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Monthly Archives: March 2013

  • Video: Soho gallery highlights, inc. Charming Baker & Peter Blake limited edition art prints

    View our collectable art highlights for April 2013 by taking a walk around the walls of our London gallery. Gallery Manager Sam Rhodes takes you through three fantastic art works including an outstanding Charming Baker limited edition, the first ever lenticular by Sir Peter Blake and an amazing....
    View our collectable art highlights for April 2013 by taking a walk around the walls of our London gallery. Gallery Manager Sam Rhodes takes you through three fantastic art works including an outstanding Charming Baker limited edition, the first ever lenticular by Sir Peter Blake and an amazing Stanley Donwood art work depicting the destruction of Los Angeles. Charming Baker, ‘Being Yourself is Easier When You’re Not Being Someone Else’ art print: “Classic Charming title, signed limited edition of 145, signed in pencil, numbered in pencil, it’s got the Charming stamp. It features sketches of some mice which were done for a sculpture at the Victoria & Albert museum last summer with Paul Smith, featuring a tiny mouse holding up a big racing bike…” Sir Peter Blake, ‘James Dean at the Albert Hall’ art lenticular print: “This is his latest release. It’s a 3D lenticular, his first forary into 3D work… It was produced especially to be a lenticular which makes all the difference. The composition suits being a lenticular, Peter Blake designed it like that.” Stanley Donwood, ‘Apocalypse 101’ art print: “Apocalypse LA, you’ve got all the landmarks and, really nice, the classic Donwood black and white… Best thing about this? Probably the fact that Donwood and Radiohead have separate collector bases so there’s lots of interest in this. It’s very collectible.” To find out more about any of these pieces either drop in to our Soho gallery or contact them on +44 (020) 7240 7909 email soho@artrepublic.com. View all Charming Baker prints View all Peter Blake prints View all Stanley Donwood prints See more of what’s on the walls of our London gallery $test =
  • The Accession of Magnus Gjoen: Grenade Assumption of the Virgin

    Magnus Gjoen’s stunning new print ‘Grenade Assumption of the Virgin’ elegantly combines his fascination with war and religion with his love of Renaissance art and Italy (he studied in Milan and frequently returns to the country). The ‘Assumption of the Virgin’ is an Ita....
    Magnus Gjoen’s stunning new print ‘Grenade Assumption of the Virgin’ elegantly combines his fascination with war and religion with his love of Renaissance art and Italy (he studied in Milan and frequently returns to the country). The ‘Assumption of the Virgin’ is an Italian Renaissance masterpiece by Titian, executed in 1516-1518. The large oil painting was Titian’s first major commission in Venice and is the largest altarpiece in the city. Titian’s painting commemorates the story of the Virgin Mary’s assumption into heaven. It is based on apocryphal legends, which told how the body and soul of Jesus’ mother were taken up to heaven by angels, three days after her death.  In his latest release, Magnus molds a religious painting of the assumption onto a grenade, a stark and uncompromising image of warfare. In classic Magnus style, the piece handsomely and succinctly represents the beauty and destruction created in the name of religion. The giclee print is from a limited edition of 200 and printed on Enhanced Matt 189 gsm fine art paper. Read our Q&A with Magnus Gjoen View all Magnus Gjoen prints $test =
  • Charming Baker - Lie Down I Think I Love You

    Charming Baker’s three-day show at Milk Studios in Hollywood, Los Angeles, marks a high point in what has been an extraordinary journey for the East London artist. Five years ago he was living in a council flat, with five children and no professional experience. ....
