Monthly Archives: January 2013

  • Homage to Schwitters

    Yesterday saw the opening of Tate Britain’s latest major show, Schwitters In Britain. As a result the eccentric German artist who inspired Pop Art and was a founder of the Dada movement is the man of the moment. We believe it’s about time this artist was honoured everywhere as one of t....
    Yesterday saw the opening of Tate Britain’s latest major show, Schwitters In Britain. As a result the eccentric German artist who inspired Pop Art and was a founder of the Dada movement is the man of the moment. We believe it’s about time this artist was honoured everywhere as one of the key modernists.  Of course, the grandfather of British Pop, Sir Peter Blake, was ahead of the game. Kurt Schwitters was one of the artists selected by Blake in 2010 for his exhibition ‘Homage 10 x 5’. For the show Blake chose the ten artists “that emerged at the top of my inspiration list” and created five works either in the style of or taking cues from each artist. Blake gave his nod of appreciation to Schwitters, in works such as Deon, for inventing the highly original collage style he adopted and ran away with during his career, “When Schwitters made the first collage by literally picking up a piece of rubbish, a sweet wrapper, a bus ticket and a piece of wood, that was pure invention.” From fleeing the Nazis in Norway, to poetry performances in an Isle of Man internment camp, and a Cumbrian barn transformation, Kurt Schwitters’ extraordinary story is full of remarkable creativity. Don’t miss this brilliant Tate exhibition or Blake’s beautiful homage! Read our review of Schwitters in Britain View all Peter Blake prints $test =
  • The Mother of All Prints

    This week artrepublic favourite Copyright has released a beautiful new limited edition print, Mother. This sumptuous giclee with hand finishing depicts a contemplative butterfly woman releasing delicate little butterflies from her cupped hands.  It’s a characteristically romantic wo....
    This week artrepublic favourite Copyright has released a beautiful new limited edition print, Mother. This sumptuous giclee with hand finishing depicts a contemplative butterfly woman releasing delicate little butterflies from her cupped hands.  It’s a characteristically romantic work from the UK street artist and a brilliant graffiti interpretation of a timeless subject.  Images of mothers have long been a staple in Western art. 4th Century grave reliefs on the island of Rhodes depicted mothers with children and in Roman times, a mother, known as ‘Caritas’ or charity, was a common personification in paintings and sculpture. Later, ‘charity’ became a quality invested in the Virgin Mary, the primary mother whose image has dominated the of art history.  The imagery of mothers was a favourite subject matter for many Impressionists, whilst Victorian artists explored the plight of those who strayed from the virtuous path of motherhood. By the early 20th Century artists such as Mary Cassatt became well known for their portraits of mothers. Mother and Child by Gustav Klimt was painted over a century before Copyright’s Mother, but both prints capture the love and tenderness of their timeless subject with decorative accomplishment.  View all Copyright prints $test =
  • 4 new starry-eyed silkscreens from Joe Webb

    We have 4 magical new silkscreens in the Brighton gallery from the lovely Joe Webb including “Antares and Love IV” and “Daydream” (pictured). Using vintage 1950s imagery and re-presenting them within a new context, Webb has a strong belief in the handmade, creating his collages wi....
    We have 4 magical new silkscreens in the Brighton gallery from the lovely Joe Webb including “Antares and Love IV” and “Daydream” (pictured). Using vintage 1950s imagery and re-presenting them within a new context, Webb has a strong belief in the handmade, creating his collages without the use of computers. His original collages have been turned into high quality prints using finishes including diamond dust, embossing and silver leaf complimenting the artist hand-made philosophy. “I like the limitations of collage...using found imagery and a pair of scissors, there are no Photoshop options to resize, adjust colours or undo. My collages work to a basic rule of sourcing just two or three images... I then present them as a reinvented single image to communicate a new message or idea.” By his own admission his work is heavily influenced by surrealist artist Magritte, visible in the way figures often exist in their absence, within a passionate embrace of another.  They are beautifully starry-eyed and romantic making them a perfect Valentine’s Day treat too! View all Joe Webb prints $test =
  • Say it with Art This Valentine's Day

