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Monthly Archives: November 2013

  • Lovely Lenticulars from Peter Blake and Damien Hirst

    We are Lenticular-tastic in the Brighton Gallery as we have just received these absolutely stunning 3D Lenticular prints from two of the UK’s best loved artists Peter Blake and Damien Hirst. They offer so much more than a standard 2D print making you part of the works themselves as you....
    We are Lenticular-tastic in the Brighton Gallery as we have just received these absolutely stunning 3D Lenticular prints from two of the UK’s best loved artists Peter Blake and Damien Hirst. They offer so much more than a standard 2D print making you part of the works themselves as you experience them by moving around to view the depth and perspective created by this amazing technique. Peter Blake has released his super popular “Eiffel Tower” piece (in a Small and a Large version), a print that sold out a few years ago and is definitely one of his most popular images to date. The famous Parisian landmark is surrounded by butterflies appealing to the romantic in all of us. There is also the equally iconic Empire State Building “Dylan Thomas, Kim Novak and James Joyce in New York” featuring three of Blake’s favourite figures and some dancing girls that crop up in several of his other prints. The Spot paintings are possible some of the most immediately recognisable images an artist has ever created. Synonymous with his name Damien Hirst’s Spots have always been   the subject of much discussion. Here “Psilocybin” appears in three-dimensional format luring you into an abstract space; they are quite mesmerising. If you would like any further information on these Lenticulars or any other prints the please call the Brighton gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 View all Peter Blake prints  View all Damien Hirst prints  Read our article on Lenticular Prints  $test =
  • Sara Pope: Artist Interview

    Sara Pope is best known for her seductive paintings and limited edition prints of big, bright and beautiful celebrity lips. Her bold images pack a thought provoking Pop Art punch, raising questions about the ideals of beauty and the transience of celebrity culture.....
    Sara Pope is best known for her seductive paintings and limited edition prints of big, bright and beautiful celebrity lips. Her bold images pack a thought provoking Pop Art punch, raising questions about the ideals of beauty and the transience of celebrity culture. Here she tells artrepublic about her work in the fashion industry, her maths degree detour and her admiration for Grayson Perry… You have described your series of paintings as “collections”; in what ways are you influenced by your work in the fashion industry? I get a lot of inspiration and ideas from the fashion industry, ranging  from themes of ideals of beauty, style and presentation in the media, to colour trends.Also the way I work is to make series or ‘collections’. Seeing works as a group with common stylistic elements for me strengthens the idea, as with seasonal collections in fashion. Your ‘Violent Femmes’ collection distorts female faces with bold washes of colour – are you interested in how female images are so frequently manipulated in the media? I do find it interesting how far it’s now possible with technology to alter and ‘improve’ an image towards what’s perceived to be perfection. I like to take that and add an element of disintegration or distortion.  Does the title ‘Violent Femmes’ refer to violence that women experience or administer?  The images I started with in these works were mainly quite typical magazine beauty shots, with a strong feeling of passivity. Applying the paint in this way changed that energy altogether, which made me think of the name. Are your glossy lips a metaphor for anything? Extraordinary beauty and allure are inevitably transient… I think these perfect glossy pouts characterised by drips of colour represent this dissolution. As a shoe designer do you think you’ll ever do a collection of paintings of feet? Hmm, maybe one for those foot fetishists out there… no, not as yet .. but something I’m playing around with just now does have an element of shoes. What made you become an artist and how did you get started? I’ve always loved creating things and drawing, so after an initial maths degree detour I started working in magazine design and art direction. My interest in fashion then led me to study a diploma in shoe design at the London College of Fashion. I’ve worked as a shoe designer for many years since, and though I’ve enjoyed it a lot I realised at one point that it wasn’t fully satisfying creatively .. so I started painting. How do you