20% OFF FRAMING for a limited time only

Monthly Archives: August 2014

  • artrepublic at Buy Art Fair 2014: Original, Affordable, Unmissable

    artrepublic are returning to the North of England, bringing the experience of our Brighton and London galleries to this year’s huge event, the Buy Art Fair. Now in its 7th year Buy Art Fair, will take place alongside The Manchester Contemporary in their joint new home, the iconic Old Gra....
    artrepublic are returning to the North of England, bringing the experience of our Brighton and London galleries to this year’s huge event, the Buy Art Fair. Now in its 7th year Buy Art Fair, will take place alongside The Manchester Contemporary in their joint new home, the iconic Old Granada Studios in Manchester 26-28 September. The event which is one of the largest art fairs outside of London will play host to Eighty Galleries and showcase the work of over 500 artists, with prices ranging from £50-£5,000+. There are only 10,000 FREE tickets available which will allow entrance into both events. The Fair is a brilliant chance to view our plethora of collectable prints and we are very excited about welcoming customers who haven’t had the opportunity to view either of our galleries before in person. It will be a great chance to view some top quality art and there will be friendly, expert advice on hand to answer any questions. Be sure to pay a visit to our stand 101 and see some of our best pieces in the flesh. We will have incredible works from the likes of Magnus Gjoen, Tom French, Dolk and Peter Blake. As well as graffiti maestro Pure Evil, who was present at last year's fair and took part in a spot of live spray-painting. We will also be showing some extra-special, rare and one-off works. Buy Art Fair offers a relaxed atmosphere for art enthusiasts to see and buy the latest, affordable and original art. Having launched back in 2008 the fair has grown each year with the support of Manchester City Council, Arts Council England, Own Art and The Contemporary Arts Society. Over the three days there will be guided tours, the chance to meet artists and watch then paint live, music and a fantastic café bar. With the emphasis being on affordable art there will be something on offer to suit everyone. Be sure to follow the link to get hold your free tickets and pop by stand 101 to view our hottest works! OPENING HOURS: Friday 26 September: 11.00 - 19.00 Saturday 27 September: 11.00 - 18.00 Sunday 28 September: 11:00 - 17.00 TICKET INFORMATION This year there are just 10,000 free tickets for Buy Art Fair & The Manchester Contemporary. Don't miss out, get yours now! Follow us on twitter and facebook or visit the Buy Art Fair Manchester website for all of the latest art fair  news and details $test =
  • Lights, Camera, Action: Art Inspired by Film

