Monthly Archives: March 2014

  • YBA Bling: Damien Hirst Designed Jewellery...

    Are you looking for the perfect sparkler to wear whilst admiring your Damien Hirst? A new collection of jewellery designed by Turner prize winning artist Damien Hirst and American fine jewellery house Hoorsenbuhs is launching soon... The Cathedral Collection includes a contemporary rosary and matc....
    Are you looking for the perfect sparkler to wear whilst admiring your Damien Hirst? A new collection of jewellery designed by Turner prize winning artist Damien Hirst and American fine jewellery house Hoorsenbuhs is launching soon... The Cathedral Collection includes a contemporary rosary and matching ring, set with rubies, white diamonds and black diamonds. These “portable sculptures” are available in 18k yellow gold, rose gold. Both pieces are limited editions of just 25 and each has been stamped and numbered.   Damien Hirst isn’t the first major artist to experiment with making jewellery. There’s a little-chartered tradition of jewellery-making by early 20th-century artists. Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque both made jewellery late in the careers, as did Surrealists Salvador Dali and Man Ray. Handmade jewellery by American sculptor Alexander Calder has sold at auction for as much as $35,000.  View all Damien Hirst prints Visit our 'Art and Fashion' Pinterest board Image Credit: www.othercriteria.com $test =
  • Ben Eine: Amusement Times

    Have you spotted Ben Eine’s latest street art piece? The British typography virtuoso has left his distinctive graphic mark on 8 Octavia, a mixed-use condominium development, in San Francisco’s Hayes Valley. Eine hand-painted the colossal words ‘....
    Have you spotted Ben Eine’s latest street art piece? The British typography virtuoso has left his distinctive graphic mark on 8 Octavia, a mixed-use condominium development, in San Francisco’s Hayes Valley. Eine hand-painted the colossal words ‘Amuseument Times’ on the construction bridge site over a three-day period last week. He was joined by Amsterdam-based designer/artist Niles “Shoe” Meulman, who added “un-unhappy time” in his brush-painted caligraffiti.  Check out this short interview with Ben Eine and great footage of him painting at 8 Octavia. It’s inspiring to hear him describing Street Art as “socially aware”. “It’s about doing something that’s going to make a difference, that people are going to admire,” says Eine. View all Ben Eine prints View all Street Art prints $test =
  • Money, Money, Money it's an Artist's World

