Monthly Archives: December 2012

  • Tommy Roberts obituary: A tribute from artrepublic

    Sixties visionary Tommy Roberts was the previous owner of Tom Tom gallery at 42 New Compton Street now proudly occupied by artrepublic Soho. This unique boutique gallery space was established by this seminal visionary and impresario.   ....
    Sixties visionary Tommy Roberts was the previous owner of Tom Tom gallery at 42 New Compton Street now proudly occupied by artrepublic Soho. This unique boutique gallery space was established by this seminal visionary and impresario.   As well as leaving his mark on swinging London in the 1960s, the hot pants craze of the early Seventies, and the careers of Rock and Fashion legends, his innovative approach will continue to provide an inspirational legacy for artrepublic. As a tribute to Tommy Roberts we have kept the Tom Tom name above the gallery door and we take this opportunity to celebrate his colourful life. The designer Sir Paul Smith declared Tommy Roberts “an inspiration, a real character and one of Britain’s true eccentrics.” He was born Thomas Stephen Roberts on February 6th 1942 in Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire. He had an early introduction to the rag trade, after the war his father ran a tie company called Roberto Neckwear. Tommy attended Goldsmiths’ College in the 1950s, became a habitué of the Soho jazz clubs, managed coffee shops, and bought and sold American cars. The “populuxe” styling of espresso machines, limousines and blue suede shoes informed his distinctive avant-garde taste.   In 1956 he married Mary Brookes, and the following year opened his first boutique, Kleptomania, in Kingley Street. On opening, the stock itinerary included wind-up gramophones, Chinese opium pipes, 1920s candlestick telephones, old military uniform, and Penny Farthing bicycles. The mix of Edwardiana, psychedelic posters and proto-hippy apparel at Kleptomania soon pulled in members of the era’s demi-monde, among them The Who, Jimmy Page, Julie Christie and Terence Stamp.  Kleptomania was situated adjacent to Carnaby Street and next door to the Bag O’Nails club which was one of swinging London’s most popular late-night establishments, frequented by the new Rock elite. According to Tommy, clientele including The Rolling Stones, and The Beatles, would spill out of the club in the early hours and spot something in the window that they liked, then send someone around to get it for them the following day. The frilly shirts worn by Jimi Hendrix for his historic Saville Theatre gigs in 1966 were bought from Kleptomania.  Tommy Roberts built relationships with his creative clientele and his close friends were among the giants of pop culture and included Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page. He once negotiated a record deal for his close friend Ian Dury and he was a mentor for the parents of punk Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood. “Fashion, business, life, love. I don’t want to run a shop”, Roberts once said, “I want to run a circus.” Following Kleptomania, Roberts’ next venture was the King’s Road Pop Art fashion emporium Mr Freedom, which he opened with his business partner Trevor Myles and named after a film directed by William Klein.  Roberts recalled “it wasn’t meditative or cool, but garish, loud and Pop, very upfront…. Like me,” and it soon attracted customers such as Mick Jagger, Twiggy and Jean Shrimpton. Roberts became “Mr Freedom”, the self professed “most vulgar person in fashion”.  The clothes that sold under the label Mr Freedom were the radical origins of street wear, incorporating strong graphics, primary colours, comic-book iconography. When Liz Taylor & Richard Burton chose to publicly express their love for each other in 1970 they commissioned Tommy Roberts to create matching t-shirts with sequinned portraits. Elton John’s 1971 outfit for his first Rolling Stone cover came from Mr Freedom.  And Mr Freedom was not only the first to sell slogan t-shirts but also the first anywhere in the world to license images from Disney.  