Monthly Archives: May 2013

  • Marc Quinn Unveils a Meaty Portrait of Pregnant Lara Stone

    Destroy artrepublic artist Marc Quinn unveiled a breathtaking nude portrait of supermodel Lara Stone at the 55th Venice Biennale festival this week. Destroy Exposing her bump in full bloom the portrait immortalises Dutch beauty Lara Stone’s pregnancy shape and glow. In the painti....
    Destroy artrepublic artist Marc Quinn unveiled a breathtaking nude portrait of supermodel Lara Stone at the 55th Venice Biennale festival this week. Destroy Exposing her bump in full bloom the portrait immortalises Dutch beauty Lara Stone’s pregnancy shape and glow. In the painting, Stone lays naked on an ambiguous mound of red meat, cradling her unborn child with her characteristic blond hair hanging loosely around her shoulders. She appears  to be thrilled with the piece, tweeting a snap of the artwork for all her fans to admire.  No stranger to working with supermodels, Marc Quinn is the artist who gave the British Museum a solid gold statue of Kate Moss in 2008.  View all Marc Quinn prints Read our article '25 Years of Kate Moss: Artist's Muse' $test =
  • 25 Years of Kate Moss: Artist's Muse

    Global style icon and consummate party girl Kate Moss is the most successful British model of all time. She was discovered by fashion scout Sarah Doukas at JFK airport 25 years ago. As well as being the most controversial and enduring model of our era, she is the generation’s muse, inspiring mor....
    Global style icon and consummate party girl Kate Moss is the most successful British model of all time. She was discovered by fashion scout Sarah Doukas at JFK airport 25 years ago. As well as being the most controversial and enduring model of our era, she is the generation’s muse, inspiring more artists’ work than any other non-religious or royal subject in history. Kate Moss was born in Croyden and discovered at the of age fourteen. She arrived on the British cultural landscape in 1988 and ever since has been the English model at the height of fashion; the British beauty transcending every trend. Fashion designer Marc Jacobs has described her as the “muse to a generation... She defines a time, a feeling, that has become part of history.” Destroy In this, her silver jubilee, we are celebrating Moss as artist’s muse. The supermodel has been tied into the art world professionally and socially ever since she was asked to collaborate with a series of YBAs (Young British Artists), for an art issue of British Vogue. The fact that the emergence of YBAs started to make its presence felt when Kate was already an international star could certainly be a major factor in her ascent as the most popular artist’s muse of modern times. Destroy Kate Moss hung out with Damien Hirst, became pals with Tracey Emin and at one point was said to be romantically involved with Jack Chapman. She’s revealed, “I’ve worked with a lot of artists – Lucian Freud, Marc Quinn, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, Jake and Dinos Chapman... I became friends with some of them. A lot of them really. And, you know, we’d seen each other out, hung out at parties and what have you, and over the years they’d ask me to do odd projects” Here are a few of her artistic entanglements... Freudian Friend In 2002, Kate Moss befriended one of the greatest artists of the 20th century, Lucian Freud. The unlikely pair were introduced after Moss named Freud as the person she would most like to meet in a questionnaire for i-D magazine. Within two days Lucian Freud’s daughter Bella Freud got in touch, saying “He just wants to go for dinner with you. Don’t be late.” After going for dinner together, Freud immediately began painting Moss, who was pregnant with her daughter Lila Grace at the time. In interviews Moss said, “I went to his house and he started that night. I couldn’t say no to Lucian. Very persuasive. I phoned Bella [his daughter] the next day and said, ‘How long is it going to take?’ She said: ‘How big is the canvas’. I said, ‘it’s quite big,’ She said: ‘Oh dear, could take six months to a year.” Destroy The painting took nine months to complete. Freud’s new muse sat from 7pm to 2am, up to seven nights a week. In the large painting her features are unrecognizably heavy. Her skin is rendered thick and blotchy from Freud’s signature application of swatches of paint slathered on the canvas with a palette knife. Critic David Cohen has asserted that, "It seems incongruous for Kate Moss to end up in a Freud painting: His aesthetic, so redolent of the miserabilist, earnest, existentialist postwar period in which he came artistically of age, seems a far cry from the slick, trashy, ephemeral pop culture epitomized by the cult of celebrity models." However, the model muse and master painter found an unexpected affinity. Moss described Freud as “the most interesting person” she had ever met, while he conceded she was “physically intelligent”, but bemoaned she was always late for their sittings. There’s a touching photograph of Freud lying in bed with Moss, his arm around her, taken by his assistant, the artist David Dawson. Moss has said “I love that picture in the bed... Lucian was always really kind. I adored him.” Destroy Not only did Freud capture Moss on canvas, he left his indelible mark on her body. The artist told the model how he used to give homemade tattoos using permanent ink and a scalpel when he was in the Merchant Navy during World War II. In an interview with Vanity Fair Moss explained, “He told me about when used to do all of the tattoos for the sailors. And I said, ‘Oh my God that’s amazing.’ And he went, ‘I can do you one. What would you like? Would you like creatures of the animal kingdom?’ I mean, it’s an original Freud.” And so Moss is now the muse who sports a physical signature, on her lower back, from the artist whose masterpiece portrait sold for £3.9m. The Golden Touch Since 2006, Marc Quinn has made numerous studies of supermodel Kate Moss. His highly anticipated sculptures of Kate Moss have transformed the unearthly beauty into a contorted figure with ankles wrapped awkwardly round her ears and the largest gold statue made since Ancient Egypt (solid 18 carat). “The sculptures are really about the same thing: why we do, or do not, find a person beautiful”, said the contemporary artist.  Destroy To create his artwork, Quinn found someone who could do the yoga poses and took many drawings, photographs and measurements. Later Moss went into the studio and Quinn made some life casts and took further photographs and measurements. From all of this he sculpted Kate’s body in the pose with her exact proportions.  Quinn was drawn to Moss because of her ambiguous place in contemporary culture; a creature who is admired and obsessively observed, but about whom we know very little. He told The Guardian, “She is a contemporary version of the Sphinx. A mystery. There must be something about her that has clicked with the collective unconscious to make her so ubiquitous, so spirit of the age.” “Kate Moss is a cultural hallucination we have all agreed to create,” he asserts, “She is the only person who has the ubiquity and silence that is required in an image of divinity, that has been created through time, so that we can project onto it” Destroy ‘Siren’ (2008), Quinn’s solid gold sculpture was exhibited in the British Museum. Named after the deadly marine seductresses of Greek mythology, the piece presents Moss as a modern-day Aphrodite reminding us that her image has become as iconic as the goddesses of the ancient world. James Fox, co-curator of the display at the British Museum, said “It’s not about Kate Moss in its accuracy to her character. It’s using her likeness that has become so iconic to explore broader themes, to make a familiar face unfamiliar. What Quinn might be doing here is creating her in a cult-like form, in a solid-gold state, as a comment on celebrity culture and how it has mythologies Moss like a goddess, feverishly” One of Marc Quinn’s Kate Moss sculptures, ‘Myth Venus’, sold for $1.2m at a Christie’s contemporary art auction in New York in 2011. The ten-foot-tall, white-painted bronze went to an “exceptionally cultivated” private contemporary collection and the hammer price was at the top end of pre-auction estimates. Kate Moss is truly the muse with the golden touch.  Pop Princess If you had attended Kate Moss’ wedding you would have found Sir Peter Blake forking down the salmon alongside Bryan Ferry and Paul McCartney. The godfather of British Pop Art and the international fashion darling are pals. In fact it was Blake who took Moss to Stella McCartney’s 40th birthday party. Vogue reported, “In lieu of husband Jamie Hince, Moss arrived with pop artist Sir Peter Blake – famous for creating the Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ album sleeve – and his wife Chrissy.” The prestigious fashion magazine also published photographs of Moss and Blake at the birthday bash swigging bubbly with Tracey Emin.  