approach the actual making of your work? In the fashion industry I’m constantly surrounded by images of women in this specific context. So the themes that I work with stem naturally from this. I’ll start with an idea, this can come from either doing some research, or an idea just randomly popping into my mind . I’ll mull it over for a while, then start work playing out the idea. Sometimes I’m happy with it straight away, and sometimes morphs into something slightly different. What’s your medium? Anything which best lends itself to expressing my ideas, I’m quite happy to try new mediums and new approaches. What would you say are the main themes you pursue? Beauty, celebrity and consumerism. Where do you find inspiration? Fashion, advertising and art. Which of your works are you most proud of? The first Lips series distilled and clarified for me the themes I’m interested in and the kind of look I like my work to have. The response to the work, especially 'Lips 02' also confirms that they are images which communicate something, and people relate to. Do you care whether people like your work? Yes absolutely, I’d like my work to be attractive and for people to desire it, but primarily I have to like it. What memorable responses have you had to your work? I get a lot of ‘I love your lips’! What have you sacrificed for your art? In the beginning financial stability, but I’ve always been able to do shoe design alongside making art so it hasn’t felt like too much of a desperate sacrifice.  Do you suffer for your art? In a way, yes. In the period before an idea really comes together which I know I’m satisfied with, I can experience extreme self doubt. It’s definitely not a relaxing process. When are you happiest? When I’ve completed a new series, gone away and come back to it with a fresh objective eye and realise I like it… and when I get a new idea to start work on, is exciting.  Which artists do you most admire? Grayson Perry, not only for his art, but because he is so extremely articulate about his work and his place in the current art world. Francis Bacon, seeing his paintings opened my mind to art. What work of art would you most like to own? Anything by Bacon… or maybe ‘Green turban’ by Tamara De Lempicka, appealing to my fashiony side, I love the sumptuous use of colour and beautiful style. If you weren’t an artist what would you be doing? I currently still do shoe design projects, so of course that… but I can’t imagine not making art. View all Sara Pope prints View our Sara Pope biography If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Peter Blake's 'Under Milk Wood' Exhibition Opens to Great Acclaim

    Last night artrepublic was honoured to be at the grand private opening of ‘Llareggub: Peter Blake Illustrates Dylan Thomas’s Under Milk Wood’ at the National Museum Cardiff. artrepublic’s director, Lawrence Alkin, described the exhibition of Peter Blake’s illustrations as “absolutely st....
    Last night artrepublic was honoured to be at the grand private opening of ‘Llareggub: Peter Blake Illustrates Dylan Thomas’s Under Milk Wood’ at the National Museum Cardiff. artrepublic’s director, Lawrence Alkin, described the exhibition of Peter Blake’s illustrations as “absolutely stunning”.  The exhibition is a culmination of 28 years worth of loving study into Dylan Thomas’s BBC radio play ‘Under Milk Wood’ by Pop Art legend Sir Peter Blake. It features 170 visual interpretations of the poetic masterpiece, including incredible drawings, beautiful watercolours, mixed media works and even photographs that Blake took in Laugharne in the 1970s.  Yesterday’s opening is part of the launch of a year-long series of events to mark the 100th anniversary of Dylan Thomas’s birth. The exhibition has attracted considerable press attention, featuring in The Telegraph, The Times, Wales Online and The Guardian. A fantastic interview with Peter Blake about the Under Milk Wood project was aired on BBC Radio 4’s ‘Front Row’ last night.  This incredible exhibition cements Peter Blake’s position as the grandee of British culture. Don’t miss it! View all Peter Blake prints View photos from the private opening in our Facebook album View our 'Llareggub: Peter Blake Illustrates Dylan Thomas’s Under Milk Wood' exhibion review Read more about the project in our article 'Under Milk Wood: a Play Illustrated by Peter Blake' Listen to Radio 4's interview with Peter Blake $test =
  • Andy Wilx: Artist Interview

    Contemporary artist Andy Wilx is a gifted illustrator, printmaker and storyteller. His work is characterised by intricate iridescent patterns and enchanting characterful animals. He kindly took the time to tell us all about his beautiful new prints, his inspirati....