A move to larger premises in Kensington included such innovations as children’s clothing and ‘fun furniture’: Liquorice Allsort pouffes, jigsaw-piece tables, and chairs that looked like sets of false teeth. In the basement was a mini burger bar, Mr Feed ’Em, which was the first British take on the American diner. It served blue-dyed mashed potato and a plastic fly with every bowl of soup.  In May 1972 the LA Times called Mr Freedom “the Andy Warhol of the Fashion World”, and references to art can be found throughout Roberts’ career. From Kandinsky printed satin and clothes which featured the signatures of Pablo Picasso and Paul Gauguin, to ‘POW’, ‘ZAP’, and ‘LOVE’ jersey dresses evoking Lichtenstein. His re-sizing of everyday objects into giant plastic furniture had the feel of Claus Oldenberg whilst the psychedelic bread and plastic fly garnish at Mr Feed’Em were Surrealism brought to life.  Roberts was bankrupted in 1974 by the recession and retreated to antique dealing. He kept up his involvement in the music business, managing and outfitting Ian Dury’s band Kilburn and the High Roads, and offering free rehearsal space to the Sex Pistols. In 1993 Roberts married Jane Sharratt and returned to retail, with the central London store Tom-Tom, which is now the home of artrepublic Soho.   Robert’s Tom-Tom gallery mixed examples of post-war and contemporary furniture with Japanese toys, design collectables, and prints by the artists Jim Dine and Richard Hamilton. Tom-Tom customers included Noel Gallagher, and Patrick Cox. The gallery championed the collecting of art and furniture and exemplified the best of British boutique culture.  In the late 2000s Roberts retired to the south coast, where he made paintings depicting the images of the King’s Road in its Sixties heyday. He also collected Dinky toy cars and rare books.  It was in 2007 that artrepublic took over the gallery space in New Compton Street formerly occupied by Robert’s renowned Tom Tom gallery.  Ever since artrepublic Soho has proudly continued the Tommy Roberts tradition of showcasing the finest cutting-edge art and supporting innovative contemporary artists. We’ve kept the gallery as a beacon of the best of British Pop with the work of Sir Peter Blake and Dave White amongst others. Music also continues to influence the Soho art spot with artrepublic supporting artists such as Jamie Reid, with his infamous Sex Pistols album cover, and Stanley Donwood who’s best known for the album covers he has produced for the band Radiohead. Tommy Roberts was the unsung hero of British design, who seemed to live in the gap between life and art. His example and his favourite catchphrase “Come on, let’s get going!” motivate us all to push the boundaries of art and design.  Return to our London gallery page  Images Rave Magazine's in-house dandy decked out in flower-power finery from Kleptomania 1967 Jimi Hendrix, London 1967, wearing a shirt by the label Sam Pig in Love, a new line of clothing introduced to the shop which became a Kleptomania staple Mick Jagger wearing a Tommy Roberts/Trevor Myles designed T-shirt which he purchased as stagewear for the Stones fateful American tour of autumn 1969 The ground floor interior of the Mr Freedom shop at 20 Kensington Church Street, 1971  Mr Freedom book cover, Kleptomania promo card Johnny Rave/Rave magazine article, kleptomania boutique slogan, Jimi Hendrix, Mr Freedom shop interior and David Bowie images - all scanned from Mr Freedom Tommy Roberts: British Design Hero by Paul Gorman, published by Adelita. Mick Jagger, Madison Square Garden, photograph scanned from The Rolling Stones by Jeremy Pascall & Rob Burt, published by Hamlyn Mr Freedom interior. Photograph: JON WEALLEANS Mr Freedom hotpants, 1970. Photo: Stephen Markeson (The Sun/NI Syndication), scanned from Petticoat, November 1974. artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • 'Love is the Answer' for Mr Brainwash Fan on Made in Chelsea

    Last night’s episode of E4’s reality phenomenon Made in Chelsea, which documents the pretentious lives of the young Chelsea set, saw the work of Mr Brainwash being admired. 24 year-old Francis Boulle, diamond mining heir and skateboarding enthusiast, took his latest plummy date to a....
