Monthly Archives: June 2013

  • 'Lowry and The Painting of Modern Life' Finally Opens

    The highly anticipated Tate summer blockbuster ‘Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life’ has opened to the public today!  The opening comes after weeks of speculation and excitement, including the discovery of a lost painting hidden behind one of the exhibits just days ago. It seem....
    The highly anticipated Tate summer blockbuster ‘Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life’ has opened to the public today!  The opening comes after weeks of speculation and excitement, including the discovery of a lost painting hidden behind one of the exhibits just days ago. It seems the whole of the UK has turned their attention towards the industrial painter. As well as being the subject of numerous newspaper editorials , L.S.Lowry’s relationship with his mother has been dramatised in ‘Mrs Lowry and Son’ and his view of women discussed on Radio 4’s ‘Women’s Hour’. The Tate are expecting ‘Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life’ to be extremely popular so they recommend booking in advance, if you are not a member, to avoid disappointment. We have also added several new prints to our extensive L.S.Lowry collection so don’t miss the chance to take your own Lowry industrial landscape home...  View all L.S.Lowry prints Read our 'Lowry and The Painting of Modern Life' review View our L.S.Lowry biography $test =
  • Happy Birthday Sir Peter Blake!

    artrepublic sends our best wishes to Sir Peter Blake who is celebrating his 81st birthday today.  To mark his 80th birthday last year, Blake created an incredible 22 colour silkscreen inspired by his seminal cover for The Beatles ‘Sgt Pepper’ album, featuring family, friends and ....
    artrepublic sends our best wishes to Sir Peter Blake who is celebrating his 81st birthday today.  To mark his 80th birthday last year, Blake created an incredible 22 colour silkscreen inspired by his seminal cover for The Beatles ‘Sgt Pepper’ album, featuring family, friends and 21st century icons. We’re delighted that the British Pop Art pioneer is showing no signs of slowing down; having just released 5 new prints from his wonderful ‘Found Art’ series.  Peter Blake’s works have a beautiful nostalgic and sentimental quality. Born in 1932 in Dartford, Kent, Blake’s rich portfolio of art perfectly captures the progression of British popular culture and design.  We hope he is having a wonderful day, full of vintage treasures. View all Peter Blake prints View our Peter Blake biography $test =
  • Lost Lowry Discovered Days Before Major Tate Exhibition Opens

    The Tate’s highly anticipated summer blockbuster show ‘Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life’ opens tomorrow. As the media coverage and excitement builds to a frenzy, a last minute discovery has added even more suspense and intrigue.  An undiscovered work by L.S. Lowry has just been u....
    The Tate’s highly anticipated summer blockbuster show ‘Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life’ opens tomorrow. As the media coverage and excitement builds to a frenzy, a last minute discovery has added even more suspense and intrigue.  An undiscovered work by L.S. Lowry has just been unearthed by astonished curators as a painting for the show was being unpacked. The secret painting lies undetectable on the back of Lowry's ‘The Mission Room’ painting. The untitled work is on the back of the wooden panel of the painting, which is on loan from the Leamington Spa Art Gallery & Museum. Apparently the Leamington Spa museum did know about it, although no one else did as it doesn’t appear in any official literature.  Seeing the paintings together for the first time, Tate curators have discovered that the unnamed painting, made in around 1922 at the beginning of his career, is an earlier version of ‘A Town Square’ (1928) and ‘Our Town’ (1941). It shows a crowded square in Lowry’s native Salford. It is characteristic of his bleak industrial landscapes and depictions of northern mill towns. Co-curator of the exhibition Professor Tim Clark has said, “It’s absolutely intriguing”, and that the new find was “a bit of a muddle.” The discovery highlights how often Lowry returned to and honed his favourite scenes in his work over the years and it reinforces expert’s belief that Lowry was a determined perfectionist. Of the newly discovered painting, Clark explains, “Obviously he was dissatisfied with it. But the way he returns to subjects and is a perfectionist is part of the story of Lowry. The common image of Lowry mistakes deliberate simplification and schematisation for an artlessness and lack of skill.” The Tate curators had earlier been excited to discover an entry on Lowry in a 1931 French dictionary of contemporary artists that including a reproduction of the painting ‘A Town Square’, which has since been lost. The reference came from a time when the British artist was better known and exhibited in Paris than he was in London, despite his distinctively English industrial subject matters.  The blockbuster show has been described as a “victory over the highbrow art and establishment and ‘snobbish’ attitudes towards Lowry.” The Tate has previously been accused by some Lowry fans, including the actor Sir Ian McKellen and Oasis star Noel Gallagher, of shunning the artist. TJ Clark has said, “Snobbery is an easy word. It is part of it, of course. But Lowry became implicated in a British version of the culture wars. Britain is still fighting out this question. How do we recognise our central historical experience? The experience of industrialisation and deindustrialisation?” Sadly, the discovery has been made too late for curators to display the panel with both sides visible in the show. But the hidden painting can be seen online and in the photograph above. artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Video: Magnus Gjoen solo exhibition 'Break Glass for a New Beginning' at artrepublic Soho