    Contemporary artist Andy Wilx is a gifted illustrator, printmaker and storyteller. His work is characterised by intricate iridescent patterns and enchanting characterful animals. He kindly took the time to tell us all about his beautiful new prints, his inspirations and life as an artist working in his basement studio.  Tell us a bit about your new prints… Up until now I’ve been producing all my prints at home from my basement. While this has allowed me the freedom to experiment it has restricted the size of print I can produce. In the late summer of this year, with the amazing support of Dario Illari and the skill of William at Jealous Printing Studio I’ve produced much larger versions of my work. This has been a game changer for my work and me.You can expect more big stuff in the future! The two new big prints are ‘Bear in a Boat (large)’ and ‘Dreaming of Fish (large)’.  ‘Bear in a Boat’ started as a commission I did for some friends who had just moved from the city to the coast. I took the idea of that image and reworked it with a bear and some fish. Some find the bear to be sad; others think he’s contemplating the fish. I agreed with the latter and produced the next print ‘Dreaming of Fish’. I love this image because you can’t quite put your finger on the bear’s expression. People have said it’s like looking into a fantastical mirror. If you asked me to be all arty about it I would say it’s about addiction, the bear’s addiction to fish and the small bird is breaking that circle of addiction as if a little spring of hope. But no, it’s a picture of a bear dreaming about fish. You’ve been described as a story teller – do you tell stories with your prints?  I hope so. I like my work to set a scene, introduces characters and suggest a narrative. I want the viewer to ask questions; why is this bear in a boat? Where has he come from, where is he going? What’s with the fish? I don’t have the answers, there’s no beginning, middle or end in my head. I leave that up to the viewer to create the narrative, that’s the fun of art. Inspired by children’s literature, how do you think your prints speak to adults?  I think all good children’s illustration should speak to adults. Take Sir John Tenniel and his magical illustrations of ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’ or the inspiring work of Maurice Sendak’s ‘Where the Wild Things Are’. Their illustrations have maturity and the characters have personality that we can all identify with, there’s no dumbing down. I hope I can achieve that. What interests you about the relationship between man and nature? I enjoy putting animals into a human context, the juxtapose of a seagull in your living room or a bear sailing in a boat, but that’s not to anthropomorphise them. I also love the relationship children have with animals, there’s an initial wary respect but once that confidence barrier is broken there’s an instant honest and real friendship. I hope my work reflects a friendship like that. Would you describe your work as environmentalist? It’s obvious that we’re encroaching upon and devastating our planet and the homes of those who can’t speak-up for themselves. It’s not a conscious thing but I always consider the animal in my pictures to be the hero and the towering city skyline in the background to be the villain. So yes in a way I guess I do. What’s your favourite animal? The urban fox. They have all the attributes that inspire me. They thrive out of place, they have heaps of character and if, on an evening drive, you happen to see one dart across the road in front of you it’s like watching a single scene from another story. Where did he come from and where is he going? What made you become an artist? The lack of creativity in my previous life as a graphic designer. How did you get started? I’ve always illustrated but it was a short screen-printing course I was given as a 40th birthday present that inspired me to give up my job and become a fulltime artist. I simply fell in love with the process of printing and the results I achieved. How do you approach the actual making of your work? I draw all my pictures by hand, sometimes using a pen, sometimes using a Wacom Tablet on my computer. Whichever it is they are all hand draw. The drawings are then transferred onto acetate, each colour being a separate page. That acetate is then exposed onto a silk screen using a photo emulsion to create the negative, one screen for each colour. All this is done in my basement and washed down in the garden. Then I apply each colour in turn. I only use water-based ink, which I mix myself using either silver, for cold colours, or gold, for warm colours, as a base. This gives all my work an iridescent