring colour theory. His explanation for this new method was, ‘The different sections of each painting showcase different approaches and colour logic, and in turn for the viewer to see both the individual and the whole”. The painting Alana was the main lead image for the show so it is rather fitting that it has beautifully transformed into a limited edition giclee print. The show was incredibly well received and generated a lot of interest on blogs and social media, drawing in huge number of street art followers. The new edition comes in three variations, one has a silver metallic silkscreened layered and the other two are hand finished with gold and copper leaf. The subjects of the portraits are all people David knows personally and there is an underlying theme of different forms of creativity. He has painted fellow artists, musicians and dancers amongst others. Many of the print edition sold along the originals at the show so if you’re as captivated by ‘Alana’ as we are don’t sleep on it because she won’t be around for long! View all David Walker prints David Walker private view with Lawrence Alkin Gallery David Walker – ‘A Blank Canvas is a White Flag’ Street Art News Feature David Walker’s Urban ArtFest Work $test =
  • Ben Eine conquers the cube

    Street art sensation Ben Eine has been the talk of the town recently. Not only has the typographic wiz released a red-hot new silk-screen edition, ‘Revolution’, which has been flying out the door at artrepublic, Eine has also just launched his new project ‘URBAN[E]’ in Tokyo, Japan. The l....
    Street art sensation Ben Eine has been the talk of the town recently. Not only has the typographic wiz released a red-hot new silk-screen edition, ‘Revolution’, which has been flying out the door at artrepublic, Eine has also just launched his new project ‘URBAN[E]’ in Tokyo, Japan. The latest venture from the king of street lettering is a collaboration with Fragile Ventures, a company who specialises in helping artists develop their work into three-dimensional forms and communicate it to the world.  Eine has created 3 hand cast limited edition cubes, in concrete, wood and metal. Each cube features an etched or engraved ‘E’ in one of the artists signature ‘Circus’, ‘Tenderloin’ and ‘Shutter’ fonts. In a recent interview with The Independent Eine described how he sees himself as a protector of dying out handmade skills. His view of the cubes was, “They’re just so beautiful. They’re all hand finished. I spent the last week in my studio in San Francisco sanding them down and hand waxing them. They are just really tactile, I can’t stop touching and poking them.” Eine also recently made headlines when he revealed that David Cameron made a joke about ‘Berlusconi’s Jacuzzis and whores’ when the street artist was invited for tea at 10 Downing Street. Famously Eine’s painting ‘Twenty First Century City’ was gifted to Barack Obama in 2010 from David Cameron when the PM made his first official trip to Washington. Eine was rather sceptical regarding whether the painting was actually on show in the White House; “I’ve never seen the painting after they picked it up. It’s probably in the cupboard of unwanted gifts that they only get out when that foreign dignitary comes backs to visit.”  View all Ben Eine prints Read more about Ben Eine's new silkscreen edition 'Revolution' $test =
  • RYCA at Art Basel

    The 13th annual Art Basel has just taken place in Miami. In recent years the event has become an increasingly important date in the international art scene calendar. It was estimated that some 75,000 people decamped to the glamorous Atlantic coast city to enjoy the art on show, contributing $13....
    The 13th annual Art Basel has just taken place in Miami. In recent years the event has become an increasingly important date in the international art scene calendar. It was estimated that some 75,000 people decamped to the glamorous Atlantic coast city to enjoy the art on show, contributing $13m to the local economy. Art Basel is well known for drawing some of the hottest names in street and urban art as well as a great number of VIP guest. This year saw Kim and Kanye in attendance as well as the ever twerking pop starlet Miley Cyrus. Also attending the event this was artrepublic favourite Ryan Callanan aka RYCA, who took the transatlantic trip to exhibit his work. Callanan spread some of his acid house inspired happiness when he painted the wall of a local school with a signature rave smiley and love heart, complete with a fittingly sentimental caption. Callanan has had a very busy 2014, back in October his ambitious dual venue show ‘8 Forever’ open in our sister galleries Lawrence Alkin Gallery and Ink_d.  The Wynwood Walls projects is one of the biggest draws of Art Basel and is where the real heavyweights of street art and graffiti can be found carefully plying their trade with “do not disturb the artist” signs taped to their backs. The project was the brainchild of the renowned community revitaliser the late Tony Goldman. Goldman had a single clear idea: “Wynwood’s large stock of warehouse buildings, all with no windows, would be my giant canvases to bring them the greatest street art ever seen in once place”. The venture has transformed the area from a site of social deprivation to a colourful and sprawling hub of creative. The Wynwood area now boasts over 90 galleries and draws the big league street artists with people like Obey/Shepard Fairey, Faile & Bast, Ron English and Retna all painting nearby walls. View all RYCA prints View all Shepard Fairey Prints View all Retna prints  $test =
  • Tracey Emin inspires Brit Award

