Monthly Archives: February 2014

  • Win a £200 Voucher in our Interior Design Challenge!

    Want to show off your art work and win £200 artrepublic gift voucher to invest in more art? We’re launching a brand new competition, ‘My art by artrepublic’, celebrating your interior design skills... Do you have an eye for complementing your colour scheme with your contemporary art? Is yo....
    Want to show off your art work and win £200 artrepublic gift voucher to invest in more art? We’re launching a brand new competition, ‘My art by artrepublic’, celebrating your interior design skills... Do you have an eye for complementing your colour scheme with your contemporary art? Is your Pure Evil perfectly matched with your bed linen? Is your Dan Baldwin the finishing touch in your designer bathroom? We're looking for photos of your artrepublic prints hung at home, in your office, on your boat or in your caravan. All you need to do is email a photograph to artzine@artrepublic.com The photo will be put on our Facebook page and the photo with the most likes wins. It's as easy as that! The competition closes on March 31st but the sooner you can send us a snap the more chance you'll have of winning. Embrace your inner interior designer, rearrange the furniture and be in with a chance of winning £200! Need some inspiration? Check out our 'Art in Interiors' Pinterest board! Visit our Facebook page View our Art in Interiors Pinterest board $test =
  • Video: artrepublic Gallery Highlights, inc. Justine Smith, Bruce McLean and Dan Baldwin

    View our collectable art highlights for March 2014 by taking a walk around the walls of our artrepublic gallery. Gallery team member Jess Miles takes you through three fantastic art works including a beautiful Justine Smith edition, a brilliant hand-finished piece by Bruce McLean and an outstan....
    View our collectable art highlights for March 2014 by taking a walk around the walls of our artrepublic gallery. Gallery team member Jess Miles takes you through three fantastic art works including a beautiful Justine Smith edition, a brilliant hand-finished piece by Bruce McLean and an outstanding Dan Baldwin silkscreen with diamond dust. Justine Smith, Diamond Queen art print: This is a signed limited edition of 60. There’s a nice finishing touch where it’s got the signature in blue and a little emblem as well. In all of her work Justine Smith uses different forms of currency. In this one she’s taken the Queen’s head from various English notes. It’s a silkscreen print, some of it is beautifully finished with diamond dust and the background is pearlised. It’s a really great patriotic piece to celebrate the diamond jubilee of the Queen! Bruce McLean, Tulbagia art print: It’s a signed limited edition of 75. It’s beautifully hand-finished where the white is on the flowers. It’s also got a collaged section at the bottom. Bruce is a really well established contemporary British artist. He represented Britain at the Venice Biennale along with Gilbert and George in 1980. He also currently teaches graduate painting at the Slade School of Art.  Dan Baldwin, Faith Less art print: It’s a signed limited edition of 100. It’s a silkscreen print that has been finished with Diamond Dust, gold-leaf, and embossing. A lot of Dan Baldwin’s work features a mix of childhood imagery mixed in with quite dark imagery such as sculls, knives, razor blades and crows. A lot of the elements in this work are carefully placed, there’s a lot to look at and explore. You can get really lost in this image! View all Justine Smith prints View all Bruce McLean prints View all Dan Baldwin prints Visit artrepublic Brighton $test =
  • Nash & Ravilious: The Art of the British Downs

    Our new collection of prints by Adam McNaught-Davis is inspired by the stretching shorelines, ancient chalk figures, meandering rivers and magnificent white cliffs of South-East England. His landscapes reminded us of two other artists equally influenced by the scener....