effect. What’s your medium? Screen Printing is my medium of choice at the moment, it suites my graphic style. But I plan to start producing some paintings next year. What would you say are the main themes you pursue? I think there are two themes that come across, character and narrative. My bird prints are more character studies. The birds are set to wallpaper patterns suggesting they’re inside and not out where they should be, but it’s the character of that bird I’m interested in. On the other hand my bear prints set a scene and introduce a character then asks the viewer to conjure a narrative. How do you choose your subjects? I don’t choose my subjects as much as I start to sketch and something comes out. More often than not I’ll draw something that wont make it to print because, as an ex graphic designer I can’t help but consider the marketable value of an image, I have to make a living, but I’ll always finish the drawing. Where do you find inspiration? Really I’ve got no idea. Which of your works are you most proud of? On my studio wall I have a drawing of a Dalek that I did when I was six years old. That’s the one I show people when they visit. It’s quite good.  Do you care whether people like your work? I understand that everyone has different taste so no not really. What’s more important is to create work that people don’t ignore. There’s nothing worse than someone walking past your work and not even registering it’s there. I don’t mind if they don’t like it as long as they’ve stopped and considered it. Anyway, when someone really like’s your work that’s worth a hundred that don’t.  What memorable responses have you had to your work? Recently I’ve been delivering my large framed prints to people’s houses and it’s amazing when you realise that it’s going to take pride-of-place in someone’s front room or in their kitchen.  What’s the best advice anyone ever gave you? Spend as much time as you can with other artists. It’s so important to share ideas and keep learning from others. What have you sacrificed for your art? I’ve given up nothing of value. The new iPhone maybe. It’s all thanks to the unwavering support of my wife, Julia, that I’m able to do this. Maybe she’s better placed to answer that question. Do you suffer for your art? I cut the top of my finger off the other day trimming paper. It hurt. Is there an art form you don’t relate to? I don’t get those clusters of little clay figures you see in crafty galleries. They remind me of the 1932 Tod Browning film ‘Freaks’. Do people really put them in their homes? That said I loved Antony Gormley’s ‘Field’. Which artists do you most admire? Stanley Donwood, Damien Hirst, Tara McPherson, Ray Caesar to name only four. What work of art would you most like to own? I was going to buy a print by Ray Caesar called ‘Golden Words’ but didn’t and I hear Damien Hirst bought it. So I think I’m going to sneak into his gallery and steal it. If you weren’t an artist what would you be doing? If I weren’t an artist I would be set up in a tent somewhere in Africa or Antarctica or on a boat in an ocean or deep beneath it, wherever I was I would be studying some kind of animal.  Describe an average day in the life of Andy Wilx... Kids, drawing, printing and wine in no particular order. View all Andy Wilx prints Read our Andy Wilx biography artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Video of collage artist Joe Webb

    Check out this short video featuring collage artist Joe Webb and his wonderfully surreal cut-out creations. See Joe at work surrounded by his distinctive vintage imagery and his beautifully framed limited edition prints. Can you spot ‘Daydream’ amongst the fifties beauties and retro applian....
    Check out this short video featuring collage artist Joe Webb and his wonderfully surreal cut-out creations. See Joe at work surrounded by his distinctive vintage imagery and his beautifully framed limited edition prints. Can you spot ‘Daydream’ amongst the fifties beauties and retro appliances? Joe Webb’s fan base is justifiably soaring. He’s recently announced that he will be showing original collages alongside his prints at the famous Saatchi gallery in a few weeks. We highly recommend investing in this talented artist and his handmade mixed media magic now… View all Joe Webb prints Read our artist interview with Joe Webb $test =
  • artrepublic artists raise a lot of love for British Heart Foundation

    artrepublic was delighted to be at the glamorous Tunnel of Love last night. The British Heart Foundation’s art and fashion dinner party, in its third year, attracted a host of high-profile faces in an effort to support the fight against heart disease.  Two of our top artists, Dan B....