    Films and their stars have both proved to be incredibly influential in the work of a great number of artists. At artrepublic we have a plethora of magnificent prints by artists who have been inspired by films in different way to create beautiful unique images.  Sir Peter Blake, who is wid....
    Films and their stars have both proved to be incredibly influential in the work of a great number of artists. At artrepublic we have a plethora of magnificent prints by artists who have been inspired by films in different way to create beautiful unique images.  Sir Peter Blake, who is widely thought of as the Godfather of British Pop Art, is well known for his use of icons from popular culture in his work. Having experienced first hand the boom in youth culture in the 1960s, Blake channelled the era’s vibrancy and optimistic spirit into his work. Viewed now against the backdrop of time, his use of bygone movie stars invokes a strong feeling of nostalgia and sentimentality. 'James Dean' from his incredible new USA Series, sees Blake including the legendary actor who is instantly recognisable with his iconic red jacket and self-assured squint. Despite having died nearly 60 years ago in a car crash, the actor remains the epitome of cool whose signature style and attitude has transcended generations. Dean also appeared in Blake’s first foray into lenticular printing, where he was juxtaposed in front of the Albert hall in the now sold out holographic print.  Another colossal star of the era that has functioned as a muse for a wealth of artists over the years is the irrepressible Marilyn Monroe. The image of the blonde bombshell is an indelible component of art history both as an illustration of beauty and a symbol. Monroe stared in Hollywood blockbusters including ‘The 7 Year Itch’ and ‘Some Like It Hot’ and courted controversy with her alleged affair with then president John F. Kennedy. Following her death in August 1962, it was the Pop-Art visionary Andy Warhol who would go on to create the most iconic and recognisable images of the actress. In the four months following her death Warhol made more than 20 silkscreen paintings of the actress in different colour combinations all based of the same publicity image from the 1953 film Niagra. For Warhol Monroe represented the two constant themes present in his work: death and the culture of celebrity.  In his famous painting ‘Marilyn Diptych’ Warhol contrasts vivid colour with black and white, the fading effect of the right panel echoing the polarity of life and death. The repetition of her image reflects ubiquitous presence in the media and the notion of her being one of the most photographed people to ever live.  Peter Blake has also paid homage to the actress in ‘Marliyn’. He offsets the repeated image of Monroe with signature vivid colours and geometric shapes, providing a nod to his experience as a graphic designer. It is not just the pop art pioneers who have used Marliyn Monroe to make an artist statement. The ever elusive artist HYBRID, made the beautiful print ‘Marilyn Butterflies’ using actual newspaper clipping which all feature Monroe as the subject matter. The clipping combined with butterflies capture her status as a global icon as well as capturing her fragility. While Thai artist Pakpoom Silaphan has used her image in ‘Marliyn on Pepsi’ to comment on the universal reach of cultural icons and mass consumerism. Silaphan used vintage signs and advertising hoarding onto which he adds collage and illustrations of celebrities. Sometime a film can have such a lasting impression on an artist they can’t help but make works that celebrates it. A great example of this would be Ryan Callanan a.k.a RYCA and his Star Wars influenced prints. ‘Chose Your Droid’ is a playful reworking of Banksy’s ‘Choose Your Weapon’, where RYCA has replaced the hooded youth and Keith Haring dog with characters from the sci-fi trilogy. While ‘Death Dots’ is his take on Damien Hirst’s famous spot paintings, with the multicolour dots being replaced by Death Star’s, the space station/ super weapon that appears in the films. One artist who has experience life on either side of the film camera is the French maverick Theirry Guetta a.k.a Mr. Brainwash. For many years Guetta would document street art heavyweights such as Banksy and Obey as they went about their work leaving their mark on city streets in the dead of night. It was Banksy who helped Mr. Brainwash to make the transition from cameraman to leading star through the 2010 documentary ‘Exit Through the Giftshop’. The film follows the run up to Guetta’s debut show ‘Life is Beautiful’, which was held in a former television studio in LA. Despite the chaotic build up to the show, it proved to be a huge success with over 100 works by the artists on display and helped establish Mr. Brainwash as internationally renowned artist. Now that you know a bit more about the influence of film in the work of some of our artists be sure to check out all of the beautifully crafted prints on offer. That’s a wrap! View all limited editon art prints artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   $test =
  • Zeus Unveiling at Gatwick Airport

    Holidaymakers and those travelling through London’s Gatwick Airport will have the opportunity to view two new sculptures by legendary Grafitti artist Dean ‘Zeus’ Coleman. The pair of large scale ‘urban sculptures’ have been designed by the artist to inspire passengers and celebrate the ex....
    Holidaymakers and those travelling through London’s Gatwick Airport will have the opportunity to view two new sculptures by legendary Grafitti artist Dean ‘Zeus’ Coleman. The pair of large scale ‘urban sculptures’ have been designed by the artist to inspire passengers and celebrate the extensive range of destinations across the globe Gatwick now serves.  Zeus has a reputation as a prolific graffiti writer and has played a prominent role in both the UK Hip-Hop and graffiti scenes having worked for the likes of Tim Westwood and Def Jam record label. The artist has been described by The Face Magazine as “A 3D graffiti pioneer” and in recent years has made a number of unique graffiti inspired fish tank as well as installations. Zeus fuses elements of graffiti, typography, fine art and sculpture into his practice creating his own individual visual language.  The pieces on show at Gatwick will measure around 2 metres high and depict two iconic landmarks in New York’s Chrysler Building and Dubai’s colossal Burj Al Arab. The installation, which will launch in time for the busy bank holiday weekend, will run for two months and is set to be viewed by hoards of travellers as then embark on their journeys all over the world. The work will be official unveiled in the Airport’s South Terminal today by Zeus and Spencer Sheen, Head of Retail at Gatwick. We cannot wait to see what the 3D graffiti maestro has created!  View all Zeus prints $test =
  • Unseen Andy Warhol Films to be Digitalised

    Andy Warhol was most famous for his brightly coloured Pop Art prints. However, he was also a prolific filmmaker shooting 60 features films and over 500 black and white shorts in the years between 1963 and 1972. In the early 70s Warhol removed the vast majority of these films from the public domain ....
    Andy Warhol was most famous for his brightly coloured Pop Art prints. However, he was also a prolific filmmaker shooting 60 features films and over 500 black and white shorts in the years between 1963 and 1972. In the early 70s Warhol removed the vast majority of these films from the public domain and they have remained hidden in archives until now.  New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is joining up with The Andy Warhol Museum to digitalise his entire body of film work. The mammoth task, which will take several years to complete, involves taking over a thousand rolls of 16mm film, painstakingly scanning them frame by frame and converting them to high-resolution 2K format.  Eric Shiner, director of The Warhol Museum explained the intention behind the labour intensive project, “The Warhol’s mission is to be the global keeper of his legacy. Making it possible for curators, scholars and the public to see Warhol’s total output as a filmmaker for the first time is a major step toward achieving our goals”. The entire process will help viewers gain a deeper understand of the work of the artist but it is not the only recently attempted to recover “lost” work by Andy Warhol. Experimental works of art by the Pop-Art provocateur were recently salvaged from 30-year-old floppy discs by a team of computer experts.  View all Andy Warhol prints Read our blog about Andy Warhol's floppy discs $test =
  • Hirst-on-Sea

