20% OFF FRAMING for a limited time only

Monthly Archives: June 2014

  • Own Art Now Available up to £2,500!

    This year marks the 10th Anniversary of the brilliant Own Art scheme which enables you to spread the cost of hundreds of limited edition prints, interest free* whilst receiving and enjoying your art straight away. As part of the celebrations, customers can now borrow anything from £100 to £2,500 ....
    This year marks the 10th Anniversary of the brilliant Own Art scheme which enables you to spread the cost of hundreds of limited edition prints, interest free* whilst receiving and enjoying your art straight away. As part of the celebrations, customers can now borrow anything from £100 to £2,500 (previously £2,000)! We are super proud to be one of a few UK galleries selected by Arts Council England to offer art lovers this 10 months interest free credit* and one of just a handful of websites offering online applications directly through our checkout. Now we can offer Own Art up to £2,500, even more of our massive art collection is accessible to collectors and fans. Incredible pieces by top artists, including Damien Hirst’s ‘Probucol’ and Peter Blake’s ‘Framed Marilyn 2010’, are newly available to purchase through Own Art so now is the perfect time to invest in contemporary art, grow your collection and support living artists! Discover more about Own Art View all prints eligible for the Own Art scheme $test =
  • Meet New Artist Pam Glew...

    We’re delighted to welcome Pam Glew to artrepublic! An established contemporary British artist, Pam is known for her unique technique of painting with household bleach on vintage fabrics and flags. Her innovative work plays with our notions of idols, patriotism and the culture of heritage. ....
    We’re delighted to welcome Pam Glew to artrepublic! An established contemporary British artist, Pam is known for her unique technique of painting with household bleach on vintage fabrics and flags. Her innovative work plays with our notions of idols, patriotism and the culture of heritage.  This video from 2010 is a little dated but offers a fantastic insight into Pam’s artistic processes, her interests and her quirky working space: 'Calm Before the Storm' is Pam’s latest limited edition print. In this striking new work she has immortalized British icon and supermodel starlet Cara Delevingne, who has unequivocally taken the fashion world by storm. Delevingne is portrayed on a patriotic Union Jack background, demonstrating Glew’s fascination with flags. View all Pam Glew prints Read our Pam Glew biography $test =
  • Sarah Shaw: Artist Interview