    Charming Baker’s three-day show at Milk Studios in Hollywood, Los Angeles, marks a high point in what has been an extraordinary journey for the East London artist. Five years ago he was living in a council flat, with five children and no professional experience. Now he has sell-out shows in London and New York under his belt and his work is selling for more than £150,000. The artist’s largest show to date explored the unpredictable nature of love through 20 paintings, as well as an over-sized sculptural installation of a plastic toy aeroplane, prints, and sculptures. Baker’s works were displayed in stark simplicity in a huge hanger-like building. In an interview with the BBC, Baker  explained, “It’s not a moving film, it’s not a piece of music that you have to play. It’s just one still image. It doesn’t need lighting, it’s not an installation that needs electricity, it’s the most basic form of self expression. It’s just a painting, a picture on a flat surface.” The VIP opening preview was attended by big names from the art world, including LACMA’s Abby Bankster, MOCA’s Director of Communications Lyn Winter, The Gasgosian Gallery’s Candy Coleman, and Hammer Museum’s David Morehouse. Fellow artists RETNA, Bumblebee, Quam Odunsi, Nicholas Bowers, and Mear1 were also in attendance, as well as celebrities including Rosamund Pike, Rose Mcgowan, Atticus Ross, and Davey Havok. artrepublic artist Russell Marshall attended the highly anticipated preview and generously sent  us this insider scoop - “BRITISH artist Charming Baker turned LA upside down last night... Along with a gigantic model airplane - the centrepiece of his latest show - Lie down I think I love you. Baker's largest exhibition to date fills LAs Milk Studios with 20 new paintings, unique sculptures and limited edition prints. Centre stage is 'Love's Revolution' a massive sculptural piece that takes the form of a 28 foot child's toy airplane inverted - a motive repeated in snow globe, canvas and print format. Baker's new paintings are simply stunning. The canvas and oil board works run with a familiar Baker theme of retro wallpaper designs behind incongruous foreground images but with an added depth and energy. Baker's work explores well trodden and intrinsically linked themes; love, life, death, terror, joy and despair with a dark sense of humour and evokes the memory of eerie childhood dreams. As with Baker's previous London and New York shows, most of the major pieces sold out before the show even opened. And with collectors including Damien Hirst, Alberto Mugrabi, Frank Cohen, Harry Blain and Sir Paul Smith this achievement only goes to further cement Baker's status as one of Britain's leading contemporary artists.” To discover our latest rare Charming Baker works available call artrepublic Soho on +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London gallery section artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Tilda Swinton Beds Down for Modern Art

    Last week was a busy week in the art world for Scottish actress Tilda Swinton. On Wednesday, she gave the opening speech at the V&A’s blockbuster exhibition ‘David Bowie Is’ and on Saturday she spent more than six hours ‘napping’ in a glass box for a performance art piece in ....
    Last week was a busy week in the art world for Scottish actress Tilda Swinton. On Wednesday, she gave the opening speech at the V&A’s blockbuster exhibition ‘David Bowie Is’ and on Saturday she spent more than six hours ‘napping’ in a glass box for a performance art piece in New York's Museum of Modern Art. It’s not Swinton’s first contemporary art performance. The live sleeping work, which is a collaboration with artist and friend Cornelia Parker, debuted at the Serpentine Gallery in London in 1995 and was repeated at the Museo Baracco in Rome a year later.  Titled ‘The Maybe’, the piece consists of Tilda Swinton remaining in a glass box for some six-and-a-half hours. She wore the same combination of light blue shirt and jeans as she did 18 years ago. The only notable difference was the addition of a pair of glasses on the mattress beside her. The performance will be an occasional feature at MoMA in the coming weeks.  Read our review of 'David Bowie Is' $test =
  • The Chinese Girl Returns to South Africa After £1 Million Sale

    Yesterday the original painting of the Chinese Girl, thought to be the most reproduced print in the world, was sold for £982,050. The Vladimir Tretchikoff painting reached nearly double its estimated price in a sale at Bonhams auction house. Tretchikoff was a Russian émigré who settled in....