    We have the ideal solution this Valentine’s Day for getting round the difficulties suffered by those who fear the paralysing verbal-emotional vortex. Instead of struggling to find the appropriate words to tell someone how you feel, we suggest finding the perfect piece of art to timelessly and ele....
    We have the ideal solution this Valentine’s Day for getting round the difficulties suffered by those who fear the paralysing verbal-emotional vortex. Instead of struggling to find the appropriate words to tell someone how you feel, we suggest finding the perfect piece of art to timelessly and eleoquently express your affections.  To reassure you of the effectiveness of this method I need only mention the rom com classic Notting Hill. In this paradigm of romance the beguiling actress Anna Scott (Julia Roberts) uses Marc Chagall’s painting La Mariée (The Bride) to great effect in her pursual of the floppy haired bookshop owner Will Thacker (Hugh Grant). Anna gives Will the painting as dramatic expression of the words she can’t bring herself to say, this “feels how love should be – floating through a dark blue sky.” The colourful painting by the Jewish-Russian born painter Marc Chagall depicts a young bride, her husband, and a violin-playing goat. Many of Chagall’s works were inspired by his love for his deceased wife Bella Rosenfeld Chagall who died in 1944. The beautiful, haunting, and deeply romantic work tells Will that “Happiness is not happiness without a violin playing goat”, and is instrumental to their happy ending.  With this inspiring success story in mind we take a look at some prints which might just express exactly how you feel… If you want to tell someone “All of the words in the world are worth nothing if we cannot be together” then 'All of the Words in the World' really is the perfect work of art. The limited edition silkscreen is by the master paper cutter artist Rob Ryan and was created for the British Heart Foundation Art Appeal. It depicts an intricate, whimsical scene in which a couple open their hearts to each other, entwined in the intricate lettering of the unashamedly romantic phrase. Rob Ryan likes the idea of the heart being a place that you store things – a depository of emotions – hence the doors in the picture. He says “it’s a very simple idea about two people letting each other into their lives, secrets, dreams and hopes.” The print just says it more succinctly and decoratively.  Choose a Joe Webb to give a vintage glow to your chivalrous declaration. Antares and Love IV says, “when you’re in my arms I explode with exhilaration and I feel like I’m full of stars and floating in a galaxy of happiness”. Antares is a red supergiant star in the Milky Way galaxy and the 16th brightest star in the night sky. Matt glaze, collaged elements and mirror-board enhance the expression so that your loved one cannot fail to grasp your sparkling metaphor.  This simple, evocative line drawing by Lester Magoogan speaks volumes. It says, “We have a connection”, “We are one” and “Love needn’t be complicated.” This minimalist approach could be ideal for those with a sense of humour. Sometimes ones amorous feelings can’t be adequately expressed in the image of a fluffy kitten or a cuddly teddy. Sometime what you really need is a gruesome glittery heart,  like ‘Bleeding Heart’ by Trafford Parsons. This anatomical screen print of a heart bleeding red glitter draws on the history of religious paintings of Jesus’ sacred heart. The sacred heart is often depicted in Christian art as a flaming heart shining with divine light, pierced by the lance-wound, encircled by the crown of thorns, surmounted by a cross, and bleeding. It is a widely practiced Roman Catholic devotion which takes Jesus’ physical heart as the representation of his divine love for humanity.  Add the weight of religious iconography to your romantic revelation with this show stopping limited edition print. The intense and powerful image says “I would bleed for you”, “I would die for you”, “I devote myself to you” and “You are divine, I worship you.”  Interestingly, Henry VIII took this approach when wooing Anne Boleyn, using an illuminated Christian devotional book (Anne Boleyn’s Book of Hours c1528) to illustrate his burning desire.  Choose Dan Innes' ‘Where to Darlin’?’ if you want to suggest that your relationship is going places… This fun and vibrant street art print, which is available in Valentine’s friendly lilac, soft pink, and baby blue, says “You can count on me. I’m strong and exciting and with my handy gadgets I’m going to show you the world.”  It’s a sanguine statement which would attract any transport-challenged beloved with its generous offer. Love is at the centre of David Spiller’s work. As a child of the 60s The Beatles song ‘All You Need is Love’ is like a mission statement for him. In fact, the veteran of the British Pop Art movement fills the flat fields of colour in his prints with snatched lyrics. In a recent interview David Spiller pulled a phrase from a painting at random, “To make you feel my love”, and said “Bob Dylan, I think? Maybe that’s why I’m doing it. Maybe I’m an innocent and I’m doing it to be loved.”  Spiller’s latest limited edition release, ‘We Can Touch the Stars’ features his trademark scrawled song lyrics, including “Angels watch you”, “Let it Be”, and “Somewhere someone loves you… that someone was always me…” These words add a poetic intensity and romantic depth to the bold heart image. The print is an unambiguous act of homage. It confidently claims that “we can touch the stars because our love is out of this world.” Spiller’s ‘Love is the Light’ and ‘If Not For You’, could also be perfect for those looking for a nostalgic and innocent statement of devotion.  To explore more art print options in your quest for the perfect visual metaphor check our Art for Lovers pages… Image Credits:  Il Sacro Cuore by Pompeo Batoni, 1740, now in Church of the Gesu, Rome Anne Boleyn's Book of Hours c1527. Beneath the image of the man of sorrows Henry VIII wrote “If you remember my love in your prayers as strongly as I adore you, I shall scarcely be forgotten, for I am yours. Henry Rex forever”. artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Magnus Gjoen's Magnificent New Lenticular