    Our new collection of prints by Adam McNaught-Davis is inspired by the stretching shorelines, ancient chalk figures, meandering rivers and magnificent white cliffs of South-East England. His landscapes reminded us of two other artists equally influenced by the scenery of the British Downs, Paul Nash and Eric Ravilious... For centuries artists have been depicting this green and pleasant land. Britain has a long and rich tradition of landscape painting, with greats such as Turner, Constable and Gainsborough exploring quintessentially English pastoral scenes. We’re going to take a closer look at two of our favourite landscape artists, Nash and Ravilious, and explore their relationships with the Downs in the South East of England. Let this be a guide to exploring both the art and the landscape! The word ‘Downs’ comes from the Old English word ‘dun’ meaning ‘hill’. The North Downs are a ridge of chalk hills that stretch from Farnham in Surrey to the White Cliffs of Dover in Kent, including the Surrey Hill and the Kent Downs. The South Downs are a morphologically similar range of hills which run roughly parallel across the south-eastern coastal counties, from the Itchen Valley of Hampshire in the west to Beachy Head, East Sussex, in the east. The downs are characterised by rolling chalk downland with sheep-grazed turf and dry valleys.  Paul Nash One of the most original British artists of the first half of the 20th century, Paul Nash is celebrated for his lyrical depictions of the British landscape, his Surrealist imagery, and his work as a War Artist. Born in 1889, Nash began his career as an Edwardian landscapist, painting ink and watercolour trees and gardens, and the open hills of Berkshire and Oxfordshire. Later, he became fascinated by the stone circles, ancient tracks and buried signs of ancient Britain, especially the Iron Age hill forts of the Downs.  Paul Nash served as a war artist during the First World War, and died shortly after the Second World War. After training at the Slade School he served in the war, was wounded and in 1917 he was sent as a war artist to Ypres. He was expected to operate from GHQ but he protested, “I am determined to operate around the Front Line trenches... I realise no one in England knows what the scene of war is like... If I can, I will show them.” After the war, Nash suffered from a severe breakdown, diagnosed as ‘war strain’. He found solace in the English countryside, recuperating in a cottage her rented with his wife Margaret, in Dymchurch on the Kent coast. Nash found the seaside town on Romney Marsh “a delightful place with much inspiring material for work.” Paul Nash formed a string connection to Dymchurch and the ancient landscape of nearby Romney Marsh. These landscapes became a preoccupation in his work until the mid 1920s. He was particularly drawn to the vast sea wall, a man-made structure designed to protect the Marsh from the flooding sea. It’s the subject of ‘Shore’ which is simultaneously abstract, architectural and descriptive, giving perfect expression to Nash’s extraordinary sense of place. In 1924, Paul Nash discovered Ivinghoe Beacon in north Buckinghamshire, “an enchanted place in the hills girdled by wild beech woods, dense and lonely places where you might meet anything from a polecat to a dryad.” The beech tree copses and rolling hills soon became the subject of one of his most-loved landscapes, ‘Wood on The Downs’.  The beech trees rise in a sculptural wave over the hills whilst the chalk of the downland reflects the light from the spring sky. “It was a lovely day for the drive,” Nash remarked about the day he discovered the beacon, “But devilish cold for drawing when we got to the hills... The woods in the hollow below were crowded with wild pigeons which alternately sailed in the clouds over the tops of the trees or settled in the branches where they sat so thick the woods looked like monstrous orchards bursting into bloom.” ‘Dead Tree Romney Marsh’ reveals how Nash was inspired not only to paint, but to photograph the natural scenes of South East England. Nash once wrote, “There are places... whose relationship of parts creates a mystery, an enchantment.” He believed that certain ancient sites had a talismanic quality, a “genius loci”, or spirit. He linked this with his recent discovery of Surrealism to offer a new way of seeing the English countryside. The Tate explains how, “these links confirmed his view that the origins of Surrealism were embedded in English culture: from the fantasy landscapes of Samuel Palmer and the Romantic poetry of Samuel Taylor Coleridge to the nonsense writing of Edward Lear and Lewis Carroll.” Surrealist imagery and themes can be found in ‘Event on the Downs’. In 1934, Nash and his wife moved to Swanage in Dorset. He had asthma and hoped the coastal climate would help. ‘Event on the Downs’ is a depiction of the view from his window at Whitecliff Farm on Ballard Down just outside Swanage. In the foreground of the discernible south coast landscape are a tree truck and a giant tennis ball, both of which are recurrent themes in Nash’s art. It’s possible to recognise the influence of Surrealist artists such as Rene Magritte and Georgio de Chirico in the incongruous placement, although Paul Nash considered his approach to be individualistic, rather than one directly motivated by the Surrealist manifestos.  