    Damien Hirst has recently been given the go ahead for perhaps his most controversial work to date, with plan to build an entire village near his childhood home. The proposed 750 home eco-town has been drawn up by architects MRJ rundell + associates and will develop an area on the edge of the seasid....
    Damien Hirst has recently been given the go ahead for perhaps his most controversial work to date, with plan to build an entire village near his childhood home. The proposed 750 home eco-town has been drawn up by architects MRJ rundell + associates and will develop an area on the edge of the seaside town Illfracombe in Devon.  Damien Hirst has already left a mark on the town with his colossal sculpture ‘Verity’; A 66-foot tall bronze depicting a pregnant women holding aloft a large sword. The artist/town planner also owns a restaurant in the area, which rather fittingly specialises in seafood.  The new town is set to benefit from the latest in renewable energy technology featuring environmentally friendly wind turbines, solar panels and insulation. The entire project is predicted to take 10-15 years to complete and will draw on Hirst’s iconic style and artistic flair. It remains to be seen whether the houses will be painted with his signature multi coloured spots or if animals in formaldehyde will be on sale in the local supermarket! View all Damien Hirst prints Image credit: www.telegraph.co.uk $test =
  • Ben Eine & Jo Peel's Living Walls at the Olympic Park

    Urban artists Ben Eine and Jo Peel have been creating epic murals at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London as part of a participatory public art project entitled ‘Living Walls’. Through collaborations with the local community, the major project aims to create world class art for everyone t....
    Urban artists Ben Eine and Jo Peel have been creating epic murals at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London as part of a participatory public art project entitled ‘Living Walls’. Through collaborations with the local community, the major project aims to create world class art for everyone to enjoy in and around the park. Ben Eine has produced a monumental 400m long mural stretching over the Olympic Park hoardings. Titled ‘The Review’, it is his largest street art work to date. Eine has been inspired by the proposed plans for a new cultural quarter on the park and his signature circus font depict adjoining adjectives referring to the Games.   Jo Peel is currently working on ‘Meet Me in the City’, a project to recreate her urban landscapes of local landmarks in 3D, using common structural elements such as windows and doors. Stories of love, relationships, dreams and emotions surrounding the Olympic Park development will be told by Peel along 200m of canal side hoardings. Her mural will incorporate parts of Hackney Wick and chart their change from an industrial to culturally significant area. View all Ben Eine prints View all Jo Peel prints View all Urban Art prints $test =
  • The Art of Printmaking

