Monthly Archives: September 2013

  • Jo Peel: Artist in Residence

    Urban artist Jo Peel is this week’s artist in residence at ‘Never Under Dressed’, the luxury fashion and beauty digital magazine. As well as an interesting interview the magazine feature includes four galleries of beautiful images about Jo Peel, including photos of her work, studio space and ....
    Urban artist Jo Peel is this week’s artist in residence at ‘Never Under Dressed’, the luxury fashion and beauty digital magazine. As well as an interesting interview the magazine feature includes four galleries of beautiful images about Jo Peel, including photos of her work, studio space and inspiration.  The interview covers Jo’s beginnings as an interior designer, “That’s what I thought all people did if they liked art and wanted to make a job out of it”, her exodus from London and her ceaseless fascination with buildings and the modern metropolis.  Destroy The fashion writers may have picked up on Jo’s work when Chanel recently commissioned her to create three short films, which they are planning show across Asia in the coming months, in their stores and on giant billboards. We love that the overall-clad street artist is causing a stir in the fashion world and we’re delighted that her intricate and highly individual street art is attracting the attention it deserves!  Read the 'Never Under Dressed' Jo Peel article View all Jo Peel prints View all Street Art prints $test =
  • Pure Evil Live Painting Time Lapse Video

    Yesterday urban art extraordinaire Pure Evil whipped up a street art storm at Manchester’s Buy Art Fair 2013. Painting live in front of an audience, the charismatic artist used stencils and spray paint to create original canvases from his Nightmare Series, including ‘Vladimir Putin’s Nightm....
    Yesterday urban art extraordinaire Pure Evil whipped up a street art storm at Manchester’s Buy Art Fair 2013. Painting live in front of an audience, the charismatic artist used stencils and spray paint to create original canvases from his Nightmare Series, including ‘Vladimir Putin’s Nightmare’ and ‘Frank Sinatra’s Nightmare’. Many thanks to photographer Joby Catto for producing this great time lapse video capturing the artist at work – Destroy Read more about these new Pure Evil works and see more videos from the Buy Art Fair event in our new article ‘Pure Evil Live Painting Putin’s Nightmare’ View all Pure Evil prints Read our article 'Pure Evil Live Painting Putin's Nightmare' Read more about Buy Art Fair 2013 $test =
  • Pure Evil Live Painting Prince Philip's Nightmare

    Destroy Yesterday was the highly anticipated VIP opening of the biggest UK art fair outside of London, Manchester’s Buy Art Fair 2013. The highlight, if we do say so ourselves, was the brilliant live painting performance we commissioned by urban art extraordinaire Pure Evil. Pure Evil trave....
    Destroy Yesterday was the highly anticipated VIP opening of the biggest UK art fair outside of London, Manchester’s Buy Art Fair 2013. The highlight, if we do say so ourselves, was the brilliant live painting performance we commissioned by urban art extraordinaire Pure Evil. Pure Evil travelled up to Manchester, spray can in hand, to take centre stage in a live painting exploit. The charismatic and charming street artist generously gave VIP guests a glimpse into his painting process by creating original canvases live at the fair. The commission was described by Pure Evil as a “James Bond mission… Get in, blow the place up… leave on Friday morning”. In true Bond style the performance was suitably thrilling and thoroughly British, with HRH the Queen featuring as his subject (a bit of a role reversal there). You can watch Pure Evil’s Royal portrait being unveiled thanks to his sharp spray painting skills and impressively steady hand in this video- Destroy The Queen Elizabeth portrait is titled ‘Prince Philip’s Nightmare’ and is the latest addition to Pure Evil’s wildly successful Nightmare Series. It shows HRH receiving the characteristic Nightmare treatment with a solitary tear rolling down her aristocratic cheek in an unusual display of emotion from the head of state. The series has explored famous females from the 20th century so it seems only right that the female monarch would appear sooner or later. “In a recent documentary about the 20th century it was described as being a very male century. I’m hoping to bring the feminine back with this series and save the planet,” said Pure Evil once. With girl power in mind and bolstered by the Mancunian audience, Pure Evil whipped up three patriotic paintings brimming with British iconography. The works are reminiscent of the King of Pop, Andy Warhol’s iconic portrait of the Queen in his Reigning Queens Series. Pure Evil’s Queen looks equally regal sporting her favourite Royal ‘bling’, an ornate crown and a classic diamond necklace, depicted in eye-catching silver spray paint. Destroy As well as ‘Prince Philip's Nightmare’, Pure Evil treated audiences to a live painting performance of two ‘Frank Sinatra’s Nightmare’ canvases. One of these was taken directly from his recently released silkscreen limited edition, ‘Frank Sinatra’s Nightmare – Red’. Both were expertly stencilled portraits of an equally formidable female, Ava Gardner. The silver-screen siren oozes femme fatale magnetism and Pure Evil tantalised the crowd spray- painting her seductive and slightly frightening stare. Everyone was massively grateful to Pure Evil for his generous demonstration. The street art favourite further demonstrated his generosity by charitably donating 25% of the price of his new canvas originals to the Buy Art Fair’s charity partners MacMillan Cancer Support. On Monday he had donated an artwork to a Macmillan auction and the piece was purchased by Welsh soprano Kathryn Jenkins. With the celebrity seal of approval, his latest creations are already proving to be highly collectable classics. Destroy artrepublic will be at the Buy Art Fair 2013 until Saturday 29th September. Visit us at booth 84 where we have the Pure Evil magic available. If you’re interested in Pure Evil and his powerful women you can… View all Pure Evil prints View our Pure Evil biography artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   $test =
  • Dan Baldwin's Solo Show 'Fragile'

