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Monthly Archives: November 2012

  • The Highs and Lows of Ryan Callanan's 1st Solo Show

    Ryan Callanan’s first ever solo show opened to the public in London on the 1st of November. He very generously gave artrepublic back stage access to the installation snf invites to the Storm Trooper packed launch party. Ryan Callanan has....
    Ryan Callanan’s first ever solo show opened to the public in London on the 1st of November. He very generously gave artrepublic back stage access to the installation snf invites to the Storm Trooper packed launch party. Ryan Callanan has been working under his alia ‘RYCA’ for several years building a huge collector base. The artist from the East End of London made his name in the graffiti and street art scene with limited edition prints brimming with pop culture references, iconic movie moments, and his infectious sense of humour.  His solo show ‘The Highs and Lows’ brought together for the first time his classic RYCA work, the popular ‘Reservoir Troopers’ and ‘Star Wars’ inspired prints, with his diverse new ‘Ryan Callanan’ creations. Drawing on his vast knowledge of materials, Ryan has been experimenting with industrial processes, video installation, and furniture design, pushing the boundaries of his art to create some incredible contemporary work. Meeting Ryan he was clear about the distinction between his RYCA work and his Ryan Callanan work, describing the show as “a bit of a split personality”, but far from being disjointed the show was an impressive invitation into the breadth, and depth of Ryan’s vision. Bridging his two ‘personalities’ and binding them together is Ryan and his approach. The show, split across two floors was enjoyably witty, his aesthetic was clean and bold throughout and his approach was refreshingly democratic.  Ryan is a self confessed Star Wars geek and a genuine toy collecting enthusiast. His first ever video installation piece, created especially for the show, was a wall of videos built into a giant ‘H’, the initial of Star Wars character Han Solo. The 7 screens featured video clips of Harrison Ford as Han Solo in cleverly edited shooting scenes which interplayed with each other creating an overwhelming wall of retro seventies explosions.   The video wall was installed just outside Ryan’s handmade Storm Trooper temple. A small, darkly lit room with silver walls, candles and a smoke machine was built especially for the show. Inside the enticing room was Ryan’s meticulously constructed shrine to Star Wars Storm Troopers; glow-in-the-dark screen prints, a wall of Storm Trooper crucifixions, and rows and rows of Storm Trooper figurines each hand painted. The eccentric construction epitomized Ryan’s approach; highly amusing, atmospherically nostalgic, masterfully constructed, and surprisingly philosophical. When asked why he had built a shrine to Star Wars, a temple to the Troopers, Ryan replied “Star Wars only started wars on TV”. Not only did it showcase his incredible eye for detail, interest in materials, passion for toy collecting and his whole hearted enthusiasm for the golden age of cinema and old school cool (1977) the installation was quite clearly a thought provoking piece about religion, worship and childhood. The Strom Trooper helmet money box in the middle of the temple, seemed to reference a religious collection box, amusingly raising challenging questions about the modern day church.  The genius of Ryan’s work is that it is generously welcome to all and as a result it is fascinatingly multifaceted; his painstakingly constructed Storm Trooper crucifixes and expertly printed Han Solos are not only gently humorous, nostalgic slices of retro cool, they provide an opportunity to laugh at ourselves, our religion, our history, and our politics.  The collection of work on show created under the ‘Ryan Callanan’ name also demonstrated Ryan’s great skill with materials, his perfectionism, and his ability to subtly reference and record popular culture. In an incredibly exciting way, these works seem to have created an entirely new genre of art. Working in bas-relief, in a material, technique and style usually associated with traditional pub signs, Ryan has reinvented sign writing, elevating it to a contemporary art form. He has worked as a professional 3D sign writer and transferred the skill into his own art, making stunning 3D glass and resin works as well as limited edition moulded text pieces. It was fascinating talking to him about these incredibly inventive works. It seems as though he’d become frustrated by the street art scene, and especially “the drips”, “everyone’s doing messy” he