    Last night’s episode of E4’s reality phenomenon Made in Chelsea, which documents the pretentious lives of the young Chelsea set, saw the work of Mr Brainwash being admired. 24 year-old Francis Boulle, diamond mining heir and skateboarding enthusiast, took his latest plummy date to a contemporary art gallery where he attempted woo her with his wise words on Mr Brainwash's work ‘Love is the Answer’. He even revealed that he had previously purchased an artwork by the internationally renowned street artist for his rival love interest Sophia Sassoon, “who’s a fan”.   As the scene progresses Francis asks his fox-hunting aficionado date if she knows "that Andy Warhol of two people kissing" and asks her if she wants him to demonstrate on her; continuing the conceit the two kiss in front of a Mr Brainwash collage featuring Einstein holding a banner “love is the answer”. Clearly a Mr Brainwash print and an Andy Warhol anecdote are the perfect first date material… View all Mr Brainwash prints View all Andy Warhol prints $test =
  • Raphael Fox and his passion for screenprinting.

    Discover more about a fascinating and courageous artist in our Q&A with Raphael Fox. Read of his passion and experimentations with printing, his affinity with Andy Warhol and his appearances in several documentaries. What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? I love the aestheti....
    Discover more about a fascinating and courageous artist in our Q&A with Raphael Fox. Read of his passion and experimentations with printing, his affinity with Andy Warhol and his appearances in several documentaries. What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? I love the aesthetics of the hand-drawn vs. the clarity of the digital. Mix media processes to interact with my environment. Core elements, stripping things back, the ultimate message is what guides me, ‘Practise Safe Design, Use a Concept’.  I am inspired by printouts left by both newbies and veterans at my print studio, Ink Spot Press. Where I print there’s of great artists, including Penelope Kenny, Bonnie & Clyde, Jane Fox & Rhys Whootton. How do you approach the actual making of a piece? Usually from the end-point, I will usually have a message or at least a technique I want to try out. I always experimenting with something new, trying to push the realms of printing: printing onto wood, onto book pages, in gloss, in gold, on t-shirts in clubs.  I once made a print with my own blood “Life Tonic” just to see how it would work through the screen onto paper. I discovered blood on black was the best, as it’s subtle and shiny. The whole process was pretty disgusting, from extraction to mixing the blood with screen-medium; it had a consistency like jam and smelled vile. What’s your medium? I love experimenting within the medium of silk screen, approaching it from all angles with a design eye and from the heart. I work with a broad range including photography styles, line drawings and typography. It’s a healthy combination of machine and hand. What are you currently working on? I’m in the midst of a collaborative screenprinting project with Jay Stewart (Pink 100) which first aired at POP, London, during the 2day conference. We created pop art style portraits of gender fluid people who have appeared in the media. I am currently printing more images and pasting them in toilets and photographing them for inclusion in a book about Pussy Riot inspired creativity. Additionally I designed and printed some tasty gold on black cotton rag for the band the Dark Horses. I made the print to commemorate the release of their album Black Music. I’ve printed a tasty batch of ‘Frisky in Blue’ prints, on white cotton rag 100 X 70 (out of 69). I’m enjoying more canvas based prints, experimenting with 100+ year old book pages, screenprints and then encasing them in resin.  Describe your work in 5 words. Dark. Queer. Creative. Heartfelt. Gold. Describe an average day for you. There is no average day for me. Wake up. Drink tea. Make a long list. Prep screens. Print some ships and shapes. Clean out print drawer. Update website. Pop by StencilMoose (tshirt screenprinter) and prep images for live club printing. Prep all equipment. Take a sketch & play with it using my digital drawing pad. Enter friendly drawing competition. Answer emails. Press ups. Fall asleep to film about the deep blue sea.  