    Destroy Fragile, opened last week in London and is showcasing some of Dan Baldwin’s newest works on canvas and ceramic. Working with collage and a range of mixed media, his eclectic style fuses images from childhood nostalgia, with the more sinister skulls, knives, razor blades and othe....
    Destroy Fragile, opened last week in London and is showcasing some of Dan Baldwin’s newest works on canvas and ceramic. Working with collage and a range of mixed media, his eclectic style fuses images from childhood nostalgia, with the more sinister skulls, knives, razor blades and other memento mori. These elements, that have become characteristic in his work, come together in perfect harmony to create a sumptuous visual feast. Destroy Dan Baldwin has recently been taken on by highly successful American music producer who is jettisoning Baldwin’s career to even dizzier heights following the success of managing global selling bands such as Green Day. Consequently the opening night of the show was littered with celebrities such as Holly Willloughby (who’s husband has the same name as the artist!), Frank Lampard and Christine Bleakley and proved to be a knockout success.  There are three stunning print releases following the show that are available at artrepublic from today, “Lost Souls I”, ”Lost Souls II”  and “Faith Less” and there is also a book from the exhibition available, please call the Brighton gallery for details on +44 (0)1273 724829 View all Dan Baldwin prints $test =
  • Tom French Q&A: The Bigger Picture

