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Monthly Archives: September 2014

  • Absolut Andy Warhol

    The influence of Andy Warhol’s artistic genius is as strong as ever with Swedish vodka brand Absolut recently announcing that they will be launching a limited edition, Andy Warhol inspired bottle in time for the Christmas period.  Almost 30 years since the p....
    The influence of Andy Warhol’s artistic genius is as strong as ever with Swedish vodka brand Absolut recently announcing that they will be launching a limited edition, Andy Warhol inspired bottle in time for the Christmas period.  Almost 30 years since the priest of Pop created original artwork for the brand, the vodka maker has said it plans to release a tribute bottle taking inspiration from his painting. The ‘Make the Holidays Pop’ bottle is black in design with vibrant blue, pink and yellow lettering. Four million of the bottles are to be introduced worldwide with the Andy Warhol Foundation receiving a portion of the profits as royalties. The original “Absolut Warhol” ad, which ran in the 1980’s, was significant as it began a relationship between the brand and popular artists. In the following decades artists including Keith Haring, Ed Ruscha and Kenny Scharf all supplied artwork, helping Absolut to become America’s best-selling imported spirit and global design icon.  Andy Warhol also made headlines recently when the last of his 610 ‘time capsules’ was opened. 30 years ago the artist consigned 300,000 of his everyday possessions to be sealed in cardboard boxes for future generations to uncover. Postcards, cans of Campbell’s soup and outlandish finds like a mummified pizza and a fossilised slice of birthday cake have all be recovered from the boxes alongside notes and drawings by the artist. Warhol saw the time capsules as a work of art in themselves and as a means of capturing the essence of his life. It looks like Andy Warhol’s 15 minutes of fame shows no sign of ending anytime soon!  view all Andy Warhol prints $test =
  • The Influence of Fashion in Art

    With London Fashion Week having recently swept its way into the capital, bringing with it a haze of glamour and excitement, it got us at artrepublic thinking about how often the worlds of fashion and art overlap. We decided to delve into our extensive collection of prints and select a few ar....
    With London Fashion Week having recently swept its way into the capital, bringing with it a haze of glamour and excitement, it got us at artrepublic thinking about how often the worlds of fashion and art overlap. We decided to delve into our extensive collection of prints and select a few artists whose work has been influenced by fashion and take a closer look. First up is one of our most sought after artists and somebody who is very familiar with the workings of the fashion industry, the extraordinarily talent Magnus Gjoen. In the past Magnus has worked as a denim designer at Lee Jeans and as a graphic designer for British fashion legend Vivienne Westwood. These groundings in fashion alongside an incredible aptitude for computer-aided design are key components in his artistic practice. Often juxtaposing destructive and fragile imagery, Magnus wants to address misconceptions of beauty and power, giving objects a new found meaning. Carne Griffiths is another artist who has had a history interwoven with the fashion industry. Griffiths worked as a gold wire embroidery designer for twelve years, producing intricate designs for a number of fashion labels including Tom Ford, Burberry and Ralph Lauren as well as many of London’s Saville Row tailors. He even designed the ceremonial outfit for the King of Tonga’s coronation! Griffiths combines intricate detail with loose gestural marks in his paintings and is known for using combinations of brandy, vodka, tea and ink with stunning effect. Next is Pam Glew who has used the portrait of supermodel and fashion icon, Cara Delevingne, as the focal point in her latest giclee print ‘Calm Before the Storm’. Pam Glew uses a very unique artistic process, which involves dyeing vintage fabric a dark shade then painting using household bleach to reveal her portraits.  She has also worked in collaboration with many fashion houses including Armani and Ralph Lauren. Delevingne is generally seen as this generation’s ‘It’ girl and is equally likely to be spotted walking the runways at designer shows or taking up a front row seat alongside her celebrity friends. One model who has consistently acted as muse for a number of artists is the irrepressible Kate Moss, with her image being reproduced by everyone from Banksy to Tracey Emin. Moss is one of Britain’s most successful models and is also known for her well-documented history of hedonism. The Godfather of Pop-Art Peter Blake chose Kate Moss as one of his subjects for his stunning ‘Stars’ portfolio. Moss was included alongside immortal icons such as Brigit Bardot, Elvis Presley, The Beatles and Marilyn Monroe. The artist also included her when he revamped his famous ‘Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ album cover, when marking his 80th birthday in 2012. Peter Blake has also had his own foray into the realm of fashion. In 2011 the artist teamed up with the legendary British brand Fred Perry to produce a line of Pop inspired polo shirts. Blake has also designed and released his own limited edition shoe entitled ‘The First Real Pop Shoe’. The collectable black and white trainers are made from recycled chequebook wallet leather and feature the artist’s trademark heart, target, rainbow and star motifs embroidered on each side. What could possibly be cooler than rocking a pair of limited edition Peter Blake’s on each foot? artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   $test =
  • Major Documentary on David Hockney to air on BBC

