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Monthly Archives: February 2013

  • Unite with the Natural Beauty of Carne Griffiths' Art

    Carne Griffiths, the artist working in ink, tea, and alcohol has released a beautiful new print, ‘Unity’. He has described the work as a “back to nature kind of piece”, which examines our connection with nature and the modern day barriers that get between us and the simpler thing....
    Carne Griffiths, the artist working in ink, tea, and alcohol has released a beautiful new print, ‘Unity’. He has described the work as a “back to nature kind of piece”, which examines our connection with nature and the modern day barriers that get between us and the simpler things in life. Carne is interested in how “we surround ourselves with floral pattern in print on clothes, textiles and tattoos, without realising that the connection we long for is actually much closer than we think.”  Check out this fascinating video of Carne sketching; his organic shapes and flowing lines are hypnotic…  View all Carne Griffiths prints $test =
  • Miami Auction House Suddenly Withdraws Banksy Mural from Sale

    Two weeks ago work by the world’s best-known street artist Banksy, vanished from a wall in Wood Green, north London and appeared on an art auction website in Miami. Haringey Council launched a campaign to bring it back and called on the Arts Council and Culture Secretary, Maria Miller, to inter....
    Two weeks ago work by the world’s best-known street artist Banksy, vanished from a wall in Wood Green, north London and appeared on an art auction website in Miami. Haringey Council launched a campaign to bring it back and called on the Arts Council and Culture Secretary, Maria Miller, to intervene.  Last night, as the hammer was due to fall on the auction, the Banksy ‘Slave Labour’ mural was suddenly withdrawn from sale. Frederic Thut, auctioneer at Fine Art Auctions Miami, would not comment on why the piece was taken off the auction block.  View all Banksy prints $test =
  • Brad Faine's tribute to the Oscars

    With the 85th Academy Awards taking place on Sunday we thought we would highlight this fantastic piece by Brad Faine that pays homage to the Oscars. Brad Faine is known for his grid style works into which he packs a huge amount of information as well as beauty. Id Like to Thank... is compos....
    With the 85th Academy Awards taking place on Sunday we thought we would highlight this fantastic piece by Brad Faine that pays homage to the Oscars. Brad Faine is known for his grid style works into which he packs a huge amount of information as well as beauty. Id Like to Thank... is composed of a grid of still from every film that has one the Best Picture award since the Oscars started in 1929. Included in this illustrious line up are stills from classic films such as Gone With the Wind, Lawrence of Arabia, My Fair Lady, The Godfather, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Silence of the Lambs.  The grid is numbered according to the year the film represented won the award. Covering the length of the grid is the famous silhouette of the Oscar statuette. View all Brad Faine prints View all Celebrity prints Read more about Hollywood prints for the Oscars $test =
  • A closer look at Dan Baldwin's ceramics

    We have some fantastic new vases by Dan Baldwin just in to our Soho gallery so we thought we would take a closer look at how Dan creates his striking ceramics. Dan started working on pots by chance in 2004 when he doodled on a pot from the pound shop w....
    We have some fantastic new vases by Dan Baldwin just in to our Soho gallery so we thought we would take a closer look at how Dan creates his striking ceramics. Dan started working on pots by chance in 2004 when he doodled on a pot from the pound shop with a marker pen. At the time he had filled up thousands of pages for years with a series called ‘Evil n Sick n Need Help’ that was very separate to his paintings. So he started doing ‘Evil n Sick’ ceramics. ‘The beautiful pot with a very dark fucked-up decoration really interested me.’ Dan Baldwin. To get a pot like one of his paintings was his long term goal and Dan embraced the new paints, glazes, and firing techniques he had to learn. He started off hand-painting factory moulded biscuit pots, getting them glazed and fired, and learning to use ceramic paints. But this was not enough and Dan longed to make the pots more like his painting with more 3D and mixed media elements. Then one day when Dan was getting some of his pots fired he met Roberto a Sicilian potter and a new partnership was born. Employing Roberto’s technical abilities in clay together they have been able to bring more of Dan’s 3D ideas to the pottery. They have made about 50 moulds as well as moulded 3D objects in clay – brass swallows, guns, hand grenades, hearts, bullets, – and incorporated those into the ceramic design. It starts with a still wet pot, hand thrown, then Dan chooses what he wants to decorate it with and they apply these clay elements, freestyling as they go. Dan is now producing highly advanced ceramic works with 3D clay casting of objects and working in precious metals, like pure gold. His dream of producing a pot like one of his canvases is even close, as you can see in the two amazing pots in our Soho gallery. For more information on these two ceramics by Dan Baldwin please contact our Soho gallery or pop in for a closer look. If you are interested the work of Dan Baldwin or simply if you would like to discuss artworks and artists we have currently available in the gallery please call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Patrick Thomas cooks up horsemeat controversy with installation at Leicester Square tube station