said. Whereas sign writing is a highly technical skill which is clean and disciplined, and allows him to further develop his aesthetic whilst pushing boundaries and rejuvenating a dying art. The fantastic Ryan Callanan works include a series of signs which are ‘expletive-insertions’ (a process by which an expletive or profanity is inserted into a word). Again, they are brilliantly witty and cleverly tap into the collective British psyche in which the pub sign has become an unconsciously absorbed reference point against which Ryan’s words and symbols react. The pieces are very impressive, combining numerous techniques with glass, gilding, resin and lettering. A beautiful example of one of these ‘signs’ is the work Ryan created for photographer JR. Another highlight of the show were Ryan’s traditional pub signs of quotes of poignant song lyrics from 90s hip hop and rap. He described them as “hip hop in Wild West format”. Not only did they showcase Ryan’s distinctive 3D sign writing technique, but also his aesthetic of cross reference; taking an item out of its context and splicing it with another to create something that feels familiar but whose meaning is subtly shifted. Again the depth of the work was impressive; for example ‘Cash Rules Everything Around Me’ was a piece created in the traditional pub sign palette “to keep it true to its roots”, which referenced C.R.E.A.M. a song by the New York hip hop group Wu-Tang Clan, from 1993, whilst remaining cleverly contemporary and topical in today’s economic climate.  Ryan’s first solo show is full of highs. It showcases the work of an incredibly skilled artist who has a genuinely impressive knowledge of the materials and processes he uses. His art is brimming with his infectious enthusiasm, playful humour and refreshing generosity. He offers art that can be enjoyed and accessed by everyone, from Star Wars geeks and film buffs, to art historians and political theorists. Ryan, with his Storm Trooper temple, has discovered the holy trinity of fine art; creating works which are materially, visually and conceptually interesting.  View all Ryan Callanan prints View all RYCA prints artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Video portrait of Raphael Fox

    Fox has recently been filmed for a beautiful short film that is now online.  It is a mini documentary about Raphael Fox, his art and his experience of being trans-gender.   This beautifully shot video portrait was filmed by Fox's friend Lewis Hancox and offers a fascinating insight int....
    Fox has recently been filmed for a beautiful short film that is now online.  It is a mini documentary about Raphael Fox, his art and his experience of being trans-gender.   This beautifully shot video portrait was filmed by Fox's friend Lewis Hancox and offers a fascinating insight into the world on one of our artists. He talks about his passion for screen printing and how his art practice has been able to flourish since his courageous decision to medically transition.  It’s an inspiring life story. Take a look.... View all Fox prints $test =
  • artrepublic Advocates Art in the Digital Age

    The Guardian have created a fantastic video about art in the digital age and the impact of technology on art, artists, and audiences. As one of the earliest online art businesses artrepublic have long been exploring the potential of the internet and social media, in terms of discovering new artis....
    The Guardian have created a fantastic video about art in the digital age and the impact of technology on art, artists, and audiences. As one of the earliest online art businesses artrepublic have long been exploring the potential of the internet and social media, in terms of discovering new artists, reaching beyond a traditional art audience, and making art collecting more accessible.  It’s exciting to see how our artists are embracing new digital technologies as artistic mediums, check out Tom Lewis, who describes himself has a “mouse master”,  Eboy’s incredible ‘eCities’, and Magnus Gjoen, whose work is arguably the best example of truly beautiful digital art.  Louise Shannon, from the V&A says “it’s not a one-way conversation any more”, to discover more artists embracing the digital age and to join the exchange… Visit us on Tumblr Follow us on Twitter $test =
  • Peter Blake exhibition Rock, Paper, Scissors

    Rock, Paper, Scissors is the first major retrospective exhibition devoted to Peter Blake in the UK since 2007. The show features almost 50 new and previously unseen works from the past six decades. The exhibition title takes the idea from the children’s game, and provides a framework for the sect....