Paul Nash evidently adored the British downs with their ancient uplands and his paintings of Iron Age hill forts, track ways, and sacred sites span a region from the Dorset coast to the northern tip of the Chilterns. From post-war solace to surreal inspiration, the countryside of South East England was evidently an uplifting force in Nash’s life and art. His sensitive and articulate landscapes beautifully embody his position as a Modern artist in an Ancient landscape.  Eric Ravilious After the war, Paul Nash taught in the Design School at the Royal College of Art where his students included Edward Bawden and Eric Ravilious. Artist Eric Ravilious’ native land was the south coast, specifically Sussex. As a boy he moved to Eastbourne, where his parents ran an antique shop and he later won a scholarship to Eastbourne School of Art and in 1922 another to study at the Design School at the Royal College of Art.  Despite travelling to Italy, living in Hammersmith, London, and settling in rural Essex with his wife Eileen ‘Tirzah’ Garwood, Eric Ravilious frequently return to the countryside of the South East and the South Downs became his signature stomping ground. Although Eric Ravilious was becoming known primarily as a wood engraver, his ambition was to revive the English watercolour tradition. He followed a broadly pastoral heritage, depicting the South Downs villages that might be described as part of a “quintessentially English” landscape. “Eric Ravilious’s love of Sussex produced some forceful art,” Tom Lubbock wrote in the Independent. In 1934, Eric Ravilious was invited by the artist Peggy Angus, a contemporary and friend of his from the Royal College of Art, to stay at her cottage on the South Downs, just west of Firl. The cottage, ‘Furlongs’, was a flint-faced shepherd’s cottage below Beddingham Hill on the Firle Estate. Angus, who taught at Eastbourne, had discovered Furlongs the year before and had set about creating an interior as curious and as beautiful as that of Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell’s house nearby at Charleston. She filled the cottage with a series of paintings of the Sussex countryside by herself and her contemporaries.  Peggy Angus described Furlongs as “the matrix of much strange and inventive creation” and it became the gathering place of many artists, including Edward Bawden, Percy Horton, John and Myfanwy Piper, Maurice de Saumarez, and Eric Ravilious. Over the following years Eric and Tirzah, and their children, visited frequently. When Ravilious visited he said he felt, “he had come to his own country”, and many of his best landscape paintings were inspired by this stretch of Sussex land.  You can see Furlongs at the foot of ‘Beddingham Hill’ in ‘Furlongs’ and the garden in ‘Tea at Furlongs’. You can also glimpse the surrounding chalk fields through the windows in ‘Interior at Furlongs, 1939’. ‘Caravans’ is one of the many landscapes Ravilious painted whilst staying with Peggy Agnus. The two caravans are old fever wagons from the Boer War that Ravilious purchased and parked at the nearby chalk pits. He made one into a bedroom and the other into a studio so he could surround himself with the scenery of the South Downs.  Like Paul Nash, Ravilious was drawn to the chalky cliffs of ‘Beachy Head’ and the ancient chalk figures, such as ‘The Wilmington Giant.’  Of the latter, Tom Lubbock wrote in the Indpendent, “He’s more interested again in play – between the broad, smooth uniformity of a view and the chaos of minute detail. See the black barbed wire and the rusty fences, strung across the grass and sky. These knotted, twining, wiggling lines crawl over the landscape – and make a contrast, too, against the fat white rounded drawing of the hill figure.” Most of Ravilious’ rural views, despite their absence of figures, deal in the man-made. As well as being influenced by modernism, Ravilious’ art engaged with modernity – his pastoral scenes are sharpened by fences, barbed-wire, cement pits, ploughs, roads, and pylons. The absence of walkers, farmers and operators, however, lends a certain sadness to the poignant beauty of the pictures. The combination of the ancient natural forms with the human debris reveals the force of the Sussex landscape and the fierceness of Ravilious’ painting.   Ravilious’ austerely beautiful watercolours were rooted in his fascination with the British downs. The geographical landscape offered him the freedom and impetuts to advance British Modernism. As a celebrated war artist of the Second World War, Ravilious’ landscapes have been interpreted as symbols of Englishness and defiance. Like Paul Nash’s, they capture the beauty, mystery, and complexity of this ancient landscape.  Roused by these Ravilious and Nash landscapes we’re off to don our walking boots and embark on a Nash/Ravilious inspired stomp around the Downs! View all landscape prints View our Paul Nash biography View our Eric Ravilious biography Image credits: Paul Nash, Dead Tree, Romney Marsh © Tate, London, 2012 Paul Nash, The Wall, Dymchurch circa 1923, Engraving on paper, image: 127 x 203 mmPresented by the Trustees of the Paul Nash Trust 1971© Tate John Holloway - Long Man of Wilmington Fishing nets laid out on the slipway at Newhaven Harbour photo - with acknowledgement to the Pilton Elderly Project group who compiled an exhibition of old photos of Granton artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Sylvester by David Spiller Coming Soon...

