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Monthly Archives: April 2013

  • Copyright , one year after 'The Apprentice'

    It’s a year since popular Bristol based artist Copyright’s appearance on BBC1’s 'The Apprentice'. He featured on Season 8 of the series as an artist that was selected and taken to London to put on an exhibition to see which Team of candidates could sell the most artwork. We caught up with....
    It’s a year since popular Bristol based artist Copyright’s appearance on BBC1’s 'The Apprentice'. He featured on Season 8 of the series as an artist that was selected and taken to London to put on an exhibition to see which Team of candidates could sell the most artwork. We caught up with him to talk about the experience, here’s his response... “I really couldn’t have imagined the impact it would have, I totally underestimated what being watched by 8million viewers would be like for me as a working artist. I knew going on the show would be a risk, I mean I know with those things they like to dramatize stuff to make better viewing, and a clever edit one way can easy make things out of context, but like all things that I chose to do, for me it was about the adventure, you know when you make a decision to make art full time, it’s not really a career decision more of a ‘if I don’t do it I’ll never know’ kinda vibe. Maybe all artistic types have a regret complex, I dunno. Anyway thankfully it worked out well... I haven’t caught my breath since. “ “The weeks that followed the show were insane, I kept thinking, ‘this has got to slow down soon’ but it didn’t and still hasn’t.  It’s been great fun, but it’s been a lot of hard work, I know now is a temptation to put out new work quickly, but I’m conscious that now I have a bigger audience it’s more important than ever to only do work that represents me best and to try and do my strongest work ever. It’s been difficult to keep up with demand, many stressful days / sleepless nights, but I am still releasing new works slowly.”  Copyright is an artist who never disappoints, we often sell out of his prints before we’ve even had a chance to get them framed and up on the gallery walls! “My latest print ‘Beautiful Heartbreak’ goes on sale this week, it’s already been one of my most popular images, so am sure it’ll be a popular print.” “The best part of The Apprentice for me was finding a new audience, this art scene is still quite underground, my works been collected by people familiar with the scene and art collectors for a long time, but since going on the show I’ve noticed a change in the people wanting prints to a more wider audience. It’s lovely to imagine my prints and paintings hanging in people’s homes up and down the country.  “ View all Copyright Prints Watch the best bits of Copyright’s appearance on 'The Apprentice'... If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Mike Edwards on Brigitte Bardot and Life as an Artist