    To celebrate the arrival of an incredible collection of new limited edition prints and originals by Tom French we’ve got in touch with the talented artist to learn more about his work and career. Back from a successful solo show in California, the insightful painter took some time out of his stud....
    To celebrate the arrival of an incredible collection of new limited edition prints and originals by Tom French we’ve got in touch with the talented artist to learn more about his work and career. Back from a successful solo show in California, the insightful painter took some time out of his studio to talk to artrepublic about his latest series, paranoia, philosophy, purists and paint.  Destroy Could you explain some of the concepts behind your Duality series? We are all subject to constant, and ever changing psychological forces, and are generally at the mercy of our unconscious minds more than we realize - in the last few years neuroscience has shown us that many decisions are made in the brain before we are actually aware of making the decision. This means that, in many instances, by the time we’re conscious of having made a choice, the choice may already have been made for us. It's suggested that our unconscious mind is generally responsible for emotional actions and reactions. We have little control over this, and are generally unaware of these forces even though we experience, and are in a sense, enveloped by them. This is the underlying basis for the compositions of the double image paintings, the characters acting out the scenes within the larger composition (of a face or a skull) are unaware of the bigger picture, yet moulded and influenced by it, and visa versa, both a separate, yet integral part of the other’s existence. Emotion and reason, instinct and awareness, mind and matter, the constantly present co-existence of opposites, these are a small few of the many facets to dualism theory. Destroy Everyone will be familiar with the idea of seeing faces in the clouds, the man on the moon, or maybe the Rorscharch test and Max Ernst’s frottage technique - all applications of the psychological phenomenon 'Apophenia' - the experience of seeing meaningful patterns or connections in random meaningless data - sometimes described as 'unmotivated seeing of connections accompanied by a specific experience of abnormal meaningfulness'. In his notebooks, Leonardo da Vinci wrote of this as a device for painters, writing "if you look at any walls spotted with various stains or with a mixture of different kinds of stones, if you are about to invent some scene you will be able to see in it a resemblance to various different landscapes adorned with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees, plains, wide valleys, and various groups of hills. You will also be able to see divers, combats and figures in quick movement, and strange expressions of faces, and outlandish costumes, and an infinite number of things which you can then reduce into separate and well conceived forms." In turn, as well as giving visual significance to objects, we also often make conceptual/abstract connections (often without being consciously aware of doing so), adding meaning - be it sentimental or symbolic - to something otherwise inanimate. Andre Breton wrote about the 'fundamental crisis of the object' - the object being thought of not as a fixed external object, but also as an extension of our subjective self. This has also been described as irrational knowledge - delirium of interpretation. Destroy The action of bringing these phenomena into a visual reality, specifically through use of the double image technique, was described by the surrealists as the 'Paranoiac Critical Method', (although many examples of this existed previously) partially derived from the term 'paranoia', the definition of which bears a remarkable similarity to the aforementioned Apophenia. The subject of 'paranoia' has, on many occasions, been explored in this more positive sense - Philip K Dick commented “Strange how paranoia can link up with reality now and then.” and William S. Burroughs claimed “Paranoia is just having the right information.”  Would you describe your art as philosophical? Elements are philosophical, or reflect certain philosophical ideas, but I wouldn't say my art falls predominantly into the philosophical bracket.  You've quoted Andre Breton who wrote about the “fundamental crisis of the object” – do you view your art work as an extension of yourself? Unintentionally and unavoidably so, more than I realize at the time. Destroy A monochrome palette is a characteristic of your art, how do you feel about colour? What’s your favourite colour? I do enjoy working in monochrome; it has strengths which are difficult to put into words. There's something special about the simplicity of only using light and dark without the distraction and complications of colour and, though I'm by no means minimalist, I do like the purity of this. Colour can be very subjective and therefore has the possibility to be restrictive, and it would be foolish to think that full colour images can give us complete representation, due to our limited perception and individual interpretations, so for me, for now, I enjoy being free of these issues. For some of my paintings, particularly the more figurative works with stronger elements of narrative, the timeless quality of the monochromatic palette suits and adds a cinematic feel, creating the feeling that the scene is a small part of a whole story. Of course, I'm not writing off the strengths of colour here, these are just a few quick thoughts as to why I didn't feel it would be beneficial for these recent works. Destroy What made you become an artist? How did you get started? I've always drawn or painted. From as far back as I can remember, my parents used to set time aside every day when I had to do something creative - writing, drawing, playing an instrument. I have no rhythm and language is far from a strength of mine.  