    Contemporary painter Sarah Shaw graduated from Falmouth College of Art in 2001 with a first class honours degree in Fine Art. Based in Brighton, she creates incredible paintings which explore some of the conditions of being human and the concept of living through time. New to artrepublic, Sa....
    Contemporary painter Sarah Shaw graduated from Falmouth College of Art in 2001 with a first class honours degree in Fine Art. Based in Brighton, she creates incredible paintings which explore some of the conditions of being human and the concept of living through time. New to artrepublic, Sarah kindly took some time away from her brushes and canvases to answer our curious questions.. Would you describe your work as Abstract? I always find it a bit odd when I am referred to as an abstract artist. I don’t think I am at all! I guess in one way I always feel unsatisfied if a painting sits on one dimension and I always feel the need to abstract the picture plane: to disrupt it, fracture it and make it more reflective of my subject. There are figurative elements but I suppose the space could be said to be abstract being less of a physical space than an analogy to a mental space.  I try to evoke something of multi faceted, questioning nature… to parallel the weirdness of life! What’s the idea behind your Monolith series? I’ve always been fascinated with those flowers that people leave strapped to lamp-posts in memory of the people who have met their end there. They have always seemed so charged and poignant; morbidly beautiful and strangely evocative of so many things: all the hopes, fears, loves, disappointments, losses that we have all experienced in life at some time, whether it be the actual loss of a loved one or the loss of something else, like love, youth or dreams. I remember even as a child being fascinated by them appearing on the roads I walked to school. Death, that thing that seemed so very far away, brought abruptly into the present. I noted their eventual decay and their regeneration when the flowers were sometimes replaced, the old blooms still visible behind the new.  I wanted to make a series of paintings which evoked something of the feelings that they evoked in me then and still evoke in me now. Where did you grow up? Were you a creative child? I grew up in the North surrounded by the beauty of the Yorkshire landscape. You could see for miles around where I lived. There was a hill I used to go up often from which you had almost a panoramic view of the world, interrupted only by the grim and loud M62 to one side. That landscape, both in the day where I would sit up there sketching for hours and when the twinkling lights appeared stretching into the distance at night, have often featured in my work. I think the M62 has appeared too! What made you become an artist? I don’t think I ever made a career decision to be an artist. It’s just something that I have always loved and have always done. I can’t imagine life without making work. It’s a huge part of the way I think, see and make sense of being alive and in this world. How did you get started? I’ve always made work.  When I lived in Wales I had a studio in my attic, when I lived in Yorkshire I had a freezing studio in my cellar. When I was a teenager I also had a spidery studio in my cellar. These were all beset with difficulties, I fell backwards out of my attic studio and broke my arm, I painted my studio cellar with whitening lime and burnt my arms too! (very daft in retrospect). My point is, I don’t think there was a point where I started; making paintings has always been in my life. Where and what is your studio? My studio is an amazing place with an amazing heritage. It is the old studio of Dan Baldwin, Simon Dixon, Chris Kettle amongst others and feels like it has a real sense of history. It wouldn’t be to everyone’s taste, it’s an old wooden shack that used to be a fire station (it still has the hole for the firemens pole, though unfortunately not the pole itself!). It is ramshackle, wonky, walking around feels like being on a boat as the floor is so uneven, I sometimes get rained on INSIDE the studio, but I just stick on a hat and get on with it. I love it. How do you approach the actual making of your work? I have loads of ideas spinning around all the time. I collect images that mean something to me, on the internet, in magazines, personal photos, newspapers etc and kind of collate them in my studio, scribbling on them what it is that has evoked my interest. My studio is strewn with these images and words scribbled on the walls, bits of a poem, something someone has said, an eclectic mix of stuff from the world which may or may not make it into a painting, but is a way of identifying my artistic languages. My tutor used to say that I had too many ideas, and that I should spread them out over a few canvases rather than trying to make everything come together in one painting.  Great advice.  I am currently working on 12 paintings at the same time… I’m trying to keep things minimal in each painting as I think that’s where my work is the most successful. I create almost like a collage, usually in photoshop, trying out different elements together, printing images out, working from them. Photoshop becomes irrelevant in the end, but it is a way of generating information to paint from. My paintings tend to change massively through this process... ideas are tried out, rejected, altered, dismissed, lovingly painted and then cleared out with a massive swipe of the brush! The paintings are the most successful when they retain a sense of the dialogue that has occurred between me and the painting. What would you say are the main themes you pursue?  Just being a human being living through time and all that implies. Nothing too lofty! Which of your works are you most proud of? I know it’s not very fashionable to say it but I’m proud of all my work. I know the blood, sweat and tears that have gone into every piece of work that I have considered complete. They are my sad eyed children, and I always feel a tinge of sadness when they go out into the world on their own journeys. Do you care whether people like your work? I go through phases to be honest. I have periods when I care far too much, periods where I couldn’t care less if people like it or not. I’m in a semi non-caring phase at the moment where there are a few key people whose opinions I trust. If they like/get it, and no one else in the world but me and them like it then that’s ok. ‘Like’ is a weird word anyway. I’d rather people loved or hated it, at least there is some passion there. What’s the biggest myth about artists? Ha! That we are all up in garrets being all tortured and emotional. There are times of pure anguish and pure joy and I am in a kind of garret, but its all part of the amazingness of the making of work.  I play music loudly, dance whilst I paint and in general, have an absolute ball! What’s the best advice anyone ever gave you? Trust yourself. And keep a well stacked fruit bowl. Which artists do you most admire? I admire all my tribe. It takes guts to be an artist; to live an emotional life which is visible and open to the criticism of strangers. In terms of painters I admire, the list is endless. If you weren’t an artist what would you be doing? I don’t see myself as an artist, I see myself as a painter and I’d still be painting. Describe an average day in the life of Sarah Shaw... Well, home stuff, get my daughter ready for school, feed the cat etc. Two cups of coffee and a bit of a chat with the studio manager, stick on some music, and paint. After couple of hours destroy painting, turn canvas around and then paint some more. Put on some more music, paint some more, start to like bits of a painting so leave it the hell alone and put it out of sight at far end of studio. Work on a different canvas, repeat all of above to infinity. Eat at some point, read a bit, walk home late at night usually looking like a chimney sweep attracting stares from glamorous pub goers. Sleep. Repeat next day. View all Sarah Shaw prints Read our Sarah Shaw biography artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   $test =
  • Stanley Donwood Designs for Glastonbury