    Rock, Paper, Scissors is the first major retrospective exhibition devoted to Peter Blake in the UK since 2007. The show features almost 50 new and previously unseen works from the past six decades. The exhibition title takes the idea from the children’s game, and provides a framework for the sections sculpture, works on paper and collage. In his sculpture, Blake continues to assemble found objects, with surreal scenes and narratives. ‘A Parade for Saul Steinberg’, started in 2007, resembles a New York street parade, where famous cartoon characters and other fantasy figures march in recognition of the cartoonist Steinberg; one of Blake’s artistic heroes. Popular characters from Blake’s earlier works reappear; Snow White is seen showing-off her garden of underwater debris to René Magritte, whilst elsewhere 30 of her dwarf companions lead an invasion of a bagpiper’s Swiss chalet. In addition to using plastic, readymade characters, Blake constructs figures from natural materials including a miniature army made from bowling balls and stained wood, adorned with medals and badges to represent military achievements. Another sculpture built from wooden objects is a life-size family group posing beneath a driftwood tree and this two-metre-high sculpture will dominate one of the galleries. As a departure from his constructions of found objects, in a new group of works, Blake presents six found objects as works of art in their own right, reminding him as they do of sculptures by Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth and other twentieth-century masters. The early works on paper in the exhibition date back to 1948 and are shown alongside Blake’s most recent watercolour, ‘Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II’, commissioned by the Radio Times for the cover of their Diamond Jubilee souvenir issue. Blake’s ten new London collages form the ‘scissors’ component of the exhibition, creating fantastical scenes around London landmarks, such as a comic book convention at Piccadilly Circus (attended by the comic-book characters themselves), a gathering of escaped animals at Westminster Abbey and a parade in Abbey Road. The most ambitious work in the exhibition will be a six-foot-wide canvas, started in 1963 and still a work in progress. Originally titled ‘Drake, land wars in Ireland and Essex’, the painting was created for a group exhibition about Shakespeare. Blake is painting over his initial composition, turning the rural scene into a fantasy narrative featuring children and storybook characters. The painting will be exhibited at Waddington Custot Galleries in its current state as Blake intends to continue reworking it indefinitely. PETER BLAKE: ROCK, PAPER, SCISSORS 21 November – 15 December 2012 Waddington Custot Galleries  Image Credit: Peter Blake, A Parade for Saul Steinberg, 2007-2012, 11 ¾ x 73 ¼ x 11 ¾ in / 30 x 186 x 30 cm, found objects, Courtesy of Waddington Custot Galleries artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Who Knew That Salvador Dali's Real Masterpiece was the Logo for Chupa Chups?

    In many ways the Chupa Chups lollipop is a bonafide design classic. It was invented in 1958 by Spanish businessman Enric Bernat, and was the first ever sweet to be sold on a stick and the first sweet to be placed in a jar on the counter.  Originally it was called ‘GOL’ but later ....
    In many ways the Chupa Chups lollipop is a bonafide design classic. It was invented in 1958 by Spanish businessman Enric Bernat, and was the first ever sweet to be sold on a stick and the first sweet to be placed in a jar on the counter.  Originally it was called ‘GOL’ but later changed to ‘Chupa Chups’, after the Spanish ‘chupar’, meaning ‘to suck’. Bernat called upon the services of an artist friend of his to create a logo for his product, the wacky surrealist known for his pointy moustache and melting clocks, Salvador Dali. According to lore, one day in 1969 Salvador Dali spent an hour doodling on discarded newspaper and came up with the sweet’s famous daisy logo, creating one of the most enduring pieces of branding ever.   It was Dali who insisted that his design be placed on top of the lolly, rather than on the side, so that it could always be viewed intact. Eye-catching, bold and deceptively simple, the logo has barely changed since Dali created it. So to acquire your very own Salvador Dali design simply pop down to the sweet shop!  View all Salvador Dali prints View all Surrealism prints $test =
  • "Spread the Word" by Gill Alkin

    Gill Alkin (brother of artrepublic CEO Lawrence) has been working as a commercial photographer since the early 80s collaborating with numerous clients worldwide, creating fantastic, award winning photography. We now have one of his large black and white photographic prints framed in the Br....