    Tracey Emin’s new design for the 2015 Brit Award statue has been be revealed ahead of the Award show, which takes place in February 2015. Emin’s imitable scrawled handwriting is a recognisable characteristic of her artwork and has been included on the statue, which reads: “Congratulations on ....
    Tracey Emin’s new design for the 2015 Brit Award statue has been be revealed ahead of the Award show, which takes place in February 2015. Emin’s imitable scrawled handwriting is a recognisable characteristic of her artwork and has been included on the statue, which reads: “Congratulations on your talent, on your life, On everything you give to others, Thank You”.  It is the most recent loving and benevolent statement delivered via the medium of art to come from the controversial artist. In 2012 Emin designed one of the official posters for the London Olympic games alongside other artists including Martin Creed, Bridget Riley and Michael Craig-Martin. You could argue that Emin has somewhat soften in recently years when looking back at her earlier expletive heavy text work and has curbed her provocative nature. When asked about designing the statue Emin said: “You want to do it really well. You don’t just want to decorate it, you want to make something that is really Tracey-ish, that is special for the people receiving it." Tracey Emin is the latest in a line of esteemed British artists chosen to design the Brit Award. Previous people charged with updating the statue include artrepublic favourite Sir Peter Blake, who in 2012 delivered a fittingly Pop version in his signature bold colours complete with his own meticulously written signature and emblems. In 2013 it was the king of the vitrine Damien Hirst who added his iconic multi-coloured dots to the award and in the past Dame Vivienne Westwood has also contributed to proceedings. View all Peter Blake prints View all Damien Hirst prints Read our article 'Peter Blake: Classics Revisited' $test =
  • Record Breaking Turner sale

    2014 has seen the great painter JMW Turner remind the public of his immense talent and enduring influence in the world of art. Earlier this year we reported on ‘Mr. Turner’ the award winning biopic of the 19th Century British painter, directed by Mike Leigh and starring Timothy Spall as the can....
    2014 has seen the great painter JMW Turner remind the public of his immense talent and enduring influence in the world of art. Earlier this year we reported on ‘Mr. Turner’ the award winning biopic of the 19th Century British painter, directed by Mike Leigh and starring Timothy Spall as the cantankerous, monosyllabic genius. The film was met with rave reviews winning Spall the coveted Cannes best actor award as well as putting him firmly in contention for the Baftas and quite possibly Oscars.  Alongside the film, September saw the opening of ‘Painting Set Free’ the supreme exhibition of Turner’s late works held at the Tate Britain. The show and film both examine the final two decades of the artist’s life, a time where his output was at its most prolific. It was in these works that Turner embraced a radical and experiment approach to painting, he began to reduce the images down until they were luminous depictions of pure colour and light.  This month has seen one of the last privately owned Turner masterpieces go under the hammer at Sotherby’s for a record £30.3M. The painting, ‘Rome, From Mount Aventine’, was based on detailed sketches Turner made during his second trip to the city in 1828. Alex Bell who is the co-chairman of Sotherby’s Old Master Painting Department, spoke about the quality and longevity of the piece: “This painting, which is nearly 200 years old, looks today as if it has come straight from the easel of the artist. The picture retains the freshness of the moment it was painted: the hairs from Turner's brush, his fingerprint, the drips of liquid paint which have run down the edge of the canvas, and every scrape of his palette knife have been preserved in incredible detail.” The attention on Turner this year just goes to show the enduring appeal of the great “painter of light”.  View all JMW Turner prints Read our article of 'Mr Turner' Spotlight of JMW Turner $test =
  • PatnDon: Artist Interview