    A piece of art shocked commuters in the capital yesterday as graphic artist, Patrick Thomas, debuted his latest provocative piece, ‘Moo’, to the public, making more than a subtle nod to the current horse-meat scandal.  The Berlin-based artist, known for creating powerful messages....
    A piece of art shocked commuters in the capital yesterday as graphic artist, Patrick Thomas, debuted his latest provocative piece, ‘Moo’, to the public, making more than a subtle nod to the current horse-meat scandal.  The Berlin-based artist, known for creating powerful messages through the use of iconic images, previewed ‘Moo’ at Leicester Square where the artwork was aired across the tube station throughout the day. The piece attracted plenty of attention with many commuters posing next to the displays and tweeting their amusement. However, some remained oblivious as they tucked into their burgers and strolled past the art with their weekly shopping.     Patrick Thomas, who created the piece said “It is the job of an artist to be witness to his time in history and art should have a social function and be an intrinsic part of everyday life. Art can be a powerful weapon and although this print is intentionally humorous; in the context of the horsemeat scandal currently dominating the UK press - it conceals a darker message.” The ‘Moo’ image is available as a silkscreen print in a singed limited edition of 100 and you can buy it now. View all Patrick Thomas prints $test =
  • Spotlight on Pop Art

    With a new retrospective of work by Roy Lichtenstein opening at the Tate Modern this month we thought we would take a look at the Pop Art movement of which he was such an integral part. Pop Art developed simultaneously but independently in both the US and the UK in the mid 1950s and reached its ....
    With a new retrospective of work by Roy Lichtenstein opening at the Tate Modern this month we thought we would take a look at the Pop Art movement of which he was such an integral part. Pop Art developed simultaneously but independently in both the US and the UK in the mid 1950s and reached its peak in the 1960s. It was a revolt against prevailing orthodoxies in art and life and can be seen as one of the first manifestations of Postmodernism. The main feature of both UK and US Pop Art was its source of inspiration in ‘low art’ such as popular and commercial culture. Pop Art used popular culture such as advertising, comic books and mundane cultural objects, as both a source material as well as a subject for critique. It reflected and passed comment on the substantial shifts occurring in society towards a more consumer-orientated market. The movement also embraced other aspects of consumer culture such as Warhol’s embracing of mass producing art in his ‘Factory’ using the silkscreen printing process. Lawrence Alloway art critic first used the term in print in 1958, and conceived of Pop art as the lower end of a popular-art to fine-art continuum, encompassing such forms as advertising, science-fiction illustration and automobile styling. In the US Pop Art emerged from works originally classified as Neo-Dada, referencing the first use of everyday object is high art by Duchamp in his ready mades. Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg applied techniques from Abstract Expressionist painting to everyday objects they found around them. Roy Lichtenstein also began as an Abstract Expressionist but in the 1960’s broke with this style and began developing his paintings inspired by comic strips. He wanted to use the mass produced style on a scale not normally seen, to express very deep emotions or concepts. He also used the style to reproduce existing works of ‘high art’ by artists such as Picasso and Monet. The other big artist in US Pop Art is of course Andy Warhol. Warhol began as a commercial artist and used both everyday objects as well as celebrities and images from the mass media. He further replicated consumer culture in his Factory production methods and he use of multiple productions of the same image. Other painters working in the USA associated with Pop Art included Jim Dine, Robert Indiana, Mel Ramos, Ed Ruscha, and Wayne Thiebaud. In the UK Pop Art evolved from a group of artists working and studying at the Royal College of Art and the ICA in London.  Peter Blake was one of the first British Pop artists with his student works directly reflecting his love of folk art and popular culture. In the late 1950s he made constructions and collage-based paintings that incorporated postcards, magazine photographs and mass-produced objects.  Other early proponents in the UK include Richard Hamilton David Hockney and Eduardo Paolozzi. Hamilton defined Pop in 1957 as: ‘Popular (designed for a mass audience); Transient (short term solution); Expendable (easily forgotten); Low Cost; Mass Produced; Young (aimed at Youth); Witty; Sexy; Gimmicky; Glamorous; and Big Business’. Pop Art has left a lasting legacy with artists today continuing to use everyday objects in their work and methods such as silkscreen printing in producing their work. Pure Evil even uses the images of Pop Art itself to create new work, such as his Nightmare series paying homage to Andy Warhol’s celebrity portraits. David Spiller uses cartoon characters and the lyrics from popular songs in his works. Both artists use the silkscreen printing method in their works.  artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Announcing the 2013 artrepublic Visual Arts Prize within Brighton Fringe