Destroy “I’d love to do a portrait of Kate”, Blake told the Telegraph, “Kate’s extraordinary because she’s not a great beauty but she photographs like a dream. It wouldn’t be a nude, it would just be of her face.” In 2010, Blake chose Kate Moss as one of his subjects for his stunning ‘Stars’ portfolio. Now Moss immortally sits alongside Brigit Bardot, Elvis Presley, The Beatles and Marilyn Monroe in his sparkling collection of Pop Art photo collages.  When Blake reinvented his famous Beatles ‘Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ album cover (1967) last year, Kate Moss made the impressive selection of people who have inspired the acclaimed artist over the decades. Appropriately the supermodel is situated beside her dear friend Lucian Freud, keeping Viviene Westwood, Alfred Hitchock Amy Winehouse, Anish Kapoor, Damien Hirst, JK Rowling, Delia Smith, David Hockney and others company. Peter Blake said, “I’ve chosen people I admire, great people and some who are dear friends.” Her enviable inclusion in the coolest collage in art history is proof of her position at the forefront of British culture; the perfect Pop Art princess.  Model Graffiti Kate Moss is a big fan of Banksy. The infamous street artist immortalised Moss in a screen print portrait in the style of Andy Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe. One of the prints was sold at auction in February 2008 for an astonishing £96,000. Two years later, Moss paid around $200,000 commissioning Banksy to create a mural for her. Apparently she wanted Banksy to depict her and some of her friends throughout the ages and the graffiti star even got the keys to her apartment to make the piece whilst she was on honeymoon.  Destroy Banksy isn’t the only urban artist drawn to the British beauty, the maverick Mr Brainwash chose Moss as his muse for a giant mural promoting the debut of his first solo UK show. The brightly coloured paste-up was similar in style to Mr Brainwash’s Madonna album and situated on New Oxford Street. In his recent foray into British culture, Mr Brainwash has continued to explore Moss’ iconic image, depicting her in several successful limited edition prints and artworks, such as Kate Moss (Pink).  Luminous Transcendence  Chris Levine, famous for his hologram of Queen Elizabeth, has rendered Kate Moss as a ‘holographic stereogram’, a kind of light installation. His portrait, ‘She’s Light’ was created in collaboration with prominent make-up artist Charlotte Tilbury, a long-time friend of Moss’. It depicts the model in a meditative state, with red lipstick and a diamond necklace.  Destroy “Kate has been an ambition of mine for some time,” Chris Levine told the Telegraph, “I always felt she was someone who somehow transcended fame for whatever reason her spirit was resonant in contemporary pop culture. It’s that spirit I wanted to express, to radiate.” Whilst Moss told Grazia Magazine, “I love collaborating with artists, so when my dear friend Charlotte asked me to do this project with Chris I was really excited, as his work is so unique. Chris captures from the outside what you feel inwards. It is amazing how he captures your spirit.” So why does Kate Moss think she’s become the art world’s 21st century muse? “I guess I’m adaptable. I don’t know, I kind of go with whatever they want. I don’t see myself as one thing. You know, I turn up at work and they can kind of do what they want with me really [laughs],” she told Grazia magazine. Artist Alex Katz believes it is because “She’s completely ordinary. That’s what makes her extraordinary.” Certainly, the paradoxical nature of her accessible and mysterious beauty allows artists to approach but never quite capture the essence of her allure.   At artrepublic we’re looking forward to another 25 years of great art inspired by the iconic Kate Moss.  artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Where are the Women in the London Art Audit?

    The East London Fawcett’s (ELF) art audit of more than 100 commercial galleries in London, which collectively represent 3,163 artists, found that only 5% represent an equal number of male and female artists. Here are some more of their art world statistics - In the exhibition programmes of 29 ....
