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Monthly Archives: August 2012

  • Sir Peter Blake Releases his Highly Anticipated London Suite

    The city of London is the latest stop in Sir Peter Blake’s incredible ‘World Tour’ series. The London Suite is the newest creation in a continuing city-collage series which the godfather of British Pop has been developing for the last few years. The suite pairs postcard views of city sights w....
    The city of London is the latest stop in Sir Peter Blake’s incredible ‘World Tour’ series. The London Suite is the newest creation in a continuing city-collage series which the godfather of British Pop has been developing for the last few years. The suite pairs postcard views of city sights with a crowded assortment of Blake’s motley visitors. The result is an extraordinary collection of imaginative snapshots of a city that has been visited by the world this summer.   The prints, inspired by vibrant and historic London, are silkscreen, signed limited editions of Blake’s beautifully crafted collages. The collages themselves are composed from postcards, found photographs, engravings, second-hand book illustrations and vintage children’s literature cut outs. They are a development of an aesthetic made famous in 1967 with Blake’s cover design for the Sgt. Pepper’s album, and affirm his mastery of the collage technique. The London Suite culminates in a magical history tour of the British capital, with characters and figures spanning centuries filling the familiar landscapes. Unsurprisingly, Blake has ingeniously woven tongue-in-cheek juxtapositions to build beautiful, apt and comic portraits of the city; Westminster Abbey is overrun with animals, Piccadilly Circus is swarming with comic book superheroes, and the Thames is crowded with an eccentric collection of vessels reminiscent of the river’s Jubilee display. Although the collages use familiar source material, the butterflies, dancers, and cultural icons have taken on a new guise and the works appear incredibly current and contemporary. One print, Petticoat Lane, is teeming with images of women from all different nationalities, cultures, and ages, and not only functions as a fascinating rendition of London’s rich history, but also as a witty snapshot of the city’s present day, tourist saturated state.   Following Paris and Venice, Blake has turned his extraordinary vision and collector’s eye on to the British capital city and the result is an entirely appropriate, beautifully detailed, nostalgic fusion, brimming with celebratory theatricality.  $test =
  • Young British Artist Damien Hirst Inspired by 1975 Blue Peter Episode

    Damien Hirst has told Blue Peter viewers that the iconic British children’s television show was the inspiration behind one of his best known and most lucrative painting techniques. The episode in which Hirst explains “I grew up with Blue Peter... I got my idea for the spin paintings from an epi....
    Damien Hirst has told Blue Peter viewers that the iconic British children’s television show was the inspiration behind one of his best known and most lucrative painting techniques. The episode in which Hirst explains “I grew up with Blue Peter... I got my idea for the spin paintings from an episode in the 1970s” will be broadcast today.  Hirst will also join an elite but disperate group, including the Queen, JK Rowling and David Beckham when he is presented with a gold Blue Peter badge during the programme.  It was in Leeds in 1975 that nine-year-old Damien Hirst was transfixed by John Noakes demonstrating a motorised cardboard paint spinning device for children “who like to paint, but are one of those people who never really knows what to draw”. The contraption was made of a rubber band, two nails knocked into a wooden baton, an electric motor and a battery, and spun blobs of paint into a kaleidoscopic colour explosion.  Blue Peter editor Tim Levell told the Guardian, “Blue Peter is famous for encouraging children to get up and do something creative. It’s great to see that come full circle, and for us to present Damien with a gold Blue Peter badge for all he’s done for British art.” Read our Damien Hirst biography View all Damien Hirst prints Image credits: Blue Peter presenters John Noakes, Valerie Singleton and Peter Purves inspired artist Damien Hirst. Photo: BBC/Rex $test =
  • Q&A with Joe Webb