    We love David Spiller’s joyful Pop Art and we’re exceptionally excited about his newest work. Currently being expertly printed, ‘Love Is’, is Spiller’s latest colourful cartoon character portrait. Sylvester J. Pussycat, Sr. (of Looney Tunes fame) appears bright-eyed and beaming ....
    We love David Spiller’s joyful Pop Art and we’re exceptionally excited about his newest work. Currently being expertly printed, ‘Love Is’, is Spiller’s latest colourful cartoon character portrait. Sylvester J. Pussycat, Sr. (of Looney Tunes fame) appears bright-eyed and beaming with his bushy whiskers and unmistakable red nose. Bold text appears beneath Sylvester’s grinning portrait with the iconic ‘Moon River’ lyric “We’re after the same rainbow’s end.” Characteristically romantic, nostalgic, and gleeful, this print is set to become a Spiller classic. These short videos are great behind-the-scenes glimpses into David Spiller’s professional printing process. Watch the 9th and 10th layers being precisely silkscreen printed. The final artwork, printed on Somerset Satin 100% cotton 5400gsm paper, will consist of 35 separate colours. We can’t wait to see it in person! View all David Spiller prints View all Pop Art prints $test =
  • Noah Taylor: People Are Strange

    Our sister gallery, Lawrence Alkin Gallery, have just announced the subject of their next gallery show, the art of Australian artist and actor, Noah Taylor. The exhibition, 'Noah Taylor: People are Strange', will feature up to 30 of his quirky, haunting and starkly-rich ink drawings. We’re very....
    Our sister gallery, Lawrence Alkin Gallery, have just announced the subject of their next gallery show, the art of Australian artist and actor, Noah Taylor. The exhibition, 'Noah Taylor: People are Strange', will feature up to 30 of his quirky, haunting and starkly-rich ink drawings. We’re very excited about this one... Noah Taylor is a familiar face, he has worked in the world of showbiz most of his adult life. He is best known for his acting roles in films such as ‘Vanilla Sky’, ‘Shine’ and ‘Submarine’, but he has been making music and painting since his teens. He had his first solo show last year in his native Australia. It was a sell out. ‘People are Strange’ will be Taylor’s UK debut.  'Esquire' magazine has hailed 2014 as “the year where [Noah’s] art outshines his acting” and the upcoming show is already featuring on Artlyst and Red Seven Leisure. What can we expect of the art? Well, Noah describes himself as a “non committed Catholic neo-situationist”, if that’s any help! Certainly prepare yourself for the wonderfully peculiar because the ‘people are strange’ and the landscapes are curious... Read our exhibition review of 'Noah Taylor: People are Strange' $test =
  • Banksy's Kissing Coppers Cash In

    Banksy’s puckering up policeman, who had previously inhabited the wall of Brighton’s Prince Albert pub, have sold at a US auction for $575,000! The 'Kissing Coppers' was removed from the Brighton wall in 2011 and flown to the US. The monochrome stencil of the caressing constables has now been ....
