20% OFF FRAMING for a limited time only

Monthly Archives: July 2014

  • Video: artrepublic Gallery Highlights, inc. Marion McConaghie, Aroe & Damien Hirst

    View our collectable art highlights for August 2014 by taking a walk around the walls of our artrepublic gallery. Gallery team member Amy Fonseca takes you through three fantastic art works including a beautiful edition by Marion McConaghie, a brilliant Aroe and an outstanding Damien Hirst lent....
    View our collectable art highlights for August 2014 by taking a walk around the walls of our artrepublic gallery. Gallery team member Amy Fonseca takes you through three fantastic art works including a beautiful edition by Marion McConaghie, a brilliant Aroe and an outstanding Damien Hirst lenticular. Marion McConaghie, ‘Violet Butterfly’ – This is an edition of 50 signed, stamped and numbered by the artist. She has created a series of butterflies; this is one of the three that has been hand-finished in 27 carat gold and silver leaf. The gold and silver touches really highlight the piece. Marion McConaghie grew up in Northern Ireland but is now based in Lewes in Sussex. Marion McConaghie is inspired by everything vintage and antique but brings a contemporary feel to her work. Her work is fresh and timeless making it extremely popular in the gallery. Aroe, ‘Ink Panther’ – This is a giclee signed limited edition print of just 50 by Brighton based graffiti artist Aroe. Every print is hand-finished with a unique tag in the bottom right-hand corner making each one completely different. Aroe has created huge pieces all over the world and has been known to cover buildings in San Francisco and Brighton. His tag remains on trains in India and Eastern Europe. All of his graffiti is free-hand, no stencils or projectors used.  Damien Hirst, ‘The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living’ – This is a lenticular on acrylic signed limited edition of 150. Damien Hirst is one of Britain’s most recognised artists of today gaining institutional fame when he won the Turner Prize in 1995. He was a prominent member of the YBAs in the ‘90s. They were seen as part of the wider Brit Pop cultural movement. This piece was taken from his series of animals in formaldehyde which also included a cow and sheep. Along with ‘For the Love of God’, this print has become one of the most iconic images in contemporary art. View all Marion McConaghie prints View all Aroe prints View all Damien Hirst prints $test =
  • Top 5 Trees in Contemporary Art