    artrepublic was delighted to be at the glamorous Tunnel of Love last night. The British Heart Foundation’s art and fashion dinner party, in its third year, attracted a host of high-profile faces in an effort to support the fight against heart disease.  Two of our top artists, Dan Baldwin and Sir Peter Blake, wowed the likes of Yasmin Le Bon, Alexa Chung, Daisy Lowe, Hugh Grant and Erin O’Connor, with their generously donated artworks. Over £230,000 was raised for charity, with a Dan Baldwin vase contributing £11,000 to the total (we can reveal that Hugh Grant was outbid on the Baldwin vase!). It was an amazing evening of top notch art and celebrity spotting at charity’s most fashionable night. Congratulations to Dan Baldwin and Peter Blake for their fantastic auction contributions! View all Dan Baldwin prints View all Peter Blake prints Read more about Tunnel of Love $test =
  • Jo Peel: Things Change

    Last year Jo Peel made an epic street art animation film titled ‘Things Change’. She described the piece as “an optimistic look at the idea of human impermanence.” It playfully explored our dynamic relationship with the natural world.  Jo Peel spent three weeks painting a big....
    Last year Jo Peel made an epic street art animation film titled ‘Things Change’. She described the piece as “an optimistic look at the idea of human impermanence.” It playfully explored our dynamic relationship with the natural world.  Jo Peel spent three weeks painting a big wall at Village Underground, Shoreditch, to create the 3 minute animation. She incorporated physical objects such as plastic bags, boxes and rocks to the adjacent pavement to add another dimension and build an immersive element into the piece.  In the fascinating film the buildings and debris of human exploitation of our natural environment decay and give way to the force of nature once again. The film was screened in a little one-seater cinema at Jo’s solo show ‘In The Mean Time’. We’re super excited to announce that we now have have her accompanying limited edition print available to buy! ‘Things Change’ is a beautiful signed giclee from a limited edition of just 40. View all Jo Peel prints View all Street Art prints View our Jo Peel biography  $test =
  • Is it The End for New York Graffiti Mecca 5Pointz?

    5Pointz Aerosol Art Center is an outdoor art exhibit space in Long Island City, New York, considered to be the world’ premiere ‘graffiti Mecca’. It is surely doomed after federal judge Frederic Block ruled on Friday, “the building, unfortunately, is going to have to come down.” Artists h....
    5Pointz Aerosol Art Center is an outdoor art exhibit space in Long Island City, New York, considered to be the world’ premiere ‘graffiti Mecca’. It is surely doomed after federal judge Frederic Block ruled on Friday, “the building, unfortunately, is going to have to come down.” Artists have been painting the 200,000-square-foot warehouse since the 1990s without intervention of the property owners, Jerry and David Wolkoff, who now have plans to redevelop the site. One of the artists, Block, is leading a group of artists in a lawsuit against the Wolkoffs. Lawyers for the 5Pointz graffiti artists cited an obscure law that prohibits the destruction of art in their effort to block the redevelopment. However, whether the arosol works are protected under statute is controversial, because the works are usually illegal.  “I love the work and it’s going to tear my heart out to see it torn down, but as a judge I have to apply the law,” Federal Judge Frederic Block said, referring to the owner’s right to develop the property. 5Pointz reputation as an epicentre of the graffiti scene has united aerosol artists from across the globe. Its looming destruction is part of a major debate about the legal status of street art. View all graffiti prints View all street art prints Read more about 5Pointz $test =
  • Sarah Hardacre: Artist Interview

    This week we have launched our first ever collection of prints by contemporary artist Sarah Hardacre. She generously made the trip all the way from Salford to Brighton to meet with us and introduce her brilliant work. This article delves into our animated conversatio....