    Mike Edwards is one of the pioneers of contemporary Typographic Art. His latest creation sees the iconic Brigitte Bardot transformed through the text of French erotic pulp-fiction novels into a captivating ‘readable’ giclee.  In this Q&A he tells us al....
    Mike Edwards is one of the pioneers of contemporary Typographic Art. His latest creation sees the iconic Brigitte Bardot transformed through the text of French erotic pulp-fiction novels into a captivating ‘readable’ giclee.  In this Q&A he tells us all about this stunning new print and gives us a fascinating insight into the artistic life of Mike Edwards – complete with the threat of “philistine governments” and advice for painting straight lines.  How did you create Bardot (Giclee Signed Limited Edition of 25)? By an insanely painstaking method that’s taken a few years to develop. It's so labour intensive it sometimes drives me to the edge of quitting and getting a day job as an abstract expressionist or a minimalist or something. You could say it was created using a ‘dense maximalist technique’... Do you think Bardot is an icon? Does she still have a cultural significance? Are you kidding? I think she’s one of the sexiest women that’s ever lived and her status as one of the original sex symbols - along with Marilyn Monroe - is firmly cemented in popular culture and continues to endure today. I was in Paris last year and couldn’t believe the amount of vintage Bardot imagery I saw about the city - particularly the huge window displays in Lancell’s [see left image] - which were one of the inspirations for this piece. What I like about Bardot more than Marilyn though is her association with Parisian intellectuals in the 50’s and 60’s - it gives her a much more of an enlightened European aesthetic - she’s a woman in control of her destiny. She’s definitely not the ‘girl next door’. She doesn’t have the cutesy, innocent ‘fluttering eyelashes’ characteristic that Monroe often imparts, instead she’s the woman in the hot, subterranean jazz club at three in the morning smoking Gitanes and reading Simone de Beauvoir. In other words - she’s liberated - free. And whilst her image is the physical embodiment of sex and seduction, at the same time she makes the statement that she won’t be manipulated - and this combination of beauty, intelligence and strength is what makes her iconic. And this is also what continues to make her culturally significant - and for me, connects her with contemporary liberators such as Pussy Riot, Aung San Suu Kyi and New York’s ‘Topless Pulp Fiction’ group. Why do you think this portrait of her is so successful? Hopefully the combination of the French text, the seductive colours and the ‘pulp paperback’ composition manages to portray the very essence of Bardot - sexy yet strong and intelligent. Technically - it’s one of the few times I’ve used a combination of both larger and small text simultaneously across the same image. The smaller text was used to define the key features of the face and hopefully was a way of successfully capturing the fire of the eyes and the allure of the lips - whilst the larger text drives home the point that the image is made solely from text. Also, for much of my previous work I’ve adhered to a specific set of rules I imposed upon myself - the main one being that each letter should be a single colour. But in this piece I’ve used shading across the letters - more time-consuming, but it creates a softer blend of tones which complements the subject more.  Similarly, I haven’t used a defined font - I’ve used my own handwriting which, because of its roundness, perhaps helps to evoke a more personal, intimate feel. Like the way a handwritten love letter has the edge over a typed proclamation of love. What’s the relationship between words and images in this work? The words that create the visual image of Brigitte Bardot are all titles of French erotic pulp fiction novels such as “La Caress du Fouet” [The Caress of the Whip], “La Maison des Plaisirs Defendus” [The House of Forbidden Pleasures], “Ou Me Baise Longtemps” [will leave you to translate that one!] - which not only add an air of Frenchness - French is the language of love after all - but also create an underlying exotic naughtiness - which amplifies the theme of seduction. Compositionally, the idea is that it’s an old vintage pulp paperback that’s had a list of French erotic pulp novels written over the cover. By applying a clever optical trick - i.e. by painting each letter a different colour - the words in the list magically converge into the pictorial image of Bardot. So there’s a concrete relationship between the words and the image in that the words physically create the picture - but at the same time there’s also a cerebral relationship in that the words are able to extend the relationship with the image by conveying further images and meanings in our heads. What made you become an artist? For as long as I can remember I’ve felt I was an artist. How did you get started? It still feels like I’m just starting. What’s your medium? Paint liberated by Photoshop. What would you say are the main themes you pursue? The study of depiction - can visual images be depicted by words? Content-wise I’m drawn to themes of liberty and freedom of expression. What are you currently working on? I always have commissions on the go - some that no-one but the client will ever see - and some such as the Lord Attenborough portrait I’m working on for Sussex University - which everyone’ll see towards the end of this year. I’ve also just started a new series of ‘Niqab’ paintings contemplating oppression in the Middle east and contrasting it with our own liberty. Combining pictorial elements from the two cultures as well is also giving the paintings a rich ‘visual sizzle’. Which of your works are you most proud of? Haven’t made ‘the one’ yet. Do you care whether people like your work? I care that my work connects with people. What memorable responses have you had to your work? I made a unique version of the David Bowie artwork for a Cancer Research auction. Cancer Research then asked Bowie if he would sign the piece to add to it’s value. He signed it - and it went on to raise £22,000. What is the greatest threat to art today? Philistine governments. What’s the best advice anyone ever gave you? Pierre Finkelstein wrote that the best way to paint a straight line is to not look directly at the brush as you paint the line - but to look ahead of the brush - that way you’ll get a straight line. Plus, it’s a great metaphor for life... What’s your favourite film? 'La Haine' - preferably with live soundtrack by Asian Dub Foundation. Although I’d also recommend that short film of John Baldessari’s career voiced-over by Tom Waits... “This is Jon Baldessari’s pencil..” artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Nikki Black hand-finishing in the Brighton gallery

    Look who popped into the gallery to see us and do a spot of hand-finishing.  The lovely Nikki Black came into the Brighton gallery this weekend to add the finishing touches to her newest prints “Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd”.  The print is made up of real....
    Look who popped into the gallery to see us and do a spot of hand-finishing.  The lovely Nikki Black came into the Brighton gallery this weekend to add the finishing touches to her newest prints “Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd”.  The print is made up of really colourful letters that are the lyrics to Pink Floyd’s track “Brain Damage” from the Dark Side of the Moon album that was released 40 years ago. In the centre is a perfect black circle of diamond dust to draw you in to this appropriately psychedelic print. We managed to get a few snaps of the camera-shy artist at work as he carefully applied the glue and the black glitter to the circle in the centre of each print before signing and numbering each one.  View all Nikki Black prints $test =
  • Bankers & Boris Back London Graffiti Project