    This week we’ve seen fans flocking in to snap up Rob Wass’ magnificent new print ‘Murmuration’. The work is an elegant depiction of a tree formed from wheeling and darting starlings. This exclusive release has inspired us find shade from the summer sun and contemplate our favour....
    This week we’ve seen fans flocking in to snap up Rob Wass’ magnificent new print ‘Murmuration’. The work is an elegant depiction of a tree formed from wheeling and darting starlings. This exclusive release has inspired us find shade from the summer sun and contemplate our favourite trees in contemporary art... Trees have been a powerful theme of many artists throughout art history. Many artists have had arboreal obsessions and there are countless tree cameos in art history. Of course before canvas became popular as a painted surface in the 16th century, artists often painted on panels from whatever suitable trees were nearby; apparently Durer painted on poplar and Leonardo da Vinci used French oak. The first great trees in European art were probably Albrecht Durer’s. In 1643 Rembrant van Rijn created ‘The Three Trees’, his largest and most striking etched landscape. We've heard that Vincent van Gogh was very fond of Mulberry trees and surreal trees are everywhere in Salvador Dalí’s work. In 1912, lover of lines Piet Mondrian was inspired by the linear quality of an apple tree and chose to deconstruct it into its most simplified linear form. Then, in the 90’s, art duo Christo and Jeanne-Claude wrapped 162 trees in translucent polyester. Trees remain as inspirational as ever for artists. Here’s our pick of our favourite trees in contemporary art... Rob Wass Artist Rob Wass is known for his vibrant work which fuses nature with geometry and frequently features birds. His signature use of heavy black produces lively pops of contrasting colour in his subtle optical illusions. His latest work combines both optical illusion and nature; ‘Murmuration’ is a bewitching image of a tree formed from swirling flocks of starlings. A murmuration is when starlings flock together, wheeling and darting through the sky in tight, fluid formations. Wass’ murmurations form the intertwining branches and roots of his handsome tree. His hand-colouring in vibrant inks portrays the varied colours of leaves; the orange is particularly reminiscent of an arboreal autumn. We love Wass’ contemporary tree teeming with life and energy. Kozyndan Trees fill the oeuvre of husband and wife art duo Kozyndan. The couple are deeply inspired by their love of the natural world and their enthusiasm for environmental awareness fills their joyful and imaginative illustrations. Arguably their best known work is ‘Bunny Blossom’, a tree bursting into blossom but instead of flowers it has adorable little pink bunnies!  You can spot another bunny tree in ‘The Bunnies Fall’, the autumn edition. In an interview with artrepublic, Dan (from Kozyndan) explained, “[our art’s] inspired by our interactions with one another, our travels, our shared love of nature and the ocean, and of a shared unease with the unnatural human world in which we are cogs. We are either glorifying the intricate perfection of the natural world, or depicting an ongoing fantasy where nature rises up to exact an Old Testament, “eye-for-an-eye” style vengeance on mankind and specifically on the urban wasteland our inherent greed has produced.” This sentiment is particularly palpable in their recent ‘An Ode to California’; a wonderful hippie utopian landscape, complete with magical Redwood trees. Stanley Donwood Last year the notoriously reclusive English artist and writer Stanley Donwood wrote on his blog, “I am still drawing trees, you know. Even though I promised that I'd stop. I can't, though; it's like an addiction. Only not like smack or crack or tobacco. Nowhere near so much alleged 'fun'. An addiction to 8B pencils. I will stop soon though. I think.” Donwood’s latest release consisted of limited edition giclee prints with stridently colourful trees, black mists dancing between them and creatures permeating through the darkness. The idea behind the series is that we, as a species, spent so much time in the forests and this is his attempt to take us back there. We love Donwood’s dark, mysterious forests bristling with multi-coloured trees. We certainly hope his tree addiction doesn’t end anytime soon! Bruce McLean One of the major figures in contemporary British art, Bruce McLean is known for his rebellious installations, performance art, sculpture and public art. Now he works primarily in paint and he has returned to nature to express his painterly style. Larger than life and employing bold colour, his contemporary depictions of trees and plants renew the traditional genres of landscape and still life. ‘Designer Trees’ combines dynamic geometric shapes suggestive of architectural forms with stark tree-silhouettes. Though effectively Abstract, McLean’s palette and inclusion of a segment from a London street map perfectly capture the atmosphere of a sunny day in a London park. The urban atmosphere is increased by the inclusion of graffiti–like text. You can certainly imagine McLean’s sleek trees, such as ’Black Mimosa’ ‘Pink Cava Lilly’ and ‘Agave Americana’, in swanky city courtyards. We love how he boldly fuses the urban and natural. Penelope Kenny Penelope Kenny’s work explores transhumanism, hybrids, evolution and biotechnology. Drawing inspiration from Darwinism, natural history illustrations and taxidermy, she creates fascinating postmodern animals that perch, crawl and climb up her contemporary trees. “I am inspired by how we perceive, organise and try to control nature, especially in relation to genetic manipulation and scientific tampering with the species boundaries,” explained Kenny in our artist interview. Penelope Kenny’s depictions of trees serve as habitats for her weird and wonderful creatures. We like how her work explores scientific developments and imaginatively questions their environmental impact. We wonder what genetically modified animals might be living in our trees in the future? Or whether we will even have trees? It might be a little disconcerting but at least ‘The Tree of Modified Life’ is beautiful! artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   $test =
  • Art Everywhere: A Very Very Big Art Show

    We’re delighted to see Art Everywhere returning for a second year. The collaborative project presents the UK’s favourite art from the nation’s public collections in a vast nationwide exhibition. It is the largest outdoor exhibition with thousands of poster sites and billboards up and down t....
    We’re delighted to see Art Everywhere returning for a second year. The collaborative project presents the UK’s favourite art from the nation’s public collections in a vast nationwide exhibition. It is the largest outdoor exhibition with thousands of poster sites and billboards up and down the country celebrating a summer of art. There are 30,000 poster sites with 25 works of art on display for 6 weeks. "Whether you're on the high street and you suddenly see a Turner, or you get on a bus and you see a Chris Ofili, it is about having great images beautifully reproduced in an unexpected urban context," explained Stephen Deuchar, co-founder of Art Everywhere. "This is a fantastic initiative and I hope it goes on for many, many years to come," said the artist Antony Gormley. The 25 artworks were chosen from a long list of 70 works in public galleries. David Hockney's elderly parents, Marc Quinn's blood-filled head and Dora Carrington's painting of an idyllic Lake District farmhouse are among the works chosen. With 38,000 public votes and the help of the finest UK curators and creatives the exhibition is now on until 31st August! View all art prints $test =
  • Damien Hirst to Open London Museum in 2015

