Monthly Archives: April 2014

  • Art is the New Rock and Roll: The Relationship Between Art and Music

    Art and Music have always been two of the most direct and intuitive forms of communication for humankind. When asking artists to cite their influences invariably music will come high up on the list. It is also common place for artists to work closely with musicians, producing images directly in r....
    Art and Music have always been two of the most direct and intuitive forms of communication for humankind. When asking artists to cite their influences invariably music will come high up on the list. It is also common place for artists to work closely with musicians, producing images directly in response to their music which are seen as a visual extension of the musician’s work. Even in the age of digital downloads replacing the physical purchase of CDs the most straightforward connection between art and music is still the humble album cover. Despite acclaimed designer Peter Saville (famed for creating the iconic covers for Joy Division and New Order), stating that album artwork was dead, we have seen artists continue to produce stunning works for new albums.  Local Brighton artist John Simpson was commissioned by Gary Lightbody, lead singer of the UK alt-rock band Snow Patrol, to create the artwork for their 2011 album ‘Fallen Empires’. The result, ‘Eagle's Descent’, was turned into a stunning limited edition print. Read more about Simpson’s album artwork in our blog post ‘Snow Patrol and Antony Micallef are Fans of New Artist John Simpson’.  Dan Baldwin is another artist who has recently created a record cover, this time for the single ‘Scream (funk up my life)’ by internationally acclaimed singer/songwriter Paolo Nutini. Baldwin used a cropped section from his multi-layered original painting ‘Cyclone’. This, however, is not Baldwin’s only link to the music industry; he is managed by Pat Magnarella who also represents the US Punk band ‘Green Day’.  Pat Magnarella lists several other prominent British artists on his roster, including whimsical painter Charming Baker and the subversive Street Art duo Miss Bugs. Magnarella has taken the promotional business model from rock and roll applied it with great effect to the art world. He also uses the same guerrilla marketing approaches found in music promotion, such as using street teams to hand out thousand of flyers and stick up fly posters when advertising art shows. Magnarella draws comparisons with the two forms of culture: “With music it’s getting people to hear the music, getting people to come see the band. It’s the same thing with the art. The goal is getting people out to see the art, sending them art, getting them excited about the art.”  Whilst some artists look at the music business model as a template for success in the world of art, other artists become more closely associated with the musicians they work with. A prime example of this close working relationship is the one between the artist Stanley Donwood and the British experimental rock band Radiohead.  Stanley Donwood is often referred to as “the 6th member” of Radiohead, having produced virtually every piece of artwork since their 1995 commercial breakthrough album ‘The Bends’ right up to singer Thom Yorke’s 2013 side project ‘Atoms for Peace’. Donwood and Yorke met whilst studying at art school and they still share studio space to this day. Donwood has adapted his artistic style as the band has evolved and each new piece of artwork is as unique and distinctive as the music it accompanies.  Storm Thorgerson, who sadly passed away last year, is an example of another artist whose work is intrinsically linked to music and the genre. Thorgesen is famous for his cover designs for the British progressive rock band Pink Floyd. His work was featured on no less than 16 album covers for the band and Thorgersen also produced the band’s music videos and films of their performances.  Storm Thorgerson’s most well know image was for the seminal release ‘Dark Side of the  Moon’ in 1973, which remains one of the best selling albums of all time. Produced for the 40th anniversary of the album, Thorgesen reworked the iconic prism design in his limited edition print ‘Dark Side of the Moon 40th Anniversary’, paying homage to other great artists including Salvador Dali, Roy Lichtenstein and Pablo Picasso. It would be seen as an act of sacrilege to not mention the Godfather of British Pop Art Sir Peter Blake, co-creator of perhaps the most iconic and instantly recognisable album covers ever made, ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ by The Beatles. Blake was present in the studio during the recording of the album and even over 40 years later the album and artwork still have great cultural significance.  The worlds of art and Music frequently collide and as a result they have a tremendous influence on each other. From artists being promoted and marketed in the same way rock bands have been in the past, to artists working closely alongside musicians to produce work which connects the audio and visual experience. Practitioners from both fields share similar inspiration and creatively feed off each other with spectacular results.  If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email: brighton@artrepublic.com Return to our Brighton section View all Music prints artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Seb Lester's New Poetic Print