    In his latest print release, ‘Roses are Dead’ (2013), Magnus Gjoen uses advanced printing technology to produce a beautifully detailed contemporary art work with a vanitas theme inspired by the Classical Era in Rome.  The alluring image is of a skull adorned with flowers and a rose in i....
    In his latest print release, ‘Roses are Dead’ (2013), Magnus Gjoen uses advanced printing technology to produce a beautifully detailed contemporary art work with a vanitas theme inspired by the Classical Era in Rome.  The alluring image is of a skull adorned with flowers and a rose in its mouth. In the print, modern lenticular technology has brought to life the phrase “sub rosa” (“under the rose”), meaning to keep a secret. 'Roses are Dead' depicts a person whose secrets were so dark it was their cause of ruin and ultimately death.  This stunning print previewed to much at acclaim at the London Art Fair 2013 and is now available online. See the incredible 3D effect of the lenticular printing in this short video...  View all Magnus Gjoen prints Discover more about Lenticular prints $test =
  • Charming Baker: My Paintings Aren't Quite Right Are They?

    Charming Baker is the painter who shot to fame and has been hailed officially one of Britain’s best artists.  Championed by Damien Hirst and sold to the world’s biggest collectors, his beautiful and unnerving art has found international acclaim. We’ve stumbled across this fantastic vid....
    Charming Baker is the painter who shot to fame and has been hailed officially one of Britain’s best artists.  Championed by Damien Hirst and sold to the world’s biggest collectors, his beautiful and unnerving art has found international acclaim. We’ve stumbled across this fantastic video interview with him which is definitely worth sharing.  Filmed in New York, the interview discusses Baker’s incredible portrait of Michelle Obama and the unusual techniques he employed in the process of creating it. Baker is incredibly articulate and candid and offers some fascinating musings on light, bowerbirds, conflict, and the nature of painting. It is also worth a watch for the amusing shots of Baker walking across New York with Michele Obama tucked under one arm, and down Sub Way staircases with a large zebra…  View all Charming Baker prints Read our Charming Baker biography  $test =
  • Ben Eine: the Sky's the Limit

    Ben Eine’s art is reaching new heights in the first gallery at 35,000ft. During the month of February, Virgin Atlantic, Richard Branson’s airline, will be displaying 10 works by Eine in its upper-class clubhouses at Heathrow and New York’s JFK airport. Upper-class passengers on Lon....
    Ben Eine’s art is reaching new heights in the first gallery at 35,000ft. During the month of February, Virgin Atlantic, Richard Branson’s airline, will be displaying 10 works by Eine in its upper-class clubhouses at Heathrow and New York’s JFK airport. Upper-class passengers on London to New York flights will be able to take a virtual tour of the Gallery in the Air, look behind-the-scenes at the making of the Virgin Atlantic artworks by Eine in his studio, and even commission a ‘pixel portrait’ of their own image.  “Branson’s a cool dude,” Eine told the Guardian, “I did have misgivings at first – I try not to collaborate with brands very often. But I’ve been interested in Branson for a long time: he’s just a genuine, decent guy.” Apparently Ben Eine has discussed designing sick bags and menus to be used throughout the plane. “It’s a natural extension of the fact that art is no longer just about traditional galleries”, he says, “Transatlantic flying is pretty boring. This is an experiment to make that journey a little less mundane.”  View all Ben Eine prints $test =
  • Vanitas