    Gill Alkin (brother of artrepublic CEO Lawrence) has been working as a commercial photographer since the early 80s collaborating with numerous clients worldwide, creating fantastic, award winning photography. We now have one of his large black and white photographic prints framed in the Brighton gallery available for purchase now.  “Spread the Word” was taken in London in 2008 and features an elderly gentleman strolling past two vintage billboard posters advertising phone lines and tobacco. His ethic behind his success is recognising the “importance of listening and asking questions, knowing it develops a good relationship with the client and makes business sense” which has clearly served him well in creating striking images such as this print. View all Gill Alkin prints $test =
  • Billion Dollar Art Buying Binge Set to Re-Write Record Books

    The auction houses of New York City are set to hammer out record-breaking sales as the biggest names defy the recession with lots that are set to fetch a billion dollars in a two-week frenzy of cultural consumption. In the midst of a very busy few weeks for the art market, New York’s biggest a....
    The auction houses of New York City are set to hammer out record-breaking sales as the biggest names defy the recession with lots that are set to fetch a billion dollars in a two-week frenzy of cultural consumption. In the midst of a very busy few weeks for the art market, New York’s biggest and best auction houses are seeing a buying frenzy courtesy of the world’s super-rich. Of the many modern and contemporary sales going on during New York’s biannual auction season, it  was Monet’s ‘Nympheas’, one of the French Impressionist’s water-lily paintings, which sold for almost $44m (£27m) that was the highlight of 70 works on sale at Christie’s by artists who also included Picasso, Matisse and Magritte. Kandinsky’s ‘Studie für Improvisation 8’ sold for $23m (£14.4m), an auction record for the Russian painter. Nature Morte aux Tulipes - Picasso At Sotheby’s more than 60 lots are on sale including nine works by Picasso, led by paintings of his lover Marie-Thérèse Walter. ‘Nature morte aux tulipes’ carries an estimate of up to $50m while ‘Femme à la Fenêtre’ could fetch up to $20m. Dollars fly by the million every May and November in New York, but sales recently are exceeding expectations among collectors and auction houses. Christie’s deputy chair of Impressionist and modern art, Conor Jordan stated “there’s fierce appetite across the world for the best-quality objects. Record prices get the headline, but demand is strong at every level.” It is ultimately due to the economic downturn across the world that appears to be enticing investors, including increasingly wealthy new buyers from Russia and China, towards canvas rather than stocks. It’s seems to be ringing true, and has been for the past couple of years, that when interest rates are not huge, people turn to something beautiful in their house that may also hold or increase in value. Michael Moses, co-founder of the Mei Moses All Art index agrees saying, “stocks don’t look so good on walls and for those with palaces and villas to fill, the buying doesn’t stop today. The Manhattan cash caravan moves on next week to sales of contemporary and post-war art with equally eye-watering estimates.” Rothko’s No. 1 (Royal Red and Blue) (above) could fetch $50m at Sotheby’s, while one of Francis Bacon’s “screaming pope” paintings should sell for up to $25m. Christie’s, meanwhile, is pinning its hopes on Andy Warhol’s ‘Statue of Liberty’, (below) a 3D work expected to go for more than $35m. If you are interested in investing in art and would like discuss options or perhaps want to increase your collection further and are looking for a new work or simply if you would like to discuss artworks currently available and artists we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Cover Image 'Dollar' by Justine Smith Return to our London section artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Q&A with Tom Lewis

    As a new artist to artepublic we thought we would delve deeper into the magical world of Tom Lewis, whimsical Japanese inspired prints, a marriage proposal and a parachute! What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? At the moment, it’s a mixture between old Japanese woodblock prin....