    Typography master Seb Lester has just released a brand new limited edition print. ‘Cloths of Heaven’ is his beautiful interpretation of a poem by renowned Irish poet W.B. Yates, ‘Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven’. The print is a continuation of his ard....
    Typography master Seb Lester has just released a brand new limited edition print. ‘Cloths of Heaven’ is his beautiful interpretation of a poem by renowned Irish poet W.B. Yates, ‘Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven’. The print is a continuation of his ardent exploration of the beauty in the context of letterform design. “Yeats’s poem references ‘embroidered cloths’ and ‘gold and silver threads’, so I wanted to try to make the screen print look like an exquisite and timelessly beautiful piece of highly ornamental needlework. I’ve drawn from Medieval, Renaissance and 18th-century sources but I have also tried to integrate personal, progressive and irreverent flourishing ideas. The result is a hybrid stylistic treatment that I think could only exist in the 21st century,” explains Lester. As well as producing this exquisite metallic gold ink print on 330gsm midnight blue Plike art paper, Seb Lester has collaborated with The London Embroidery Studio to create an embroidered artwork. This elegant short film shows footage of both the print and embroidery being created.   View all Seb Lester prints View all Typography prints $test =
  • Sir Peter Blake Unveils the Royal Albert Hall's Diverse Alumni in Magnificent Mural

    Our beloved Pop Art pioneer, Sir Peter Blake, has unveiled a magnificent mural celebrating famous figures that have appeared and performed at London’s prestigious Royal Albert Hall.  The 10ft mural is a triptych titled ‘Appearing at the Albert Hall’ and f....
    Our beloved Pop Art pioneer, Sir Peter Blake, has unveiled a magnificent mural celebrating famous figures that have appeared and performed at London’s prestigious Royal Albert Hall.  The 10ft mural is a triptych titled ‘Appearing at the Albert Hall’ and features a spectacular assemblage of figures from across the eras. The Albert Hall horde includes stars from the spheres of entertainment, sport, science and the arts, all of whom have spoken or performed at the Knightsbridge venue since its opening in 1871.  The Hall was opened as part of Prince Albert’s vision for a centre of the Arts and Sciences in London. Both Prince Albert and Queen Victoria appear in the mural. Amongst the 400 luminaries jostling for space in the theatre stalls and balconies are icons as diverse as Emmeline Pankhurst, Muhammad Ali, One Direction, Diana, Princess of Wales, Adele, Jay-Z, Benny Hill, Sir Edward Elgar, Jimmy Carr, Tim Henman, Leona Lewis, astronaut Buzz Aldrin, Russell Brand, a Dalek, and the Dali Lama.  The work sees Peter Blake return to the iconic ‘crowd’ theme of his infamous 1967 Beatles album cover. Bob Dylan, Fred Astaire, Dylan Thomas, The Beatles and Einstein all have the privilege of appearing in both the original Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band cover design and the Royal Albert Hall rendition. Albert Einstein delivered a prophetic speech on individual liberty at the Royal Albert Hall in 1933, shortly after the Nazis had risen to power and he became a refugee from his native Germany.  The figure with the most prominent central position in the mural is 36st 8lbs sumo wrestler, Konishiki. Known as Dumptruck, he entertained London fans in 1991 at the first sumo tournament to be staged outside Japan. He is joined in the artwork by British wrestlers Big Daddy, Mick McManus, Jackie Pallo and the masked Kendo Nagasaki. “Most of the names were sent to me by the Royal Albert Hall but I wanted to get Kendo Nagasaki in,” said Sir Peter, who used to attend wrestling bouts at the hall as a Royal College of Art student. “I was here the night McManus took out Pallo in a street-fight and I saw Nagasaki unmasked.” Peter Blake produced the Sgt. Pepper piece using a laborious and lengthy process of hand-cutting, sticking and tinting. He even made a life-sized set to photograph. His 2014 adaptation, however, was created using a computer and digital manipulation. “Hi-def images are just clearer and better,” explained Blake, who had only seen it on a computer until the unveiling.  Peter Blake was notoriously paid just £200 for his renowned Beatles album cover in 1967. He confirmed that he has been paid “a fair price” for his latest adaptation, which was specially-commissioned by the Royal Albert Hall. The Hall has recently revealed a record performance in 2013 with its highest ever operating income.  Speaking ahead of yesterday’s star-studded launch, Sir Peter said: "I was honoured when the Royal Albert Hall commissioned me to create this mural. The project instantly captured my imagination – the ultimate opportunity to promote the arts in one of Britain’s greatest venues, combined with the challenging process of immortalising over 400 of the world’s most popular artists." Rock legends Roger Daltrey, Bill Wyman and Brian May, all of whom feature in the mural, attended the launch and left laudatory comments in the Hall’s famous visitor’s book.  The spectacular mural is a testament to Peter Blake’s remarkable and unstoppable artistic energy and vision! The 81-year-old has created a magnificent celebration of one of Britain’s most fascinating historical venues and the Hall’s wonderfully multifarious alumni. The artwork will remain at the Royal Albert Hall where it can be freely viewed by any visitors.  View all Peter Blake prints Read our Peter Blake biography Image credits:  Andy Paradise, 2014, www.dailymail.co.uk artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Who Goes There? Eelus and 'The Thing'