    It has been reported that BBC Two has commissioned a feature-length documentary on Yorkshire’s favourite son, the celebrated artist David Hockney. The programme entitled HOCKNEY is set to air next year and will focus on the life and work of the iconic painter. The filmmaking team behind the proj....
    It has been reported that BBC Two has commissioned a feature-length documentary on Yorkshire’s favourite son, the celebrated artist David Hockney. The programme entitled HOCKNEY is set to air next year and will focus on the life and work of the iconic painter. The filmmaking team behind the project also worked on a documentary examining another of Britain’s greatest artists in Lucian Freud: Painted Life. Freud and Hockney shared a close friendship and often featured in portrait form in each other’s work. BBC Two Controller Kim Shillinglaw says: “David Hockney stands as one of Britain's seminal and most important artists, and I'm delighted to be showing this major film on him on BBC Two. I know this film will be a riveting and inspiring watch.”  David Hockney has given unprecedented access to his personal archive of photographs and films for what promises to be a candid and unique visual diary of his life. It will also show Hockney’s endlessly prolific output, with him taking to the studio seven days a week at the grand age of seventy-seven years old. The film is set to be a fascinating insight into a national treasure and a revealing account of one of Britain’s best-loved artists.  View all David Hockney prints $test =
  • Diamond dust Apex VIII arrives at our Brighton Gallery with an Almighty Splash...

    Well established artist Dave White has caused a stir down at the Brighton Gallery with his dazzling new release Apex Shark VIII. Renowned for his depiction of endangered creatures, he has tackled one of the most powerful aquatic predators in this intensely beautiful print – the great white shark.&....
    Well established artist Dave White has caused a stir down at the Brighton Gallery with his dazzling new release Apex Shark VIII. Renowned for his depiction of endangered creatures, he has tackled one of the most powerful aquatic predators in this intensely beautiful print – the great white shark.  Apex Shark VIII is the latest release from his aquatic series, which also featured the Sea Horse, Octopus and the previous sell out Apex Shark which was released earlier this summer and sold out after only two weeks of release. Dave White really captures the intensity of the predator, giving it a real life feel of its beautiful movement yet fierce fully passing past showing off its gritty menacing teeth. In an interview in The Independent, Dave White explained, “Obviously great whites have a nasty reputation, but in actual fact they’re fragile and beautiful. I want people to look at how rare they are – that’s the crux of it all.” Oozing with bold brush strokes and dripping finishes, this limited edition is a 16 colour silkscreen with varnish and features a beautiful diamond dust background. It is limited edition of only 50, signed and numbered on the reverse. Don’t let this masterpiece swim out the door before it is too late! View all Dave White prints View our Brighton page $test =
  • Mr Brainwash leaves his mark on New York

    The art world maverick Thierry Guetta aka Mr Brainwash made his presence known in New York City last week when a huge mural by the artist was unveiled on a building near the site of the World Trade Centre. The mural, which reads “WE LOVE NEW YORK”, was displayed on the department store Century ....
    The art world maverick Thierry Guetta aka Mr Brainwash made his presence known in New York City last week when a huge mural by the artist was unveiled on a building near the site of the World Trade Centre. The mural, which reads “WE LOVE NEW YORK”, was displayed on the department store Century 21 to coincide with the 13th anniversary of 9/11. In an interview with the Gothamist website, Guetta explains how the mural is his way of showing his love for New York and as a means to greet the people of the city. Having recently moved to the Big Apple, Guetta goes on to describe his plans for collaborating with other artists and helping local schools with his art, as well as becoming a part of the artistic community. The mural is loaded with iconic American imagery including the national flag, a heroic fire fighter and policeman wielding a can of spray paint. Besides the New York mural Guetta has collaborated with the likes of Madonna, Michael Jackson, Rick Ross, Coca-Cola, Nike and Mercedes.    Guetta reiterates that his modus operandi is to create work that is inspired by love, positivity and beauty, often for the benefit of charities. We can’t wait to see what he gets up to in his new adopted home of New York!   View all Mr Brainwash prints Read our Mr Brainwash biography $test =
  • Swing back to the 60s with David Studwells glorious new iconic prints...