    We catch up with new artist to artrepublic Joe Webb and discover why glue and Rene Magritte are so important in his life as an artist! What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? Rene Magritte. I'm obsessed by his work. I took my family on a holiday to Brussels just to go to....
    We catch up with new artist to artrepublic Joe Webb and discover why glue and Rene Magritte are so important in his life as an artist! What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? Rene Magritte. I'm obsessed by his work. I took my family on a holiday to Brussels just to go to the Magritte Museum. The kids weren't amused. They wanted to go to Disneyland. How do you approach the actual making of a piece? I look in second hand bookshops for an image which triggers an idea...then take it back to my studio and cut it up and juxtapose other images around it...trying to reinvent it somehow to tell a visual story. What’s your medium? Collage – vintage magazines and books. What’s the one thing you can’t live without? Glue. What are you currently working on? A piece commissioned by the Saatchi Gallery, it will be on their site soon and will have very limited edition Prints of it as well as the original for sale. Describe your work in 5 words. Simple, complicated, surreal, real, confusing. Describe an average day for you. Breakfast, collage, lunch, collage, dinner, collage. Does the impact of the viewer influence your work and if so how? I’m trying not to worry too much about the viewer, although I want the work to be well received. My main aim is to make work I enjoy making that says something. What led you to become an artist? I’ve always made art since I was a kid, so just immaturity I guess. What’s your strongest memory of your childhood? Getting a picture of mine on Tony Harts gallery! What themes do you pursue? I use a lot of vintage 1950s imagery which has all sorts of connotations....it was an idealistic time with a sinister undercurrent... A lot of the pieces try to hold a mirror up to the differences in the world showing how ridiculous everything is. What jobs have you done other than being an artist? Postman, Graphic / web designer What memorable responses have you had to your work? Getting tens of thousands of views online …which led to me showing my work in the Saatchi Gallery. Click to view our current available Joe Webb editions Read our Biography of Joe Webb If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com Return to our Brighton section $test =
  • Loaded Magazine features artrepublic 'Bloke Art'

    ‘Loaded’ magazine’s September 2012 issue features a glossy six page spread bursting with ‘Bloke Art’ from artrepublic. Our very own Amy Conochie offers her experienced eye to guide readers through the world of affordable prints, art investments and trend setting works.  ....
    ‘Loaded’ magazine’s September 2012 issue features a glossy six page spread bursting with ‘Bloke Art’ from artrepublic. Our very own Amy Conochie offers her experienced eye to guide readers through the world of affordable prints, art investments and trend setting works.  artrepublic suggestions for ‘Loaded’ readers include Richard Burton’s 'Nightmare 1st Marriage’ by Pure Evil, whose rise in popularity has been meteoric following his appearance on ‘The Apprentice.’ A great affordable print featured is Static’s ‘Right Hand Red’ which combines elements of street and fine art in a powerful twist on a game of Twister.   Richard Duardo’s cheeky ‘R U Looking at my Arse?’ looks like a befitting suggestion for the ‘lad’s mag’ article. Whilst Ben Allen’s ‘Union Jack Skull’ adds some popular patriotism to the glossy spread. Loaded chose Kennardphillipps’ ‘Photo Op’, with former PM Tony Blair taking a snap of himself smugly grinning as a war wages behind him, as their top pic declaring that the limited edition “looks cool”.   View all Pure Evil prints View all Richard Duardo prints View all Ben Allen prints  $test =
  • Sir Peter Blake Joins the Tapestry Revival