    Banksy’s puckering up policeman, who had previously inhabited the wall of Brighton’s Prince Albert pub, have sold at a US auction for $575,000! The 'Kissing Coppers' was removed from the Brighton wall in 2011 and flown to the US. The monochrome stencil of the caressing constables has now been purchased by an unknown telephone bidder at a Miami auction. 54 pieces were auctioned alongside ‘Kissing Coppers’, including two other Banksy paintings – ‘Bandaged Heart Balloon’ and ‘Crazy Horse Car Door’. Both of these artworks were created during the Bristolian street artist’s 2013 New York ‘street residency’. The original ‘Kissing Coppers’ was replaced with a replica and encased in Perspex. Critics argue that such pieces should not be removed from their original locations as it takes away from Banksy’s original intent, what do you think? View all Banksy prints View all Street Art prints Image credits: Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images $test =
  • Copyright: One Red Rose Forever

    Last week saw the opening of a new exhibition at our sister gallery Lawrence Alkin Gallery. The artist behind the solo show, ‘One Red Rose Forever’, is one of our very favourite Urban artists, Copyright. We accompanied Copyright to a neighbouring London pub f....
    Last week saw the opening of a new exhibition at our sister gallery Lawrence Alkin Gallery. The artist behind the solo show, ‘One Red Rose Forever’, is one of our very favourite Urban artists, Copyright. We accompanied Copyright to a neighbouring London pub for some Dutch courage before facing the queuing crowd at the preview. He took the time, over a cider or two, to discuss the blooming lovely exhibition and his ever-blossoming art career... ‘One Red Rose Forever’ was described by Time Out London as “the ideal Valentine’s offering”. The exhibition opened to the public on Valentine’s Day manifesting a visual feast of hand painted roses, scantily clad beauties, love birds and smouldering sirens draped in ravishing red gowns.  Copyright admitted that the abundance of romantic imagery wasn’t a coincidence, “it was a no brainer really.” The dates of the show and Copyright’s characteristic motif, the red rose, combined perfectly to set a unified theme for the new collection. “I spent ten minutes brainstorming with Gemma [artist Gemma Compton, Copyright’s wife] before coming up with the idea,” he explained. The rose has been a longstanding motif in Copyright’s street art, “I started with the rose image about 11 years ago.” Back then the roses were mostly monochrome and speedily sprayed on the streets, now they are delicately hand-painted on canvas in tonal pinks and greens.  In exploring this reoccurring motif, the exhibition is evidence of the progression of Copyright’s style and career; from street walls to gallery walls. Copyright’s art may have moved into the gallery but it hasn’t lost its street art heart. We wondered whether Copyright thought Street Art and romance were incongruous. “It’s true, most Street Art is political or satirical and current”, he answered, acknowledging that flowers, hearts, and gems aren’t your average street art subjects! By exploring more traditional and timeless themes, such as beauty, nature and femininity, we think Copyright is pushing the boundaries of the Street Art genre, creating work that is innovative, inventive and truly unique.  Perhaps the noticeable lack of romantic imagery in Urban Art and Street Art is related to gender? Graffiti writing and Street Art have been male dominated art forms (although this is changing, hurrah!), tackling themes that have also been traditionally dominated by men, such as politics, war and comedy.  “A lot of people think I’m a woman or gay,” chuckles Copyright, who is neither. He emphasizes how ludicrous this is by pointing to the historical example of Renaissance artists, like Raphael and Leonardo da Vinci, who explored subjects such as angels, motherhood and femininity, whilst remaining exemplars of ‘Renaissance men’ and ‘masculinity’. Copyright revealed, “When I was seventeen I started painting pin-ups, half-naked chicks,” and women have remained a favourite subject of his. Interestingly, he noted that as his style has matured and developed the females have become more and more clothed! ‘One Red Rose’ is evidence of Copyright’s increasing interest in ‘traditional’ art subjects and techniques. The exhibition is brimming with beautifully hand-painted elements, ornately patterned backgrounds and even a gold aureole (in ‘Earthhound’) which is more commonly associated with early Christian art. Copyright describes his distinctive style as a “fusion” and observed that the street art elements have faded out more in this latest