    It has been reported by The Art Newspaper that Merrill Lynch, the wealth management and investment banking arm of Bank of America, has launched a public art project in southeast London in conjunction with Tate and Graffiti Life, a London street art collective. Following a five-day worksho....
    It has been reported by The Art Newspaper that Merrill Lynch, the wealth management and investment banking arm of Bank of America, has launched a public art project in southeast London in conjunction with Tate and Graffiti Life, a London street art collective. Following a five-day workshop led by Graffiti Life, 60 young people from Southwark and Lambeth aged between 16 and 25, who are not in work, education or training, created a large-scale outdoor mural. The graffiti artwork is due to be unveiled on 2 May at the Bankside Open Spaces Trust. “London is famous throughout the world for being a bustling hub for the arts, and it’s an immensely important part of our economy,” said Boris Johnson, Mayor of London. “If we are to preserve that heritage, Londoners must have the opportunity to participate and engage in the exciting art and cultural opportunities that our city has to offer.” We certainly hope the bankers and Boris keep up this enthusiasm for urban art! View all graffiti prints $test =
  • The Magical Peter Blake Art Bus Is Destined for Brighton

    Sir Peter Blake’s Art Bus is a mobile work of art and a unique travelling art gallery. Designed to emulate a rock ’n’ roll tour bus the four-wheeled ride is a groovy Pop marvel.  This year the eccentric double-decker returns to Brighton as part of the city’s Fringe Festiv....
    Sir Peter Blake’s Art Bus is a mobile work of art and a unique travelling art gallery. Designed to emulate a rock ’n’ roll tour bus the four-wheeled ride is a groovy Pop marvel.  This year the eccentric double-decker returns to Brighton as part of the city’s Fringe Festival celebrations, which artrepublic is very proud to be sponsoring again. It can be flagged down in New Road in the centre of Brighton on Saturday 4th May from 1pm - 4pm. It’s a free, non ticketed event so jump on the bus and let the godfather of British Pop art take you on a magical mystery tour! Can't wait? Check out this great Guardian video of Peter Blake giving a tour of pop cultural landmarks around London on his marvellous Art Bus… View all Peter Blake prints Read our guide to Brighton Festival Fringe 2013 $test =
  • The Art of the Celebrity Mug Shot

    The gossip columns are awash with the latest celebrity mug shot as Reese Witherspoon is arrested for disorderly conduct. Mug shots taken by countless clerks, cops and sheriffs are the most candid photos of celebrities and have inspired some of artrepublic’s most sought after screen print....
    The gossip columns are awash with the latest celebrity mug shot as Reese Witherspoon is arrested for disorderly conduct. Mug shots taken by countless clerks, cops and sheriffs are the most candid photos of celebrities and have inspired some of artrepublic’s most sought after screen prints… Russell Young is familiar with a celeb or two, having photographed the likes of Morrisey, Bjork, REM, Diana Ross and Paul Newman. Now an internationally acclaimed Pop artist, he has transformed classic mug shots into larger than life images documenting history and popular culture. Young has said that his idea to create “anti-celebrity” portraits was probably a reaction to his former career. Artist Russell Marshall has similarly appropriated the criminal snap shot. Having worked in the tabloid newspaper industry for over 20 years, his mug shot masterpieces reflect his interest in the public’s obsession with celebrity.  Both Young and Marshall have created art works featuring the identification photos of Jane Fonda, Al Pacino and Elvis, besides numerous other popular culture figures. We’ll keep our eyes peeled for a Reese Witherspoon edition! View all Russell Young prints View all Russell Marshall prints View all celebrity prints $test =
  • The influence of Martha Cooper