    Yesterday the original painting of the Chinese Girl, thought to be the most reproduced print in the world, was sold for £982,050. The Vladimir Tretchikoff painting reached nearly double its estimated price in a sale at Bonhams auction house. Tretchikoff was a Russian émigré who settled in South Africa and went on to become one of the wealthiest artists in the world. Giles Peppiatt, director of South African art at Bonhams, said: “This was an exceptional price for a work of art which really does merit the word ‘iconic’. And it’s very happy news to hear that it is going home.” It has been reported that that blue-hued beauty was bought by British diamond jewellery magnate Laurence Graff, who owns the Delaire Gaff estate near Stellenbosch, in South Africa, where the painting will join the rest of his art collection on display. Prints of the Chinese Girl were available from Woolworths in the 1950s but can now be bought at artrepublic! View Chinese Girl by Vladimir Tretchikoff $test =
  • The Influence of Marcel Duchamp on Andy Warhol, Richard Hamilton & Peter Blake

    Great Pop Duchamp-ions The Barbican’s current blockbuster show, ‘The Bride and the Bachelors: Duchamp with Cage, Cunningham, Rauschenberg and Johns’, focuses on Marcel Duchamp’s cultural legacy by tracing his relationship to four great modern masters; composer John Cage, choreographer M....
    Great Pop Duchamp-ions The Barbican’s current blockbuster show, ‘The Bride and the Bachelors: Duchamp with Cage, Cunningham, Rauschenberg and Johns’, focuses on Marcel Duchamp’s cultural legacy by tracing his relationship to four great modern masters; composer John Cage, choreographer Merce Cunningham, and visual artists Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns. The show has inspired us to take at look at other great Duchamp-ions… The art and ideas of French painter, sculptor and writer Marcel Duchamp, perhaps more than those of any other 20th century artist, have radically altered our understanding of what constitutes an object of art. From his early experiments with Cubism and his association with Dada and Surrealism, to his conception of the ready-made, Duchamp refused to accept the standards and practices of an established art system. Refusing to repeat himself or develop a recognizable style, Duchamp paved the way for later movements such as Pop Art. Prolific artist Duchamp employed chance and humour, questioned the tastemakers, playfully ridiculed existing norms to transcend the status quo, and perhaps most radically, created works of art from everyday objects. Here we examine how this artist-provocateur influenced three of Pop Art’s greats; Any Warhol, Richard Hamilton, and Sir Peter Blake: ANDY WARHOL Among the qualities that Andy Warhol and Marcel Duchamp share are a desire to shock, a taste for celebrity, a belief in the everyday object, an interest in language and puns, and a penchant for cross dressing. In 2010 the Andy Warhol Museum held an exhibition examining the artistic links between these two art giants, ‘Twisted Pair: Marcel Duchamp/Andy Warhol’. The show revealed that Warhol himself owned over thirty works by Duchamp, including a copy of the ‘Fountain’ urinal, which he acquired by trading away three of his portraits. Warhol made several short films of Duchamp and, during the mid-sixties, he planned to make a 24 hour film on the French artist. Although the project never materialised, he did make a ‘screen test’ film by crashing a 1966 party in Duchamp’s honour. Duchamp later said, “I like Warhol’s spirit. He’s not just some painter or movie maker.” Readymades Marcel Duchamp’s most striking, iconoclastic gesture, the readymade, is arguably the century’s most influential development on artists’ creative process. These were ordinary objects of everyday use, sometimes slightly altered, and designated works of art by the artist. One of Duchamps best-known readymade pieces is a urinal, titled ‘Fountain’ and signed ‘R.Mutt’, which he submitted to an exhibition in New York in 1917. Andy Warhol’s obsession with everyday objects undoubtedly originated in Duchamp’s mind-opening experimentation with object-as-subject. Warhol understood that advertisements, consumer objects, newspaper photos, and people themselves were all up for grabs as objects d’art. He understood the challenge of the ready-made, along with the irony of the reproduction. In 1964, Warhol began a series of sculptures that mimicked shipping cartons for products such as Heinz tomato ketchup and Brillo soap pads. In a 1968 show, he skipped the replication process and simply exhibited 500 actual cardboard Brillo boxes, aligning the work even more