    One of the most controversial and divisive art world figures, Damien Hirst, is set to cause a stir in the world of curating next year when he opens his first museum in London. Best known for his vitrines of animals preserved in formaldehyde and his clinically precise spot paintings, the former YB....
    One of the most controversial and divisive art world figures, Damien Hirst, is set to cause a stir in the world of curating next year when he opens his first museum in London. Best known for his vitrines of animals preserved in formaldehyde and his clinically precise spot paintings, the former YBA is converting a building spanning the length of an entire street in Vauxhall, South London.  The new space which is being transformed from a former theatre and scenery production workshop has been designed by Caruso St John architects, who were also the team behind the recent redevelopment of the Tate Britain. The currently unnamed complex will comprise of six separate galleries and a restaurant. The Museum had been scheduled to open later this year but will take longer to complete. A spokeswoman for Hirst’s Science Ltd Company says it now due to be ready “in May or June” next year. Back in 2012 Damien Hirst initially announced his plans for the venture as a means to share his own personal art collection with the public. His private collection known as 'Murderme', consists of over 2000 pieces spanning generations of international artists including: Francis Bacon’s ‘Study for a figure at the Base of a Crucifixion’, Andy Warhol’s ‘Electric Chair’ and Pablo Picasso’s ‘Nature morte au crane’. Murderme, which has been valued in excess of £100m, gives a fascinating insight into Hirst’s own personal interests and tastes.  View all Damien Hirst prints $test =
  • Rob Wass Releases a Beautiful Flock of Starlings

    We are delighted to announce the highly anticipated release of Rob Wass’ latest limited edition print! ‘Murmuration’ is a magnificent two colour silkscreen print on Somerset Satin 300gsm fine art paper. Each print in this limited edition has been exquisitely hand-coloured by the artist with b....
    We are delighted to announce the highly anticipated release of Rob Wass’ latest limited edition print! ‘Murmuration’ is a magnificent two colour silkscreen print on Somerset Satin 300gsm fine art paper. Each print in this limited edition has been exquisitely hand-coloured by the artist with beautiful French inks. A murmuration is when starlings flock together, wheeling and darting through the sky in tight, fluid formations. Murmurations can range from small groups of a few hundred starlings in a small ball, to undulating seas of millions of birds. Inspired by these aerial ballets birds perform, Rob Wass has created a bewitching image of a tree formed from swirling flocks of starlings.   This elegant new print is an exclusive artrepublic release. Rob Wass’ previous hand-finished limited edition ‘We Are Bigger Than Them – Colour’, which also featured elegant birds in formation, quickly sold out so we’re expecting this ‘Murmuration’ to fly out of the door! View all Rob Wass prints View all Animal prints $test =
  • The Art of the Nation

    Most of the nation's greatest works of art are in our museums and galleries, but there are also thousands of significant works in homes across the country. A new series on BBC Radio 4 begins this afternoon investigating the art-works in UK homes and considering the stories they tell about our natio....
    Most of the nation's greatest works of art are in our museums and galleries, but there are also thousands of significant works in homes across the country. A new series on BBC Radio 4 begins this afternoon investigating the art-works in UK homes and considering the stories they tell about our national identity.  In the first programme of the series BBC Art Editor Will Gompertz reveals the importance of discovery, hearing about the joy of uncovering apparently lost masterpieces and acquiring works by chance. Gompertz meets an unemployed couple from Lincoln who believe they have tracked down, via the internet, works by Vincent Van Gogh, Edouard Manet and Paul Cézanne.  He also finds out about a businessman who happened to become a good friend of Pablo Picasso. The genius artist gave him one of his prized plates which sat in a drawer for 40 years, because its new owner thought it looked horrible. Now his son has re-discovered it! And there's the tale of home owner who happened to find a work by Francis Bacon on a wall - long hidden behind fitted furniture. This is sure to be a fascinating series! Listen to 'The Art of the Nation' on BBC iplayer Image credit: www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b049y9pg $test =
  • Warren J Fox: Artist Interview