    As graffiti art now appears in exhibition spaces alongside “gallery art” we thought we’d take a look at an influential character in the graffiti art scene and remember some of the steps it took to get it from the walls of the streets into the galleries and onto the walls of art col....
    As graffiti art now appears in exhibition spaces alongside “gallery art” we thought we’d take a look at an influential character in the graffiti art scene and remember some of the steps it took to get it from the walls of the streets into the galleries and onto the walls of art collectors. As a young photographer Martha Cooper documented the beginnings of graffiti in a way that had never been done before and in turn totally transformed the way we look at street art inspiring many artists still today. Back in the 70s and 80s when graffiti was emerging, tagging was the primary form of artistic expression, it was quick and cheap and allowed kids to express their individuality and make a mark on their territory. Subway trains were adorned with tags from individuals seeking to be the best or “The King” by creating the most widely spread or imaginative tag, to gangs asserting their dominance.  Young people with limited supplies and limited money were able to express themselves with a few cans of paint and some adapted nozzles. By using the subway trains, taggers could cover a huge geographical area as the trains passed from one side of the city to another from the Bronx through Manhattan to Brooklyn.  In this way they gained notoriety as their artwork was viewed all over the city and as it became more popular, the unconventional movement was born. As graffiti was, and still is, largely illegal the artists had to overcome many hurdles accessing the trains, working often at night and in dangerous positions. Martha began photographing them as part of an anthropological study on “Street Play” and over time earned their trust and was allowed privileged access to their world never previously seen in such detail. She formed close friendships with some of them in particular Dondi, Futura and Lady Pink and was eventually able to accompany them and document them at work capturing the perilous nature of aerosol art. The development of simple tags into more elaborate “Wildstyle” lettering began. Overlapping fonts and symbols often incorporating other intricate designs were mainly done freehand so the artists could demonstrate highly skilled use of the spray can in a way that was difficult to replicate or copy.  There are many artists today such as RETNA, Revok, Chaz Bojorques, Ben Eine and Saber who  began making their mark this way and now command high prices for their artwork that is collected all over the world. Martha met Henry Chalfont who had been documenting the actual trains daubed with spray paint and together they produced “Subway Art” combining Martha’s study of the graffiti writers and Henry’s panoramic photos of the trains and their tags or “burners”. The book, which has since been a huge influence on many, was the catalyst and affirmation that this existed as an art form to be explored and developed.  Many very successful artists today still cite this book as a one of huge importance and inspiration. Shepherd Fairey, for example, has used her photographic images selecting several figures to create a poster called “Defiant Youth” just few years ago. She has never seen herself as an artist in her own right but refers to her work as social documentation, calling herself an ethnographer specialising in art and anthropology rather than a photo journalist or artist. Her photos have earned her worldwide acclaim and now her work appears in many publications such as National Geographic and Art News. If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com Return to our Brighton section View all Graffiti art prints View all Street art prints artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Storm Thorgerson Obituary: The Designer Behind the Iconic Album Art of Pink Floyd