closely with Duchamp’s readymade concept. Duchamp rejected the work of many of his fellow artists as ‘retinal’ art, intended only to please the eye. Instead, he wanted, “to put art back in the service of the mind.” In 1964, Duchamp stated: “Pop Art is a return to ‘conceptual’ painting… If you take a Campbell soup can and repeat it 50 times, you are not interested in the retinal image. What interests you is that concept that wants to put 50 Campbell soup cans on a canvas.” Mona Lisa In 1963, Andy Warhol followed Marcel Duchamp’s footsteps and reinterpreted Leonardo Da Vinci’s art historic masterpiece ‘Mona Lisa’. The painting had just visited the United States and was given all the fame and media attention of a visiting celebrity. For Warhol, the overexposed icon became an infatuation which would last throughout his career. Aside from Warhol's works such as 'Two Golden Mona Lisas', the most famous recreation of the Mona Lisa was Duchamp’s ‘L.H.O.O.Q’. Duchamp’s piece, with its infamous facial hair, was not simply an act of vandalism on the mass produced tourist icon the Mona Lisa had become, but represented Duchamp’s attempt to subvert ‘higher culture’ and challenge preconceived notions of what art is. Fifty years later Warhol mirrored both Duchamp’s use of readymade images and his profound effect on how art can and should be interpreted. Other examples of Warhol revisiting Duchampion subjects include his ‘Most Wanted Men Series’ which took direct inspiration from Duchamp’s 1923 work ‘Wanted: $2,000 Reward’. The Alter-Ego In Duchamp’s ‘Wanted: $2,000 Reward’, he pasted two head shots of himself on the poster and had a printer add another alias to those listed; that of his recently created alter-ego Rrose Sélavy. Rrose Sélavy emerged in 1921 in a series of photographs by Man Ray of Duchamp dressed as a woman. Through the 1920s, Man Ray and Duchamp collaborated on more photos of this cross-dressing creation and Duchamp later used the name to sign several artworks. The ‘dressing up’ of Duchamp and Man Ray, the concept of the Alter Ego, and photographic collaboration all appealed to Andy Warhol. Warhol collected Man Ray photographs and began to collaborate with American photographer Christopher Makos, who had apprenticed with Man Ray in Paris. Together they created a collection of photographs of Warhol as Alter Ego, in drag. Rrose Sélavy gave the project art historical gravitas; it was as Makos explained, “something that we discussed, we wanted some artistic provenance, we did not want to do a copy, if there are some of the same poses it’s a conincidence.” RICHARD HAMILTON   British painter and collage artist Richard Hamilton has been described as the father of Pop Art and “the Duchamp-ion of intellectual art”. The internationally renowned artist who helped invent Pop art also interpreted and popularised the work of Marcel Duchamp. It was Hamilton especially who rediscovered the French artist in the 1960s by meticulously studying and reconstructing his works. It was the beginning of an intense and erudite dialogue between the two artists which would last over a decade. The Bride.../The Large Glass From 1915 to 1923 Marcel Duchamp worked on ‘The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors’, also known as ‘The Large Glass’, which he considered his most important single work. The piece summarized Duchamp’s view that painting and sculpture were fundamentally incompatible and inadequate as art forms with which to render contemporary life. The nature of ‘The Large Glass’ is that of a machine organism. The piece is a registry of different mechanical devices which, with Duchamp’s trademark wit, parallel sexual frustration. The viewer’s frustration with the impossibility of contact between the Bride and her Bachelors serves as a metaphor for the thwarted dynamic between the males and female he created. Duchamp’s extensive preparatory drawings, writings, and studies for ‘The Large Glass’ are mostly contained in his 1934 work ‘The Green Box’, and indicate his development towards a more abstract, mathematical approach to connoting the real world. From 1957 to ’60, Hamilton “worked on the notes of the Green Box as a translator, in a sense.” He published 'The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even : A Typographic Version by Richard Hamilton of Marcel Duchamps Green Box’ in 1960. Six years later, Hamilton finished reconstructing Duchamp’s ‘The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors.’ When he had finished Duchamp signed his reconstruction as if it were his own creation and it was included in the retrospective ‘The Almost Complete Works of Marcel Duchamp’ which Hamilton organized at the Tate Gallery in London. Hamilton described ‘The Large Glass’ as “an epic poem, a technical treatise and a pictorial masterpiece.” In his highly analytical 2003 print ‘Typo/Typography of Marcel Duchamp’s Large Glass’, Hamilton combined a diagram of Duchamp’s artwork with the English translations of his notes from the Green Box, bringing together the visual and literary elements of Duchamp’s project. The Great Decipherer The correspondence Richard Hamilton initiated in 1956 ended with Duchamp’s death in 1968. It reveals on the one hand Hamilton’s ongoing creative penetration of Duchamp’s idea, and on the other the existence of a friendship between the two great artists. The frankness with which Duchamp replied to Hamilton’s questions about his concept of the readymades and his vision of the artist, reveal the respect he had for the young artist he called his “great decipherer”. In a BBC Radio 3 interview, Hamilton said: “What was marvellous about Duchamp I found, and what I admired him almost most for, was his detachment. It was as though he’s looking at the thing from quite a distance and I was quite happy to adopt that as one of the useful things that he could teach me; stand back a bit.” PETER BLAKE If Richard Hamilton is the father of Pop Art, then Sir Peter Blake is the Godfather. Blake began incorporating the ephemera of popular culture into his paintings while still at the Royal College of Art in the 1950s (in advance of Andy Warhol and his soup cans). By the time he had created his celebrated cover of the Beatles’ Sgt Pepper album in 1967, the art of the surreal juxtaposition was his forte. Marcel Duchamp's World TourYou can see the influence of Marcel Duchamp and Blake’s surreal Pop at its best in ‘Marcel Duchamp’s World Tour’. The series is based on Blake’s belief that wherever Marcel Duchamp stops (even posthumously) he has a profound effect upon the artworld. Each painting follows a fantasy journey in which Duchamp travels through unidentified places meeting other artists, such as Damien Hirst, Pablo Picasso, Edward Hopper and Tracey Emin, and popular idols, including Tarzan, Elvis, and The Spice Girls. Wherever he stops Duchamp makes an impact, regardless of whether his newfound context is culturally high, low or a fusion of the two. As Duchamp tours in the world in his rock ’n’ roll bus, Blake constructs fantasy situations around him. Blake told the Tate how, “I decided to send him on a posthumous world tour, rather like the Flying Dutchman, where he would travel the world forever in a big rock ‘n’ roll tour bus, being very comfortable. He meets people along the way and people come and go on the bus and he goes to various happenings.” It is reminiscent of the Beatles’ 1967 Magical Mystery Tour film, in which the famous Pop band goes on a surreal, psychedelic bus tour. “The idea is to give [Duchamp] a kind of posthumous thank you,” explained Blake, “He opened the door that so many of us went through, the door of possibility, by saying anything an artist makes is art.” Chess In the 1920s, Duchamp famously renounced art making in favour of playing chess for the rest of his life. In ‘Playing Chess with Tracey’ (2003-5), Blake depicts Duchamp playing chess with Tracey Emin in the desert surroundings of her video self-portrait, ‘Sometimes…’ (2000), while three enigmatic cowboys wait by the bus. In 1927, Duchamp married a young heiress. The honeymoon did not go well. “Duchamp spent most of the week studying chess problems,” recalled his close friend Man Ray, “and his bride, in desperate retaliation, got up one night when he was asleep and glued the chess pieces to the board.” Duchamp once famously remarked, “While all artists are not chess players, all chess players are artists.” At his Pasadena Art Museum retrospective exhibition in 1963, Duchamp staged a game of chess between himself and a young nude woman, Eve Babitz. A brilliant black and white photograph of the famous chess game shows his intent concentration. In 2007, Sir Peter Blake recreated the famous chess match with model Carol Holt, using the original chessboard, made by Duchamp. If you enjoyed this article you should read our exhibition review of The Bride and the Bachelors: Duchamp with Cage, Cunningham, Rauschenberg and Johns at the Barbican Art Gallery $test =
  • Amanda Marie's Sweet New York Street Art

    American painter and stencil artist Amanda Marie was in New York last week for contemporary art show SCOPE. She left her mark in the city with a new whimsical and delicate street art piece.  Amanda Marie is known for drawing upon illustrations and characters reminiscent of mid 20th c....