Since taking part in My Transsexual Summer on Channel 4 I have been in the public eye for my transition, helping to promoting awareness. A lot of my time is taken up with appearances and helping others. I’m known for my art in some circles and for being trans in others. Does the impact of the viewer influence your work and if so how? I like to make work which works on a visual and mental level. Bob Geldof recently bought ‘Celebrate Peasants’, which tickled me. What led you to become an artist? Being a left-hander, I am strongly right-brained. Being creative does come easily for me but it was always a toss-up between art & words (I won the English & Art award for every year of my secondary education). It feels great to make money from what I love doing. After my MA in Sequential Design & Illustration, I felt that I needed to get my hands messy, so took Jane Sampson’s Silk screen course. We clicked and I immediately began investing my time and effort into learning from the masters. Screen printing is one of those things which totally clicked for me. I am completely passionate about everything to do with it. What’s your strongest memory of your childhood? The sun and the sand. I lived in Saudi Arabia for 10 years and I went to an American school and lived on a massive compound which I explored every inch of.  Being transgendered and for other reasons, I don’t have the best memories of my childhood. I think that’s why I’ve chosen a profession where I get to have the innocence of exploration and ability to do things my way. That doesn’t mean I’m a control freak at all, it’s the opposite. I enjoy anti-regime since that was heavily enforced as a child.  What themes do you pursue? Animal imagery. Celebration of life. Commentary on society. Creation. Humour. Love. What jobs have you done other than being an artist? I gutted fish & washed up in old town Hastings for £2 an hour, waitered for horrible low-budget weddings, worked at the British Consulate in business development in Seattle, did medical testing (which paid for my MA), worked for the Friday-Ad (using an ancient system), and was a food/music critic. What memorable responses have you had to your work? Watching my prints sell out at the De La War gig for Unkle was really thrilling.  What makes you angry?  Disrespect of others. Lack of common sense. Space invaders.When are you happiest? When I pause to breathe and really live in the present. With a belly full of gourmet grub and the time to draw. What superpower would you have and why? The ability to fly/transport. I always wanted to (time) travel. Name three artists you’d like to be compared to and why. Andy Warhol. Gilbert & George. Stefan Sagmeister. They are all weirdos just like me. I connect with Warhol’s inherent shyness and contradictory wish to be in the public eye.  What’s your favourite or most inspirational place? Berlin always gets my juices going. My friend has a gallery there. I hear there’s an old hospital where you can rent out space to screenprint. It would be ace to do a project out there.  What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? Rolf Harris once told me to read and write a lot when I met him at a party when I was 17. In another life (if you weren’t an artist) what would you be doing? I can’t imagine not being creative.... In another life I could be helping animals, growing fields and fields of hemp, a writer or perhaps a detective.   Check out the short film about Fox in our Blog section Click to view our current available Fox prints Read our Biography of Fox If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the Brighton gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com Return to our Brighton section artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Two Striking new prints from Dave White.

    And we thought he couldn’t get any better!  Just in time for Christmas, Dave White has released another two stunning prints from the Natural Selection show earlier this year.  “Chameleon” manages to capture the ever changing colour of the creature in an explosi....
    And we thought he couldn’t get any better!  Just in time for Christmas, Dave White has released another two stunning prints from the Natural Selection show earlier this year.  “Chameleon” manages to capture the ever changing colour of the creature in an explosive blend of hues. And “Butterfly” boldly fills the page with expressive movement whilst still retaining the delicate and fragile nature of the butterfly. As with all his editions, we don’t expect them to be around for long so why don’t you treat yourself, or a loved one, for the festive season. If you’re feeling extra special, then both prints are also available in a larger hand finished version embellished with 25 carat gold paint in very limited edition of just 20. Please call the Brighton gallery for further information or to purchase on +44 (0)1273 724829 View all Dave White prints $test =
  • Sweet New Work From Zeus

    London artist Zeus has been described as a 3D graffiti pioneer and his latest creation has us fizzing with excitement. Broken Arted is a brilliant handmade sculpture based on the British confectionary classic the Love Heart. Each piece is a hand cast and painted model of a giant Love Heart....