    PatnDon are an artist duo that share a unique vision and way of making art, communicating their idea in variety media including print, text, video, painting and photography. Their practice manifests in a number of different ways with contrasting themes: from paying homage to the costumes o....
    PatnDon are an artist duo that share a unique vision and way of making art, communicating their idea in variety media including print, text, video, painting and photography. Their practice manifests in a number of different ways with contrasting themes: from paying homage to the costumes of The Prince of Pop, Michael Jackson to creating a number of bespoke cabinets containing detritus and ephemera collected over a lifetime. We caught up with the pair to find out more about what they do and their past. Who exactly are PatnDon? P: PatnDon are Patricia and Donald. The ‘n’ represents the way in which we pronounce ‘and’. D: We like to think that it’s Yorkshire dialect but really it’s just slovenly and common and can’t really be attributed towards slang. How would you describe your work?  P: We have, with a varying degrees of success, incorporated painting, sculpture, screen printing, text video, utter nonsense and ‘cheap stand up’ in our exploration and yearning for Artistic endeavour. D: I suppose that it is quite typical to describe our work as autobiographical, but it is the most appropriate term for it. But then I suppose that all artist’s work can’t be anything other than autobiographical! P: We believe that our work carriers comprehensive pretensions, but we are just as satisfied if our work merely makes the viewer smile. What would you say are the benefits of working as part of an artistic duo? P: To a lesser or greater extent everyone strives to make their mark on this world. We just find that by working as a collaborative duo lessens the burden.  D: Our styles certainly complement each other.  P: I tend to paint things.  D: And I tend to build stuff. What is the story behind your Michael Jackson inspired series of images?   P: For quite a while we had yearned to produce a series of abstract paintings. We had devised various formulas to create colourful compositions but everything that we tried seemed too forced, predictable and tiresome. We were beginning to get disillusioned. And then Michael Jackson died and we were suddenly inundated with images in newspapers and magazines of the ‘King of Pop’ and his rather questionable fashion. We suddenly had our source material.  D: The vast majority of the pieces featured glittered and highly glazed elements to represent the glitz and glamour of the man. Out of respect and necessity we set about producing 100 paintings based on the diverse costumes that Michael Jackson once wore. The series included his significant pieces as well as some of his other less obvious creations. Do you listen to anything in particular whilst working?  P: We gravitate towards music that has a story. In the sense that it can be categorised into a beginning, middle and end. Music that allows you to embark on a journey. A climax and an anti-climax. An experience. Songs that haave layers. We are not loyal to any one specific style. We think that Hip-Hop has a lot of merit. How sampling is a marriage of styles. A homage. D: The work that we are producing at the time has a direct correlation with thetype of music that we favour. It seems to be a rather unconscious decision.Ironically, when we spent almost a year creating the Michael Jackson paintings we couldn’t bare to listen to even one of his songs. It would have been overwhelming. Pink Floyd are wonderful. Trent Reznor is a genius. Tom Waits and Nick Cave are incredible storytellers. Where did you both grow up?  P: We grew up in Goole, East Yorkshire. The town is significant for previouslyhaving the honour of being Europe’s largest exporter of wood. And of course it’siconic water towers that closely resemble Salt and Pepper pots .D: The town is now inundated with supermarkets and charity shops. Where did you train? What did training teach you? P: We completed our Foundation course at Selby College. It was an intense and avery humbling experience. It was the first time that we were amongst people who had willingly chosen to be students. We learnt so much. D: Our Tutors at Leeds University were a revelation. They wouldn’t allow you tobe dismissive of anything. Everything could be justified and rationalized. Theyreally steered our practise in a very conceptual direction. Our final piece was toproduce a manual, which the reader, our subject, was invited to use as a guide torealize our work for us. To realize language in a physcial form. To expose andexploit assumptions. It was incredibly well received. What would you say are the main themes you pursue? P: Nothing is particularly off limits. And we think that this is true with the majority of Artists. We all seem to pursue and explore the same main themes.Love, Life and Death are obvious. We do feel that humour is quite understated and generally overlooked in Art. But yet, consider the premise of a joke with most of the Art that you observe and you’ll soon happen upon a punchline. Albeit, it a dark humour in many cases. D: We certainly have a fondness for language and how language can be explored.Especially in the way we use everyday expressions. We all use expressions withlittle or no real consideration but if you were to interpret them literally you would conjure up some wonderful imagery. Which of your works are you most proud of? P: That’s like being asked to choose your favourite Child! We are proud of how all of our ‘projects’ have turned out. We are particularly fond of our on-going Collection Box series. This is by far our rawest and most honest creation. We make bespoke display cabinets and fill them to capacity with items that we haveacquired throughout our life’s. They were initially inspired by disappointingMuseum displays and over cluttered charity shop windows. D: When you begin to consider the designers involved in each item, or theindividuals involved in the packaging of said items, or the amount of peopleinvloved in the distribution of each item then it becomes an incredibly considered project. There are arguably thousands of people indirectly involved in the manufacture of the Collection Box series. What’s the biggest myth about artists? P: I can recall with anger and frustration the time when a relative asked what Iwas studying at University. After my response he proceeded to ask if the windows were clean. D: Even though this was a witty retort, the pre-conception that Artists don’t do alot with their day is incredibly annoying. Being an Artist is not a 9-5. And there iscertainly no such thing as an overnight success. You can trace any Artists successback by years. What’s the best advice anyone ever gave you? P: If in doubt, make it big. Make lots of them. And give it a fancy name. D: That, the cat sat on the mat is not a story. The cat sat on the dogs mat is! What is the greatest threat to art today? PnD: Damien Hirst. P:- IIya & Emilia Kabakov, Fischli & Weiss, Martin Creed, Angus Fairhurst. D: We admire Artists that just seem to do what they want. Individuals who appear carefree and uninhibited in the type of Art that they produce and don’t particularly conform to any assumed type. What work of art would you most like to own? P: A Thousand Years by Damien Hirst. It’s the perfect metaphor for life. I like the imagery of it being the focal point in the lounge and everyone having to live their lives around it. D: Autumn Rhythm (number 30) by Jackson Pollock. I believe that it is withoutquestion the most striking image that I have ever experienced. It’s a knockout. It is arguably the most energetic ‘still’ painting out there. A juxtaposition. It’s passive aggressive. It’s also a reminder that an Artist with a relatively simple, yet original idea can completely change the perception of Art. Finally please describe for us an average day in the life of PatnDon… P: We’ll discuss, deliberate and disagree before finally settling on something to do. There is alot of dialogue between us because we made the bold decision at University to discard our sketchbooks in favour of the actual realization of work. D: Having no tangible plan leads to all many of nonsense. It’s easy to startsomething. But it’s hard to go on. And it’s very difficult to finish. We hate endings.That is a start! artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   View all PatnDon prints and original work available $test =

9 Item(s)

Scroll To Top