    View our exclusive tour of ‘Break Glass for a New Beginning’ by the artist himself. Magnus Gjoen walks us round his impressive solo exhibition discussing the show’s origins, where he got his inspiration and how he had to re-read the bible to make it all happen. In mixing the old with someth....
    View our exclusive tour of ‘Break Glass for a New Beginning’ by the artist himself. Magnus Gjoen walks us round his impressive solo exhibition discussing the show’s origins, where he got his inspiration and how he had to re-read the bible to make it all happen. In mixing the old with something new Magnus Gjoen creates contemporary works which ask, ‘If we could start again what would we do differently?’ Escape from Eden – “We are always used to this notion that Eden is the perfect place. Maybe they don’t want to be in Eden? Maybe it’s better where we are now? Even the angels, they actually want a bit of fun, they want to sin and they’re breaking out.”  Break Glass in Case of Judgement Day & Break Glass For Reincarnation - “The notion behind these pictures is that of the 'City of the Dead', where you have infinite time. It’s based on old architectural buildings which are put together in a sort of digital collage.” It's A Fearful Thing To Love Something That Death Can Touch – “These are representing two religions in a way, fighting together. Neither of them is going to back down and if they don’t come to a solution, if they move, the pin will come out of the grenade and they’re both going to blow up.” Mala Fide – “It means ‘in bad faith’ in Latin. It is a comment on wars in the world that have been started because of religion and everything that religion has done to the world since the beginning of time. “ View all Magnus Gjoen prints View our 'Break Glass for a New Beginning' exhibition review View our Q&A with Magnus Gjoen $test =
  • Cityscape Stop Frame by Rob Wass

    New to artrepublic, artist Rob Wass fuses nature, architecture and geometry in his vibrant art work.   Rob Wass explains, “I’m interested in making static work appear in motion”. In this short stop frame animation he truly brings his distinctive style to life, speedily constructing hi....
    New to artrepublic, artist Rob Wass fuses nature, architecture and geometry in his vibrant art work.   Rob Wass explains, “I’m interested in making static work appear in motion”. In this short stop frame animation he truly brings his distinctive style to life, speedily constructing his own abstracted cityscape. View all Rob Wass prints View our Rob Wass biography $test =
  • Louis Vuitton x Ben Eine = Art Scarf and Selfridges Graffiti Pop-Up

    French fashion house Louis Vuitton have teamed up with the great Ben Eine to create their latest must-have special accessory and in doing so have decided Selfridges, Oxford St needs a street art makeover.  The item in question is a giant square scarf called 'Great Adventures' and this new c....
    French fashion house Louis Vuitton have teamed up with the great Ben Eine to create their latest must-have special accessory and in doing so have decided Selfridges, Oxford St needs a street art makeover.  The item in question is a giant square scarf called 'Great Adventures' and this new collaboration comes off the back of recent work with another artrepubic artist, RETNA. For Vuitton it also follows one of the most successful fashion/graffiti-inspired collaborations of all time when it incorporated the work of the late Stephen Sprouse. Street artist Eine, is best known for his alphabet and font lettering seen adorning many a East London shop front shutter (guaranteed a sighting around Old Street), but for those who’ve been amongst the street art scene for long enough will also recognise him as co-collaborator and printer-extraordinaire of Banksy and Gorillaz co-creator Jamie Hewlett. Eine found fame, (of a sort) when David Cameron gifted a piece of his work to the newly elected Barack Obama back in 2010. That piece, 'Twenty First Century City' came directly from our London gallery – massive fun that week. Now, with an increasing global presence, with plenty shows in Europe, the U.S and Japan under his belt, he is seen as an ideal (and cool) accompaniment to the Vuitton collaboration roster.  Of the neon-lettered artwork on the scarf "'Great Adventures' illustrates how I feel every time you get off a plane in a new city. It is the beginning of an adventure, all about new encounters," says Eine. To celebrate the collaboration, Louis Vuitton will open a new pop-up space dedicated to textiles on the Ground Floor at Selfridges, and the man himself will be there from Friday, June 21 until Sunday, June 23 graffiting the space in preparation for its grand opening on Monday 24th. The scarf will be available exclusively at Selfridges until July 1, after which it will be available worldwide at Louis Vuitton stores and concessions, priced at £465. However if you’d simply rather purchase a genuine Ben Eine artwork then click here to see what we’ve got. If you are interested the work of Ben Eine and would like further information or to discuss other artists or work that we have available in the gallery please call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • London Looks Ace after Late Night Stick Up