    David Studwell is one of our newest artists to join artrepublic, and what a fantastic release of limited edition prints they are. No doubt we are all attached to the charm and beauty of the iconic figures of the past. David Studwell has re-created some of these synonymous figures from certain eras s....
    David Studwell is one of our newest artists to join artrepublic, and what a fantastic release of limited edition prints they are. No doubt we are all attached to the charm and beauty of the iconic figures of the past. David Studwell has re-created some of these synonymous figures from certain eras such as the 60s. Twiggy, Marilyn Monroe, and Elizabeth Taylor are just some of the icons used. David Studwell studied in art and design at the prestigious Central Saint Martins in London; where he later carried on to learn the skills of printmaking in West London. His Limited Edition prints are beautifully silkscreened, although Studwell also likes to work with collage and mixed media in some of his other works.  Influenced by Pop Art in particular, these bold figurative images have been reformed to create something with more vibrancy and more of a modern approach bringing the past to the future. These vivid silkscreen prints are all very low editions of just 10. Don’t wait too long to own one of David Studwells marvellous creations! View all David Studwell prints $test =
  • Scotland's Great Debate

    The ongoing debate about Scottish independence is due to reach its conclusion next week with what will be a historic vote. All the media focus on the event got us thinking about the multitude of artists the country has produced over the years and the important role Scotland has played in the worl....
    The ongoing debate about Scottish independence is due to reach its conclusion next week with what will be a historic vote. All the media focus on the event got us thinking about the multitude of artists the country has produced over the years and the important role Scotland has played in the world of art.  The political artist War Boutique has tackled the issue of the Scottish referendum head on with two prints, Vote- Yes and Vote – No. One print features the red, white and blue of the Union Jack to represent a no vote and for Scotland to remain a part of Great Britain. The other silkscreen is in the classic blue and white of the Scottish national flag signifying a vote for independence. Often referred to as ‘the People’s Painter’, proud Scot Jack Vettriano has voiced his support for independence stating, “I think any small country that is attached to a big country wants independence”.Vettriano is probably best known for his painting ‘The Singing Butler’ and despite being largely scorned by art critics, has had an exceptionally successful career. He is one of the most reproduced artists in the world and was even asked by Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond to create his official Christmas card back in 2010.  Bruce McLean is another Scottish born artist who has achieved worldwide success, having studied at Glasgow School of Art in the early 1960s. McLean’s wide artistic practice incorporates sculpture, performance art and painting. His vivid and energetic take on traditional still life compositions has been very popular in our gallery. His rebellious spirit is always apparent in his work.  Regardless of the outcome when the votes are counted, Scottish art will undoubtedly continue to thrive and the country will carry on producing exceptionally talented artists whether part of Great Britain or independent.  view all prints by War Boutique view all prints by Jack Vettriano view all prints by Bruce McLean $test =
  • Abstract Art Season on the BBC

    BBC Four are celebrating Abstract Art this week with a season of programmes, ‘When Art Broke Free’, exploring one of art’s most extraordinarily innovative and groundbreaking movements. The season includes a host of interesting shows including ‘Why Can’t a Four Year-Old Paint a ....
    BBC Four are celebrating Abstract Art this week with a season of programmes, ‘When Art Broke Free’, exploring one of art’s most extraordinarily innovative and groundbreaking movements. The season includes a host of interesting shows including ‘Why Can’t a Four Year-Old Paint a Pollock’, finding out just how challenging it is to create a famous Jackson Pollock drip painting, and ‘The Rules of Abstraction’, which sees art critic Matthew Collings explore how Abstract Art rose to prominence in both the art world and modern culture. There are in-depth explorations into the influence of Abstract Art on modern design and how jazz embraced the art movement through its album cover iconography.  A brilliant documentary, ‘Abstract Artists in Their Own Words’, tells the story of Abstract Art in Britain through the words of some of its leading lights. From Barbara Hepworth’s Abstract geometric forms to Bridget Riley’s Op Art imagery, the film reveals the impressive and diverse ways in which British artists tackled the idea of abstraction in the 20th century. To celebrate the season BBC Four have also commissioned four British artists to produce their own channel idents, each inspired by the spirit of abstraction. Artists Laure Prouvost, John Smith, Sebastian Buerkner and James Richards all give an insight into what Abstract Art means to them.  This fantastic BBC Four season celebrates the enduring influence and legacy of Abstract Art. To discover more about the groundbreaking movement why not delve into our extensive Abstract Art collectiction.  Explore the ‘When Art Broke Free’ season on the BBC website.  $test =
  • Video: artrepublic Gallery Highlights, inc. Justine Smith, Pam Glew & HYBRID