    As a new artist to artepublic we thought we would delve deeper into the magical world of Tom Lewis, whimsical Japanese inspired prints, a marriage proposal and a parachute! What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? At the moment, it’s a mixture between old Japanese woodblock prints, invented stories and characters that are slowly developing a life of their own, and layers of information. Which I’m aware doesn’t make very much sense, but the long answer might be too boring for words! How do you approach the actual making of a piece? Whether it’s a painting or a sculpture, I usually start off with a pencil sketch. This goes through a couple of versions, before deciding which way to go next. If it’s going to be a sculpture (which is quite new for me) I’ll start trying to make a small version out of clay, before then trying to work out what the hell people make sculptures out of and whether my brain will let me think in 3d enough to make something look like I want it to.  If it’s a painting I’ll either start straight onto a canvas and get on with it, or I’ll scan it into the computer and re sketch it digitally. I often do the backgrounds digitally and print them on like wallpaper, then work on these, sanding them down etc before drawing the characters back on top and then painting them with acrylics and spray paint and anything else I can reach.  What’s your medium? It changes, but usually involves – Acrylic, aerosol, pens, airbrush, charcoal, Photoshop and more recently sculpey and jesmonite. What’s the one thing you can’t live without? Blue Staedler pencil leads. What themes do you pursue? I like suggesting stories and narratives that are totally invented, but have enough texture and detail to suggest a whole world in which it exists. At the moment I’m continuing to explore these worlds and flesh them out. Not sure how far I want to go, as I like the viewer to have to supply a lot of it themselves, but we’ll see... What are you currently working on? I’m about to start sketching for my next collection of paintings, and also working on some larger sculptures that I’m really excited about but are probably going to take years to finish. Describe your work in 5 words. Nonsensical, beautiful, whimsical, Japanical, vivid.  Describe an average day for you. I should make something up that sounds inspirational and romantic, but if I’m not totally immersed in painting or making in the months leading up to a show, I’ll probably just be doing really boring ‘business’ stuff.  Does the impact of the viewer influence your work and if so how? I’m not sure I understand the question! I think it’s probably quite a complex circular thing...I make work for myself, but part of that process involves a desire to show it to people, and for them to like it enough to give me money for it, so that I can carry on making work for myself!  What memorable responses have you had to your work? “Well, it’s definitely not tasteful is it?”  and “I don’t understand, am I missing something?” and then at the last show someone proposed in front of one of my paintings! What led you to become an artist? The idea of applying paint to canvas makes a large part of my soul sing and has done for as long as I can remember.  What’s your strongest memory of your childhood? My dad winning a WW2 parachute at a raffle and my brother and I going home, cutting the parachute off, tying the harness up to the highest point of a tree in our garden and throwing ourselves out. Repeatedly.  What jobs have you done other than being an artist? Umm...Pizza delivery man (Genuinely loved this job), computer games tester (thought I’d love it but hated it) art shop assistant and worked in a call centre, at which I was laughably sh*t. I also worked in the BHS cafe when I was 15, for £2.18 an hour. £2.18 an hour! When are you happiest? When I’ve finished varnishing a painting and I haven’t f**ked it up. What superpower would you have and why? I’d settle for being able to say no in a friendly yet assertive manner. What’s your favourite or most inspirational place? Went to Japan for the first time this year – that was pretty amazing. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? My old college tutor Colin Wright asking “What do you want to do?” I said paint, and he said “well just paint then”. I may have thought about that every day for 10 years.  In another life (if you weren’t an artist) what would you be doing? I would have liked to have a go at racing cars for a living, but I’d probably working in a BHS cafe somewhere! Click to view our current available Tom Lewis editions Read our Biography of Tom Lewis If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com Return to our Brighton section artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • An Interrogation of Russell Marshall

    Award winning newspaper designer and journalist, and artrepublic favourite, Russell Marshall could have been a boat captain. Instead he is creating iconic prints exploring our obsession with celebrity, reinventing images from the golden days of the red top press, and causing a stir in ....