    Paper cutting pro Eelus has always been a big fan John Carpenter’s 1982 American sci-fi film ‘The Thing’. Recently he got round to reading the John W. Campell novella that inspired the film, ‘Who Goes There’. The wonderfully freaky story has now inspired his latest limited edition relea....
    Paper cutting pro Eelus has always been a big fan John Carpenter’s 1982 American sci-fi film ‘The Thing’. Recently he got round to reading the John W. Campell novella that inspired the film, ‘Who Goes There’. The wonderfully freaky story has now inspired his latest limited edition release... The tale is of a three eyed alien being found buried in Antarctica. In 1972 it was voted by the ‘Science Fiction Writers of America’ as one of the finest science fiction novellas ever written. Eelus’ homage to the work originated as a 3D paper collage, created for his ‘Horrorshow’ exhibition at our sister gallery Ink_d. Now he has translated the piece into a fantastic limited edition silkscreen on Naturalis Absolute Smooth 330gsm paper. ‘The Warmest Place to Hide’ has been painted to capture the shadows and depth of the original 3D feel. Eelus even mixed in some metallic silver inks into the background blues to give a subtle nod to the icy landscapes of the original story. “It’s an honest release that I’m really proud of and has a simple graphic styling that I’m looking to explore more in the future,” said Eelus.  View all Eelus prints Read our Eelus biography $test =
  • Floppy Disc Find: Andy Warhol's Amiga Artwork is Recovered

    Experimental artworks by Andy Warhol which were commissioned by Commodore, the creators of the Amiga computer, have been recovered from 30 year old floppy discs, reports the BBC.  The digital pieces were produced in 1985 to celebrate t....
    Experimental artworks by Andy Warhol which were commissioned by Commodore, the creators of the Amiga computer, have been recovered from 30 year old floppy discs, reports the BBC.  The digital pieces were produced in 1985 to celebrate the launch of the Amiga 1000 computer. A painstaking three-year project has now recovered the images which were saved in an obscure data format. The images were recovered by staff and students who are members of Carnegie Mellon University’s computer club. Reverse engineering of the 80’s Amiga format helped to recover the artworks which turned out to be signed electronic facsimiles of Warhol’s most famous creations. 18 images in total were recovered, a dozen of which are signed by Andy Warhol.  Director of the Andy Warhol Museum Eric Shiner explains how Warhol remained interested in new technology throughout his life, "Warhol saw no limits to his art practice. These computer generated images underscore his spirit of experimentation and his willingness to embrace new media." The Warhol Museum filmed a documentary of the recovery process which will debut at the museum on the 10th of May. View all Andy Warhol prints Image credit: Andy Warhol and Debbie Harry using ProPaint on the Amiga 1000 - via the Computer History Museum $test =
  • '75 Years of The Beano' by Peter Blake