    The East London Fawcett’s (ELF) art audit of more than 100 commercial galleries in London, which collectively represent 3,163 artists, found that only 5% represent an equal number of male and female artists. Here are some more of their art world statistics - In the exhibition programmes of 29 non-commercial galleries nearly a third represented no female solo shows. Of the 386 public works of art recorded in Westminster and the City of London, only 8% were created by female artists.  A quarter of the artists selected for the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square were female 27.5% of the artists represented at the Frieze Art Fair 2012, an annual showcase of leading international artists, were women. Not a single woman appeared on the top 100 auction performances list in 2012. Destroy Gemma Rolls-Bentley, arts director at ELF, said that the audit’s message was one of optimism, “The ELF art audit results provide statistical evidence that gender inequality still persists in London’s art world. However, these results also demonstrate that significant positive progress has and is being made.” We have some fantastic female artists at artrepublic and are committed to supporting all great artists regardless of gender. If you’re looking to get your work represented check out how to submit your art here.  $test =
  • Mr Brainwash "Kate Moss" Original

    Destroy We have a great Mr Brainwash treat for you, new in the Brighton gallery, in the shape of the beautiful Kate Moss. Sorry not the actual super model herself but the next best thing, a stunning original by the infamous artist Mr Brainwash. Following the success of his first London solo s....
    Destroy We have a great Mr Brainwash treat for you, new in the Brighton gallery, in the shape of the beautiful Kate Moss. Sorry not the actual super model herself but the next best thing, a stunning original by the infamous artist Mr Brainwash. Following the success of his first London solo show last year, Mr Brainwash is establishing himself as highly collectible artist. The piece is an original on paper using bright pink acrylic and a silkscreen stencil of Kate Moss’ face, finished with metallic ink on paper. It has been exquisitely framed in a museum quality perspex box frame which looks great on such a contemporary piece. Drawing on the Pop Art tradition the artist fuses his graffiti style with the immediately recognisable iconic face of Kate Moss placing her as a modern day Marilyn Monroe. If you would like any further information then please call the Brighton gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 View all Mr Brainwash prints $test =
  • The artrepublic Flower Show with Marc Quinn

    The Chelsea Flower Show, one of the most traditional events of the English summer season, has collaborated with an artist to create an installation for the first time in its 100 year history. The unveiling of Marc Quinn’s ‘The Rush of Nature’ sculpture at the historic horticultural event has ....
    The Chelsea Flower Show, one of the most traditional events of the English summer season, has collaborated with an artist to create an installation for the first time in its 100 year history. The unveiling of Marc Quinn’s ‘The Rush of Nature’ sculpture at the historic horticultural event has inspired us to hold our own celebration of floral art.  Destroy British artist Marc Quinn, whose work frequently features flowers and plant life, seems the perfect collaboration choice for the Royal Horticulture Society. The RHS Director General, Sue Biggs, said: “Marc Quinn is one of the most exciting and celebrated contemporary artists today. We are honoured he has created this amazing piece of artwork for us to help the future of horticulture.” His six-foot high bronze sculpture of a moth orchid will be the iconic image for this year’s centenary Chelsea Flower Show.  Marc Quinn has worked for six months on the sculptural recreation of the moth orchid, which grows to just two or three inches in real life. The bronze was cast at the Pangolin Editions foundry in Gloucestershire and was painted with 18 coloured layers, each being stripped back so that every colour is visible. Quinn has created the sculpture to celebrate the garden as an artistic medium, saying “The Chelsea Flower Show has provided flowers and inspiration for my work for many years. To create a garden there is something of a dream come true for me. Especially as it will help such an important cause: our relationship to plants and nature is one of the most important things in all of our lives.” Destroy Because of their varied and colourful appearance and their association with nature, life and decay, flowers have long been a favourite subject of visual artists. Some of the most celebrated paintings in art history are of flowers, such as Vincent Van Gogh’s sunflowers series and Claude Monet’s water lilies. Apparently the first flower to be used in ancient art was the lotus. It is found on many Egyptian tombs as well as in sculptures from some of the oldest dynasties. Remains of fresco paintings depicting gardens full of flowers were found in the city of Pompeii revealing the Ancient Romans’ fancy for floral art. Perhaps the most revered flowers in western art are those in 16th and 7th century Dutch and Flemish still-life paintings. However, modern art is also replete with floral imagery.  