    Check out this short film, ‘It’s A Stick Up’, by Sabbotage Time Production. It follows paste-up artist A.CE as he takes a late night trip through London’s East End.  The film has been produced to mark the launch of the book ‘It’s A Stick Up: 20 tear out paste-ups by 20 of the wo....
    Check out this short film, ‘It’s A Stick Up’, by Sabbotage Time Production. It follows paste-up artist A.CE as he takes a late night trip through London’s East End.  The film has been produced to mark the launch of the book ‘It’s A Stick Up: 20 tear out paste-ups by 20 of the world’s greatest street artists’.  Destroy View all A.CE prints View all Street Art prints $test =
  • Butch Bones and Scavenged Brilliance: The Wonderful Art of Butch Anthony

    Destroy Butch Anthony describes himself as “artist, builder and picker of things”. Whilst following the age-old folk art tradition of creating treasure from trash, Butch Anthony pushes the boundaries of art, existence, and respectability with his strange and beautiful creations. ....
    Destroy Butch Anthony describes himself as “artist, builder and picker of things”. Whilst following the age-old folk art tradition of creating treasure from trash, Butch Anthony pushes the boundaries of art, existence, and respectability with his strange and beautiful creations.  Butch Anthony dresses exclusively in Liberty denim overalls (he owns 25 pairs) and a straw hat (he has ten). He wasn’t educated at art school but in the woods of Alabama where he hunted racoons, skinned snakes and dug up arrowheads. The maverick artist, described as a “ramshackle genius”, is now the muse of documentary film maker Les Blank who has hailed him as a “national treasure.” Once chosen by The State of Alabama to make a Christmas tree ornament for the White House, Anthony's morbid and humorous “hillbilly chic” aesthetic is now radiating from the forests of the Deep South and receiving international acclaim.  Destroy A curious boy, Butch Anthony spent his childhood exploring the fields and back roads of his Alabama home, digging up bones, tin cans, old bottles and fossils. At the age of 14 he started building birdhouses and doing taxidermy. Soon after he built a one-room log cabin by himself, which became a shop for his macabre stuffed creations. His scavenging skills developed and, overall clad, he began to build and fashion furniture, sculpture and scrap oddities from found junk.  In 1988 he began building a log cabin from heart pine salvaged from an old mill. His hand-built home is on the compound which once belonged to his grandfather, a cotton farmer, and is full of Anthony’s scavenged treasure and handmade creations, including chandeliers made from beaver chewed twigs and cow bones.  Destroy Destroy Butch Anthony started making art in 1994 when his friend and neighbour John Henry Toney ploughed up a gnarly turnip that looked like it had a human face on it. Anthony suggested that John Toney make a picture of it which he did and he took it to a local junk shop. It sold for $50. As Anthony tells it, “I thought hell, if he can do it I’ll make one too. I made a picture, stuck in the junk store, put $50 on it. Next day someone came along and bought it. I’ve been painting ever since.” Since, Mr Toney has said, “I always felt like that turnip meant something, but I couldn’t tell you what.”  Anthony’s artwork includes 19th century photographic portraits painted over with cartoonish white skeletons, and old photos affixed to paintings of imaginary mythical creatures. His work is not easy to define and his inventive creative spirit sees his artistic talents applied to numerous different modes and mediums. Fred Fussell, an independent curator and writer who focuses on traditional Southern American culture, described Butch Anthony as “one of a number of what I would call eccentric artists, which just means he does his own thing and doesn’t have much connection to other things except himself.” Destroy Now Butch Anthony runs ‘Possum Trot’ a junk auction house and ‘The Museum of Wonder’, where his wonderful creations and bizarre collections can be admired and purchased. The museum is a barn full of oddities that has included things like “the world’s largest gallbladder”, a replica of a human skeleton, a stuffed chicken and more Anthony Butch artwork. Even the famous vegetable behind the turnip epiphany now lives under glass in Butch Anthony’s Museum of Wonder. Anthony says, “I try to just take junk that I find on the road and turn it into the kind of junk someone would want to have hanging on their walls. But all of it is junk.”  Destroy Every year Butch Anthony hosts ‘Doo Nanny’, an art/folk art festival that sees people from around the world flock to his 80-acre home in Alabama. It started on the side of the road in nearby Pittsview but moved to his property a few years ago. The Doo Nanny site features a dome of old bicycles, solar showers, a wood-fuelled hot tub and an outdoor kitchen all made by Anthony and his friends. The site for creative camping is decorated with his ethereal cow bone chandeliers and his speciality beaver gnawed twigs.  Intertwangelism Butch Anthony exhibited in the UK for the first time in February of this year. His solo London show, titled ‘Intertwangelism’, saw the display of artworks which the Independent described as “humorous, morbid, childlike and yet strangely sobering.” The name of the show came from Anthony’s invented word ‘Intertwangelism’ which can be found painted on many of his works. He defines it as “Inter, meaning to mix, and twang, a distinct way of speaking. If I make up my own ‘ism’, no one can say anything or tell me I’m doing it wrong.” Destroy Of the exhibition, Butch Anthony said, “Intertwangelism is how I look at people and break them down to their primordial beginnings. Almost like x-ray vision, seeing through a person’s clothes, through their skin, and muscles and veins and bones even their shadow. These first skeletonised paintings are just the first phase of my theory to take over the art world as we know it.”  Watch this fascinating short video to hear more about Butch Anthony's art, home and aesthetic in his own words:  Destroy No bones about it, Butch Anthony’s hillbilly brilliance is an inspiration. Artist Candice Tripp has said, “I keep trying to articulate just how much I adore Butch Anthony’s work, but I can’t explain it any better than by saying how jealous I am. I love it, so much so that I wish it was my own.” We love it so much that it is now available to buy at artrepublic. View all Butch Anthony prints  artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Diamond Dust

