Monthly Archives: December 2013

  • Free Andy Warhol Online Course

    Are you looking for a new challenge for the New Year? Have you vowed to broaden your artistic knowledge? A new online course explores Andy Warhol’s creative innovations, thematic concerns and relationships to major artistic movements of the 20th century. The free online course is a first of its....
    Are you looking for a new challenge for the New Year? Have you vowed to broaden your artistic knowledge? A new online course explores Andy Warhol’s creative innovations, thematic concerns and relationships to major artistic movements of the 20th century. The free online course is a first of its kind… The course has been developed as part of the ARTIST ROOMS research partnership between the University of Edinburgh, Tate, and the National Galleries of Scotland. This kind of course (known as Massive Open Online Course) is offered by many American universities, but this is a first to be dedicated to a single artist and the first such course to be developed in a gallery/university partnership in the UK. It is open to all and encourages large-scale interactive participation.  The course is delivered in five thematic blocks of material exploring on Warhol’s life, career, and work. The five themes are; celebrity, sex, money, death and time. Students who successfully complete the class will receive a Statement of Accomplishment signed by the course instructor, which is not a formal qualification but would be useful to demonstrate prior learning and interest in the subject.  This is an amazing opportunity to learn about the king of Pop Art and a true 20th century icon for FREE!  Sign up for Free for the 5 week course starting Apr 21st 2014 View all Andy Warhol prints $test =
  • London Art Fair 2014 Features Our Sister Gallery Ink_d

    We’re pleased to announce that our sister gallery Ink-d will be exhibiting at the London Art Fair 2014. This will be the 26th edition of the fair that launches the art world year annually in the UK. Museum quality Modern British work will feature alongside exceptional contemporary work produced....
    We’re pleased to announce that our sister gallery Ink-d will be exhibiting at the London Art Fair 2014. This will be the 26th edition of the fair that launches the art world year annually in the UK. Museum quality Modern British work will feature alongside exceptional contemporary work produced by both established artists and new emerging talent.  Ink-d gallery shows a diverse range of painting, prints, sculpture and ceramics with an emphasis on the cutting edge. Sharing artrepublic’s ethos of supporting and nurturing local talent alongside rising stars and established artists, ink_d will be exhibiting some of our favourite artists including Ryan Callanan, Dan Baldwin, Stanley Donwood, Maria Rivans, Screen Prince, Carne Griffiths and Jake Wood-Evans. The fair, located at the Business Design Centre on Upper North Street, London, runs from Wednesday 15th to Sunday 19th of January. Booking in advance is strongly advised to avoid queuing at the venue.  Discover more about visiting London Art Fair 2014 Book tickets for London Art Fair 2014 online $test =
  • The Christmas of a Street Artist: How Ben Eine Swapped Eating Turkey for Painting Trains

    Renowned street artist Ben Eine told the Guardian this week, “When I was younger, every Christmas day I’d go with my mates to paint trains – it’s the one day of the year when the trains don’t run – so I actually didn’t have a Christmas dinner for 12 years.” Can you believe he sacr....
    Renowned street artist Ben Eine told the Guardian this week, “When I was younger, every Christmas day I’d go with my mates to paint trains – it’s the one day of the year when the trains don’t run – so I actually didn’t have a Christmas dinner for 12 years.” Can you believe he sacrificed gravy for graffiti? Such commitment to the street art cause! Ben Eine appears in a feature ‘Artist’s Christmas’ alongside artist Bob and Roberta Smith, sculptor Cornelia Parker and photographers Simon Roberts and Martin Parr. In the feature he discusses an artwork he’s created for a lucky friend’s Christmas present, “When I was little, I couldn’t spell Christmas so I used to write Happy Xmas in my cards. Then earlier this month I made this X for my friend’s son Xavier as a Christmas present and making it reminded me of writing happy Xmas as a kid.” This will be Ben Eine’s second festive season living in San Francisco, “Last year me and the misses just hung out at home with the tree, some presents and I cooked dinner.”  artrepublic wish Ben Eine a very merry Xmas – be it train painting or more conventional Christmas activities!  View all Ben Eine prints View 'Artist's Christmas' in the Guardian View all Street Art prints $test =
  • New Peter Blake Wooden Puzzles Set