Visit the artrepublic Flower Show to see the finest floral depictions and decide for yourself which artist deserves the ‘Best in Show’ prize… Destroy Claude Monet Monet, in old age, said he took more pride in his garden than his art and, in particular, the pond of water lilies he grew at Giverny. Monet’s Water Lilies series consists of approximately 250 oil paintings many of which were painted while he suffered from cataracts.  Destroy As a plein-air landscape artist, Claude Monet paid close attention to the design, structure and beauty of gardens. He was also fanatical about flowers, he once said, “I perhaps owe having become a painter to flowers” and “I must have flowers always and always”. The close observations of this committed gardening artist have certainly left a big impression.  Prize: Best Impressionist Bloom Destroy Georgia O'Keeffe Destroy Georgia O’Keeffe once said, “When you take a flower in your hand and really look at it, it's your world for the moment. I want to give that world to someone else. Most people in the city rush around so, they have no time to look at a flower. I want them to see it whether they want to or not.” O’Keeffe is best known for her gigantic flowers and sun-bleached desert bones, which add an architectural element.  Her work explores the connection between flowers and femininity, presenting both the bud and the female body as natural, life-giving and beautiful. A pioneering posy painter, Georgia O’Keeffe’s intense, rich and bold flowers are a modernist masterpiece.  Prize: Floral Feminist of the Year Destroy Destroy Andy Warhol Andy Warhol often turned to flowers for inspiration, from the blotted-line daisies of the 1950s to the Japanese ikebana prints of the ‘70s. His most famous series of flower paintings, begun in 1964, was based on a photograph of hibiscus blossoms (apparently the photographer attempted to sue). He would drench the flower’s floppy shape with brilliant saturation and the print came in multiple colour schemes of the next 20 years.  This celebrity artist has certainly created a popular bloom and his flourishing flowers have been reproduced with factory-like uniformity.  Prize: Consumer Choice Award Destroy Marc Quinn Destroy “I work with flowers the whole time but usually the ones I work with aren’t alive,” said Marc Quinn this week. This pigment printing contemporary artist has turned to the natural world to explore his interests in genetic modification, hybridism and modern technology. In ‘Garden’ (2000) he created a walk-through installation of impossibly combined frozen flowers that will never decay so long as the display is connected to a power source. His ‘Eternal Spring’ sculptures feature flowers preserved in perfect bloom by being plunged into sub-zero silicone.  Marc Quinn uses scientific knowledge to transform the flower into a meditation on how the conflict between the ‘natural’ and ‘cultural’ has taken a grip on the contemporary psyche. He truely is the space-age gardener of the art world.  Prize: Best Hybrid Horticulturalist   Destroy William Morris Destroy William Morris’ designs are not literal transcriptions of the natural forms he observed in his gardens or on country walks, but subtle stylised evocations. His first attempt at designing wallpaper was inspired by the gardens at Red House (where he moved with his wife in 1860), which were organised on a medieval plan with square flowerbeds enclosed by wattle trellises for roses.  Clearly passionate about flowers, one William Morris poem includes the line “Joy that may not be spoken fills mead and flower and tree.” We admire this crafty artist’s interest in wildlife (The Strawberry Thief) and natural produce (The Vine), as well as his beautifully regimented floral designs.  Prize: 1st in The Brotherhood Bouquet  Destroy Egon Schiele The Austrian painter and protégé of Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele once wrote “I must see new things and investigate them. I want to taste dark water and see crackling trees and wild winds. I want to gaze with astonishment at mouldy garden fences.”  Destroy The ‘mouldy fence’ says a lot about Schiele’s approach to gardening. His sunflower paintings are tinged with the indelible mark of imminent decay. It is amply evidenced that Egon Schiele’s sunflowers are past their peak bloom by their darkened centres and droopy leaves. However, they are the ideal motif for the artist who coined the maxim “Everything is living dead.” Prize: The 20th Century Decay Award  We bid you adieu from your visit to the artrepublic Flower Show with this adorable garden gnome designed for the RHS Campaign for School Gardening by artist Rob Ryan…  Destroy The Marc Quinn sculpture at the heart of his Chelsea Flower Show installation will be auctioned in association with Sotheby’s in a silent auction over the course of a week to help raise £1m for of the RHS Chelsea Centenary Appeal. You can participate in the Sotheby’s silent auction of ‘The Rush of Nature’ via the RHS website until 23.59 on Sunday 26th May 2013.  Destroy artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Join the artrepublic team!