    London artist Zeus has been described as a 3D graffiti pioneer and his latest creation has us fizzing with excitement. Broken Arted is a brilliant handmade sculpture based on the British confectionary classic the Love Heart. Each piece is a hand cast and painted model of a giant Love Heart sweet which has then been broken and sealed into a box frame where it is signed and numbered. The random nature of the break ensures that each of the witty works in this edition of 25 is completely unique.  Zeus majored in sculpture at Chelsea College of Art and his works represent an innovative fusion of graffiti techniques, fine art and sculpture, reflecting both his background on the streets and his formal art school training. We love the sculptural element of ‘Broken Arted’ and its playful appropriation of the sweetie that says it all is ingenious!  Interesting Love Heart facts...  Production of Love Hearts began in 1933. The first special edition was done in 1981 to celebrate Princess Diana's wedding. Wayne and Coleen Rooney got personalised sweets made up for their wedding which read "Wayne and Coleen".  View all Zeus art Read our Zeus biography $test =
  • artrepublic sponsors More Guns Than Roses exhibition

    Always keen to support contemporary art talent, artrepublic are sponsoring a one night only art event on the 15th December at the infamous private members club No.5 Cavendish Square. The exhibition, titled ‘More Guns Than Roses’, is a culmination of some of the most daring artists in E....
    Always keen to support contemporary art talent, artrepublic are sponsoring a one night only art event on the 15th December at the infamous private members club No.5 Cavendish Square. The exhibition, titled ‘More Guns Than Roses’, is a culmination of some of the most daring artists in Europe and America, including Maximillian Wiedmann, Von Hornsleth, and Artmani. The very best of controversial contemporary art, including photography by Tyler Shields, will be presented hung from scaffolding in the luxurious venue and fused with a live soundtrack courtesy of House Music DJ Maxology.  For one night only party, people watch, and peruse the thought-provoking work of acclaimed international artists. The exhibition is 6.30pm – 10.00pm and opens with a champagne reception. The first 30 people will receive a free signed screen print.  After Party 10pm-3am $test =
  • Elizabeth Price: Turner Prize winner 2012

    Last night Elizabeth Price, former 1980s pop musician, was awarded the Turner Prize for her ambitious video trilogy. She is the first video artist to win for over a decade. London-based Price, 45, who only began this type of immersive video work about four years ago, said “I’m interest....
    Last night Elizabeth Price, former 1980s pop musician, was awarded the Turner Prize for her ambitious video trilogy. She is the first video artist to win for over a decade. London-based Price, 45, who only began this type of immersive video work about four years ago, said “I’m interested in the medium of video as something you experience sensually as well as something you might recognise.”  The video ‘The Woolworths Choir of 1979’ had been described as a “tour de force” in the build-up to the ceremony and Tate Britain director Penelope Curtis  said the jury “admired the seductive and immersive qualities”.  Price beat the bookie’s favourite Paul Noble, whose intricate drawings of a fictional town called Nobson Newton, spanned 16 years of his career.  Price was presented with the £25,000 prize by Jude Law at a champagne reception at Tate Britain. The award return to its home in London, after a trip to the Baltic last year, and it was attended by a record crowd – almost 150,000. Next year, it travels again to Northern Ireland to mark Derry’s year as UK City of Culture.  Read our exhibition review of The Turner Prize 2012 $test =
  • Damien Hirst succeeds Peter Blake as BRIT Awards designer

    Damien Hirst has been announced as the designer of next year’s BRIT Awards statue. Chairman of the BRITs David Joseph said “We are delighted that Damien will become the third extraordinary creative Briton to re-imagine the BRIT statue. He is truly one of the most important British ar....
    Damien Hirst has been announced as the designer of next year’s BRIT Awards statue. Chairman of the BRITs David Joseph said “We are delighted that Damien will become the third extraordinary creative Briton to re-imagine the BRIT statue. He is truly one of the most important British artists ever and his unique vision will make winning a 2013 BRIT an even more special proposition.” Since the ‘blank canvas’ trophy was introduced in 2011, the statue has been made over by fashion designer Dame Vivienne Westwood and the God father of British Pop art Sir Peter Blake. Peter Blake has long been associated with British music, The Beatles in particular, and Damien Hirst enjoyed a short-lived pop career himself: he was a member of Fat Les with Blur's Alex James and actor Keith Allen, scoring a number two hit with 'Vindaloo' in 1998.  Hirst’s recent show at Tate Modern was the most visited solo show in the gallery’s history. We wonder if next year’s BRIT statues will be suspended in glass tanks of formaldehyde? View all Damien Hirst prints View all Peter Blake prints $test =
  • Kozy and Dan on Kozyndan

    Kozy and Dan, the husband and wife that together form Kozyndan, elaborate on their inspirations, their work and life together and their mutual love of nature and the ocean. What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? Dan: Our work is very personal in the sense that it’....