    Inspired by a recent article in the Financial Times titled ‘The Lost Art of Finance’, we’ve delved into our extensive art collection to highlight the best finance inspired prints, from cash collages to creative bank notes and currency symbol silkscreens...  According to Gillia....
    Inspired by a recent article in the Financial Times titled ‘The Lost Art of Finance’, we’ve delved into our extensive art collection to highlight the best finance inspired prints, from cash collages to creative bank notes and currency symbol silkscreens...  According to Gillian Tett of the Financial Times, “Bankers today deal with plenty of modern art, in the sense that they are constantly buying it or organising benefits to finance galleries.” But how many modern artists are dealing with banking as a subject? Gillian Tett suggests that the credit crisis has passed visual artists by, “Maybe that is just because finance is too boring, at least in a visual sense” she ponders. Her article is a call for artists to “try to create visual art that makes us reflect on the power and peculiarity of modern money,” in order to provide a fresh perspective for us all.  For bankers and non-bankers alike, and especially for Gillian Tett, here are three talented artists exploring the art of finance and offering intriguing new visions on the meaning of money... Justine Smith Artist Justine Smith has long been interested in the concept of money and how it touches our lives. In her unique artwork she explores money as a conduit of power and as a system of value. Her primary medium is paper collage and bank notes in particular. Through her collages, and paper sculptures, she examines our relationship with money in a political, moral and social sense.  ‘The Money Map of the World’ was a seminal piece for Justine Smith. The original map took 7 months to create and is made from the world’s banks notes collaged to represent each autonomous state with its own currency. “The Money Map of the World isn’t like a political map which shows all of the individual countries,” explains Smith, this map is rather a record of the boundaries of currencies. It questions the global impact of finances and the power money holds to define, divide and conquer.  Furthermore, in piece such as ‘Money Map of the World 2013’, Justine Smith highlights how fascinating banks notes are as physical objects. “All over the world bank notes reflect the society that makes them,” explains Justine Smith, “You can tell so much about a country by its currency – some choose to celebrate national heritage by showing great members of society, others choose to show natural virtues, like wildlife, logging or mining, and then of course there are those that glorify leaders.” To discover more watch Justine Smith discussing her finance inspired artwork in this short  film by Manchester Art Gallery - 'Justine Smith Video Interview'. Fiasco Fiasco is an artistic collaboration based in London. Their work focuses on the world of finance and they embody their economic interests, describing themselves as a “corporation” made up from the unlikely combination of two artists and a banker, otherwise known as the “Shareholders”.  Fiasco’s bold limited edition prints such as, ‘Love – Blue, White and Red’, ‘$ Dollar – Green’ and ‘Evolution – Bankers will Rise Again’, explore different aspects of the financial crisis. With their insider insights they create humorous and provocative images, forcing viewers to reflect on any prejudices they may have about the financial sector. Fiasco seeks to lift the veil on the uncharted motivations, emotions and relationships of the financial sector in contemporary society.  Fiasco are inspired by pop culture and Pop Art, in particular this Andy Warhol quote, “Being good at business is the most fascinating kind of art. Making money is art and... good business is the best art.” Through their appropriation of Pop Art classics, such as Robert Indiana’s ‘Love’, Fiasco rework iconic imagery for the present day, complete with its global markets, financial crisis, and scorned bankers. D*Face Like Fiasco, world renowned Street artist D*Face is similarly influenced by Pop Art. Although, D*Face believes that, “It never went far enough to critique consumerism.” Thus, since his rise to fame in the Street Art explosion, D*Face has been creating artwork to critique consumerism and the capitalist system it results from. Rooted in this visual investigation is an appetite for deconstruction and provocation. ‘The Dollar’, ‘Saddamned’ and ‘American Depress’ are three examples of D*Face deconstructing and defacing familiar bank notes and a credit card to create provocative prints which question not only consumerism, but power, politics and the financial crisis. D*Face told ‘The Independent’ back in 2006, “I did a project in 2003 where I got £20 notes and defaced them before putting them back in the system. There were 20 variations of hand drawings and printing techniques in which the monarchy is satirised, with images of the Queen being hung and having her head chopped off. Last April, I marked her 80th birthday by showing her dead, with a skull and crossbones...” Conclusion In ‘The Lost Art of Finance’, Gillian Tett writes “But the power of art, at its best, is that it can make us see the world afresh – realise that there can be beauty in the unseen details of daily life or horror lurking behind familiar scenes.” These examples of artists inspired by money, finance and capitalism reveal the beauty of currency, the iconic financial imagery of daily life, and the horror lurking behind the familiar bank note... Visual artists are definitely reflecting “on the power and peculiarity of modern money,” and offering fresh perspectives. artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Under Milk Wood Print Portfolio by Peter Blake

    We are delighted to have the recently released ‘Under Milk Wood Print Portfolio’ at artrepublic. This portfolio, by our cherished Sir Peter Blake, is a breathtaking collection of images from Peter Blake’s acclaimed illustration of ‘Under Milk Wood’ by Dylan Thomas.  This highly coll....
    We are delighted to have the recently released ‘Under Milk Wood Print Portfolio’ at artrepublic. This portfolio, by our cherished Sir Peter Blake, is a breathtaking collection of images from Peter Blake’s acclaimed illustration of ‘Under Milk Wood’ by Dylan Thomas.  This highly collectible portfolio celebrates the completion of a 30-year project by British Pop Art pioneer, Sir Peter Blake. The project, to illustrate Dylan Thomas’ 1953 play ‘Under Milk Wood’, was completed last year to coincide with the centenary of Welsh poet Thomas’s birth. The major body of work, including portraits of each of the 60 characters, was exhibited at The National Museum of Wales in 2013-4. This stunning portfolio typifies the intriguing tableaux and enchanting phantasms of the iconic play. The portfolio features signed limited edition prints of six breathtaking, richly coloured, watercolours and collages. Each of the six print editions has been printed on beautiful Archival Da Vinci soft textured 315gsm fine art paper, with stochastic pigment ink. It is the astonishing cumulative creative output of two of the grandees of British culture combined. We don’t suppose they will be in our care for long... View the 'Under Milk Wood Print Portfolio - Set of 6 Prints' View all Peter Blake prints Read our article 'Under Milk Wood: a Play Illustrated by Peter Blake' $test =
  • The Perfect Chocolates for Art Lovers