    We are delighted to have a brand new, extra special, Peter Blake limited edition available at artrepublic. You may have spotted '75 Years of The Beano’ in The Sunday Times last weekend and the Daily Telegraph today. The spectacular silkscreen print has been created in collaboration with ‘The Be....
    We are delighted to have a brand new, extra special, Peter Blake limited edition available at artrepublic. You may have spotted '75 Years of The Beano’ in The Sunday Times last weekend and the Daily Telegraph today. The spectacular silkscreen print has been created in collaboration with ‘The Beano’ to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the iconic British comic.  Peter Blake’s print focuses on the ‘Bash Street Kids’ comic strip, which was devised by Beano editor George Moonie in 1954. The image recreates an imaginary view from Moonie’s Beano office in Dundee, Scotland. The backdrop is the imposing Dundee High School, but the school children have been appropriately replaced by a collage of cut-out mischievous comic strip characters. All of the major Beano characters appear in the work, including Dennis the Menace, Gnasher, Billy Wizz, Lord Snooty and Minnie the Minx.  This fantastic print typifies the exuberance and fun of Blake’s Pop Art, illustrating some of his key themes such as childhood, nostalgia and popular ephemera. The irreverent themes and flouting of authority explored in ‘The Beano’ wonderfully echo some of the key tenets of Pop Art; flouting the rules of the fine art establishment. We really couldn’t think of a more perfect artistic partnership to celebrate 75 years of this comic book institution! View all Peter Blake prints Read our article 'British Comic Book Art: Peter Blake & Jamie Hewlett' $test =
  • British Comic Book Art: Peter Blake & Jamie Hewlett