    Australian artist Warren J Fox swapped London for Brighton and from his seaside studio he is now crafting images ranging in style from photorealistic pencil or ink illustrations to colourful graphic compositions like his new print ‘Freedom’. Warren was kind enough to put down his pencil ....
    Australian artist Warren J Fox swapped London for Brighton and from his seaside studio he is now crafting images ranging in style from photorealistic pencil or ink illustrations to colourful graphic compositions like his new print ‘Freedom’. Warren was kind enough to put down his pencil for a few minutes to answer our probing questions about his life and work. How would you describe your work? I'd describe my art as idea driven. When a concept lands, it's hard not to sketch it out and craft it up. What I'm creating down in Brighton is different to London so location, I guess, has an influence. A single piece could be an exercise in refining skills with attention to detail through to one that becomes a part of a collection. I'm drawn to the freeing up my artistic style with colour but my graphic background, at the minute, is definitely playing a part in my art. What was the thinking behind your new print ‘Freedom’ which depicts the ruins of Brighton's West Pier? Past images illustrate the magic of this pier. I wasn't living here when it burnt down but the frame work is still standing strong. To me, it still has soul; free for local bird life to call it home; free for them to take flight, whenever they feel. The idea came to me early one morning when walking to the studio. Where did you grow up? Were you a creative child?  I grew up in the South East suburbs of Melbourne, Australia and was always creative. With a longing for art classes in school, drawing with cousins, by myself, or illustrating for friends fed the creative fires. Do you see any similarities between Melbourne and Brighton? I lived by the bay in Melbourne when older, so the Brighton seaside vibe brings me home. There's a lot of art and creativity here, albeit a little cooler on the weather front. What made you become an artist? I wanted to be an artist after high school. Trying to be supportive, Dad said "No, you'll never make money from it" so I became a graphic designer/artist in advertising. The passion for it 'on hold' I guess but it was always burning in the background. 20 years on and the visions grow, not only for my collections, but bringing myself and others to their own artistic expressions. Music appears to be a large influence in your art. What do you enjoy listening to?  The range is influenced by what I'm creating. Jazz for example brings Miles Davis and Coltrane to the forefront, yet lounge and chill out albums like Cafe Del Mar will have the focus when sketching out ideas and concepts. Going back to my Australian roots, INXS or AC/DC tracks, tend to get the creative juices pumping. How long did your incredibly detailed portrait of Bob Marley take? One week solid from laying down acrylic fluoro and metallic spray background to the black ink dots. The mix media spray background, allows less dots on the black ink front to build up tone. Other pieces have taken longer than this one. Plain black and white illustrations have a lot more depth, with an A3 size piece taking up to a month. It's never a linear process; walking away and coming back always brings a fresh eye. I'd be lying in saying a piece is finished. Even after signing it, I still want to add more. Where did you train? What did training teach you and what do you wish it had taught you?  Copying refines and improves your eye, teaching you a lot. My Tertiary Graphic Art course had an Illustration component which taught me more than I imagined. It improved and refined my technique immensely. I wish it had taught me to push my own individual style more. How did you get started? Copying drawings or photos I think was the catalyst. Where and what is your studio? Currently in the Open Studios on the sea front. The space houses various artists working in different styles. What would you say are the main themes you pursue? Heart based themes. Pursuing themes that I love. Any themes that resonate with me strongly have an impact to a degree. The more I follow in that realm, overshadows any art I think or feel would appeal to others. Where do you find inspiration? Inspiration becomes richer when nothing seems to be happening. A passing comment or a vision could trigger more gold than any art book. What are you currently working on? 4-5 other pieces within the theme of 'Freedom'. Also working on New York themed pieces. Love it there! A new dot rendering pointillism piece of Jay-Z has approval to proceed. It's illustrated based on photographer Martin Schoeller's portrait of him. Commissioned street art ideas are on the cards too. What memorable responses have you had to your work? Wow! That would have to be the late iconic Jazz photographer Herman Leonard. I woke one morning with a thought to send him an original illustrations'. I didn't listen. A week later I woke with a louder thought to do it so I emailed him to say I was a big fan and that I was sending him one of my original illustrations. It was the Miles Davis piece with the depth of field capturing wrinkles in his hand and blurred out background. I received an email saying he loved it and that had never seen an illustrator capturing his work like that. He said he'd send out a gift. Soon after he sadly passed away. Upon this news I gave up as nothing arrived in the mail. A few months later I received a knock at the door, the Royal Mail man had a package with US stamps. My heart skipped a beat! Thinking it was signed book from him, you can imagine the elation when opening it I discovered a personally signed print from him. A print from the same image I illustrated. Titled and signed, "Miles Davis New York City, 1953 For Warren"! Copyright Herman Leonard. Probably the best response I've ever received and most magical response to my art. What’s the biggest myth about artists? We're all tortured souls. What is the greatest threat to art today? Dismissing it as child's play. Do you suffer for your art? To a degree, yes. Having a talent or gift yet thinking you and your art are never good enough would be an underlying suffering. Which artists do you most admire? Street artists - the ones that create mass pieces on the sides of buildings. Etam Cru. Aryz. Smug. Belin. New 2D graffiti artists with 3D results. Art for the world to see where buildings become canvasses. If you weren’t an artist what would you be doing? Ummmmm. Wow, I'd have to say a musician. A saxophonist. Describe an average day in the life of Warren J Fox... Not wanting to get out of bed would support that 'average' definition... On the upside a sleep in, get up, breakie, coffee, walk up to the studio and create. Back home, dinner and sketching then crafting ideas on the computer 'til the wee hours. Late nights and, if I'm awake, early hours are the best creative times. View all Warren J Fox prints Read our Warren J Fox biography artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   $test =
  • Pure Evil in the Press & on the Streets