    View our hottest art highlights for Sep 2014 by taking a walk around the walls of our artrepublic gallery. Gallery manager Jessica Miles takes you through three fantastic pieces, including an explosive edition by Justine Smith, a storming Pam Glew and an exquisite HYBRID. Presenting Ju....
    View our hottest art highlights for Sep 2014 by taking a walk around the walls of our artrepublic gallery. Gallery manager Jessica Miles takes you through three fantastic pieces, including an explosive edition by Justine Smith, a storming Pam Glew and an exquisite HYBRID. Presenting Justine Smith, Pam Glew and HYBRID works at artrepublic (September 2014) from artrepublic on Vimeo. Justine Smith, A Bigger Bang – This is a giclee print, signed, limited edition of 40. Smith’s primary medium is paper collage and sculpture, with bank notes and political themes reoccurring in many of her pieces. In this print each country is represented as an island covered in its national currency. Russia completely dominates the piece as the largest country in the world with England represented as a fifty-pound note. It also comes in a white colour way, which gives it a softer feel. Smith has exhibited internationally and her work can be found in The British Council and financial institutions. Prime Minister Gordon Brown chose to hang her iconic image of the Euro on the walls of 10 Downing Street during his tenure. Pam Glew, Calm Before the Storm – This is a signed limited edition of only 50. It is a giclee print with a gloss finish. The Brighton based artist specialises in portraits painted freehand onto vintage textiles. She uses household bleach to create bold faces emerging from the darkness. This print features fashion icon and supermodel Cara Delevinge on a vintage union jack. Glew has exhibited alongside the likes of Tracey Emin, Peter Blake and Damien Hirst.  HYBRID, Jacqueline Kennedy –This is a signed limited edition of 75. It is a beautiful giclee print with a silkscreened layer of high gloss varnish, creating a really nice subtle sheen. The original for the print was created using a fascinating collage of Jaqueline Kennedy’s handwritten letters, notes, postcards and newspaper cuttings. It was finished with real butterflies from around the world, which really bring it to life. HYBRID is an artist that likes to remain undisclosed so the work can speak for itself.  view all Justine Smith prints view all Pam Glew prints view all HYBRID prints  $test =
  • Static: Artist Interview