    'Wooden Puzzles' is the latest portfolio set from Peter Blake. It has been exceptionally produced employing a huge variety of printing finishes with glazing, diamond dust, embossing not to mention the actual collaged parts on each print. Presented in a portfolio box with individual trays for each....
    'Wooden Puzzles' is the latest portfolio set from Peter Blake. It has been exceptionally produced employing a huge variety of printing finishes with glazing, diamond dust, embossing not to mention the actual collaged parts on each print. Presented in a portfolio box with individual trays for each print to protect the delicate collaged elements they are a real collector’s piece.  Returning to a collage of found ephemera he demonstrates his enormous skill in combining different visual elements to great effect. Drawing on his enormous archive of found objects and interesting imagery, Peter Blake effortlessly assimilates a range of visual media to create these intimate and beautiful collages. There are five prints in the Wooden Puzzles set 'The Kiss', '50', 'Friendship', 'Landscape' and 'Everly Brothers' rich with images that he has collected using a variety of textures and techniques. They are really lovely pieces that you will never tire of and are a wonderful example of Peter Blake at his best.  They are available as a set of five and there will be a limited number available as the single prints. Please call the Brighton gallery if you would like further information on +44 (0)1273 724829 View all Peter Blake Prints $test =
  • A Special Afternoon with Sir Peter Blake