    Destroy We currently have a vacancy at artrepublic for a Logistics Administrator. The role requires an enthusiastic, outgoing and reliable individual, with previous administrative experience in a busy working environment. If you’d like to manage our beautiful and exciting stock, suppor....
    Destroy We currently have a vacancy at artrepublic for a Logistics Administrator. The role requires an enthusiastic, outgoing and reliable individual, with previous administrative experience in a busy working environment. If you’d like to manage our beautiful and exciting stock, supporting our sales team and online systems, please email a covering letter and detailed CV to andrew@artrepublic.com Read here for more info & details $test =
  • Brighton Graffiti

    Sometimes we forget how lucky we are at artrepublic to be nestled in one of the world’s best locations for street art.  Check out this recent video of the best of Brighton graffiti – from classic Cassette Lord stencils to Mike Edwards paste-ups and our infamous Banksy creations. Come ....
    Sometimes we forget how lucky we are at artrepublic to be nestled in one of the world’s best locations for street art.  Check out this recent video of the best of Brighton graffiti – from classic Cassette Lord stencils to Mike Edwards paste-ups and our infamous Banksy creations. Come to Brighton, find these urban art gems and don’t forget to call into our Brighton gallery for a street art souvenir! Destroy View all Banksy prints View all Cassette Lord prints View Mike Edwards prints $test =
  • Magical 3D Circus Collages by Peter Blake

    Destroy Sir Peter Blake has taken his masterful use of collage to the next level in his recent release of a three-dimensional Circus Collage triptych. Three individual boxes have been created especially to house the three circus scenes, archival inkjet prints painstakingly cut out by hand....
    Destroy Sir Peter Blake has taken his masterful use of collage to the next level in his recent release of a three-dimensional Circus Collage triptych. Three individual boxes have been created especially to house the three circus scenes, archival inkjet prints painstakingly cut out by hand and displayed as an audience watching a magical circus performance.  Destroy For these unique new editions Peter Blake has combined his love of the circus with his characteristic collaged crowds in a three dimensional format.  The works are inspired by German illustrator Lothar Meggendorfer’s “International Circus” a pop-up book first published in 1887.  Each custom made box measures 43cm high by 55cm wide and 9cm deep and is available individually as either the Right, Centre or Left panel, but when put together the three boxes complete the whole scene of circus merriment.  If you would like any further information please call the Brighton gallery on +44 (0)1273 724 829. View all Peter Blake prints Read the full article on Pop-up Pop Art from Peter Blake $test =
  • Pop-Up Pop Art from Peter Blake

    Sir Peter Blake has taken his masterful use of collage to the next level in his recent release of a three-dimensional Circus Collage triptych. Three individual boxes have been created especially to house the three circus scenes, archival inkjet prints painstakingly cut out by hand and displayed a....