    Artists have oft been inspired by the visual delights of confectionary, just think of Pop artist Wayne Thiebaud’s slick ice cream cones and copious cakes, but now we’ve discovered a genius chocolatier inspired by art, or more specifically art supplies... These chocolate paints and pencils were....
    Artists have oft been inspired by the visual delights of confectionary, just think of Pop artist Wayne Thiebaud’s slick ice cream cones and copious cakes, but now we’ve discovered a genius chocolatier inspired by art, or more specifically art supplies... These chocolate paints and pencils were designed by design firm Nendo for the Seibu Department Store in Japan. The edible chocolate pencils were created back in 2007 and the 12-Piece Paint set is their latest limited edition gourmet chocolate collection. This incredible set of syrup-filled chocolates could be easily mistaken with a fresh painter’s supply.  Nendo explains, “Tubes in a box of paints contain a variety of colours, and these chocolates a variety of flavoured syrups. The labels indicate each chocolate’s flavour and also function as wrappers, keeping fingers clean for eating. A design that combines the childhood excitement of opening a new box of paints and the thrill of opening a box of chocolates you’ve been given unexpectedly." Right, we’re off to Japan to pick up a box of chocs... View all Cusine prints Visit our 'Art and Appetite' Pinterest board Image Credit: Ayao Yamazaki $test =
  • The Art of The Grand Budapest Hotel

    Film director Wes Anderson’s latest release is a wonderfully playful middle European fantasy. Much to our delight, as well as being a work of art in itself, ‘The Grand Budapest’ centres on the fate of a “priceless” portrait of a young boy pensively clutching an apple and features a fant....
    Film director Wes Anderson’s latest release is a wonderfully playful middle European fantasy. Much to our delight, as well as being a work of art in itself, ‘The Grand Budapest’ centres on the fate of a “priceless” portrait of a young boy pensively clutching an apple and features a fantastic collection of art.  The film’s central painting, ‘Boy with Apple’, is described as a quintessential product of the Czech mannerist, Habsburg high Renaissance, Budapest neo-humanist style - in other words it is a finely constructed, quintessential Wes Anderson, piece of nonsense. The Guardian describes the painting as “a fiction within a fiction that pays a delicately knowing homage to the art history of old Europe.” Mr Anderson has explained, “Our reference was kind of Flemish painters. And Hans Holbein; I don’t know if it’s the younger or the elder. I like Brueghel, and another one that’s maybe connected to this is a Bronzino at the Frick. We were trying to suggest that it wasn’t an Italian Renaissance painting. That it was more northern.” As well as speculating over the art historical inspiration behind ‘Boy with Apple’, art fans will also enjoy spotting a watercolour of lesbian lovers by real-life Austrian genius Egon Schiele and a splendid collection of Gustav Klimt paintings in the hotel, including ‘Faggeto’ and ‘Allee in Park von Schloss Kammer’.  View all Egon Schiele prints View all Gustav Klimt prints $test =
  • There's 'Signs of Light' at our Sister Gallery, Ink_d

    Ink_d gallery lit up the Brighton lanes last night with the preview of their latest exhibition ‘Signs of Light’. It was a dazzling evening of light boxes and neon galore in the company of extremely talented artists and awe-struck collectors... The exhibition which celebrates Ink_d....
    Ink_d gallery lit up the Brighton lanes last night with the preview of their latest exhibition ‘Signs of Light’. It was a dazzling evening of light boxes and neon galore in the company of extremely talented artists and awe-struck collectors... The exhibition which celebrates Ink_d’s love affair with light is open now until April 21st, showing work by the likes of Andy Doig, Carne Griffiths, Dan Baldwin, Tina Keane, Grande Dame, Magnus Gjoen and Pure Evil. Don’t miss the flashing religious icons, luminous alphabets, neon sofa and washing line of incandescent laundry! Go on, light up your life! Read our 'Signs of Light' exhibition review $test =
  • In the Studio with Bonnie and Clyde