    Last weekend artrepublic held an exclusive lunch with Sir Peter Blake and a lucky host of guests. Following a champagne reception and scrumptious food at the Hotel du Vin, Brighton, we were treated to a lively and illuminating question and answer session with the legendary Godfather of British Po....
    Last weekend artrepublic held an exclusive lunch with Sir Peter Blake and a lucky host of guests. Following a champagne reception and scrumptious food at the Hotel du Vin, Brighton, we were treated to a lively and illuminating question and answer session with the legendary Godfather of British Pop Art.  Peter Blake generously spoke to the captivated audience about his love of the circus, his eclectic collection of ephemera, his dislike of Roy Lichtenstein and the time he turned down the MoMA. With questions on topics ranging from album art to British youth culture and the threat of technology, it was a fascinating insight into the artistic life and career of the grandee of British visual culture. Below are some of the highlights of Peter’s candid and humorous dialogue – Peter Blake began by clarifying that he did not intend to spend the entire afternoon discussing the notorious Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover, but it wasn’t long before the matter of the illustrious Beatles artwork was raised… Artist Chemical X asked whether it was “good or bad being defined or known for one thing?” After an amusing expletive, Peter’s repartee revealed his sharp wit. He told the audience “I’m proud to have done it”, despite the frustrating challenge of his gallery at the time signing away the copyright. Peter doesn’t have an ‘original’ of the iconic Beatles cover because the image was an intricate real-life stage set made from life-size cut-outs, wax work models and textile creations. As a result Peter has been represented by a QC working for DACS (Design and Artists Copyright Society) attempting to get just financial recognition for the work (he was paid just £200 at the time).  Peter suggested that he has accepted and moved on from the Sgt. Pepper matter, “I’m not defined by it anymore.” He pointed to the resurgence of interest in Pop Art and his recent high profile projects helping the epochal album cover to “take its place in the order of things.”  Projects such as Peter’s current acclaimed exhibition at the National Museum Cardiff, ‘Llareggub: Peter Blake Illustrates Dylan Thomas’s Under Milk Wood’.  Peter’s pioneering Pop Art paintings were considered shocking and controversial by many at the time (the Swinging Sixties), can art still be shocking? “I don’t think I ever used shock tactics. I didn’t want to shock”, clarified Peter. He believes that it was the subject matter that was shocking at the time; his interest in wrestlers, popular icons and circuses. On the question of whether it is still possible to shock with art today, Peter replied with admirable conviction, “I’m sure you still could if you wanted to. I wouldn’t do it.” Where did his interest in the circus and fairground originate from? The circus has long been a source of inspiration for Peter. Motifs from the fairground and the circus can be found throughout his oeuvre, from very early figurative works to recent projects such as his three dimensional Circus Collage triptych. Peter earnestly explained that it is “a class thing”. He believes that he inherited his fascination with the popular entertainment extravaganzas from his working class parents. Thinking more about the circus as a source of inspiration he said “the glamour; that I enjoy” and “how I explain why I like it is difficult.” It certainly became clear that Peter is a true connoisseur of the circus. Like many of his fascinations he has intently submersed himself in the colourful world, passionately reeling off his favourite clowns and describing the sights of the circus in Paris in 1956.  “Ken Russell filmed a lot at the circus,” Peter told the audience. Ken Russell’s cutting edge documentary ‘Pop Goes the Easel’ is a beautiful portrait of a 29-year-old Peter. It records the many hours Peter spent sketching clowns and drawing behind the scenes of Sixties circuses.  How long does it take to create a suite? How do you explain your incredible work rate? Peter’s output has been prolific, much to the appreciation and enjoyment of our audience of collectors. His work rate is remarkable and incredibly inspiring. He explained that many works and projects overlap and the time it takes to create them varies considerably. His 2009 limited edition print ‘Aquarium’ took months of evenings of cutting out collaged elements and 2 weeks’ worth of sticking swarming fish.  There has been much publicity about his Dylan Thomas exhibition, the culmination of 28 years worth of infatuation and loving study of ‘Under Milk Wood’, but Peter also mentioned his portrait of fellow Pop Art figure and long-time friend David Hockney as an example of one of his more lengthy creations. He started the portrait of fellow Royal College of Art alumnus David Hockney in the 1960s and it was finally presented over thirty years later to the Tate in 2002. Peter went on to list an overwhelming number of projects that he’s currently focusing on finishing.  He reassured the astonished audience (feeling somewhat inadequate by this point), “I’m not working constantly”.  His studio is separate from his house. He gets the bus to the studio and usually works 11-6. This work rate alone is remarkable but Peter went on to admit that he usually works on something at home too! “It’s just a pleasure, I just love doing it” he told us.  He described working at home watching TV with his wife Chrissy. With the TV on in the background, he is able to watch the replays of the goals he misses whilst he’s drawing, collaging and painting.  Peter is big Chelsea football fan; he even created a 3ft collage for the club titled ‘Made from 100% Chelsea’.  Peter is a renowned collector of ephemera, what one piece would he save from a fire? This was a difficult question for Peter who is famous for his collections of found objects and ephemera. Although his collections were never created for public display, just for his own pleasure, a significant proportion of them went on display at the Museum of Everything in a show he co-curated with James Brett in 2010. “I keep special things in the studio”, Peter explained, listing music memorabilia, Victoria taxidermy, folk art, theatrical curios and vintage toys amongst his expansive and eclectic compilations. He revealed that his favourite are a hat worn by Douglas Fairbanks Jr., shoes worn by the famous Victorian dwarf General Tom Thumb and a stick and a pair of clown shoes once belonging to Max Miller. Staying true to his preservation of popular culture, he finally picked the Max Miller shoes to save from the hypothetical fire.  Throughout his career, Peter has worked with numerous preeminent musicians, designing album covers for the likes of The Beatles, The Who, Ian Dury, Eric Clapton, Paul Weller, Oasis and Madness. Does he think that the demise of the LP will be the death of music art?  Peter proclaimed that “the LP is coming back” and “luckily everything I’ve done has come out as an LP as well”. Thankfully, despite the vast changes that have occurred in the music industry in the decades Peter has been working, he explained that he still does exactly the same for contemporary musicians as he did for the Sixties bands. The only difference now is that he uses the computer. Actually, “I can’t use a computer,” he confessed, but someone in the studio assists him with translating his album designs, such as the recent Madness release, onto the computer. Peter has embraced new technology with an unusual enthusiasm and youthful vigour; he often speaks about his work exploring cutting-edge printing techniques such as 3D lenticular printing. Is he concerned about the impact of technological advances on the next generation of artists? In short, “Yes”. Peter and his wife and Chrissy recently visited an art college and Peter was shocked to find that almost every student there was working on a computer. He firmly asserted to the audience, “it should be used as a tool…  If everything was done on the computer it would be a bad thing.” But he accepted that modern technology is a “wonderful tool”. He also said that “I’m not the person to ask”, suggesting that this was really a matter for young artists at the beginning of their careers to address. Over the decades Peter’s Pop Art has moved from figurative oil painting, to intricate collages and bold graphic pieces, has he drifted into different styles and mediums? Peter answered this question with a beautiful metaphor. He described his career as a tree. The trunk and roots are his figurative painting and the branches represent his experiments with different techniques and directions. The image wonderfully describes his enthusiasm for experimentation and his terrific accomplishments in numerous mediums, but also his unwavering commitment to figurative painting, as seen in the exhibition ‘Llareggub: Peter Blake Illustrates Dylan Thomas’s Under Milk Wood’. Peter explained how he was actually advised to become a graphic designer and described himself as a “rogue graphic designer and a rogue painter.” There a crossovers and interchanges between the different disciplines through his artwork. Thinking about his numerous series and collections his fascination with graphics, typeface and text has been a lasting theme.  What would Peter Blake have been if not an artist? “Probably an electrician”. Peter’s first art school was part of the technical school and he very nearly studied for a trade until he realised he could do fine art instead, “art was a gift”. “I would have liked to work in wood as some sort of craftsman,” Peter explained. Although, he admitted when asked this question by the Sunday Times Magazine he replied “professional wrestler” in a rogue attempt to make the article more interesting! Of course, professional wrestlers are another fascination of Peter’s but he doubts that he would have made a great wrestler himself! Peter is described as the Godfather of British Pop Art, but which Pop artists have inspired him? “Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Stanley Spencer, Paul Klee, Joseph Cornell, Kurt Schwitters,” listed Peter, amongst a stream of other artists. “Not Andy Warhol”, he professed. And “I never liked Lichtenstein, I thought he was patronizing about comic books,” a popular subject matter that Peter has taken seriously throughout his career, “I use comic book imagery a lot” (a fine example is ‘London - Piccadilly Circus - The Convention of Comic Book Characters’). Peter has collaborated with numerous musicians and artists through his career and painted countless portraits of diverse subjects, but has he ever refused any commissions for moral or political reasons? “I’ve shot myself in the foot 3 times,” Peter confessed to the enthralled audience. His first show in New York in 1961 received terrible criticism from the New York critics and consequently Peter “vowed never to show in New York. It wasn’t a wise move”. Bravely turning down the MoMA’s offer of a show was “a mistake probably,” Peter admitted in his characteristically modest style.  Peter’s second refusal came when he “told the gallery don’t ever sell my work to Saatchi,” believing that “Saatchi will always be a dealer, not a collector.” That “might have been a mistake too,” Peter said smiling at the chuckling guests. His last big veto was a proposed portrait commission from a high-powered and renowned arms dealer.  The man had previously paid Lucian Freud £1mil to paint his portrait and invited Peter to drinks hoping to employ him to create a new work. Peter questioned whether it was the best decision to walk away from such a potentially sizable cheque but he proudly declared, “I turned down a lot over the years, I’ve been pretty moral really.” A moral, wise and witty artist; lunch with Peter Blake was a true treat! The audience and artrepublic were delighted to be in the presence of the Pop Art legend who generously spoke so openly about his career and thoughts on the art world. Our thanks go to Peter for his wonderful visit and fascinating words. Here’s a toast to one of Britain’s finest cultural luminaries. View all Peter Blake prints artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • 'Faith Less' and 'Lost Souls' by Dan Baldwin