    American painter and stencil artist Amanda Marie was in New York last week for contemporary art show SCOPE. She left her mark in the city with a new whimsical and delicate street art piece.  Amanda Marie is known for drawing upon illustrations and characters reminiscent of mid 20th century children’s books. With her well-groomed boys and girls “she plays on the sameness and ubiquity of this instantly recognizable representation of wholesome American innocence.”  In this latest work her brigade of blonde school girls come face to face with a delicate flock of birds. The contrast of these chaste and playful motifs with the gritty New York wall is intriguing and surreal. We love how Amanda Marie is subverting street art stereotypes.    View all Amanda Marie prints $test =
  • Time-lapse video of Carne Griffiths drawing

    See how Carne Grifiths builds up the layers of pen ink, tea alcohol to create his beautiful artworks in this speeded up video of him working in his studio to create a piece called “From The Forest”.  It’s amazing to the see the image emerge from the page as he uses a photo of a fore....
    See how Carne Grifiths builds up the layers of pen ink, tea alcohol to create his beautiful artworks in this speeded up video of him working in his studio to create a piece called “From The Forest”.  It’s amazing to the see the image emerge from the page as he uses a photo of a forest scene as inspiration, the female figure and the natural flora merge to become one. If you like what you see then take a look at the gorgeous new prints we have in the Brighton gallery “Bauhinia” and “Unity”. View all Carne Griffiths prints $test =
  • Q&A with Copyright

    As one of our fastest selling artists, Copyright is an experimental artist always looking at new techniques to articulate his ideas and inspirations and explore the various media of printing. We learn more about his work and motivations in our Q&A... What or who are the main inspirations beh....
    As one of our fastest selling artists, Copyright is an experimental artist always looking at new techniques to articulate his ideas and inspirations and explore the various media of printing. We learn more about his work and motivations in our Q&A... What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? I’m fascinated with mythology, in all its forms, Christianity, paganism, Greek deities, modern urban myths. That form of storytelling which can affect people to the bone, by developing some kind of human connection, and playing on the heart strings.  What’s your medium? Usually mixed, I often start a year with a month of experimentation into new mediums, working out what works for me and what doesn’t, filtering out the bits I can use and scrapping the bits that don’t. Then I spend the rest of the year incorporating those new methods into my existing toolbox, so that way I’m always evolving. The bulk of my works are acrylic and spray-paint with stencil making, but often with gilding techniques, screen printing and other printing methods. But in the past I have experimented with laser etching, neon tubes, led lights, glow in the dark paint, stained glass, and wood carving within my works.  How do you approach the actual making of a piece? I start with an idea, can be just a feeling, heartbreak, loss, etc, then I sketch out a facial expression which starts to convey that feeling, gradually building elements, symbols and icons within the image which turn the feeling into a little story, but often with deliberately ambiguous messages, so that the final story is one that will connect with the viewer, each person may see something different.  What are you currently working on? Currently painting 3 versions of the same painting, presented with 3 unique treatments. Composition wise they almost identical, but the story each painting tells will be different. So I’m playing with storytelling really.  Does the impact of the viewer influence your work and if so how? Yeah as I explained before, it’s very much a part of my work, the paintings are engineered to be viewed in a way that engages the viewer. Playing with Iconography and symbols that can connect on different levels.  What memorable responses have you had to your work? I love it when people have my works tattooed on themselves, that’s happened a bunch of times, it’s the ultimate compliment.  What’s the one thing you can’t live without? Love Describe your work in 5 words. Bitter-sweet (is that 2 words?), romantic, heartbreak, sexy, colourful.  Describe an average day for you. Get up at 8, drink coffee, start work 8.30 usually on computer, emails etc, start painting something, more emails, wrap up stuff to post out, trip to post office, trip to pickup more art supplies, maybe coffee whilst I’m out, back to painting or pulling prints, finish 9-10-ish, watch cartoons. What led you to become an artist? It’s just something that I’ve always done.  What’s your strongest memory of your childhood? One of my earliest memories is a parrot on a unicycle on a tightrope.  What makes you angry? Spending time compensating for other people’s mistakes. That and tardiness. Oh and I’m not so good with authority figures, I don’t like being told what to do.  When are you happiest? When I’m able to fully be myself, which is pretty much all the time.  Name three artists you’d like to be compared to and why. I don’t think I can answer that, the honest truth is I just want to be myself. I have been compared to many artists in the past, the comparisons are flattering, but it’s really hard to be unique, and that’s more important to me than being compared to anyone else.  What’s your favourite or most inspirational place? I spent some time doing an exhibition in Tokyo, that was just amazing. There’s inspiration everywhere, just a wild blend of the ultra modern and the traditional/ spiritual. In another life (if you weren’t an artist) what would you be doing? Something else hands-on, my grandfather was a carpenter, that would be nice. My other grandfather was a car mechanic for a while, that would be nice too. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? Assumptions are the mother of all f**kups.  Read our Biography of Copyright View all Copyright prints  If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com Return to our Brighton section artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =
  • Drawn Together: Artists in Love

    This week we released two new panoramic prints by kozyndan, our favourite husband-and-wife artistic collaboration, which got us thinking about other creative and romantic duos. The history of art features many passionate and creative personalities, sometimes when their paths cross two artists....