    Festival season is upon us once again and over the next few weeks revellers up and down the country with be packing their wellies, instant noodles and cider in preparation for some alfresco party action. The biggest festival in the UK and arguably the world, Glastonbury, kicks off this week and art....
    Festival season is upon us once again and over the next few weeks revellers up and down the country with be packing their wellies, instant noodles and cider in preparation for some alfresco party action. The biggest festival in the UK and arguably the world, Glastonbury, kicks off this week and artist Stanley Donwood has once again created an incredible design for this year’s festival. Stanley Donwood studied with Radiohead front man Thom Yorke at The University of Exeter and has provided artwork for all of the band’s albums since their 1995 breakthrough ‘The Bends’. He also has a long standing affiliation with Glastonbury. We have limited edition silkscreen prints of Donwood’s designs for both ‘The Glastonbury Festival 2011’ and ‘Glastonbury Festival 2013’. The image on this year’s programme shows a cropped section from Donwood's painting ‘Nether’ which is also available at artrepublic as a limited edition giclee print in an edition of 100. Donwood's latest series of paintings examines the relationship humans have had with woods and forests over time. This painting is the perfect pick as thousands of people prepare to return to nature this summer and embrace life in a field (if only for the weekend)!  View all Stanley Donwood prints View all Music prints $test =
  • Dave White Releases a Glittering Great White

    We are brimming with excitement about the arrival of ‘Apex Shark’ from internationally renowned artist Dave White. Carrying on from his sensational Aquatic series, White has looked to the most feared sea creature of all in his new collection of paintings, the great white shark. ....
    We are brimming with excitement about the arrival of ‘Apex Shark’ from internationally renowned artist Dave White. Carrying on from his sensational Aquatic series, White has looked to the most feared sea creature of all in his new collection of paintings, the great white shark. The title ‘Apex’ refers to the shark’s position at the top of the food chain and was the title of his recent debut show in Los Angeles. White’s intention is to encourage the viewer to reconnect with these fascinating creatures and highlight their often overlooked beauty and fragility. In an Interview with the Independent Dave White said,"I want people to re-engage and look at the incredible beauty of these things... It doesn't matter what it is, if you just take a step back and have a real look at something, you often leave completely blown away." ‘Apex Shark’ is a 15 colour silkscreen with varnish, from a signed limited edition of just 50. Each print has been finished with a spectacular diamond dust background. White’s use of energetic and spontaneous brush strokes perfectly captures the dynamism and power of the shark. Move quickly to avoid missing this incredible piece!  View all Dave White prints View all Animal prints $test =
  • RYCA's Winning Cup for Fatboy Slim

    Big Beat DJ and Brighton legend Fatboy Slim is taking Brazil by storm this summer with a host of huge gigs to be held during the World Cup. Packed alongside his records, signature Hawaiian shirts and sun cream will be the amazing replica World Cup trophy made by Ryan Callanan aka RYCA.  The....
    Big Beat DJ and Brighton legend Fatboy Slim is taking Brazil by storm this summer with a host of huge gigs to be held during the World Cup. Packed alongside his records, signature Hawaiian shirts and sun cream will be the amazing replica World Cup trophy made by Ryan Callanan aka RYCA.  The 'Acid Cup' was originally intended to be used for the album cover of the DJ’s forthcoming album ‘Bem Brazil’ until copyright issues arose preventing it. The handcrafted cup features one of RYCA’s signature acid house smiley faces. It quickly sold out from our sister gallery Ink_d but a limited edition of 7 finished with 23 carat gold is still available.  So when the national team crash out of the competition at least there will be one Englishman raising a trophy in Brazil this summer! View all RYCA prints Visit our sister gallery Ink_d's website $test =
  • The Art World Cup