    Dan Baldwin has just had a really successful solo show in London and is developing quite a celebrity following. He combines a visual feast of different elements that are carefully chosen and considered for their impact together as a whole. We have three stunning new prints framed in the gallery f....
    Dan Baldwin has just had a really successful solo show in London and is developing quite a celebrity following. He combines a visual feast of different elements that are carefully chosen and considered for their impact together as a whole. We have three stunning new prints framed in the gallery for you to enjoy, the small but perfectly formed 'Lost Souls I' & 'Lost Souls II' and the larger piece, 'Faith Less'. He uses childhood imagery that look like they come straight from old illustrations mixed with various skulls, knives, guns, collaged together with graffiti and loads of colour. His prints are amazing to look at and as your eye wanders across the surface you discover more and more about the piece, it draws you in, seduces you. They are beautifully printed with all the trimmings, embossing, glazing, gold leaf which really does justice to the original collages.  We recently had an evening at the gallery where Dan was doing a special signing of the book he has released called 'Fragile' that is a monograph of his work from the last 23 years to coincide with his recent exhibition. The books are available to buy at artrepublic Brighton but if you buy one of these three prints you get a free signed copy, although there are limited numbers of the signed book so don’t wait too long ! View all Dan Baldwin prints $test =
  • Peter Blake and Pauline Boty in 'Pop Goes the Easel'