My father's an artist too, a true inspiration, as dedicated as they come and an amazing wealth of knowledge, which is still a strong influence for me. Destroy How do you approach the actual making of your work? How long does an average painting take you? I guess I approach the actual making of a work relatively conventionally. I'll sketch out quick ideas or compositions, or even just reference points, then create small quick studies of the important elements of a painting. As for the final painting, I'll have an idea of what I want to achieve before putting paint to canvas, but am in no way strict with this, so the paintings do develop and evolve as they progress. Destroy It's impossible to give a time scale for an individual piece of work, I have many paintings in progress at the same time, working up a section of one, then an element of another, giving myself a chance to reflect on developments before returning to the painting.  What would you say are the main themes you pursue? Mortality, reality, perception, the psyche and the self. Where do you find inspiration? Destroy I try to feed myself with as much creative input as possible - reading, viewing exhibitions and the likes, as well as the randomness of day to day situations/experiences, but to be honest,  most of my 'eureka' moments come whilst painting. I think it’s because that's when I'm most engaged with the work and also engrossed in it to the point that the brain can wander and reflect. It seems that once I get started with creating something it sparks off some kind of chain reaction. This does mean I'll often leave the piece I’m working on to start something more exciting, resulting in many unfinished works, though hopefully this means that it's the most interesting ones which make it to the end of the process.  Destroy  What are you currently working on? Now that I've just completed my latest body of work for an exhibition, I’m trying to get to grips with a heap of concepts I've had rattling around for the last few weeks/months/years. I'm pretty excited to see what'll come out of it. Which of your works are you most proud of? The centre piece of my latest 'Dualism' triptych is, probably the strongest contender so far. Do you care whether people like your work? Destroy Sometimes. Not all that much, but more than I'd like to. What memorable responses have you had to your work? Destroy At a recent exhibition, someone I'd never met before insisted that they believed a significant event had occurred in my life, when my work took a particular direction - they pushed to ask me what had happened, personally, before I created a particular work. I hadn't even realized this event was directly related to the concept behind the painting until that point. It was a fascinating and true personal revelation from a complete stranger. What is the greatest threat to art today? Stupidity. I was tempted to say money or greed, but to be fair, good art can still come from bad motives...sometimes. Do you suffer for your art? Destroy In some ways and occasionally this knocks onto those close to me - it can, at times, be challenging, frustrating and time consuming. I struggle to relax and turn off from it if something isn't working out well. Of course, when it's good it's great, and the benefits just about outweigh the negatives. When are you happiest? When I don't give a fuck about anything - a luxury my brain doesn’t allow me to indulge very often! Is there an art form you don’t relate to? Some more so than others, but surely everyone can relate to everything in some way or another, however insignificantly. I'll keep this positive rather than going into the negatives I find with certain art forms. Destroy Which artists do you most admire? Purists.  What work of art would you most like to own? Frans Snyders 'Still life with terms and a bust of Ceres'. It's the most visually impactful painting I've seen so far. What was the last book you read? Destroy I'm currently reading Geek Love. It’s odd, I haven’t decided if that’s in a good way, but I'm intrigued. What’s your favourite film? The last film to really make an impact on me is, The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover. I'm still trying to work out the meaning of the Frans Hals painting used as a focal point for the main set of the film. Describe an average day in the life of Tom French - I don't really have much of an average day, or that much of a routine. I mean, I wake up, do stuff (as much stuff as I can fit in generally), eat, shit and sleep, just in different quantities each day. As much as possible, I try to keep things so that I can do what I like, when I like.  Image Credits: Richard Kenworthy photography artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • 'Better Out Than In' Banksy