    This week we have launched our first ever collection of prints by contemporary artist Sarah Hardacre. She generously made the trip all the way from Salford to Brighton to meet with us and introduce her brilliant work. This article delves into our animated conversation about tower blocks, titillation, Modernism, feminism and the glamour and grit of Salford’s social housing experiments… Over a brew in one of Brighton’s quintessentially quirky coffee shops Sarah talked us through our new collection. We currently have four limited edition silkscreen prints, three of which are classic Sarah Hardacre works featuring backdrops of Salford tower blocks juxtaposed with the sensual curves of cut-outs from ‘gentleman’s’ magazines. The fourth, ‘Jodie Knew It and Remained Professional’, is a reworking of the iconic Marlboro cigarette packet. The photographic collage has Sarah’s signature bare-breasted beauty clasping the wrist of a rugged vintage cowboy.   ‘Jodie Knew It and Remained Professional’ was Sarah’s first work instigated by a brief from a fellow artist. The piece came about through her participation in the group show ‘Your Garden is Looking a Mess Could You Please Tidy it up’, curated by contemporary artist Andrew Curtis. The group of artists, including Sir Peter Blake, were given the iconic Marlboro cigarette flip box designed in 1955 by Philip Morris as their starting point. Through the cigarette packet, which currently faces the predicament of a progressively imageless future, the exhibition sought to explore print ephemera in this period of dismantling, re-invention and possible cultural renewal.  The Marlboro pack was a perfect springboard for Sarah. Cigarette advertising was at its peak in the 1950s and ‘60s (as Man Men taught us) and had a major aspirational affect on people’s desire to display their identity. It is an industry dominated by print ephemera, with a glamorous past and a perilous future. Sarah’s work is fuelled by her 20th century social history interests, her fascination in the contrasts between the aspiration and the reality of 60’s architecture, Modernism, working class society, sexuality and social policy. It is deeply rooted in her passion for the print industry and fundamentally concerned with identity; her own, that of women and the working classes.  Sarah created a second piece for the group show, ‘Those Little Bits of Soot You Can’t Sweep Up’, a candid collage of nuns smoking in front of the wonderful example of ‘60s architecture that is ‘West Salford Youth Club’. The composition and colours echo the Marlboro packet but the subject of four nuns in restricted habits fuelling their nicotine habit in Salford is far from that of the autonomous Wild West cowboy! Sarah explained how her work can be considered an exploration of Salford’s post-industrial landscape. Her prints are a charting of her personal environment, the city she has lived in for 12 years now.  Sarah spoke eagerly and knowledgably about Salford’s radical social history, including the Battle of Bexley Square (a demonstration of unemployed workers’ in 1931) and the fact that it was the home of the Pankhurst sisters, infamous political activists and leaders of the British suffragette movement. Her thorough research into the Salford’s colourful history provides the foundation of her artwork. The history and environment of Salford situates her silkscreens and collages, imbuing them with a fascinating richness and depth.  Salford, like many British cities, was subjected to post-war housing experiments which were dominated by Modernist architecture. Modernism in design and architecture emerged in the aftermath of WW1 and the Russian Revolution. It rejected history and applied ornament and believed that design and technology could transform society. Modernism was driven by the search for utopia, an idea that the world could be fundamentally rethought. Wars brought a massive need for housing and provided the new technology necessary to develop architectural design. Political social policy was intrinsically linked to the new developments in architecture and Sarah explained how her work explores the social implications of this desire to build a brave new society.  Investigating Britain’s high-rise housing experiments, Sarah’s work is packed with photographs of sixties tower-blocks and social housing estates from local history archives. The architectural elements reference her exploration into the effects of urban regeneration. She explained how this new, modern and aspirational architecture was designed to induce collectivism but has instead left a legacy of alienation, serving to marginalise those who live there. Gone are the days of back allies full of children playing and women hanging washing between rows of terraced houses, replaced by suburban towers of individuals plugged into electrical appliances.   Sarah is particularly interested in the effect these literally ‘boxed off’ neighbourhoods had on Salford’s working class community. She explained how Salford’s Working Class Movement Library has been a great source of inspiration and imagery. In all of the backgrounds in all of her prints the absence of any people is tangible. There’s no unemployed men demonstrating, women nattering on the street corners or children crowded round an ice-cream van.  Her work asks whether this avant garde utopian housing accompanied by an influx of ‘convenient’ appliances effectively ripped the heart out of the community.   “I am concerned with how corners were cut between the triangle of private financiers, local authorities and hypnotized town planners to knock up social housing at high volume and low quality which caused such vast architectural differences between the classes”, Sarah declares. She points to the ironic contrast between the visionary Brutalist architecture that was intended to be integrating and protective and the brutal reality of the working class people actually living in these concrete constructions. She suggests that life has a rawness that is constrained by these dehumanising architectural grids. Behind the net curtains, in front of the TV and under the strip lighting, people “dance and drink and screw because there’s nothing else to do” (Pulp, ‘Common People’). At the heart of Sarah’s work is her “personal questioning of the roles of women within this new futuristic world of the home, specifically within the context of forever ‘re-generating’ working class communities.” Sarah doesn’t shy away from questioning the position of women in post-war housing experiments; in fact the issue is boldly laid bare. The Salford skylines are overshadowed by the sensual shapes of her appropriated second-hand porn models (or ‘gentleman’s’ magazines as she prefers to call them!). The rounded tummies, buxom chests and tufts of body hair dramatically contrast with the uniformity of the hard-edged, phallic housing.  Of her sometimes explicit female imagery Sarah says, “I think I can get away with it because I’m a woman.” Her selection of sixties and seventies models is celebratory in a sense, they appear proud and powerful. Their natural curves and sexuality represent a stance against the male dominated environment, technology and politics. Just as Sarah’s Salford shots can be read as nostalgic of a lost era of optimism, her scantily clad women wistfully hark back to a time before fake tan, manicured body hair and plastic surgery; a time when erotic images were much closer to the reality of women’s bodies.  Sarah highlighted how the iconic poster for the 1958 American science fiction film ‘Attack of the 50 Foot Woman’ represents the energy and power women have to burst out of their restrictive environments. You can see the influence of this image in her prints which have enlarged women straddling sixties architecture. She previously wrote, “The women presented in the prints and collages draw strength from fragilities and bring promise for change on a grander scale.”  Is Sarah Hardacre a feminist? We had to ask. She is certainly influenced by feminist artists such as Penny Slinger and Linder Sterling. Her interest in social history includes radical women’s movements and the changing role of women in working class communities. She acknowledges her work’s position in the contentious history of the female nude as well as her own position as a female artist. However, she said she’s not quite ready to answer the question. Her work is more about exploring, investigating and raising questions rather than asserting a political or philosophical position. Currently Sarah describes her work as biographical rather than feminist.  Sarah’s highly personal prints explore her identity as a Salford resident, a woman, an artist and a printer. They investigate her own family history, her observations of depravation working for charities such as ChildLine and the NHS drug services; they reflect her passion for printing, a traditional, labour-based, industry and her infectious enthusiasm for social history. We asked whether she thought she could apply her aesthetic to a different environment and she revealed that she’s currently working on a New York project, exploring city housing authority tower blocks. We’re excited to see how Sarah’s art develops. The questions she’s raising in her work are fascinating and important. The fact that she manages to raise them in such a visually appealing way is surely the key to her success. We asked whether she thinks she’ll get to a stage with her art where she can answer the questions she raises. “I have got stuff to stay” she replied. After the most interesting cup of tea, maybe ever, we don’t doubt it.  View all Sarah Hardacre prints Read our Sarah Hardacre biography Image Credits: Sarah Hardacre Shirley Baker Salford 1960s (Tate) Penelope Singer, 'Waiting-Room' : photographic collage on card (1977)  Linder Sterling artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • John Doe's Perfect Storm

    Last week we released a limited edition print by a new artist, John Doe. The beautiful work, titled ‘Annie’, depicts a small girl whipping up a tornado of clouds over the Earth. It serendipitously arrived in the midst of the major storms that hit the UK!  The giclee print has been creat....
    Last week we released a limited edition print by a new artist, John Doe. The beautiful work, titled ‘Annie’, depicts a small girl whipping up a tornado of clouds over the Earth. It serendipitously arrived in the midst of the major storms that hit the UK!  The giclee print has been created using a combination of techniques and special effect layers. In this little video you can see the incredible finish these unusual inks achieve-  The giclee, printed on Hahnemuhle Photo Ray 308gsm archival stock paper, has been screenprinted with 2 different iridescent layers and spot varnish. We think the subtle twinkle of the stars and the pearlescent glow of the little girl’s dress make the print truly out of this world!  View all John Doe prints View all New Arrival prints $test =

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