    Vanitas art is an intriguing and macabre genre which features objects rich in morbid symbolism in order to produce in the viewer’s mind an acute awareness of the brevity of life and the inevitability of death. Skulls, hourglasses, extinguished candles, insects and rotting fruit, are amongst the co....
    Vanitas art is an intriguing and macabre genre which features objects rich in morbid symbolism in order to produce in the viewer’s mind an acute awareness of the brevity of life and the inevitability of death. Skulls, hourglasses, extinguished candles, insects and rotting fruit, are amongst the common motifs that refer to the evanescence of existence. It is a genre of still-life painting that flourished in the Netherlands and Northern Europe in the mid to late 17th century. Vanitas themes originated from medieval funerary art and evolved from simple pictures of skulls that were frequently painted on the reverse of portraits during the late Renaissance. Following devastating outbreaks of the Black Death in Europe, art became increasingly focused upon death and decay. The origins of the term date back to the Latin biblical aphorism ‘vantias vanitatum omnia vanitas’ (Ecclesiates 1:2), ‘Vanity of vanities; all is vanity’. In this sense of the word vanity means both ‘empty’ and ‘frivolous’ and refers to the meaningless of earthly life. In the Vanitas tradition of the 17th century, skull paintings were considered to be both beautiful objects and works of spiritual contemplation. They represented the fleetingness of earthly pleasure in the face of unavoidable death. Since Damien Hirst’s diamond studded skull memento mori, ‘For the Love of God’ (2007) hit the headlines there has been an influx of artists returning to the Vanitas theme and the skull motif in particular. $test =
  • Lenticular

    Lenticular is an adjective often relating to lenses. Lenticular printing is a technology in which lenticular lenses are used to produce images with an illusion of depth, or the ability to change or move as the image is viewed from different angles. Lenticular technology has matured and artists who ....
    Lenticular is an adjective often relating to lenses. Lenticular printing is a technology in which lenticular lenses are used to produce images with an illusion of depth, or the ability to change or move as the image is viewed from different angles. Lenticular technology has matured and artists who produce lenticular prints today have access to superior imagery more 3D movement and greater colour saturation. A long way for the lenticulars on cereal packets and rulers we remember from childhood. The technique uses several images which are sliced into strips and interlaced together. A plastic sheet containing a set amount of linear prism-like lenses is then placed on top, perfectly aligned with the images for the 3-dimensional effect to work. Depending on where the viewer is standing, each lens acts as a magnifying glass to enlarge and display a different portion of the image. The combination of many lenses working together with many interlaced images creates a three-dimensional horizontal image plane when the viewer looks at the image from a different angle from left to right. This is because each eye views the print from a slightly different angle and sees a different image with different perspective views of the subject, giving the 3D stereoscopic effect. View all lenticular prints $test =
  • Looking at the Lenticular Illusion