    Diamond dust is a glittering material that can be applied to paper and ink in the silkscreen printing process to create a textured and luminous finish. Diamond dust is a professional and versatile material that is sourced from specialist manufacturers. It is available in multiple sizes o....
    Diamond dust is a glittering material that can be applied to paper and ink in the silkscreen printing process to create a textured and luminous finish. Diamond dust is a professional and versatile material that is sourced from specialist manufacturers. It is available in multiple sizes of grain, from a fine diamond dust which is similar in size to salt or sugar, to big coarse flakes (half a centimetre). It is also available in numerous colours but printers most commonly use clear diamond dust which can be applied on top of coloured ink to create a kaleidoscopic sparkle. Silkscreen printing is a technique that uses a woven mesh to support an ink-blocking stencil. Prints can be created using multiple layers of stencils, each apply a separate colour. To apply diamond dust to a print, instead of ink being transferred through the stencil archival art glue is applied. Printers have only minutes to work before this glue dries. They must apply the chosen grade of diamond dust to the glued surface and tap off any excess. The diamond dust is an exceptionally hardwearing material, and applied to paper with archival glue it is a surprisingly durable and enduring artistic medium. $test =
  • Back to Black with Joe Webb

    Destroy Joe Webb’s latest release is a slinky and seductive limited edition depicting an anonymous female figure oozing glamour and elegance.  ‘Back to Black’ deconstructs the beauty of the female form into disconnected, almost abstracted, body parts, including an enticing long ....
    Destroy Joe Webb’s latest release is a slinky and seductive limited edition depicting an anonymous female figure oozing glamour and elegance.  ‘Back to Black’ deconstructs the beauty of the female form into disconnected, almost abstracted, body parts, including an enticing long leg and scarlet lips. In characteristic form, Webb’s beauty has a vintage quality and has been adorned with the delicate sparkle of diamond dust on her striking jewels.  Destroy Joe Webb has said, “Back To Black is taken from a series of new collages I've recently made. There's a continuous unbroken line throughout the body parts...it's my most minimal work yet, only the flesh of the subject is left which produces an almost abstract shape. These were in part inspired by Henri Matisse's 'Blue Nude' cutouts. I like Matisse's idea of 'painting with scissors' and the way his work became so minimal and concise in his later years. I enjoy referencing other artists work then taking it somewhere else." ‘Back to Black’ is available in two sumptuous silkscreen print editions, one with sparkling black glitter and diamond dust, the other with a sleek gloss finish. Both versions are very small limited editions of 75, and each print has been hand signed and numbered by Joe Webb.  View all Joe Webb prints View all Diamond Dust prints $test =

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