    Award winning newspaper designer and journalist, and artrepublic favourite, Russell Marshall could have been a boat captain. Instead he is creating iconic prints exploring our obsession with celebrity, reinventing images from the golden days of the red top press, and causing a stir in the art world.  He takes time off from the hectic aftermath following his latest print release to tell us all about his upcoming projects, a day in the life of Russell Marshall, and his hope for the future of British art… What made you become an artist? I'm not actually sure. But I guess everything thing that I have done throughout my career has brought me to where I am now. How did you get started? I design newspaper pages every day. I've designed something in the region of 2,500 newspaper front pages and tens of thousands of pages in total. And while I love the immediacy of designing for daily papers there are massive constraints - time and resources. You are also designing by committee. Someone chooses this image, someone else writes that headline, this size ad must go on the page... and someone else comes along and changes the colours you've used. So it's never really your idea. I wanted to produce work that was completely my own.I had been collecting for years and after visiting a London Art Fair I felt that I could do better than some of the work on offer. I designed a print and took it to a studio to be screen printed. They put it up in their gallery. Sold two the first weekend and three the following weekend. And now I have produced 22 different prints, canvass work, stainless steel work and am featured in seven galleries - and a new opportunity seems to arrive every other day. How do you approach the actual making of your work? The same way I go about designing anything. I tend to get an idea and can see how it will look in my head. Then I have to translate what's in my imagination to paper, or canvas or digital file. Which can be the tricky bit. I'm very production-based, I prepare artwork for my screen prints in photoshop - I'll use a different layer for each colour and produce a file in a similar way to how the piece will be printed. What’s your medium? Screen prints mainly, though I'm currently working on a collection of acid etched stainless steel pieces. And my first canvas work goes for auction in March next year to raise funds for Joss Parkes Searchlight - a charity that helps children with cancer. I'm really pleased with how this piece has turned out. I've spent a lot of time prepping canvas and then wet and dry sanding layer upon layer of gesso to create a smooth printing surface but also keeping the texture of the linen canvas. What would you say are the main themes you pursue? Celebrity; but hopefully with a twist. I like the more unusual newsy or candid images. I like collections, multiples and themes. I like there to be a story behind the image or images - a reason why the images have been used. Photo Opportunity has a story behind each frame, Cowboys and 27 are all collections of linked showbiz legends and Mouse Arrest was just a bit of pun-based fun. How do you choose your subjects? Images have to fit the theme, but also the composition needs to work too. With cowboys I needed all the subjects to visually look like cowboys in just a head and shoulders shot. A picture of a cowboy's face without a hat or a neck scarf is just a picture of an actor. It could be their driving licence picture. What are you currently working on? Sorry - that's a secret for now, but you'll be among the first to know when they are ready! There's a big anniversary coming up of the death of a hero of mine, I'd like to get a print in time for this but the schedule is pretty packed right now. The stainless steel work is in progress, a canvas collection is in progress too... and I've started the artwork for my next series of screen prints. It's taken over three months to get Photo Opportunity: The Collection finished, so I'm looking at spring for the next collection. Do you care whether people like your work? I want to produce work that people like, but I'm not upset if someone doesn't like a piece. I love getting an email or a twitter from someone who has bought something I have made. It's quite an honour to have someone spend their hard-earned money on a piece of my work because they like it, and they want to frame it and put on their wall... and look at it every day. I've also had people turn their nose up at my work. Which is fine. I probably wouldn't choose the art they have on their walls. What’s the biggest myth about artists? Ha! So far everybody I've met through the industry has been brilliant. I've met quite a few established artists and the most shocking thing has been how nice, supportive and in a way, normal, they have all been. I was expecting more ego and flamboyance. The one thing everyone seems to have in common though is dedication and hard work. What is the greatest threat to art today? I'm very positive about the art scene. Particularly the British art world. Technology is often seen as a threat to creativity but I'm not so sure. Software like PhotoShop makes it easier to produce images and effects that took years to learn longhand but it can't tell you what to produce - that still comes from the imagination. And it can't edit a good idea from a bad idea. Most people have internet access now, and a pretty good home printer but there's no value in hitting apple P and out pops an image. Collectors want value in the work they own and that comes from good people working hard. What’s the best advice anyone ever gave you? A lesson I've from many people, but one friend summed it up quite well: Put yourself in the way of life.  