    STATIC is the creative output of London based images makers Tom Jackson and Craig Evans. Their unique work combines screen-printing with mixed media techniques to produce images that merge elements from street and fine art. The immensely talented kindly took a few minutes to give us some fascin....
    STATIC is the creative output of London based images makers Tom Jackson and Craig Evans. Their unique work combines screen-printing with mixed media techniques to produce images that merge elements from street and fine art. The immensely talented kindly took a few minutes to give us some fascinating insight into their lives and work. How would you describe your work? A combination of visual samples, found images, elements and objects, blended together in new and unique ways across layers of glass and pieces of paper. What would you say are the benefits of working as part of an artistic duo? Nemo solus satis sapit. (No person can be wise enough on his own) What made you choose the name Static? STATIC can have positive and negative connotations. We are STATIC, but we are never still. To view something properly either you, or the object you are viewing, needs to be STATIC. We wanted something that reflected the duality of our set-up, which needs both of us to create the work we do. We Like STATIC – and hope you do too? Do you listen to music whilst working? If so what do you have playing? The majority of the time we’ll have 6 music on as it covers pretty much all bases and means we’ll get to hear everything from the Beastie Boys to Brian Eno and everything in between, which is just how we like it. Where did you grow up? Were you creative children and what made you become a artists? We grew up in the seaside town of Scarborough in the North East of England. Famous for it’s castle, it’s arcades and it’s naval warfare re-enactment… T. I was always pretty creative as a kid and tended to lean towards art as I never seemed that good at any of the other subjects. C. I loved reading stories and would draw with my Dad on Sunday afternoons. Then from around the age of 7 or 8 I started collecting pictures from magazines, brochures and postcards to make scrapbooks of things I liked and places I wanted to go.Neither of us really thought about ‘becoming’ an artist though and the majority of the time when we’re asked what we do, we both say that we’re screen printers. Where did you train? What did training teach you and what do you wish it had taught you? We met at Art College where we were encouraged to move around the different departments and set ourselves personal projects and from there we went to university where we spent 3 more years doing the same without any idea of where these skills would take us in the years that would follow. We obviously picked up a few things along the way, but the processes we use day to day are techniques we have taught ourselves over the last 8 years, trying out different approaches and learning (sometimes, but not always) from our mistakes. How did you get started? We set up our first studio in a large derelict flat overlooking the South Bay in Scarborough. Everything was hand-made and we would use the photocopier at the office supply shop to make traces and the dark room at the local arts centre to make our screens.At the time we didn’t have a proper print bed so we improvised using 2 pieces of wood bolted to a table and used masking tape as guidelines to make sure everything lined up. Needless to say, our prints got more adventurous when we got our hands on a vacuum bed complete with a cradle for registration… Looking back we don’t know how we managed to create some of the prints we did with such a basic technique! Where and what is your studio? For the past 4 years, we’ve been working out of a second floor studio in Hackney Wick. As the layered glass pieces have grown in size and weight, we’ve been thinking we should find a ground floor space and recently we found out that this whole area has been sold for redevelopment, so the search has begun… What would you say are the main themes you pursue? Pop culture, celebrity, beauty, power, faith, belief & identity. Where do you find inspiration? Everywhere and nowhere.Sometimes it can find you and other times you have to go looking. What are you currently working on? We have just finished 2 layered glass pieces that each have over 1400 coloured feathers incorporated into the background and which are currently on display at LAG as part of the MIX Summer 2014 group show. We’re also involved in a couple of really exciting projects that should keep us busy for a while, have a private commission on the go and we’re starting to play around with themes and ideas for our next London solo show. Which of your works are you most proud of? T. The 2 new pieces are up there with my favorites and the possibilities that they could lead to with future pieces are pretty exciting. C. If you look at the progression we’ve made from the prints and originals we were making 7 or 8 years ago, you can see how our ideas and techniques have developed and that’s something I’m personally really proud of and something that I hope we’ll be able to continue doing for another 8 years. Who would you say buys your work? Anyone and everyone, we don’t really seem to have a type, it can be anyone from a teenager working a paper-round to save up for a print - to a member of the Saudi Royal family who will pick up 3 or 4 originals out of the blue. What memorable responses have you had to your work? Well we did have to act fast at the opening of our ‘Moments of Clarity’ show, when an over-eager admirer of our layered glass works decided to take one off the wall for a closer look. Let’s just say this guy had been making the most of the refreshments that were on offer and it was lucky we were close to hand to step in and return the piece safely back to it’s spot. What is the greatest threat to art today? T. Aliens, killer bees, triffids…. In that order! C. Mediocrity, virtual reality and the rapidly diminishing attention span of the human race. What’s the best advice anyone ever gave you? T. Never, Never, Never, Never give up! C. Don’t be afraid to get things wrong. What have you sacrificed for your art? Our lungs. Which artists do you most admire? JR – for the way he has pointed his camera at the people who previously had been ignored, the everyday individuals who are the life and breath of the communities they live in and in doing so, has empowered them and made them part of a global family connected through the Inside Out Project. What work of art would you most like to own? T. Conor Harrington original or an old school Faile wooden box. C. Micallef’s ‘21st Century Love’ or an AJ Fosik sculpture. If you could exhibit in any gallery in the world, which would it be? T. Laz Rathbone, LDN C. Guggenheim, NY If you weren’t artists what would you be doing? T. Who knows… Electrician/ shop assistant/ burger flipper/ astronaut were a few of my other options C. Something that paid twice as much but that made me half as happy. Describe an average day in the life of Static... Eat, Drink, Create, repeat. $test =

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