    artrepublic are delighted to once again be the proud sponsor Visual Arts within the 2013 Brighton Fringe Festival and as part of our involvement we are excited to announce the 2013 artrepublic Visual Arts Prize. Returning for its second year, the 2013 artrepublic Visual Arts Prize is now open fo....
    artrepublic are delighted to once again be the proud sponsor Visual Arts within the 2013 Brighton Fringe Festival and as part of our involvement we are excited to announce the 2013 artrepublic Visual Arts Prize. Returning for its second year, the 2013 artrepublic Visual Arts Prize is now open for entries from artists registered to take part in the Visual Arts section of this year’s Fringe, together with art students from the Arts Faculty at University of Brighton and City College Brighton & Hove. The Prize An artrepublic gift voucher worth £250 combined with a cash prize of £250 will be awarded to the artist who is considered to produce the best piece of visual art. The lucky winner will also receive free registration to the 2014 Brighton Fringe worth £228 (ideal if you want to bring your work to a wider audience next year). The competition follows no specific theme and is open to artistic imagination. Submissions are now open to those eligible, with the deadline for entries on Sunday 28th April 2013.  How you can get involved Although the prize is only open to those taking part in Visual Arts at Brighton Fringe and art students at University of Brighton and City College Brighton & Hove, we would like everyone to get involved in the judging. Once all submissions have been received, artrepublic and a panel of local artists will decide on a shortlist from applicants which will then be followed by a public vote during May 2013, to decide the winner. Keep checking our website for details. Visit the shortlist exhibition All those shortlisted will be exhibited at the Visual Arts Fair which will form part of the Fringe City event at the Unitarian Church in New Road, Brighton on Saturday 1st of June. The winner of the 2013 artrepublic Visual Arts Prize will be announced at the exhibition. We are excited at the prospect of viewing lots of fresh unique artistic works over the coming months and awarding the 2013 artrepublic Visual Arts Prize on 1st June.  Good luck to all applicants! Find out more at the Brighton Fringe website artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • 'James Dean at the Albert Hall', a new Lenticular print from Sir Peter Blake

    Peter Blake revisits iconic imagery with his newly commissioned 'James Dean at the Albert Hall'. Butterflies appear to jump out of the picture plane, mimicking flight and movement. A young James Dean smoulders in the foreground with the Royal Albert Hall behind him, enveloped in a swarm of....
    Peter Blake revisits iconic imagery with his newly commissioned 'James Dean at the Albert Hall'. Butterflies appear to jump out of the picture plane, mimicking flight and movement. A young James Dean smoulders in the foreground with the Royal Albert Hall behind him, enveloped in a swarm of butterflies; and of course, where there’s butterflies, there’s the Butterfly Man. The perspectival depth is amazing, you literally want to reach out to put your hand through it! As more and more artists are exploring the new medium of lenticular prints they are able to produce works using more than just a two-dimensional surface. The illusion of perspective and depth creates another level on which to view a piece, one in which the viewer is a more active participant, only getting the full effect by moving around the work. If you are interested in any available Peter Blake prints then please call us at the Brighton Gallery on +44 (0)1273 724829 View all Peter Blake prints Read our article on Lenticular prints $test =
  • Banksy Mural Torn Off London Poundland Shop and Headed for Miami Auction