    Bonnie and Clyde has long been one of our favourite artists. Her cool mixed media collages have transported us from Havana’s curious skyline, to palm tree lined Venice beach and the gritty streets of New York City. Last week we were luckily invited into her stud....
    Bonnie and Clyde has long been one of our favourite artists. Her cool mixed media collages have transported us from Havana’s curious skyline, to palm tree lined Venice beach and the gritty streets of New York City. Last week we were luckily invited into her studio to discover more about her global adventures and her life as an artist... For an artist interested in architecture and observing the minutiae of everyday life, Bonnie and Clyde has the perfect studio. Nestled in between streets of Victorian terraced housing, her studio is found in the front of a jewellery workshop in a converted 1960’s garage. The single story building stands in the shadow of an imposing Grade II listed brick viaduct. Her expansive window, which takes up almost the entire wall, frames her view of passing life on the bustling Brighton road.  Bonnie and Clyde’s studio feels like a sanctuary away from the urban environment outside. Her calm and bright space is full of colourful collages of expansive beach scenes, mid-air divers, miniature cut-out palm trees and modernist LA architecture; a world away from the grey day of a British seaside town. Over a pastel coloured French Fancy (or two), we dived into Bonnie and Clyde’s beautiful world of Cuban swimming pools, Californian beaches, colourful clouds, and collaged cities... It all began, a little less exotically, in Bradford. Bonnie and Clyde describes her childhood as creative, remembering with fondness Bradford’s art-hero David Hockney and the magnificent Gallery at Salts Mill. Her first painting, which her Dad still has, was of a boxing match. Bonnie and Clyde pointed out that this was probably an unusual choice of subject for a little girl, but it was clearly the beginning of her fascination with observing life from a distance; behind the rope or camera lens.  Despite not actually taking Art A‘level, Bonnie and Clyde managed to win the ‘Art and Design Prize’ at school! Actually, it seems she avoided the conventional Fine Art route for quite some time... After school and a Foundation, where she discovered her love of collage, she went on to study ‘Furniture and 3D Design’ at Kingston University. She loved the subject but ponders whether university is in fact “always a disappointment”? We silently share a concerned look and hopeless thought for the future of arts education.  After Bonnie and Clyde’s degree and her love/hate relationship with London, she returned to England’s North West. Moving to Manchester, she set up her own graphic design company with the help of a Prince’s Trust grant. Entirely self taught in the wizardry of Photoshop, Illustrator, and the like, she was soon creating everything from posters, brochures, and book sleeves, to signage and tee-shirts. Her clients were predominantly creative industries - music venues, theatres, arts centres, club nights, and festivals such as the Women’s Arts International Festival.  We wondered whether it was lonely working as an independent freelancer; Bonnie and Clyde poignantly replied, “I always felt like a bit of an outsider... Luckily moving to Brighton was like coming home”. We also wondered whether it had always been her dream to become a full-time artist, free from demanding clients and their restrictive briefs. It was always in the back of her mind, Bonnie and Clyde explains, although she liked working in graphics she had always “dipped in and out of painting”. During her ‘Furniture and 3D Design’ degree she would always present her plans as collaged and painted illustrations. After her degree she continued and remembers that she had even had a small show in Manchester.  Manchester was great for the music and fashion scenes, explained Bonnie and Clyde, but she had always loved Brighton, “it’s so open and creative.” So a few years ago she bravely packed up and decamped to the seaside determined to learn the art of screen printing. Having printed her own tee-shirts in Manchester, “the process was already in my head,” she explains. Visiting a major Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibition in Nottingham “cemented” the idea.   Before she arrived in Brighton, Bonnie and Clyde telephoned the giclee printmakers and silkscreen specialists ‘Harwood King Fine Arts Studio’ and signed herself up on a printing course in the city. Was screen printing a new love? “Yes, absolutely. It opened up a whole new world to express my creativity.” It was clearly an invigorating and momentous move.  To begin with Bonnie and Clyde created all of her own screens. Her prints were much simpler and more graphic than the collaged style she is known for now. As she delved into photomontage and advanced her mixed media aesthetic she developed a closer relationship with the printers at Harwood King. Now she creates her bigger limited editions with the printing studio, “I love the collaborative element. I love being around people,” she says. She can go in with a simple sketch and plan her next creation, “Quentin [owner] is brilliant. He’s an artist as well and has a really good eye. I can talk really ambiguously about my ideas and he gets it!” Describing her method, Bonnie and Clyde reveals, “I start with a simple sketch”. Then she rummages in her voluminous collection of photographs to excavate the perfect photographic images.  These are scanned into her Mac computer and then she embarks on a lengthy process of printing, scanning, cutting, layering, painting, and passing back and forth between the computer and paper. “Because of the way I work I edit as I go along,” she explains when asked whether she discards many pieces in the process.  The photographic elements in Bonnie and Clyde’s work are all taken from her own original photographs. “I’m not a professional photographer,” she modestly claims before revealing that she used to take pictures for magazines and “had a couple of exhibitions of photography.” She has remained loyal to her 5 mega pixels, fixed lens “beloved Leica camera” throughout. We were surprised to discover that she didn’t have zoom or wide-angle lenses, considering her expansive compositions. It often feels as though we’re observing her collaged cityscapes from a great distance, looking down on a distant pool of swimmers or across the bay at a string of sinking cars.  Bonnie and Clyde's observations of ‘others’ and the world around her are wonderfully calm and non-judgemental. “It’s just everyday life,” she says, “I don’t want my artwork to impart judgement of the places I explore and the people I observe". Travel is a vital component of Bonnie and Clyde’s art. “I like going to new places and  people watching”, she explains, adding that she especially likes to see the “gritty” side of a place not just the tourist postcard views. She physically needs to be there to pick up on the destination’s atmosphere, feeling, light and palette. When she’s there she will take hundreds of photographs for her archive. Interestingly she doesn’t always create a piece or series immediately following a trip, as she did with her American West Coast adventure. Sometimes a place she’s visited can spark an artwork year’s later, like with ‘Tokyo Beat’. It’s the architecture of a city that really grabs Bonnie and Clyde’s attention. She loves the graphic nature of Modernist buildings and the repetitive patterns of skyscrapers and high-rises. She seems to have a penchant for bizarre and quirky architectural creations, such as the ‘Binoculars Building’ in her ‘FIVE’ print, and the giant fabricated cricket (insect) in 'Tokyo Beat’. We asked whether she was inspired by any artists and she revealed that “I really liked Dada when I was young,” but admits she is “terrible with the history of art, I admire many artists …Tracey Emin, Linda Sterling, Peter Blake, Bill Viola and Laurie Anderson to name a few, but I find all other creative avenues equally inspiring from music, film and architecture to design and photography.” Where will Bonnie and Clyde’s little light-filled studio take her next? Well, she fancies a trip to Barcelona. It will be quite a step away from her recent survey of LA’s postmodernist architecture, but she’s keen to explore Gaudi’s neo-Gothic creations. She's been asked to contribute to a new touring show opening this November at Leeds College of Art. Titled “The Subterraneans”, it will be based around Jack Kerouac and his influence. Bonnie and Clyde will be exhibiting a new 20 screen print with collage elements, 'The Strip'. We can also reveal that Bonnie and Clyde will be busily preparing for a joint exhibition with Maria Rivans at our sister gallery, Lawrence Alkin gallery. The exhibition will take place from the 9th May – 8th June. Watch this space for more information on the upcoming show and a joint interview with Maria Rivans... Many thanks to Bonnie and Clyde for welcoming us into her beautiful bijou studio and giving us a glimpse into her fascinating artistic journey, from Bradford to Brighton and beyond!  View all Bonnie and Clyde prints artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Mr Brainwash Designs the 'Deluxe' Version of Rick Ross' Album Cover