    Sir Peter Blake has taken his masterful use of collage to the next level in his recent release of a three-dimensional Circus Collage triptych. Three individual boxes have been created especially to house the three circus scenes, archival inkjet prints painstakingly cut out by hand and displayed as an audience watching a magical circus performance.  Destroy For these unique new editions Peter has combined his love of the circus with his characteristic collaged crowds in a three dimensional format.  Peter Blake illustrates his love for the circus employing new techniques with imagery that he is very fond of. He often uses circus figures and performing animals in his work, in particular the in The Paris Suite and the recent Appropriated Alphabets where Alphabet 4 is made up of acrobats forming the shapes of the letters. The works are inspired by Lothar Meggendorfer’s “International Circus” a pop-up book first published in 1887. Three-dimensional pop-up books and books with moveable parts were initially created typically for scholarly books, rather than childrens’ illustrations and it wasn’t until much later that they were used for entertainment. The first recorded example appeared in 1306 in a manuscript for an astrological book, however, it wasn’t really until the 18th century that they became popular as an alternative form of illustration.  Destroy The first real pop-up books were made by Lothar Meggendorfer, a German illustrator and writer whom Blake cites as his inspiration for the 3d Circus triptych. They were hugely popular in Germany and Britain during the 19th century. Meggendorfer was first published in 1862 in the Fliegende Blätter, an illustrated comic weekly, and from 1868 in the bi-weekly Münchener Bilderbogen. He also illustrated Neues Struwwelpeterbuch a popular children’s book in the 1890s by Julius Beck. In honour of his superb skill for creating pop-up books, the Movable Book Society awards an annual pop-up book prize named after Meggendorfer himself. Destroy Continuing the tradition of pop-up illustration, Peter Blake has used the ideas from Meggendorfer’s “International Circus” and re-presented them with his own take on the technique. For his Circus, Blake has put together two weird and wonderful audience collages in which the crowds are being entertained by a circus act. These two panels sit either side of a central stage collage, which features a line up of unusual people, and an eclectic orchestra sourced from the Artist’s extensive collection of ephemera. Each custom made box measures 43cm high by 55cm wide and 9cm deep and is available individually as either the Right, Centre or Left part, but when put together the three boxes complete the whole scene of circus merriment. As an edition of just 60 we anticipate these to be a really special collectors’ piece. View all Peter Blake prints If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Artist Castaways: Artists Deserted by Desert Island Discs

    Destroy Artist Damien Hirst is the latest castaway on Radio 4’s iconic ‘Desert Island Discs’ programme, which celebrated its 70th anniversary last year. The incredible Desert Island Discs archive has given us access to previous artist castaways, including Sir Pe....
    Destroy Artist Damien Hirst is the latest castaway on Radio 4’s iconic ‘Desert Island Discs’ programme, which celebrated its 70th anniversary last year. The incredible Desert Island Discs archive has given us access to previous artist castaways, including Sir Peter Blake (twice!), David Hockney, and Jack Vettriano, helping us to paint a portrait of these renowned artists by delving into their record collections.  Destroy Desert Island Discs is one of Radio 4’s most popular and enduring programmes. The format is simple: each week a distinguished guest is invited by presenter Kirsty Young to choose eight records, a book (they are automatically given the ‘Complete Works of Shakespeare’ and either the Bible or another appropriate religious or philosophical work) and a luxury item that they would take with them to a desert island.  