    World Cup fever has gripped the country once again and the sight of different nations coming together to celebrate the beautiful game has got us thinking of the various countries being represented at our Brighton Gallery and the variety of great prints we get from all around the world. ....
    World Cup fever has gripped the country once again and the sight of different nations coming together to celebrate the beautiful game has got us thinking of the various countries being represented at our Brighton Gallery and the variety of great prints we get from all around the world. One artist who has truly got into the world cup spirit is RYCA aka Ryan Callanan, who has produced a replica of the world cup trophy complete with his signature acid house smiley face. It was commission by Brighton based DJ Fatboy Slim who will travel around Brazil playing gigs during the tournament. The original edition of 14 sold out at our sister gallery Ink_d, although they do have a special set of 7 available which have been beautifully finished with 24 carat gold. Now to meet the nations... ENGLAND If one of our artists had to represent England at the World Cup it would have to be ‘The Godfather of British Pop Art’ Sir Peter Blake. A big football fan, Blake is a life time Chelsea supporter and proud Englishman. In interviews Blake has said one of his favoured ways to unwind is by cutting out images from books in front of a game of football on the television. These cut-outs go on to make up his iconic collaged images and crowd scenes. Blake’s artwork celebrates British culture and we are lucky to have a large selection of his signed limited edition prints available in our Brighton Gallery. Sir Peter’s latest print ’75 Years of the Beano’ was made to celebrate the anniversary of the children’s comic book the Beano. It features an energetic and mischievous group of characters from the comic in front of Dundee High School. Also available by the renowned artist is the wooden puzzle set of prints. ‘Wooden Puzzle Series- Everly Brothers’ is a collage of found objects and printed matter. It has been embossed and is inspired by his love affair of icons and the ephemera of popular culture. JAPAN Kozyndan, the California based King and Queen of quirky represent both the USA and Japan. Their Japanese art influences can been seen in their 4 seasons open edition series and the instantly recognisable ‘Uprisings’ prints which is a modern take on ‘The Great Wave of Kanagawa’ by Katsushika Hokusai. The couple’s latest signed limited editions prints ‘Hunters: Charks an Kittehs’ and ‘Vegans: Mantees n’ Bunnies’ sees them juxtaposing different animals to make unlikely partnerships. ‘Hunters’ show two of the animal kingdoms predators teaming up whilst ‘Mantees’ has cute bunny rabbits and serene Mantees forming a vegan alliance. SOUTH AFRICA South Africa who played host to The World Cup 4 years ago is home to one of our newest and incredibly popular artists Pixel. His first series of prints, the ‘Mexican Patriot’ series, were reinterpretations of well-known comic book super heroes with a Mexican twist. Only ‘Lobenzo’ (Wolverine) remains from that series with Batman and Iron Man having quickly sold out. However, fear not as Pixel has returned with the 3 villainous enemies of his previous hero protagonists. ‘El Comodin’ is the dark and brooding Joker with his trademark red painted mouth and ghostly palour. ‘El Iman’ is Magneto, the powerful mutant scourge of Wolverine, while ‘Perdicion’ is Dr Doom, Iron Man’s nemesis which is a stunning metallic silver print onto black. All of the superhero prints are silkscreens in an edition of just 30 and won’t be around for long! FRANCE One of the most memorable images of the 2006 World Cup was of France captain and football legend Zinedine Zidane losing his head quite literally and butting his opponent in the final against Italy which subsequently led to him being sent off. In our Brighton Gallery we have the work of our veruy own maverick Frenchman in the form of the irrepressible Mr. Brainwash. Best known as the star of Banksy’s 2010 film ‘Exit Through the Gift Shop’, Mr Brainwash has exhibited worldwide and his exuberant and brightly imagery has been used for album artwork for the likes of Madonna and rapper Rick Ross. Mr Brainwash’s objective is to spread a positive message to the world through his work and has made ‘Life is Beautiful’ his mantra. ‘The Vacuum Queen’ is a signed limited edition silkscreen print which shows MBW’s classic playful spirit and artist vision. We also have a number of 1/1 original works on paper by this wonderfully eccentric artist in our Brighton gallery. ITALY Italy traditionally fare well at the World Cup and emerged victorious in 2006. Despite the Spanish sounding surname, Luca Barcellona is our Italian artist representing the blue of the Azzuri. An immensely talented calligrapher and typographic artist, Barcellona creates stylish text based work by hand in brush, pen and ink. ‘Knowledge Speaks’ is a beautiful 4 colour Silkscreen print featuring a quote from Jimi Hendrix in an elegant gothic script. Performance analysis... So while the World Cup is great time to be reminded of the footballing talent around the world it is also a great time to look at the fabulous and diverse prints available at our  Brighton Gallery. We have artists representing countries all over the globe and stunning prints from a variety of nations so head down to check out the talent on offer! artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   $test =
  • Peter Blake's 'Tracks of My Years' on BBC Radio 2 All This Week