    Destroy We haven’t seen a new Banksy out since his last rendition just before the London Olympics, until now that is! A freshly stencilled piece has appeared on the Los Angeles streets in conjunction with a cryptic posting on Banksy’s official website, showcasing the work to the rest ....
    Destroy We haven’t seen a new Banksy out since his last rendition just before the London Olympics, until now that is! A freshly stencilled piece has appeared on the Los Angeles streets in conjunction with a cryptic posting on Banksy’s official website, showcasing the work to the rest of the world.  The simple but brilliant new street art work employs Banksy’s trademark tongue-in-cheek humour and depicts a young graffiti vandal throwing up flowers. The flowers are part of the physical habitat, making the piece site-specific and truly rooted in the street.  The caption on Banksy’s website is ‘Better Out Than In, October 2013’. There is speculation that this refers to a new project set to be unveiled in October. Unsurprisingly, there are no details yet from street art’s ultimate man of mystery, but we’ll be sure to keep you up to date as we hear more! View all Banksy prints $test =
  • Wanted: New Artists!

    Destroy artrepublic are currently engaged in a call for artists and portfolio submissions – we are interested in seeing your work if you’re a talented artist, looking for new markets and new challenges. We’ve been at the forefront of cutting edge, collectable art for over 20 years. D....
    Destroy artrepublic are currently engaged in a call for artists and portfolio submissions – we are interested in seeing your work if you’re a talented artist, looking for new markets and new challenges. We’ve been at the forefront of cutting edge, collectable art for over 20 years. During that time we’ve been central to the ascendency of numerous high profile artists’ careers, including Magnus Gjoen, Ryan Callanan, Copyright, Pure Evil and Carne Giffiths. With galleries in Brighton and Soho, as well as a prominent online presence, joining artrepublic could launch your artistic career to a new level.  If you have artwork suitable for release as a signed limited edition, please send a maximum of 3 images of your work (no more than 100k each in size) to: artwork@artrepublic.com Include your name and details about yourself and your work, including whether your work is being sold elsewhere. View our current artists $test =
  • Meet Legendary Music Photographer Dennis Morris

    Dennis Morris was the official Bob Marley UK tour photographer at the age of 14, had one of his images on the cover of NME at the age of 18 and took the first official pictures of The Sex Pistols. This photographer’s career is a truly unbelievable record of reggae, rock  'n’ roll, punk a....
    Dennis Morris was the official Bob Marley UK tour photographer at the age of 14, had one of his images on the cover of NME at the age of 18 and took the first official pictures of The Sex Pistols. This photographer’s career is a truly unbelievable record of reggae, rock  'n’ roll, punk and popular culture.   Destroy With our Dennis Morris silkscreen prints it’s possible to invest in a piece of music history by one the most iconic image-makers in the industry. His 15 colour silkscreen prints of Sid Vicious are from editions of 77, referencing the Sex Pistols most formidable year, 1977. The Cowboy T-shirt worn by Sid in the image is one Vivienne Westwood’s most iconic designs. View all Dennis Morris prints View our Dennis Morris biography $test =
  • Contemporary Japonism: The Influence of Japan on Art