What have you sacrificed for your art? Just time and money. Things we'd all like more of! Do you suffer for your art? I'm quite a positive person. I look at the failures as one step closer to the successes. When are you happiest? I'm pretty much constantly happy, no tortured soul here. I don't expect much so am rarely disappointed and often pleased. Is there an art form you don’t relate to? Absolutely not. There are styles I would not choose to work in or display in my home, but I can appreciate the talent and effort that has been put in. Which artists do you most admire? Too many to mention. Look at all the artists on artrepublic's website or in their gallery. I'm proud to be included among them and admire them all. What work of art would you most like to own? Old school would be Andy Warhol, the new breed would be Greg Gossel. If you weren’t an artist what would you be doing? There was once the chance to become a boat captain. I worked as chief mate on a luxury motor yacht in Boston, Massachusetts. The boat was dry docked for repairs and I was given a month's leave with a view to returning and training up for my captain's ticket. I returned to the UK and my journalism career started to happen. Sometimes I wonder what my life would have been like if I'd have returned. But I briefly returned to the ocean several years ago. Four of us sailed the Atlantic on a 40 foot sailboat... it took us 19 days.  Describe an average day in the life of Russell Marshall - I still work in the newspaper industry. Average day starts at 7.30 to 8.00 with a coffee and a cigarette and I sit down at the computer to check mail. I've normally got several things to sort out before I head to work, like ordering supplies or sending out prints or working on the website. The studio I use is on my way to the day job so I often call in to drop off artwork or proof work or maybe a signing. Work starts about 11.00 to 11.30. Midday I have a meeting with my editor and department heads to plan the following day's paper. 1.00 the designers start to arrive and the we begin working on the paper. Things get busier throughout the day and I generally start designing the front page around 5.00. Everything can change at the last minute, but I'm usually away by 7.30 to 8.00 but there will be people working until 2.00 sometimes later. I tend to work on my stuff at weekends and mornings. View all Russell Marshall prints artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world $test =
  • Kate Moss's First-Ever Modelling Photo Goes on Sale

    Kate Moss, the supermodel and icon that has defined a generation will see the very first modelling photo of her career go up for auction this month in Mayfair, London.  The black-and-white image of the British supermodel shows Kate back in 1988 aged just 14, at the beginning of her rise to ....
    Kate Moss, the supermodel and icon that has defined a generation will see the very first modelling photo of her career go up for auction this month in Mayfair, London.  The black-and-white image of the British supermodel shows Kate back in 1988 aged just 14, at the beginning of her rise to super-stardom. She is simply showing off the unwavering stare and high cheekbones that have made the Croydon-born star one of world's most recognisable faces, she looks fresh-faced as she poses without any make-up. The picture, which is one of three shots up for sale this week of Moss from her first sitting, was captured by photographer David Ross and is thought to be the first-ever professional shot of the model. The photograph is expected to fetch a minimum of £1,200 when it’s auctioned off at Bloomsbury's in Mayfair later this month. Speaking about the sitting, photographer David Ross praised Kate's character saying, "she seemed like a tough or resilient teenager, comfortably fronting me up, perhaps covering up her nerves. She was a cool character.” The supermodel who was famously talent scouted at an airport in 1988, as she waited to board a flight back to London from New York has been the muse of numerous artists and photographers since her emergence. She has appeared in all forms or artwork and anything associated with her face/image continues to be extremely popular in the art market. Click here to see a variety of works we currently have featuring Kate Moss, including an edition from Sir Peter Blake, which features a photograph collage and diamond dust. If you are interested in artworks of Kate Moss and would like further information or if you would like to discuss other available artworks and artists we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section Image copyright credited to SWNS $test =

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