    In celebration of a brand new Peter Blake print marking the 75 year Anniversary of ‘The Beano’ and the UK’s largest ever exhibition of mainstream and underground comics at The British Library, we’re taking a closer look at the marvellous and sensational wor....
    In celebration of a brand new Peter Blake print marking the 75 year Anniversary of ‘The Beano’ and the UK’s largest ever exhibition of mainstream and underground comics at The British Library, we’re taking a closer look at the marvellous and sensational world of British Comic Book Art...  At its simplest, a comic book is a visual medium used to express ideas via images, often combined with text and presented in a sequential manner to form a narrative that may or may not be humorous. According to ‘A Brief History of Comic Books’, by John Petty, “Many comics historians point to European broadsheets of the sixteenth century as the ancient precursors of comic books, or satirical magazines of the 1780s.” Arguably the art form has a pre-history that goes as far back as the Lascaux cave paintings.  The genre as we would recognize it today was first popularized in the United States and emerged as a mass medium in the early 20th century with the advent of newspaper comic strips. Magazine-style comic books followed in the 1930s. They were originally aimed at the semi-literate working class, and eventually came to be seen as childish; hence they were marketed towards children.  The exhibition ‘Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK’ at The British Library traces the British comic book tradition back through classic 1970s titles to 19th century illustrated reports of Jack the Ripper and beyond. The top three longest running comics in the world are all British. ‘The Dandy’ began in 1937 and ‘The Beano’ (which is still going today), in 1938.  Comic Book Art has long been a medium that challenges categorisation, preconceptions and status quo, uncompromisingly addressing politics, gender, violence, sexuality and altered states. In the late 1960s and 1970s, the underground comics movement inspired two new publications in Britain; ‘Oz’ and ‘Nasty Tales’, which were launched with the premise of counter-culture rebellion. ‘Oz’ notoriously features the children’s character Rupert the Bear performing sexual acts and both comics were tried at the Old Bailey under the Obscene Publications Act.  Typically occupying the fringes of pop culture, the comic book is much more than a form of entertainment for children, it can be a “serious and sophisticated art form that both feeds off of and creates cultural formulas and historical constructs.” It’s not surprisingly therefore, that serious and sophisticated artists have both created comic book art and been inspired by iconic British comics. The irreverent themes and flouting of authority explored in comic books wonderfully echoes some of the key tenets of Pop Art; flouting the rules of the fine art establishment. Pop Art emerged in the mid-1950s in Britain, presenting a challenge to the traditions of Fine Art by appropriating imagery from popular culture. Pop Art appropriated aspects of mass culture, such as advertising and comic books to both celebrate and scrutinize popular culture. The Godfather of British Pop Art Sir Peter Blake, led the way and he has been exploring imagery from magazines, fanzines and comics ever since.  In 1954, Peter Blake painted ‘Children Reading Comics’. The oil painting was based on a snapshot of himself and his sister, Shirley, reading ‘The Eagle’ comic. Shirley has the first choice of the coloured front and back pages with their exciting strip cartoons, whilst Peter is having to make do with the black and white inside pages. Many regard this painting as Peter Blake’s first Pop Art painting because it focuses on the popular ephemera of modern life, namely ‘The Eagle’ comic.  60 years later, Peter Blake continues to be inspired by classic comic book imagery. In 2012 he created ‘The Convention of Comic Book Characters’, a spectacular collage of US and UK comic book characters descending on London’s Piccadilly Circus. This year he has collaborated with ‘The Beano’ to create an extra special limited edition print celebrating the 75 years of the iconic British comic. The print is a fantastic collage of cut-out mischievous comic strip characters, including all of the Beano favourites such as Dennis the Menace, Gnasher, Billy Wizz, Lord Snooty and Minnie the Minx.  The poster for the ‘Comics Unmasked’ exhibition at the British Library has been designed by fellow artrepublic artist, Jamie Hewlett. The British comic book artist and designer has created original artwork and a video montage for exhibition, saying, “There’s no national institution better than the British Library to showcase such an extensive collection of British comic art. I’m thrilled to part of this exhibition, and to celebrate the history of British comics.”  According to an interview in the Guardian with Mark Kermode, Jamie Hewlett’s first loves were the cartoons of Chuck Jones, particularly ‘Daffy Duck’, ‘Wile E Coyote’ and ‘Pepé Le Pew’. At the age of nine he drew a strip cartoon version of Star Wars, which became his first graphic novel. At Northbrook Art College in Worthing, Hewlett, worked with two friends to produce a fanzine called ‘Atomtan’, a post-punk comic. His big break came in 1988 with the launch of ‘Deadline’, an edgy magazine blending articles on music and culture with comic strips. The magazine's star was Tank Girl, a spunky post-apocalyptic heroine with a kangaroo boyfriend who became an international cult.  ‘Tank Girl’ made Jamie Hewlett a star, a leading light of the new-wave comic book industry. Since then he has won the Design Museum’s ‘Designer of the Year’ award for his work on Gorillaz and collaborated with David Albarn on the set and costume designs for the acclaimed Chinese opera ‘Monkey: Journey to the West’. Hewlett’s comic book work has influenced his impressive range of limited edition prints, moving his visual output from the comic book pages to the gallery wall.  You can find the influence of comic book imagery throughout our collections, from Roy Lichtenstein museum prints to limited editions by Pixel, The Thomas Brothers and Pure Evil. In some cases the artists have appropriated ideas and imagery found in cartoons - such as David Spiller’s portraits of iconic characters like Pluto, Sylvester J. Pussycat, and Pinocchio. In other cases cartoonists like Simone Lia have transformed their comic book imagery into fine art prints. What is evident is the far-reaching long-lasting influence of British comics!  Happy 75th birthday to The Beano from everyone at artrepublic! View all Comic Book Art prints Read our blog '75 Years of The Beano' by Peter Blake Read our exhibition review of 'Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK' Credits:  ‘A Brief History of Comic Books’ by John Petty ‘The Year of the Monkey’ by Mark Kermode in The Guardian Image Credits: Detail of panels from The Young-Mans Victory Over the Povver of the Devil Or Strange and VVonderful News from the City of London (?1693). Page from Misty, the 1970s comic book of supernatural and horror stories. Photograph: British Library Board artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Rita Ora Provides a Pop Canvas for Mr Brainwash on 'Tonight Show'