    Every day this week on BBC Radio 2’s ‘Tracks of My Years’, the Godfather of British Pop Sir Peter Blake will be choosing 2 songs that have meant the most to him and discussing his picks with British broadcaster Ken Bruce. Best known for his iconic album cover for The Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Peppe....
    Every day this week on BBC Radio 2’s ‘Tracks of My Years’, the Godfather of British Pop Sir Peter Blake will be choosing 2 songs that have meant the most to him and discussing his picks with British broadcaster Ken Bruce. Best known for his iconic album cover for The Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’, we wonder whether Blake will be picking any tracks by The Beatles this week? We’re certainly expecting some swinging sixties classics. Blake follows a string of celebrities who have appeared on the regular radio programme, including recently Katy Perry, Cheryl Baker, Ian Rankin and Bonnie Tyler. Bruce picked Peter Blake this week as part of Radio 2’s ‘Colour on the Radio’ week. Radio 2 are celebrating art and painting with a week of special programming. Jeremy Vine will be visiting the National Gallery with a blind person and BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, Jo Whiley is presenting a ‘Colour on the Radio’ themed mixtape and Simon Mayo will be exploring the business side of the arts world.  Listen to Peter Blake's 'Tracks of My Years' on BBC iplayer View all Peter Blake prints $test =
  • Pure Evil's Street Art Project Makes the Papers

    Master of nightmares, Pure Evil, has just been featured in a double page spread in the London Evening Standard. In a major interview with the newspaper, the graffiti maverick discussed his new mission to spray a new piece every day.  In January Pure Evil embark....
    Master of nightmares, Pure Evil, has just been featured in a double page spread in the London Evening Standard. In a major interview with the newspaper, the graffiti maverick discussed his new mission to spray a new piece every day.  In January Pure Evil embarked on 365 Street Art, a project to paint or stencil or paste something up in public every day for a year, whatever the circumstances. “It’s difficult because sometimes there are days when you... Just. Don’t. Want. To do. Anything,” Pure Evil told the paper. He has continued to create new Street Art every day despite having cope with his grief following the death of his father and caring for his 18-month-old daughter Bunny. “As street art becomes increasingly mainstream and monetised, the 365 project is a return to Uzzell-Edwards’ and the movement’s roots, just putting work out there for better or worse”, writes Nick Curtis in the Evening Standard piece. It’s a great interview with one of our favourite street artists and a must read for any Pure Evil fans!  View all Pure Evil prints Read the full interview on the Evening Standard website View all Street Art prints Image credits: www.standard.co.uk $test =
  • Charming Baker Collaborates with War Child UK Charity

    Charming Baker has been chosen by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in association with War Child UK to provide the visual focal point for the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict. The summit, which is currently taking place in London until 13th June, is the largest ever inter....
    Charming Baker has been chosen by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in association with War Child UK to provide the visual focal point for the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict. The summit, which is currently taking place in London until 13th June, is the largest ever international gathering held on this issue. Charming Baker’s contemporary sculptural installations ‘Loves Revolution’ and ‘Faith’s Leap’ were selected for the international summit. Rob Williams, CEO of War Child UK said: “Charming Baker’s sculptures highlight fear as an inhibiting factor in life, both in experiencing issues and in attempting to face them, but his works also stress this can and should be challenged and replaced with hope.” Charming Baker has also released a new print edition, representing the equivocal dove of peace, with all proceeds being donated to War Child. “I'm thrilled to ‎be even a small part of such a worthy cause,” said Charming Baker in an interview in the Evening Standard.  View all Charming Baker prints $test =

1-10 of 16

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
Scroll To Top