    Mr Brainwash is already well known for his work with musicians, having directed David Guetta’s music video ‘Metropolis’ and created the cover for Madonna’s 3rd greatest hits album. His latest creative collaboration is with internationally renowned American rapper, Rick Ross.  Rick Ros....
    Mr Brainwash is already well known for his work with musicians, having directed David Guetta’s music video ‘Metropolis’ and created the cover for Madonna’s 3rd greatest hits album. His latest creative collaboration is with internationally renowned American rapper, Rick Ross.  Rick Ross, who founded the record label Maybach Music Group, has just released his sixth studio album, ‘Mastermind’. As well as a ‘standard’ cover the album has a ‘deluxe’ cover designed by none other than our favourite maverick French street artist, Mr Brainwash! So how did Mr Brainwash and Ricky Rozay hook up? The rapper explained, “I’m a fan of art. I might have got a piece or two at Art Basel. That’s one of the homies. I forgot where we met. I go over to his studio, smoke, let beats play sometimes. He has a huge studio. I let Mr Brainwash get on the mic one night. He was on the mic for three hours, just saying different things. His whole slogan is “Life is Beautiful”, so he was saying some powerful things.” If Mr Brainwash is one of your ‘homies’ don’t miss our great collection of prints...  View all Mr Brainwash prints View all Music prints View all Street Art prints Image credits: Rich Kids $test =
  • Sweet New Work for the Broken Hearted by Zeus

    Last year London street artist Zeus created a collection of incredible handmade sculptures based on the British confectionary classic the Love Heart. His hand cast and painted giant sweets, broken and wittily named ‘Broken Arted’, sold like hot cakes. Now Zeus is back with a limited edition pri....
    Last year London street artist Zeus created a collection of incredible handmade sculptures based on the British confectionary classic the Love Heart. His hand cast and painted giant sweets, broken and wittily named ‘Broken Arted’, sold like hot cakes. Now Zeus is back with a limited edition print of the ‘Broken Arted’ wrapper... ‘Love Hurts’ is a signed seven colour silkscreen printed on Colorplan 350gsm fine art paper, from a limited edition of just 10. Zeus has appropriated the iconic ‘Love Hearts’ packaging, reworking it with an Urban Art twist to read “Love Hurts”. Street Art and sweeties are two of our favourite things so we’re fizzing with excitement about this new arrival!  Interesting Love Heart facts...  Production of Love Hearts began in 1933. The first special edition was done in 1981 to celebrate Princess Diana's wedding. Wayne and Coleen Rooney got personalised sweets made up for their wedding which read "Wayne and Coleen".  View all Zeus prints Read our Zeus biography $test =

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