    Rita Ora is well known for being fearless when it comes to fashion. Her latest sartorial splash has seen her collaborating with our favourite maverick Street artist Mr Brainwash, who literally sloshed her spotless white dress with paint whilst she performed live on ‘The Tonight Show’.  ....
    Rita Ora is well known for being fearless when it comes to fashion. Her latest sartorial splash has seen her collaborating with our favourite maverick Street artist Mr Brainwash, who literally sloshed her spotless white dress with paint whilst she performed live on ‘The Tonight Show’.  Rita Ora was performing her new track ‘I Will Never Let You Down’ on ‘The Tonight Show’ with Jimmy Fallon when Thierry Guetta – aka Mr. Brainwash – adorned her pristine bustier prom dress and white Adidas trainers with five full pots of paint. Instagram pictures suggest that Jimmy Fallon also got in on the performance art action. After the show he sent Rita a self-portrait of his paint splattered face with the description “Mr Brainwash got me good tonight”.  This is the latest innovative collaboration for Mr Brainwash, who is well known for his contemporary Pop – graffiti art. Rita Ora joins an impressive and diverse list of musicians to have worked with the radical French artist, including Madonna, DJ David Guetta and rapper Rick Ross. We love how Mr Brainwash interacts with popular culture and continues to push the boundaries of artistic expression! View all Mr Brainwash prints Read our Mr Brainwash biography $test =
  • Jamie Hewlett Designs New Artwork for Comics Exhibition at the British Library

    In anticipation of the UK’s biggest comics exhibition to date, ‘Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK’, the British Library has unveiled a brand new artwork by ‘Tank Girl’ and ‘Gorillaz’ co-creator Jamie Hewlett. The exciting new commission features a sassy new female character....
    In anticipation of the UK’s biggest comics exhibition to date, ‘Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK’, the British Library has unveiled a brand new artwork by ‘Tank Girl’ and ‘Gorillaz’ co-creator Jamie Hewlett. The exciting new commission features a sassy new female character; a moody, caped female, equipped with hipflask and knuckle duster. She’s depicted in an alley way having just vanquished a generic super hero, shown dazed on the floor (with St Pancras station just visible in the background). Jamie Hewlett’s new artwork will appear on the exhibition poster around the country and as a six metre high graphic installation in the library. The comic artist and designer, says: 'There is no national institution better than the British Library to showcase such an extensive collection of British comic art. I'm thrilled to be part of this exhibition, and to celebrate the history of British comics.' View all Jamie Hewlett prints View all Comic Book Art prints Read our exhibition review of 'Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK' $test =
  • Street Artists Pure Evil & Borondo Share a Shoreditch Wall

    We’ve just discovered this great short film of Spanish artist Borondo creating a new mural in Shoreditch last month. Not only is it a beautiful Street Art piece but it’s also in very good company, sharing the wall with a monochrome ‘Andy Warhol’s Nightmare’ by Pure Evil... Pure ....
    We’ve just discovered this great short film of Spanish artist Borondo creating a new mural in Shoreditch last month. Not only is it a beautiful Street Art piece but it’s also in very good company, sharing the wall with a monochrome ‘Andy Warhol’s Nightmare’ by Pure Evil... Pure Evil and Borondo’s work can be found in New Yard Inn in Hackney, London. The striking floral portrait by Borondo is entitled ‘Looking For’ and took about four hours to complete. Tucked beneath the metal staircase, to the right of Borondo’s mural, you can spot a portrait of Andy Warhol which is unmistakably by Pure Evil (note the characteristic tear rolling down his left cheek).  This sharp time-lapse film is by Italian videomaker Fabiano Caputo who has previously documented Borondo’s London Street Art creations.  View all Street art prints View all Pure Evil prints $test =

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