    Beautiful prints are what we specialise in here at artrepublic so it seemed rather fitting to examine the process behind some of the fabulous works we showcase both online and in our gallery. The History of Printing The procedure of making artwork via the reproduction of images onto ....
    Beautiful prints are what we specialise in here at artrepublic so it seemed rather fitting to examine the process behind some of the fabulous works we showcase both online and in our gallery. The History of Printing The procedure of making artwork via the reproduction of images onto paper dates back to around the fifth century in the Far East. The earliest technique was the woodcut whereby the artist draws a design onto a piece of wood or transfers an image from paper onto the surface. The design is then carved away using a special cutter; a sharp tool is also used to carve into areas on the block that will not receive ink. The block is then inked using a roller and impressed onto damp paper to leave an image. A more accessible variant on the archaic woodcut is the linocut, which is popular amongst many contemporary artists. The process is the same although the piece of wood is replaced with a sheet of linoleum. The material has a smoother surface and allows work to be made quicker with a lower cost. World-renowned painters Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso helped to elevate the linocut from a low-fi and cheap practice to an established professional print medium. One artist who has embraced the linocut in recent years is long-term Radiohead collaborator Stanley Donwood. For his ‘Lost Angeles’ series the artist created an apocalyptic version of LA in linocut, with the city being destroyed by fire, floods and meteor strikes. The stylised and graphic, monochrome landscape was also seen in his previous ‘London View’ series which was used for the album cover of ‘The Eraser’, singer Thom Yorke’s debut solo record. Silkscreen Printing Silkscreen is the most common sort of print found at artrepublic; the process has its origins in China during the Song Dynasty (960-1276CE). It was first used as an industrial printing process in the 1800’s for printing political posters and decorating fabrics. Actual silk has not been used since the 1960’s, being replaced by more robust and inexpensive polyester mesh. The process is also commonly know as screen printing. Silkscreen printing is a process that applies the properties of a stencil; some areas are blocked out allow ink to be printed through others. Here’s a rough guide to how a silk-screen print is made: • The process starts with an original complete image from which the print will be created. • The image is then separated into its individual colours, with each one requiring its own screen, which is a piece of woven mesh stretched over a frame. • Once the separate colours have been identified they are made into stencils and transferred on to the screens using a process of exposing photographic emulsion under UV light. This then allows for ink to only pass through the screen in certain places. • When the screens are all complete they are then clamped into place on a flatbed to ensure consistent registration and the ink is pulled across with the use of a squeegee (rubber blade). • The process is then repeated with each colour being added separately with great care to insure the layers of colour don’t overlap. Once the print is complete different glazes and textures can be added to add highlights or depth to the image. One artist who is synonymous with the practice is Pop Art pioneer Andy Warhol. The medium allowed the artist to reproduce the same image repeatedly using the same screen in order to reinforce its impact. Warhol’s influence can be seen in the work of many contemporary artists. Russell Marshall uses silkscreen printing to realise his artistic vision. Marshall’s art is heavily influenced by his career in journalism and his prints examine the notion of celebrity and icons. Kate Gibb, a self-confessed “Silkscreen obsessive”, is another artist whose practice is centred on the method of printmaking. As an artist she embraces the accidents and element of chance involved in the process, incorporating the imperfections into her bold, brightly coloured images. Giclee Printing The other common type of print found at artrepublic is the modernized method of giclee. The name giclee refers to high-resolution fine art prints made using a specialized, large format, inkjet printer. Printed using archival inks, the colours of giclees are known for their lasting vibrancy and will remain colourfast for 50-100 years or more. One of our most sought after artists Dave White has released several editions of stunning giclee prints. The level of detail achieved through the print making process is astonishing and truly captures the colour and dynamism of his original paintings. He is also known for his hand fishing of larger prints with 24-carat gold leaf. Finishing Touches The finishing touches applied to prints can truly be crowning glory on already beautiful work. The addition of carefully applied gold leaf can be used to highlight areas and add an opulent element to the work. Dan Baldwin’s exquisite silkscreen ‘The Marriage’ is a great example of how the addition of gold leaf can further enhance a piece. The print has been finished with an abundance of 24 carat gold adding a luxurious and decadent quality. Dan Baldwin’s work is also a great example of the extraordinary high quality that can be achieved in contemporary screen-printing. ‘Tantrum Confession’ is a 24-colour silkscreen complete with gold/silver leaf, diamond dust, glazes and even glow in the dark paint. Just imagine the amount of work that has gone into creating that masterpiece! Diamond dust is another addition which can add eye-catching sparkle and shimmering glamour to a print. Well-known graffiti artist Obey (Shepard Fairey) has used black and white diamond dust for the first time in his eastern art inspired Lotus and Crescent silkscreen prints. The use of diamond dust reflects the artist’s interest in the seduction of advertising and consumerism. Now that you know a bit more about the printing process and the extensive work that goes into each piece, be sure to check out the outstanding collection of prints available from us at artrepublic... View all limited edition art prints artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   $test =
  • Pure Evil Featured in the Financial Times

    Did you spot the interview with our favourite Street Art maverick Pure Evil in the Financial Times last week? Interviewed by Peter Aspen for a feature on the rude health of Urban Art market, Pure Evil is described as “one of the most prominent names of the thriving street art scene.” Peter Asp....
    Did you spot the interview with our favourite Street Art maverick Pure Evil in the Financial Times last week? Interviewed by Peter Aspen for a feature on the rude health of Urban Art market, Pure Evil is described as “one of the most prominent names of the thriving street art scene.” Peter Aspen writes, “And yet urban art has never been in ruder health, its ephemeral zest turned into something more long-lasting, and commercially viable. Banksy, the movement’s flag-bearer, has become an auction-house favourite. And Pure Evil himself... is becoming an unlikely interloper in the traditional art establishment.” Aspen observes that there are “signs that street artists are becoming more ambitious in their scope, keener to align themselves with the centuries-old subjects of traditional art forms.” The interview with the purveyor of UK and international business and economic news is further proof of Pure Evil’s rocketing reputation and the vitality of the Urban Art market.  View all Pure Evil prints View all Street Art prints Read the full interview on the Financial Times website $test =

8 Item(s)

Scroll To Top