    Storm Thorgerson, the man behind some of the most iconic images in the history of Rock and Roll, has died aged 69 after suffering from cancer. He was the genius sleeve designer behind the weird and wonderful images of Led Zeppelin, Genesis, Ian Dury and the Mars Volta. He will be remembered ....
    Storm Thorgerson, the man behind some of the most iconic images in the history of Rock and Roll, has died aged 69 after suffering from cancer. He was the genius sleeve designer behind the weird and wonderful images of Led Zeppelin, Genesis, Ian Dury and the Mars Volta. He will be remembered for his crucial role in creating Pink Floyd’s progressive aesthetic. Storm Thorgerson was an English artist, graphic designer, film maker and tennis fiend. He was born in Potters Bar, Middlesex on 28 February 1944 and attended Cambridgeshire High School for Boys. He graduated in English and Philosophy from Leicester University (1966) and went on to study an MA in Film and Television at the Royal College of Art (1969). Whilst at the Royal College of Art in London, Thorgerson shared a flat in South Kensington with his friend Aubrey Powell. It soon became a swinging sixties hub for a fascinating variety of artistic and musical characters. Together Aubrey and Thorgerson formed Hipgnosis, the preeminent and most visionary album art design firm in the world. Hipgnosis’ client list included Genesis, Yes, 10cc, Bad Company and Paul McCartney & Wings. Their visual mystique was behind T Rex’s ‘Electric Warrior’ (1971) and Wishbone Ash’s ‘Argue’ (1972). Jimmy Page invited the pair to create the artwork for Led Zepplin’s ‘House of Holy’ (1973), for which they created the iconic image of eerie naked children crawling over rocks. The photograph was inspired by the Arthur C Clarke novel ‘Childhood’s End’ and was constructed from collaged photographs taken at the Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland. In 1987, following the dissolution of Hipgnosis, Thorgerson formed his own design studio called Storm Studios. He went into video directing and made TV documentaries, including ‘The Art of Tripping’ (1993), which investigated the effect of drugs on creativity, and a science documentary called ‘Rubber Universe’ (1994).  He designed album artwork for more recent artists such as the Cranberries, Anthrax, Audioslave and Biffy Clyro and continued to work on Pink Floyd projects. Storm Thorgerson and Pink Floyd members came from Cambridge and went to the same high school. Roger Water’s mum and Thorgerson’s mum were best friends. Roger was in the year above him and Syd Barrett the year below, “So we all knew each other, and Syd and I were in the same kind of peer group when we were kids, about 17.” Thorgerson didn’t have much to do with them for three or four years; it wasn’t until the band’s second album that Thorgerson got involved, “I did volunteer my services to the cover for ‘Saucerful’, when a mutual friend who had been previously asked, declined.” That was at the beginning of 1968. Little did Thorgerson know that he was entering into a collaboration which would continue for over thirty years… With ‘A Saucerful of Secrets’, his first artwork for Floyd, Thorgerson believed the band didn’t want the record company to handle it. These were the days when Floyd, the Stones and the Beatles were beginning to take power back to themselves, especially artistic power, and away from the record companies. Thorgerson explained, “I think they realised that, along with the music, sleeves are things that last, and that maybe they’re important in their own way.” In March 1973 one of the most successful albums of all time was released: Pink Floyd’s ‘The Dark Side of the Moon’. Originally released in the UK on March 24, 1973, 'The Dark Side of the Moon' became Pink Floyd’s first number 1 album in the US, remaining on the chart for 741 weeks between 1973 and 1988. Since its UK release, the album has spent an astonishing 30 years in the UK album charts. The artwork for the album, which was designed by Storm Thorgerson, has become as famous and iconic as the music. The simple and bold prism design was a reference to the light shows that the band used in their concerts. The triangular shape, a symbol of thought and ambition, echoes the shape of a pyramid and touched on themes in the lyrics of the album. Storm Thorgerson designed sixteen album covers for Pink Floyd; there are three he didn’t do. Beyond the albums, there were videos and concert films, as well as covers for solo projects by Gilmour and Barrett. Thorgerson would have blanched at any reference to him as the band’s fifth member, but he was responsible for the visual face of Pink Floyd. In the foreword to Thorgerson’s book ‘Mind Over Matter: The Images of Pink Floyd’, Gilmour wrote, “He has been my friend, my conscience, my therapist and of course my artistic advisor.” Throughout the majority of his career, Thorgerson created his iconic artwork using photography, “I like photography because it is a reality medium, unlike drawing which is unreal. I like to mess with reality… to bend reality. Some of my works beg the question of is it real or not?” He used applied techniques such as multiple exposures to create surreal dislocations and disturbing juxtapositions. He cited artists and photographers including Man Ray, Rene Magritte, Pablo Picasso, Wassily Kandinsky, and Juan Gris as influences behind his work. In his designs, Thorgerson eschewed computer manipulation in favour of building massive sets and tableaus, staging performances and actions and “doing it for real” in what he called “mind movies” and “photo paintings”. His photograph ‘A Momentary Lapse of Reason’ involved dragging 700 wrought iron beds onto a beach. In an interview, Thorgerson confirmed, “Yeah, that is what we did. And we had to drag them all back again because of the God-damn English weather. It rained.” Sometimes Thorgerson would shoot his sets in bits, but it would always be shot for real, “I prefer the computer in my head to the one on my desk.” Storm Thorgerson died 18 April 2013. His family released a statement saying he died peacefully surrounded by family and friends. “He is survived by his mother Vanji, his son Bill, his wife Barbie Antonis and her two children Adam and Georgina,” it said. Thorgerson has left an unforgettable legacy of images which have changed the face of Rock and Roll and found a permanent place in our visual history.   artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   $test =
  • 2013 Brighton Festival Fringe visual arts sponsored by artrepublic