The first Desert Island Discs was recorded in the BBC’s bomb-damaged Maida Vale studio on 27th January 1942 and aired two days later. It was introduced to the listening public as “a programme in which a well-known person is asked the question, if you were to be cast away alone on a desert island, which eight gramophone records would you choose to have you, assuming of course, that you had a gramophone and an inexhaustible supply of needles.” Since then there have been over 1,500 castaways choosing over 22,000 tracks. Art is almost impossible to appreciate over the radio waves, but check out the choices of these artist castaways and see if you can build a picture of their art from their favourite records. It’s no surprise that a pen/pencil is the most popular luxury item amongst these deserted creatives, but guess which artist picked Spice Girls 'Wannabe' as one of their eight records?! Destroy DAMIEN HIRST May 2013 “Life, death, desire, fear, beauty, horror – his creative preoccupations are standard fair; his art – using sharks, maggots, butterflies, glass, formaldehyde and even sometimes paint – is not. His best works have become iconic symbols of contemporary culture and his exhibitions and auctions attract attention the way a carcass attracts flies.” Records: The Clash, ‘The Magnificent Seven’ The Trashmen, ‘Surfin’ Bird’ Joni Mitchell, ‘Big Yellow Taxi’ The Beatles, ‘Everybody has got something to hide except me and my Monkey’ Bob Andy, ‘You Don’t Know’ Ian Brown, ‘F.E.A.R.’ Joe Strummer & The Mescaleros, ‘X Ray Style’ The Stone Roses, ‘I Am The Resurrection’ Book: ‘The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors Even, Again’ by Richard Hamilton Luxury Item: A work of art by Roger Hiorns called ‘Untitled 2009’ Destroy PETER BLAKE March 1997 “Only this week’s castaway on Desert Island Discs could place the singer Madonna in the same picture as the Madonna and Child, or follow a painting of the National Gallery’s 10 most beautiful faces with a collection of its nine prettiest bottoms.” Records: Brian Wilson, ‘Do It Again’ Peggy Lee, ‘When The World Was Young’ Rex Jamieson, ‘Mrs. Shufflewick Entertains’ Chet Baker, ‘Everything Happens to Me’ Ian Dury and The Block Heads, ‘Reasons to be Cheerful’ Gladys Knight, Elton John, Dionne Warwick, Stevie Wonder, ‘That’s What Friends Are For’ Spice Girls, ‘Wannabe’ Judy Garland, ‘Somewhere Over the Rainbow’ Book: Lempieres’ Dictionary by Lawrence Norfolk Luxury Item: A Gym PETER BLAKE May 1979 Records: The Beatles, ‘Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ The Everly Brothers, ‘Lucille’ Max Miller, ‘Max at The Met’ Dr. Hook, ‘A Little Bit More’ Danny & The Juniors, ‘Pony Express’ Humphrey Ocean and the Hardy Annuals, ‘Whoops-A-Daisy’ Ian Dury and The Blockheads, ‘Don’t Ask Me’ James Joyce, ‘Molly Bloom’s Soliloquy (from Ulysses)’ Book: Ulysses by James Joyce Luxury Item: Cement and tools to build a folly Destroy TRACY EMIN November 2004 “Tracey Emin is one of the most successful and controversial artists to emerge during the 1990s. Her work was championed early on by influential art dealer Jay Joplin and later by the collector Charles Saatchi. Her work is highly autobiographical and confessional.” Records: John Holt, ‘Riding For a Fall’ The Beach Boys, ‘Good Vibrations’ Donna Summer, ‘I Feel Love’ Clash, ‘Should I Stay or Should I Go?’ Middle of the Road, ‘Chirpie Chirpie Cheep Cheep’ Elvis Presley, ‘Burning Love’ Third World, ‘Now That I’ve Found Love’ David Bowie, ‘Young Americans’ Book: ‘Spinoza: Ethics’ by G H R Parkinson Luxury: A pen which would never run out  Destroy DAVID HOCKNEY February 1972 Records: Ludwig van Beethoven (arr. Liszt), ‘Symphony No. 5 in C minor’ Orchestre national du Capitole de Toulouse, ‘La Belle Excentrique’ Richard Wagner, ‘Verachtet mir die Meister nicht (from Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg)’ Francis Poulenc, ‘Les Biches Ballet Suite’ Jeanette MacDonald, ‘San Francisco’ Monte Carlo Opera, ‘Orchestra Fedora’ Marilyn Monroe, ‘I’m Through With Love’ Richard Wagner, ‘Liebestod (from Tristan und Isolde)’ Book: 'Route 69' by Floyd Carter Luxury Item: Paper, pencils and a battery-operated sharpener Destroy JACK VETTRIANO March 2004 “Jack Vettriano is the painter of Britain’s most popular work of art… Vettriano has enjoyed painting since he was in his 20s after a girlfriend gave him a set of watercolours. But he did not devote himself full time to art until the late 1980s when he was nearly 40.” Records: The Animals, ‘House of the Rising Sun’ Joni Mitchell, ‘Shade of Scarlett’ The Beatles, ‘Twist and Shout’ Bob Dylan, ‘Like a Rolling Stone’ Crosby & Nash, ‘Page 43’ Leonard Cohen, ‘I’m Your Man’ Eagles, ‘Last Resort’ Book: ‘SUMO’ by Helmut Newton Luxury Item: ‘Triptych’ (May-June 1973) by Francis BaconJudy Collins, ‘My Father’ Visit the BBC Radio 4 Desert Island Discs archive  artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =

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