    This week we released two new panoramic prints by kozyndan, our favourite husband-and-wife artistic collaboration, which got us thinking about other creative and romantic duos. The history of art features many passionate and creative personalities, sometimes when their paths cross two artists can find the perfect alchemy for shared love and studio space.  The creative pairings of monumental artists have often been epic love stories. Here are a few of our favourite artsy couples…  Kozyndan Kozy and Dan met in a university painting class in Orange County and soon moved in together. “The first piece we did together was when Kozy had been drawing our apartment and I liked it so much I coloured it in, “ explains Dan, “We also had rabbits, so they became our only life models around the house.” Ever since the adorable couple have been collaborating, each work becoming “bookmarks in our life together as a couple and as collaborating artists, and document (for us at least) the changes in attitudes and hopes and our world view” (Dan).  Georgia O’Keeffe & Alfred Stieglitz Between 1915 and 1946, some 25,000 letters were exchanged between two major 20th century artists, painter Georgia O’Keeffe and photographer Alfred Stieglitz. Their remarkable correspondence (sometimes they sent 2 or 3 letters a day) tracks their relationship from acquaintances to admirers, lovers to man and wife, and exasperated, but still together, long-married couple. When they met in 1916, he was 52 and a famous, internationally acclaimed photographer, with an avant-garde gallery in Manhattan. She, on the other hand, was 28 and unknown. O'Keeffe become a famous artist thanks in large part to Steiglitz's promotion of her work.  Frida Kahlo & Diego Rivera The High Museum of Art currently are currently showing an exhibition, ‘Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics, and Painting,’ of possibly the most infamous couple in the history of art. Mexican artists Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo are known world-wide for their contributions to the evolution of art. The dynamic duo are also known, not only for their talent and vision, but for their dramatic and stormy love affair. The couple were married for nearly 25 years and had a passionate and turbulent union. Frida Kahlo once said, “I suffered two grave accidents in my life. One in which a streetcar knocked me down… The other accident is Diego.” Despite dramatic bouts of jealousy and anger, Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera’s love proved enduring.  Robert Motherwell & Helen Frankenthaler After American Abstract artist Helen Frankenthaler and Clement Greenberg separated amicably in 1955, Frankenthaler married Abstract Expressionist Robert Motherwell. They moved to the Upper East Side and quickly became the art world power couple. Their summer spent at the artists’ colony at Provincetown, Massachusetts, in 1962, inspired both artists to create abstract works of the coastline. Their shared home, bursting with an art collection including Mark Rothko’s, was an art fan’s dream.  The two incredibly successful artists divorced in 1971, however, and Frankenthaler refuses to discuss the marriage. Barbara Hepworth & Ben Nicholson English sculptor Barbara Hepworth married painter Ben Nicholson in November 1938 at Hampstead Registry Office. After having triplets together the couple divorced, but their marriage was a mutually inspiring union of two of the giants of British Modernism.  Gilbert & George The hallmark of English conceptual artists, Gilbert and George is an intensely collaborative work, depending intrinsically on mutual interplay and frequently incorporating their own images. Gilbert and George have lived their lives as an enigmatic and controversial double act since they first met at St Martin’s Art School in 1967. The Turner Prize winning duo entered into a civil partnership in 2008, however, they said at the time this was prmimarily to do with the pratical business of protecting the others interests if one of them were to die. In truth, even their friend and biographer, the late Daniel Farson, couldn’t quite grasp the nature of their relationship, “frankly, I have no idea what goes on.”  