    Kozy and Dan, the husband and wife that together form Kozyndan, elaborate on their inspirations, their work and life together and their mutual love of nature and the ocean. What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? Dan: Our work is very personal in the sense that it’s specifically about the interests and values we share together as a couple.  It’s inspired by our interactions with one another, our travels, our shared love of nature and the ocean, and of a shared unease with the unnatural human world in which we are cogs.  We are either glorifying the intricate perfection of the natural world, or depicting an ongoing fantasy where nature rises up to exact an Old Testament, “eye-for-an-eye” style vengeance on mankind and specifically on the urban wasteland our inherent greed has produced.  How do you approach the actual making of a piece? Kozy: Kind of a tough question! We work in so many mediums and in so many ways.  We don’t limit ourselves to one process. Sometimes the works are spontaneously created by one or the other of us alone. Sometimes there is a bouncing of ideas back and forth, and one of us does a composition drawing, and the other paints it, or sometimes we both physically paint on the same work at the same time.   Dan: The only series that has a pretty set process is our Panoramic series, such as “Flooding of the Prinsengracht”.  We take a series of photos onsite to capture as much detail of the intended location as possible.  Then I will assemble and print photos for reference and Kozy will set out to drawing the entire environment in one (surprisingly small) drawing while I set to sketching out ideas for characters to put into the environment.  Once she is done with the background she traces my characters into her style and adds more of her own, while I scan and clean her background and the composite drawing is then put onto both our computers and we start to paint in colour with the brush tool, each painting different parts of the image until everything is filled. Then the two files are put together and final tweaks to colour and shadows are made on the completed file by one of us.  Then it’s sent off to the printers.  The process usually takes about a month. What’s your medium? Kozy: We are all over the place. Pencil, gouache, acrylic, ink, Photoshop, silkscreen, resin, ceramic, water colour, photography – we have short attention spans, and lately we have enjoyed trying new things. Describe your work in 5 words. Dan: mushrooms are better than plastic. Describe an average day for you. Kozy: Wake up. Cuddle with cats. Yogurt, passion fruits, strawberries and tea. Walk into studio. Pick music. Paint. Eat. Paint. Yoga. Eat. Play games on iPhone in bed. Cuddle with cats. Read. Sleep. Does the impact of the viewer influence your work and if so how? Dan: I think we have a love/ hate relationship with the concept of “an audience”.  This is because the work of ours that seems to resonate with our audience (at least the work the sells most broadly) is often work that we don’t particularly have much connection with.  Our life together is in some respects buoyed by things we made offhand and are not particularly proud of.  A lot of times we put something out that we are passionate about and we get zero reaction from our audience.  I think this is an experience a lot of artists in all mediums (not just visual arts) experience. We have no right to harp on the public for liking what they like, but I feel like its only a very small part of the audience that actually perceives our work the way we, in fact, do. Kozy: The other side of that though is that we have a very open relationship with our audience. We put lots of events in our life out there for the public. Our fans follow our travels and our interests, and some feel like they know us when we do not know them. There is a dialogue with them online that’s always been fun for us, if a little weird. What memorable responses have you had to your work? Dan: More than one fan has asked us to adopt them.  Those always stick out in my mind since I have no intention of ever becoming a parent.  There have been a lot of heartfelt responses to our works over the years though – couples who have told us they were brought together by a mutual love of our work, even a guy who reacted strongly to a little painting we did because it perfectly depicted how he felt about the circumstances of a recent break up with a girl.  I think its always the people that find emotional ties to the work that are memorable to me, because for us, despite the subject matter being about nature and ecology, that process of its creation is entirely about the experience of going through life with Kozy, the journey we are travelling together. What led you to become an artist? Dan: It required a lot less math at University than becoming a marine biologist. Kozy: It was always something I was good at.  