    Artists have been exploring how to represent depth and 3-dimensionality for centuries. Lenticular printing is a technology in which lenses are used to produce images with an illusion of depth. This type printing has a fascinating history, from seventeenth century Royal portraits, to early corpo....
    Artists have been exploring how to represent depth and 3-dimensionality for centuries. Lenticular printing is a technology in which lenses are used to produce images with an illusion of depth. This type printing has a fascinating history, from seventeenth century Royal portraits, to early corporate advertising, and kitsch memorabilia.  We take a look at how lenticular prints are now coming to the forefront in contemporary art and rightly taking their place in the history of art as a respected artistic medium... Lenticular printing is a technique which uses several images which are sliced into strips and interlaced together. A plastic sheet containing a set amount of linear prism-like lenses is then placed on top, perfectly aligned with the images for the 3-dimensional effect to work.  Depending on where the viewer is standing, each lens acts as a magnifying glass to enlarge and display a different portion of the image. The combination of many lenses working together with many interlaced images creates a three-dimensional horizontal image plane when the viewer looks at the image from a different angle from left to right. This is because each eye views the print from a slightly different angle and sees a different image with different perspective views of the subject, giving the 3D stereoscopic effect. Even before the beginning of photographic techniques, scientists tried some interactions with images and lenses to produce 3 dimensional images. As far back as the late 1600’s artists have been experimenting with various techniques to create the optical illusion of 3-dimension on a flat surface.  In 1692, French painter Bois-Clair discovered he could achieve a multi-dimensional effect on canvas by interposing a grid of vertical lathes between the viewer and the painting. He has been held to be the inventor of two-way paintings but there is evidence that he been following an even older traditions. ‘Turning Pictures’ are known from the seventeenth century and are referred to by Shakespeare (Allan Shickman, ‘Turning Pictures in Shakespeare’s England’ Art Bulletin, March 1977). The first images to be described as ‘lenticular’ were produced in the 1930s by Victor Anderson. By the late 1940s, Mr Anderson’s company, ‘Vari-Vue’, was producing millions of simple lenticular images a year for everything from postcards of women winking to Cracker Jack prizes, political campaign buttons, and magazine inserts. The technology for lenticular printing gained popularity in the 1960’s and 1970’s when large corporations recognized its advertising potential. Mass production became a reality on February 25th 1964, when a ‘Look Magazine’ issue featured the first ink-printed 3-dimensional postcards. Some notable lenticular prints from this time include the limited-edition cover of the Rolling Stone’s album. An early example of an artist employing lenticular printing techniques is Roy Lichtenstein. His print ‘Fish and Sky’ (1967) depicts a landscape of sky, mountains and sea, and combines several different printing techniques. It is a screenprint on gelatine photographic print mounted on 3-dimensional lenticular offset lithograph. The result is that the underwater scene is lenticular whilst the mountain range is composed of Lictenstein’s iconic dots. The captivating print sold for $6,250 at auction last year (Christie’s, 24-25 April 2012) In 2004 the Jersey Heritage Trust commissioned light artist Chris Levine to create a portrait of Her Majesty. Chris’s 21st century work, 'Lightness of Being', was the first ever 3D portrait of The Queen. To create his lenticular print Chris Levine and a technical team took over 10,000 images and 3D data-sets during two sittings at Buckingham Palace, but the portrait is made up of just nine them.  Damien Hirst has been experimenting with new printing techniques. ‘For the Love of God’ (2012) is his first lenticular artwork. It is a representation of Hirst’s infamous diamond encrusted skull sculpture ‘For the Love of God’ (2007). The lenticular technology is used to fantastic effect in this print because it is able to represent a sculptural object on a flat surface. It appears as though the face of the skull is rotating to follow the viewer around the room. It is the ultimate contemporary momento mori and is available for purchase at our Brighton Gallery.  Another beautiful contemporary lenticular print with a similar vanitas theme is ‘Roses are Dead’ (2013) by Magnus Gjoen. Gjoen has used the advanced printing technology to produce a beautifully detailed contemporary image which was inspired by the Classical Era in Rome. The alluring image is of a skull adorned with flowers with a rose in its mouth. In this print, modern lenticular technology has brought to life the phrase “sub rosa” (“under the rose”), meaning to keep a secret, derived from the ancient Roman practice of placing a wild rose on the door of a room  where a secret was being discussed. This print has previewed at the London Art Fair 2013 and will be available online soon.  It seems as though lenticular printing is evolving from an advertising gimmick into a serious art form. It has moved out of the cereal box and into the world of fine art. The technology certainly provides an incredible opportunity for artists to explore depth, present sculptural forms and re-examine viewer interaction. These contemporary lenticulars are fascinating works of art which draw you into their hidden depths. We are looking forward to seeing the boundaries of lenticular printing being pushed even further by artrepublic artists, such as Peter Blake, in the future… Image credits: www.en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/439748 www.extremevision.com Gaspar Antoine de Bois-Clair, Double Portrait of King Frederick IV and Queen Louise of Mecklenburg-Güstow of Denmark. Saturnalia record with lenticular label that switches from "Magical love" to a logo. Roy Lichtenstein, Fish and Sky, from Ten from Leo Castelli (Corlett 50), published by Tanglewood Press, Inc., New York. artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =

1-10 of 18

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
Scroll To Top