    A Banksy stencil mural has been put up for auction on a US website with a guide price of up to £450,000, after disappearing from a wall in North London.  The work, painted on the side of a Poundland shop, depicts a barefoot boy using a sewing machine to stitch union jack flag buntin....
    A Banksy stencil mural has been put up for auction on a US website with a guide price of up to £450,000, after disappearing from a wall in North London.  The work, painted on the side of a Poundland shop, depicts a barefoot boy using a sewing machine to stitch union jack flag bunting. It has been widely interpreted as mocking the impending Queen’s diamond jubilee celebrations and condemning child labour, after Poundland was at the centre of a child labour controversy three years ago.  Local councillor Alan Strickland said local residents were angry at the removal and urged people to email the auctioneers to demand that it be removed from the Fine Art Auctions Miami sale. He told the BBC, “Banksy gave that piece of art to our community, and people came from all over London to see it.” Banksy’s spokesperson has been contacted for comment but has yet to respond. In the past, Banksy has declined to authenticate works attributed to him that were up for auction because of a belief that street work should remain in its original location.  View all Banksy prints $test =
  • Hollywood prints for the Oscars

    With the Oscars coming up next week we thought we’d take a look at our own Hollywood stars in the gallery. The Hollywood hills have been synonymous with American cinema and the film industry as a whole for years, ever since they were built in the 20s. The huge white letters have featured in co....
    With the Oscars coming up next week we thought we’d take a look at our own Hollywood stars in the gallery. The Hollywood hills have been synonymous with American cinema and the film industry as a whole for years, ever since they were built in the 20s. The huge white letters have featured in countless films and artworks and have become an iconic image in their own right. The Hollywood sign was originally created as an advertisement for local real estate development in 1923, but garnered increasing recognition after the sign was left up and is now kept as an instantly recognisable symbol of the film industry. Indeed Hollywood is the title of Peter Blake’s print “The Butterfly Man in Hollywoodland”, part of the “Homage to Damien Hirst” series. Blake once again makes use of retro postcard images as the backdrop to his collage, capturing the golden age of Hollywood glamour with its vista of the Hollywood hills and kitsch mini-mansions. Frolicking in the foreground along with the butterfly man are numerous Hollywood legends including Charlie Chaplin, James Dean, Laurel & Hardy, Errol Flynn, Elvis, Marilyn and Judy Garland.  Conversely, Stanley Donwood’s paints a more ominous picture of the hills with his apocalyptic visions of Hollywood being overwhelmed by natural disaster. In a series of prints including "Hollywood Limousine" the artist depicts various well known American buildings and landmarks as they are threatened by nature itself hurling balls of fire, flood and rain, Donwood comments on the precarious nature of Hollywood, the banking Industry and consumerism as a whole. Celestial fireballs rain down upon Hollywood as the Chateau Marmont hotel and Graumann's Chinese Theatre fall beneath the waves. Screenprinted in black over a reflective silver hot-foiled layer, this is disaster in glitz. “Apocalypse 101” even features the Hotel Roosevelt in Hollywood which is where the first Oscars ceremony took place in 1929. Brad Faine has created a perfect Oscars print “I’d Like to Thank” that tracks all the winners of best film from 1929 When the Oscars first began to 2012 when silent film “The Artist” won the trophy. A grid comprising every film that has won Best Picture at the Oscars since the Oscars began in 1928 up to “The Artist” which won this year is created using a still from the winning movie, numbered with the year it won, beautifully glazed so that together they looks like strips of film.  Over the whole grid is a gold silhouette of the Oscar statue itself. The print includes some real classics such as “Gone with the Wind”, “Midnight Cowboy” and “The Godfather” and interestingly the first and the most recent were silent films that won. He has also recently released “Hollywood Rollercoaster”, a comment on the rise and fall of fame likened to a game of snakes and ladders. No consideration of Hollywood would be complete without the actors. Images of acting celebrities have always helped propel them to fame and recognition and at artrepublic we have a great selection. Prints of actors include Russell Marshall’s mug shots "Just Steve" (McQueen), "Just Elvis" and "Just Dennis" (Hopper) and some stunning prints of legends such as James Dean, Marlon Brando and Al Pacino by Russell Young who is fascinated with the idea of the American dream.   And finally we couldn’t mention Hollywood without looking at Marilyn Monroe, as famous as the hills themselves, the iconic actress is the subject of many prints in the gallery from Andy Warhol who repeated her in multiple, Peter Blake’s Diamond Dust "Marilyn 2010" to Richard Duardo’s sympathetic portrayal of her in a more natural state and Pure Evil’s stencil of "Arthur Miller’s Nightmare". Artists are still drawn to her beauty and charm as an actress and a woman.   If you would like further information on available prints or to enquire about other works and artists we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com Return to our Brighton section View all Limited Edition prints artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =

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