My parents are artistic.  I took art classes from an early age. I was always drawn to imagery and moved to the US to study so that I could be involved in special effects or music video production, anything to do with image making.  I think that we kind of just fell into making our own art because we got some attention for the work we made together for fun while still in school, and just kept doing it once we graduated.   Dan: It definitely wasn’t planned.  We just saw that we could earn some money from our own work so we kept making it.  It’s been over 10 years now… What themes do you pursue? Kozy: We invariably depict nature, particularly animals, particularly sea animals.  There is also a focus on ecology and the destruction of natural spaces. I also really like trippy imagery. Dan: We don’t even think that much about “themes” though do we? I think we our views on humanity and ecology come from an almost subconscious place.  I never really think about the work being about any ecological issues, but when I look back on the breadth of work we have made – those are the themes that emerge.  I am just usually looking for things that are exciting to draw and then add whatever pops into my head, and often we are just interested in making trippy visuals for fun.  There is a definite theme that emerges but it rarely feels intentional.  What jobs have you done other than being an artist? Kozy: None actually!  I have never had a job outside being an artist.  In University I work at the Student Graphic Services department for a time and did a design internship at a character-driven product company.  Then we started Kozyndan. Dan: She will never know firsthand how lucky she is! Haha.  I worked a lot of jobs – everything from a loader at UPS (literally a back-breaking job, broke one of my vertebra doing it), to working in restaurants and catering, a bowling alley, as well as design and retouching jobs in Hollywood (I am quite good at reducing J.Lo’s thighs while maintaining her round ass).  What makes you angry? Dan: THAT is a loaded question!! The world is ALL wrong. Our species centric view of the world is wrong.  Our drive towards growth instead of sustainability is wrong.  The utter greed that is destroying this world is wrong.  It’s all wrong.  I have almost given up on humanity.  I just want to see what’s left of the natural world before you all destroy it! Haha. When are you happiest? Dan: Under the sea. Kozy: Under the sea. What’s your favourite or most inspirational place? Dan: I guess I like the reefs of Indeonesia...SO much crazy alien inspiration in those waters.  I have rarely felt so exhilarated and scared and calm and happy and overloaded with visual stimulation at once, all while floating weightlessly.   What superpower would you have and why? Dan: Breathe underwater.  Or maybe having insane dance skills. I am a shy dancer and I wish I wasn’t. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? Dan: My step dad told me “Love shouldn’t be hard. It should mostly just work.”  I have always taken that to heart.  I got really lucky finding someone to share my life and work with, found a relationship that I rarely, even after 13 years, have to “work on”. It just works.  Kozy: My mom told me: “Don’t waste time with stupid people.  Only spend your time with interesting people.”  That has always worked for us and kept our life from ever being dull. In another life (if you weren’t an artist) what would you be doing? Dan: Studying sharks.  Actually we will hopefully get the chance to go help out shark researchers in the coming year. We’ll see how the timing and our income goes (buy some prints, people, so Kozy and I can go tag sharks!). Kozy: Oh so many things!!  And I want to do them all together!!  I want to be a stand-up comedian, yoga-instructing, masseuse that gives happy endings…  I think I would be a great horse whisperer.  Dan: You have never ridden a horse! You are kind of afraid of them!  Kozy: They are big! But I think they will find me very commanding and calming though. I think horses will listen to me. Dan: Kozy thinks she will be good at everything.  The annoying thing is that usually when she does try to do something – she IS good at it.  I hate that! Click to view our current available Kozyndan editions Read our Biography of Kozyndan If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com Return to our Brighton section artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =

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