    Following our fabulous lunch with Peter Blake at the weekend and our latest exhibition review, ‘Pauline Boty: Pop Artist and Woman’, the leading figures of the British Pop Art movement have been at the forefront of our minds.  ‘Pop Goes the Easel’ was Ken Russell’s first full-leng....
    Following our fabulous lunch with Peter Blake at the weekend and our latest exhibition review, ‘Pauline Boty: Pop Artist and Woman’, the leading figures of the British Pop Art movement have been at the forefront of our minds.  ‘Pop Goes the Easel’ was Ken Russell’s first full-length documentary for the BBC’s art series Monitor. His cutting edge 1962 documentary is a portrait of Peter Blake and Pauline Boty, as well as artists Peter Philips and Derek Boshier. This beautiful little film captures the excitement and energy of the pioneering young Pop artists.  In the film, a 29-year old Peter Blake explores his passion for pop icons, such as Brigitte Bardot. Don’t miss his magnificent bedspread embroidered with British military patches and flags – reminiscent of his work ‘Found Art: 24 Flags’. Pauline Boty, Britain’s great female pop art painter who was to die only four years later, performs in a short dramatic dream piece. She also features discussing her imaginative collages with Peter in her wonderfully vintage bedsit.  This beautiful glimpse into a bygone era reminds us how pioneering these artists really were and how their art captured the lives and loves of a generation. It is a must watch for any Peter Blake fan who can spot his reoccurring themes; circus, celebrity and popular ephemera. View all Peter Blake prints Read our exhibition review 'Pauline Boty: Pop Artist and Woman' View all Pop Art prints $test =
  • Keeki: Artist Interview

    Anthropomorphic fruit, sleeping narwhals and orating birds, welcome to the wonderful world of Keeki’s art. Following her latest release of limited edition prints, Keeki (accompanied by her cat Maude) talks to artrepublic about getting in trouble for drawing on wall....
    Anthropomorphic fruit, sleeping narwhals and orating birds, welcome to the wonderful world of Keeki’s art. Following her latest release of limited edition prints, Keeki (accompanied by her cat Maude) talks to artrepublic about getting in trouble for drawing on walls, her favourite vegetable and how she got started as an artist… Where does your name Keeki come from?  Keeki means cake in Japanese and as I’m influenced by Japanese art and I love cake it seemed the perfect name for me! Do you describe yourself as an artist or illustrator?  I would say I’m an illustrator predominantly as my work generally tells a story and usually accompanies some form of narrative. Tell us a bit about your new Fruit & Veg prints…  My new Fruit and Veg prints come from my French fruit prints that I sold a couple of years ago. I had so many more ideas for characters in my head and wanted to share them with everyone! What’s your favourite vegetable? A potato, they’re so versatile! Do you invent characters for your anthropomorphic foods? How important is a narrative element in your artwork?  Yes, each fruit and vegetable lends themselves to a certain character and a slight change in details make them all individuals with their own little story to tell! What made you become an artist? My Mum always used to read to me when I was little and my love of books and illustration stemmed from there really, particularly Roald Dahl stories and the illustrations of Quentin Blake. How did you get started? I always drew and used to get in trouble for drawing in my books, on walls, my toys, well quite a lot really! I remember copying pictures from The Beano and from a variety of books that I had and my brother and I used to make our own adventure books with illustrations. My sister is really good at drawing as well and it was always the class I most enjoyed at school. When I found out I could do a degree in illustration I was very happy! How do you approach the actual making of your work? I start with sketches then any research that’s required, ink them up, scan in and then colour up and amend if necessary. What’s your medium? It varies, I use ink, watercolour, printing and computer aided design. Where do you find inspiration? Reading, watching films, visiting galleries, travel and scanning the internet.  What’s your favourite children’s book? The Twits by Roald Dahl. What are you currently working on? I’m currently working on a couple of commissions for people and Christmas stock! Which of your works are you most proud of? The Flying Fox and Mr Citron from the French Fruits series. Do you care whether people like your work? I think an illustrator would be lying if they said they didn’t care what people thought of their work as it’s the public that they will be selling to. What memorable responses have you had to your work? The commissions I create for people generally get the best response as they are so personal, especially when they are for children. When are you happiest? When I’m at home in my pyjamas with my husband and cats drinking tea and drawing. Which artists do you most admire? There’s so many that I admire that it’s hard to pinpoint only a few but Charles Addams, Edmund Dulac, Aubrey Beardlsey, Paul Rand, Yoshitomo Nara and Marc Boutavant are all very inspirational and I’m sure I’ve missed lots of others! Describe an average day in the life of Keeki – I work full time so I get up at 6am, travel to work then head home about 4pm, have a cuddle with my cats and a cup of tea then I either do some sketching, play computer games or finish off any work I have in the evening. View all Keeki prints artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Video: artrepublic gallery highlights, inc. Peter Blake, Pakpoom Silaphan & Jake Wood-Evans