collection. He did clarify that the increase in painterly elements wasn’t actually new, “I’ve always painted; painting came first really.” Spotting several new motifs and elements in the show, we asked Copyright how his style has developed. “It has evolved as I have personally,” he replied. He was quick to acknowledge the influence of his wife, artist Gemma Compton. “She’s a better artist than me,” he gallantly admitted! Gemma Compton is famous for her astute studies of birds and we noticed in the exhibition how Copyright has adorned a number of his beauties with birds and butterflies. Another interesting new feature we noticed was jewels. Painted gem stones can be spotted on ‘The Joy of Knowing Everything You Have is a Gift’ and ‘Love is the Gift’, which even has physical rhinestones applied to the canvas. Copyright explained that he was interested in exploring this new element further, perhaps looking into working with semi precious stones in the future. We think the jewels are another romantic affirmation – gems for Gemma! Perhaps the most noticeable new addition in ‘One Red Rose Forever’ is the inclusion of three canvases devoid of a central female figure. Copyright describes them as “abstract”, although they do contain figurative elements such as birds, butterflies and roses. These canvases are the most avant-garde of the show and a brilliant addition. Copyright admitted it was “intimidating” to face a canvas without a figure. He explained how his monochrome women immediately draw the eye and consequently the peripheral elements become less paramount, but with these abstracted works every inch of the canvas is under scrutiny and he has to pay much more attention to the composition. “It’s really hard to create harmony within the composition,” Copyright said of the new challenge he’d set himself.  What is next for Copyright? Well, he gives the impression he is a laid back dude, “I don’t usually plan anything, it’s just sort of fallen into place so far,” but he’s clearly incredibly productive. He put this whole show together under a really tight deadline. “I usually take January off to explore a new medium”, he told us; last year it was stained glass and the year before that miniature paintings on wood. “I really look forward to doing something else, changing it keeps it interesting for me,” he said, revealing the secret to his fresh and cutting-edge style.  How about exploring textiles we suggested? It seems as though the abstract pieces would make brilliant repeat patterns. “Maybe, someone proposed doing a wallpaper,” Copyright replied, and Gemma’s transferred her artwork on to beautiful scarves so maybe he could follow her down that route, he pondered. Then he remembered that he had been approached to create a swimwear collection! A friend who works for a triathlon company asked whether he might be interested, “My first question was ‘can I do bikinis?’”, Copyright said smiling; “a wetsuit could be cool.”  With the cider consumed, the Bristolian artist contemplated meeting the collectors and fans waiting for him at the preview. We asked whether this audience was influential in the creation of the work; how important were their tastes in planning the show? “I am aware that it’s going to go into people’s homes but I don’t necessarily want to pander to that”, he said, “I want the work to be hung and enjoyed. It needs to look good.” Interestingly, he notes how his style has evolved as he has personally, but he’s also aware of how his audience has gradually evolved too. Early fans of his are now “middle aged dudes” and his new work “needs to pass the wife test!” ‘One Red Rose Forever’ certainly passes the wife test with flying colours. The demographic of the preview was proof of how successfully Copyright has pushed the boundaries of Street Art and welcomed new collectors. His audience is now as multifaceted as his artwork, drawn to his innovative imagery, interesting narratives, the beauty and the romance! We thoroughly recommend visiting this Copyright show and highly suspect that you will fall madly in love... Right, now to pre-order our Copyright wetsuits... View all Coopyright prints Read our exhibition review of 'Copyright: One Red Rose Forever' Read our article 'Copyright & Gemma Compton: Mr & Mrs Interview' Read our Copyright biography artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Snow Patrol and Antony Micallef are Fans of New Artist John Simpson

    We recently added a new artist to the site and an extensive collection of his enchanting and emotive art prints. It turns out we’re in good company being massive fans of John Simpson's imaginative imagery... The Brighton-based artist designed the album art for one the UK’s best-known bands, al....