Lee Miller & Man Ray In 1929, American Lee Miller travelled to Paris with the intention of apprenticing herself to the surrealist artist and photographer Man Ray. Although, at first, he insisted that he did not take students, Miller soon became his photographic assistant, as well as lover and muse. The creative duo were active participants in the surrealist movement and rediscovered the photographic technique solarisation. Throughout her life, Miller did very little to promote her own photographic work, but she is now widely respected for her contributions in the field.  Copyright & Gemma Compton Contemporary street artist Copyright, and his partner, painter Gemma Compton, put together an entire exhibition of collaborative works in a celebration of their forthcoming marriage. Both artists in their own right, their collaborative pieces showcase their two distinctive styles. Evidence of their mutually inspiring creative union can be found on the streets, in large scale urban art works. Copyright says, “… not only is Gemma a lovely person, she is one of the best freehand sketchers around… an amazing draftswoman, illustrator and creative talent, Gemma is the best.” Jackson Pollock & Lee Krasner Artist Lee Krasner met Jackson Pollock when she took part in an exhibition in 1941 to demonstrate that American art was now equal in stature to European art. She responded immediately to Pollock's work, believing that he was “a living force”. Unfortunately, however, Krasner's growing admiration for Pollock's work and immersion in his career proved initially debilitating for her own art. In October 1945, the couple married and moved to what is now known as the Pollock-Krasner House and Studio, on Long Island, New York. Their move away together from New York City turned out to be artistically rewarding and the influence of Pollock was important in the development of Krasner’s mature style. Their relationship was often turbulent and Krasner struggled with the public's reception of her identity; both as a woman and as the wife of Pollock. As a result, she often signed her works with the genderless initials "L.K." instead of her more recognizable full name.  Auguste Rodin & Camille Claudel French sculptor and graphic artist Camille Claudel started working in sculptor Auguste Rodin’s workshop in around 1884. She soon became a source of inspiration, his model, his confident and lover and the two artists shared a tumultuous and passionate relationship. Claudel never lived with Rodin, who was reluctant to end his 20-year relationship with Rose Beuret. Apparently, knowledge of the affair agitated Claudel’s family, especially her mother, who never completely agreed with her involvement in the arts. Jasper Johns & Robert Rauschenberg Jasper Johns met Robert Rauschenberg in the winter of 1953-52. The two men encountered one another again at a party a short while after their initial meeting and their relationship developed quickly. From very early in 1954, Johns became the major focus of Rauschenberg’s attention. From the start, Rauschenberg embraced Johns in unabashedly romantic terms, "I have photos of him then that would break your heart. Jasper was soft, beautiful, lean and poetic." Their intense emotional and intellectual rapport, in concert with the homophobic context of Cold War culture, created the conditions for a shared private language. Together, these two American Abstract Expressionists developed a shared language in their art of comic strip codes and dense wordplays. They remained loves for eight years and their break-up was so bitter that both left New York for their native South and neither saw nor spoke to one another for over a decade.  Pure Evil & Crossie Graffiti and street artist Pure Evil is married to fine artist Crossie. They have exhibited their work together in a joint exhibition in the vaults of a 600 year old Viennese church.  And their creative partnership has recently produced a new edition, and source of inspiration, to the Pure Evil family, baby Bunny! Max Ernst & Dorothea Tanning Gallery owner Julien Levy introduced painter Dorothea Tanning to the circle of émigré Surrealists whose work he was showing in his New York gallery, including the German painter Max Ernst. As Tanning recounts in her memoirs, ‘Birthday and Between Lives’, when Ernst visited her studio in 1942, they played chess, fell in love, and embarked on a life together that soon took them to Sedona, Arizona, and later to France. The two artists married in 1946, in a double wedding with Man Ray and Juliet Browner. artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world  $test =

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