    View our collectable art highlights for December 2013 by taking a walk around the walls of our artrepublic gallery. Gallery team member Jess Miles takes you through three fantastic art works including an outstanding Peter Blake limited edition, a brilliant contemporary Pop Art piece by Pakpoom ....
    View our collectable art highlights for December 2013 by taking a walk around the walls of our artrepublic gallery. Gallery team member Jess Miles takes you through three fantastic art works including an outstanding Peter Blake limited edition, a brilliant contemporary Pop Art piece by Pakpoom Silaphan and a beautiful Jake Wood-Evans art work.  Peter Blake, ‘London – Piccadilly’ art print: This digital print on canvas is a signed limited edition of 8. You might have seen it in the London Suite which was a set of 10 prints which depicted different scenes and landmarks of London. This is Piccadilly Circus over run with comic book characters. We’ve got Spiderman and Superman, Minnie Mouse, Beano, there’s Charlie Brown in there also and Snoopy. It’s something that the kids are going to recognise and it’s pretty nostalgic, taking you back to your own childhood, which is something really charming.  Pakpoom Silaphan, ‘Double Ali on Coke’ art print: This is by Thai artist Pakpoom Silaphan. Silaphan creates really strong images using the backgrounds of advertising such as Coke, Fanta and Sprite and combines them with classic icons such as Marilyn Monroe, Andy Warhol, Bob Dylan and now he’s done Muhammad Ali. The printing methods used are silkscreen and giclee to create the effect of the original collage. It’s got some glazes where Muhammad Ali is and the background is quite matt which recreates the rustiness of the tin. As a child he collected advertising billboards then went away to study art, came back to Thailand and rediscovered them and now they form the foundations of his work.  Jake Wood-Evans, ‘Lucid Dream’ art print: Jake Wood-Evans tends to use the traditional medium of oil paint and is inspired by old masters. He turns it into something quite contemporary; he uses modern day techniques to get completely different effects. He’s brilliant at contrasting the light from the dark. This is one of his fresher pieces; it’s got more of a spring feel. It features two naked figures walking to the end of the jetty and the ending is left untold. It’s very ethereal and it takes you into a dream like state. It’s beautifully printed so you can actually see the texture of the canvas coming through on the print.  View all Peter Blake prints View all Pakpoom Silaphan prints View all Jake Wood-Evans prints Visit our gallery $test =
  • Glittering Soup Cans from New Artist Will Blanchard

    Following in the great tradition of Pop Art, Will Blanchard, a new artist at artrepublic Brighton, has released some fabulous sparkly prints. Using the ordinary “Soup Can” and transforming it into a glittering icon in reference to a commercial symbol of the modern day and by calling ....
    Following in the great tradition of Pop Art, Will Blanchard, a new artist at artrepublic Brighton, has released some fabulous sparkly prints. Using the ordinary “Soup Can” and transforming it into a glittering icon in reference to a commercial symbol of the modern day and by calling it Pop Art Soup he creates a clever twist on the Warhol soup can and Pop Art’s use of the everyday object. As a new artist we are always intrigued to find out more about them and it turns out that Will Blanchard is also a drummer. He states that he was from a family that never threw anything away which resulted in him having a keen sense of re-using things, everything having a value however random, which aligned with the concepts of the readymade. Commenting that in his work he is “juxtaposing random objects together in surrealistic punk fusion using collected material recycled from trash, skips flea markets the street, broken toys and other useless stuff to create new forms” his work may appear nonchalant but he successfully uses familiar forms with new meaning and context. Framed in the Brighton gallery now they are available in no less than five vibrant colour variations, Black, Red, Pink, Silver and Purple. They are a treat of a print, really reasonably priced and everyone loves a bit of sparkle ! The prints are not currently online so please call the Brighton Gallery for further information on 01273 724829 $test =

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