    We recently added a new artist to the site and an extensive collection of his enchanting and emotive art prints. It turns out we’re in good company being massive fans of John Simpson's imaginative imagery... The Brighton-based artist designed the album art for one the UK’s best-known bands, alternative rock band Snow Patrol. Snow Patrol’s lead singer Gary Lightbody bought a large charcoal work from Simpson and subsequently commissioned him to provide a piece for the band’s album ‘Fallen Empires’. The result was the monotype and woodcut ‘Eagles Descent’. Gary bought the original, but we now have a limited edition print of the soaring eagle by John Simpson which has taken its place in rock ‘n’ roll history.   At the weekend we also spotted John Simpson’s fascinating ‘Descent of the Minotaur’ in artist Antony Micallef’s living room! Featuring in the property section of The Telegraph, the internationally acclaimed contemporary artist gave a tour of his “simple and serene” living space, which features Simpson’s monochrome marvel hung above a rather beautiful grey velvet sofa. With such creative admirers, John Simpson is rightly taking his place in contemporary culture. View all John Simpson prints Read our John Simpson biography Image credits: Antony Micallef Photo: Martin Pope $test =
  • artrepublic Features in Elle Decoration

    We’re delighted to feature in the March edition of Elle Decoration, the world’s leading homes magazine! The article, titled ‘Design Hero Eric Ravilious’, is a spotlight on the British designer, painter, wood-engraver and printer, Eric Ravilious.  Elle Decoration explores the question ....
    We’re delighted to feature in the March edition of Elle Decoration, the world’s leading homes magazine! The article, titled ‘Design Hero Eric Ravilious’, is a spotlight on the British designer, painter, wood-engraver and printer, Eric Ravilious.  Elle Decoration explores the question ‘what makes Eric Ravilious a design hero?’  The article highlights his prestigious ‘Celebration’ mug manufactured by Wedgewood for the coronation of King Edward VII in 1926 and his work as a war artist in the last few years of his life, but it concludes, “it is perhaps his watercolours – of landmarks such as Beachy Head, Rye Harbour and the ‘chalk figures’ of the South Downs – for which he is best remembered.” Our extensive collection of Eric Ravilious works includes several fine examples of his elegant landscapes, as well as his astute depictions of the World War II, and even a limited edition giclée print of Eric Ravilious' alphabet designs which Wedgwood transfer printed on mugs in 1937. It’s great feature in Elle Decoration and lovely to see that one of our favourite 20th century artists is continuing to receive the admiration he deserves!  View all Eric Ravilious prints Read our Eric Ravilious biography  $test =
  • The Monuments Men: Art Historian Heroes

    Last November we heard that more than 1,400 paintings, including works by Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall, missing since they were stolen by the Nazis in 1939, had been discovered in a flat belonging to the son  of a Third Reich art dealer. Now, a new Hollywood film about the scale of Hitler....
    Last November we heard that more than 1,400 paintings, including works by Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall, missing since they were stolen by the Nazis in 1939, had been discovered in a flat belonging to the son  of a Third Reich art dealer. Now, a new Hollywood film about the scale of Hitler’s looting has been released.  ‘The Monuments Men’ highlights the hitherto little-known exploits of the unlikeliest of war heroes, a disparate group of curators, art historians, archaeologists, museum directors and academics, who risked their lives in order to rescue priceless works of art from the ruins of World War II. George Clooney plays Lt Frank Stokes, a clean-cut American officer and art historian who leads a team of fellow art experts in pursuit of art treasures looted by the Nazis. Clooney not only stars in the film, but directs it. “It just goes to prove that art theft is the unfinished business of World War II,” he claimed in a recent interview. The film focuses on the rescue of two keys artworks; the ‘Madonna of Bruges’ sculpture by Michelangelo and Flemish artist Jan Van Eyck’s ‘Ghent Altarpiece’. However, between 1945 and 1951 the real ‘monuments men’ recovered and returned around five million stolen items including works by Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrant and Johannes Vermeer. We’re excited that this brave band of men and women are finally receiving some recognition for their work on the front line rescuing some of the greatest artistic achievements of civilization from destruction at the hands of Nazi fanatics. Who would have thought that art historians would be the subject of a Hollywood action film? Image credits: Moviestore/REX $test =

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