    Pure Evil gave readers a rare insight into the complex world of Graffiti in a recent interview with The Times newspaper. The artist explained the unspoken code of conduct present on the streets and voiced his opinion on the breach of etiquette when pieces of Banksy’s work had been painted over ....
    Pure Evil gave readers a rare insight into the complex world of Graffiti in a recent interview with The Times newspaper. The artist explained the unspoken code of conduct present on the streets and voiced his opinion on the breach of etiquette when pieces of Banksy’s work had been painted over by rivals. He also explained the order of importance in Street Art with simpler tags at the bottom, 2 colour ‘throw ups’ in the middle and larger more detailed pieces at the top of the graffiti pyramid. Also hot off the press... Pure Evil’s image of a hooded character stealing one of the Olympic rings emerged during the London 2012 games and has just been used as the cover artwork for Jules Boykoff’s new book ‘Activism and the Olympics’! The book, which is released later this month, examines how anti-Olympic activists deployed a range of approaches in order to challenge the Olympic machine.  As well as book covers and interviews in the national press, Pure Evil has been out leaving his own mark on the streets. The artist has just painted a fresh mural on a wall of the new East Dulwich Picture House in South London. Fittingly he sprayed painted stencilled portraits of bygone film stars with Audrey Hepburn, Sophia Loren, Marilyn Monroe and Marlene Dietrich all featuring on a background made up of his signature multi-coloured vampire bunnies. Pure Evil is clearly the man of the moment! View all Pure Evil prints Image credits: @KiPricePhoto $test =
  • Jonathan Ross Digs the Strange Case Company

    Yesterday Jonathan Ross, officially ‘the most powerful man in broadcasting’, publically declared his enthusiasm for Brighton based art duo The Strange Case Company in a tweet to his 3.79 million Twitter followers!  “I dig this Brighton artist @StrangeCaseCo at http://bit.ly/tscc-  ....
    Yesterday Jonathan Ross, officially ‘the most powerful man in broadcasting’, publically declared his enthusiasm for Brighton based art duo The Strange Case Company in a tweet to his 3.79 million Twitter followers!  “I dig this Brighton artist @StrangeCaseCo at http://bit.ly/tscc-  or at ArtRepublic" tweeted @wossy directing his multitude of fans to our latest release by The Strange Case Company. ‘All Change’ is an unusual silkscreen on acrylic panels, signed, limited edition. Three separate, individually screen printed, 3mm acrylic sheets combine to produce an innovative portrait of HRH Queen Elizabeth.  Jonathan Ross met the Queen in 2005 when he was made an OBE in her Birthday Honours for services to broadcasting. He celebrated the honour by playing ‘God Save the Queen’ by The Sex Pistols on his BBC Radio 2 show! Follow Ross’ patriotic lead with this brand new work. 'All Change' is a tiny edition of only 20 so don’t delay if you’re tempted... View all Strange Case Company prints Follow artrepublic on Twitter Image credit: www.bbc.co.uk/radio2/presenters/jonathan-ross $test =
  • 'Griffin Kitten': Behind the Scenes

    Last week Dylan Floyd released his latest, highly anticipated, print ‘Griffin Kitten’. Floyd’s striking bird/cat hybrid first made an appearance at our Urban Art Fest as a Street Art piece this May and has now been transformed into a spectacular limited edition. ....
    Last week Dylan Floyd released his latest, highly anticipated, print ‘Griffin Kitten’. Floyd’s striking bird/cat hybrid first made an appearance at our Urban Art Fest as a Street Art piece this May and has now been transformed into a spectacular limited edition. ‘Griffin Kitten’ is a giclee print on 330gsm Somerset Velvet paper with screen-printed glue and hand-applied gold leaf. Check out these photos of Dylan Floyd, who is known for his incredible finishes, painstakingly gilding his imaginative creature’s beautiful abstract halo:  “The ideas behind these pictures are not about mutation necessarily, they are more about animals as Totems or spirits, as saintly in some way. This is why I use the iconographic elements in the work. They are mythological creatures, contemporary mythological creatures,” explained Floyd in our artist’s interview.  View all Dylan Floyd prints Read our Dylan Floyd Artist Interview Read more about 'Urban ArtFest 2014 Presented by artrepublic with Brighton Fringe' $test =

1-10 of 17

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
Scroll To Top