    Brighton Japan 2013 opens tomorrow. The international celebration of Japanese arts, film, theatre, performance and culture has inspired us to take a look at the influence of Japan in our contemporary art collection.  The culture of Japan has had a profound influence on British art since the s....
    Brighton Japan 2013 opens tomorrow. The international celebration of Japanese arts, film, theatre, performance and culture has inspired us to take a look at the influence of Japan in our contemporary art collection.  The culture of Japan has had a profound influence on British art since the second half of the 19th century. For a long time only the Dutch had been allowed to trade with Japan, but in the 1850s the country opened her ports to other foreign powers, including Britain. The large number of Japanese objects which were subsequently imported were very different from anything being produced in this country and provided a major source of inspiration for many artists and designers from the period from 1850 to 1900.  Destroy From the mid 19th century Japanese wood-block prints and paintings known as ukiyo-e, by artists such as Utagawa Hiroshige and Katsushika Hokusai, became a major source of inspiration for many European Impressionist painters. The term ‘Japonism’ was coined at this time to refer to the Japanese motifs and style found in Western works like Toulouse-Lautrec posters and Van Gogh paintings such as ‘Le Père Tanguy’ and Almond Blossom .The characteristic lack of perspective and shadow, the areas of flat colour, asymmetry and compositional freedom found in ukiyo-e went on to be a major influence on the development of Art Nouveau and Cubism. The international  influence of Japanese culture continues and our collection of art includes some beautiful examples of contemporary ‘Japonism’... Copyright  Contemporary street artist Copyright had a solo show, ‘Fight of the Paper Tiger’, in Japan in 2009. The exhibition poster and the screenprint Copyright created exclusively for the show both featured the striking image of a tiger. The tiger has been a favourite subject for Japanese painters since the beginning of the seventeenth century, having spread from Buddhist temple carvings. Copyright’s tiger and the palette of the painting were undoubtedly inspired by Japanese culture. Destroy Copyright’s visit to Japan had a lasting impact on his art. Japanese imagery appeared in his work again this year when he created a pair of contemporary depictions of the Greek goddess Amphitrite, ‘Amphitrite – Sunrise’ and ‘Amphitrite – Sunset.’ The distinctive street art pieces depicted the sea-goddess ascending from waves which were created from a collage of the Japanese ukiyo-e artist Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave of Kanagawa.’   Pure Evil  Urban artist Pure Evil was similarly inspired by Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave off Kanagawa’ to create his print ‘Hokusai Tsunami print for Japan’. The monochrome signed open edition was created by Pure Evil specifically to raise money for the Japanese Red Cross to be distributed among the earthquake and tsunami affected Japanese population, following the natural disasters of 2011. Destroy Pure Evil’s re-interpretation of ‘The Great Wave’ is a dynamic acknowledgement of not only the physical power of crashing waves but also the great strength and influence of Japanese culture. In the print he combines the classic 19th century imagery with a ‘LIVE’ logo in the bottom left hand corner, no doubt referring to the mass media coverage of the tsunami and possibly to Japan’s prominent position at the forefront of technology.  Hush Hush’s graphic design and art career has taken him around the world; however, it was the opportunity to work as a toy designer in Japan that proved most influential. Hush has drawn significantly upon his experience of Japan’s culture. He has long been fascinated by Japanese culture, which is at once deeply entwined in history and at the forefront of the modern world. His art has attempted to capture the beauty and intricacy of this fusion.  Destroy Geishas as well as anime and manga-style characters feature heavily in Hush’s celebrated street art. By confronting both historic geishas and the contemporary female characters in Japanese animation, in prints such as 'G-Girl', Hush explores the contrasting depictions and constructions of women in Japan and Japanese culture. He describes his street art as “the escape from the constraints of traditions, the contrasts between old and new, the past meeting the future and the fusion of Eastern and Western culture.” Kozyndan Kozyndan are awe-inspiring husband-and-wife artists who work collaboratively to create highly detailed paintings and illustrations. Kozy is Japanese and left Japan to study art in California, where she met Dan and the two have been together ever since. Their work is very personal in the sense that it’s specifically about the interests and values they share together as a couple, one of these being Kozy’s heritage.  Destroy Kozyndan are probably most known for their bunny filled wave inspired by Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave’. It is part of a series called ‘Seasons of the Bunny’ which was inspired by traditional Japanese art. The last print in the series ‘Gray Hares (Winter Bunnies)’ is taken from ukiyo-e artist Utagawa Hiroshge’s ‘Evening Shnow Kanbara’. The idea for the work came to them after thinking of Kozy’s grandparents who live up in the mountains in Yamanshi, Japan. In their characteristically adorable style, the couple painted themselves in the picture because “it’s a bit of a love letter to ourselves telling each other we’d like to grow old together’ (Dan).  Traditionally it was Japanese printmaking that was most influential on European art. Now these cutting edge contemporary prints reveal the continuing impact and significance of Japanese culture on Western design. This influence continues to produce beautiful artworks which fuse a Western perspective with the fascinating history, imagery and art of Japan.   artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Norway's NUART 2013

    artrepublic have just returned from a recce in Stavanger, Norway, visiting an annual international street art festival to scout out some exciting urban art talent and support UK street artists including Hush. Nuart is an independent festival which has focused exclusively on Street Art since 2005....
    artrepublic have just returned from a recce in Stavanger, Norway, visiting an annual international street art festival to scout out some exciting urban art talent and support UK street artists including Hush. Nuart is an independent festival which has focused exclusively on Street Art since 2005, making it one of the oldest events there is. Providing a platform for international artists who operate outside of traditional systems, the festival challenges entrenched notions of what art is and can be. It was amazing to experience the dynamic environment and see some truly challenging and innovative work.  Destroy Nip to Norway if you get the chance; if not, we will continue to bring you the best new street art and introduce you to the world’s leading practitioners right here! View an album of photos from the trip on our Facebook page View all Street Art prints View all Hush prints $test =

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