    artrepublic is very proud to once again sponsor visual arts at the 2013 Brighton Festival Fringe, one of the largest fringe festivals in Europe. This year the Brighton Festival Fringe runs from 4th May to 2nd June with over 685 events at 178 venues across Brighton....
    artrepublic is very proud to once again sponsor visual arts at the 2013 Brighton Festival Fringe, one of the largest fringe festivals in Europe. This year the Brighton Festival Fringe runs from 4th May to 2nd June with over 685 events at 178 venues across Brighton and Hove. artrepublic has worked with the Fringe for many years to help promote the finest artistic talent from Brighton and beyond and this year promises to be another fantastic selection.  Fringe City Fringe City will take place every Saturday in May and the first Saturday in June. With everything from comedy to cabaret and puppetry to poetry, this free outdoor event, showcases the wonderful world of Brighton Fringe. This year artrepublic is involved in two events at Fringe City: Peter Blake Art Bus 4 May (12 – 4) - New Road. All aboard! The sensational double-decker Art Bus returns to Fringe City this year. Take a tour and view stunning artwork inside & out from the godfather of British pop art. 2013 artrepublic Visual Arts Prize Exhibition 1 June (12 – 4) - Unitarian Church. View the shortlist and winner of the 2013 artrepublic Visual Arts Prize. Find ‘artrepublic’ on Facebook during May and cast your vote for who should win the prize. Other 2013 visual arts highlights include: ink_d gallery presents Back To Nature - Maria Rivans at Ink_d Gallery & Studio. Maria Rivans invites you into her fantastical world by converting ink_d gallery into a jungle environment, transporting us physically into her surreal world in which to explore her humorous and bizarre 3D collages. Rivans' solo show explores the idea of a growing estrangement from the natural world, and attempts to reconnect us with nature. Warning! Expect a sensory overload. Home of the Surrealists presents Farley Farm House at Farley Farm House. Experience the extraordinary atmosphere of the Sussex home of Surrealists Lee Miller and Roland Penrose, whose friends and guests included Picasso, Man Ray and Miró. 50 minute guided tours of house throughout the day.  Carlos Garde-Martin presents Brighton Fringe Illustrator Takes Over North Laine at The North Laine Pub. Carlos Garde-Martin this year’s Brigton Fringe illustrator adorns the walls of Brighton’s North Laine Pub and Brewery with a must see collection of his unique off-the-wall imagery. Launching Saturday the 4th of May and running the whole festival. Why not kick-start your Fringe in style? The pub will also be launching their own Fringe Festival Ale! Jenny King Embroidery/Beyond Retro presents The Embroidered Tattoo Parlour at Beyond Retro. Experience couture craftsmanship as you witness your chosen tattoo embroidered on the garment of your choice on our 1950's machines in a perfect vintage setting in-store at Beyond Retro Brighton. Choose from a classic swallow to a personalised rose on to the shirt off your back or choose from an array of dazzling vintage items on the rails of Beyond Retro Brighton. artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Tracey Emin Launches a Cultural Exchange Series

    A ‘Cultural Exchange’ is launching on the BBC’s ‘Front Row’ on Monday 22nd April beginning with the artist Tracey Emin. She will be discussing the artwork that has most inspired her, Vermeer’s painting ‘Lady Writing a Letter with her Maid’. Emin describes Vermeer as “one....
    A ‘Cultural Exchange’ is launching on the BBC’s ‘Front Row’ on Monday 22nd April beginning with the artist Tracey Emin. She will be discussing the artwork that has most inspired her, Vermeer’s painting ‘Lady Writing a Letter with her Maid’. Emin describes Vermeer as “one of the first feminists”, because of the unusual way he depicted women. “He showed that women had singular thoughts that were away from their husbands.” ‘Cultural Exchange’ is Radio 4’s major new arts project. It will see 75 leading creative figures choose a favourite cultural work to share with listeners – from paintings, writing, films, music and poetry, to inspiring buildings. The other people taking part include PD James, Nigel Kennedy, Meera Syal, Jeanette Winterson, Paul Weller and film director Bernardo Bertolucci.  Emin’s 17th Century Dutch masterpiece, a sexually forthright movie from the 70s, a pioneering science-fiction novel and a ground-breaking ballet from Sweden are among the artworks chosen by the diverse range of high-profile figures. We’re looking forward to a summer of cultural conversation! View all Johannes Vermeer prints Listen to Tracy Emin on BBC Radio 4 Front Row $test =

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