    It seems as though tapestry is shaking off its dusty image and coming to the forefront as a contemporary art medium. Now Sir Peter Blake and Peter Saville have joined the revival with fantastic loom creations for a major tapestry exhibition ‘Weaving the Century: Tapestry from Dovecot Studios 1912....
    It seems as though tapestry is shaking off its dusty image and coming to the forefront as a contemporary art medium. Now Sir Peter Blake and Peter Saville have joined the revival with fantastic loom creations for a major tapestry exhibition ‘Weaving the Century: Tapestry from Dovecot Studios 1912-2012’. Grayson Perry has recently found something of an affinity with the heavy cloth. He created six tapestries as a riff on William Hogarth’s ‘A Rake’s Progress’ which were charted in a three-part Channel 4 series, ‘In the Best Possible Taste’. He used tapestry to literally weave an exploration of class mobility in contemporary British society. There has also been a recent show of pop art tapestries by Ted Willcox at the Museum of Everything.  The latest textile event to hit the art world is taking place in Edinburgh. Dovecot studios is one of the world’s leading tapestry studios and is celebrating its 100th birthday this year. To mark the occasion they have opened an exhibition, ‘Weaving the Century’, incorporating over sixty iconic tapestries, rugs, and works from Britain and American.  Among the artist-collaborators are no less than Sir Peter Blake, David Hockney, Elizabeth Blackadder and Eduardo Paolozzi. Rarely seen works by Paul Gauguin, Cecil Beaton, Louise Nevelson, Henry Moore and Graham Sutherland will also be on display.  Dovecot was first founded by the Marquess of Bute and the studio evolved from William Morris’ prestigious Merton Abbey Craft Studio. It has continued to forge artistic links. Head weaver Jonathan Cleaver believes artists are drawn to Dovecot’s highly specialised rendering skills. “We don’t use digital technology to match colours”, he says, “We do it all by eye.”  The exhibition, curated by art historian Dr Elizabeth Cumming, will be the first time such a vast collection of works produced by Dovecot has been shown together. New exciting commissions were made for the 2012 Centenary by Peter Saville and Peter Blake. Dovecot has collaborated with Sir Peter Blake to create a collection of signed limited edition tapestries inspired by his iconic designs and with Peter Saville on a tapestry of his re-appropriation of Peter Blake’s appropriation of Sir Edwin Landeer’s 181 painting ‘Monarch of the Glen’.  It is fantastic to see Sir Peter Blake’s work translated into tapestry, his legendary pop art style lending itself readily to the weaver’s skills. The textural dimension created through the painstaking weaving reveals the rich artistic potential of modern tapestry. Equally, Peter Saville’s ‘After After Monarch of the Glen’ has had new life breathed into it by the very act of weaving. Surprisingly though it may seem, the Godfather of British pop has confirmed that tapestry is well and truly making a comeback. View all Peter Blake prints Watch coverage from the BBC Culture Show Image credits: David HockneyA Tapestry made from a Painting, made from a Painting of a Tapestry, made from a Painting (Play within a Play,1st edition) (1969) Weavers: Douglas Grierson, Maureen Hodge, FredMann and Harry Wright Cotton warp, wool © David Hockney. Photo by Richard Schmidt Sir Eduardo Paolozzi Detail: Whitworth Tapestry (1967-8)Cotton warp, wool Weavers: Archie Brennan, Douglas Grierson, Fred Mann, Harry Wright Whitworth Art Gallery, University of Manchester After  Paul Gauguin La Orana Maria (1946)Wool Weavers: Ronald Cruickshank and John Louttit National Museums of Scotland  Peter Blake Based on the ‘I love’ series. On the loom. Completed July 2012.Wool cotton warpWeaver: Naomi Robertson $test =
  • Gustav Klimt Resurrected by Street Art Greats

    This year the master Austrian painter Gustav Klimt would have celebrated his 150th birthday. The Vienna Tourist Board are keen to take advantage and have helped to stage a live art event during which nine internationally renowned street artists create new works inspired by the Klimt’s ic....
    This year the master Austrian painter Gustav Klimt would have celebrated his 150th birthday. The Vienna Tourist Board are keen to take advantage and have helped to stage a live art event during which nine internationally renowned street artists create new works inspired by the Klimt’s iconic art.  The artists taking part are Mode 2, Lucy McLauchlan, Vhils, Ron English, Christian Eisenberger, Bastardilla, Know Hope, and Marlene Hausegger, with pre-made work from Shepard Fairey. Vienna Tourist spokeswoman Astrid Pockfuss believes that street art and Klimt are linked by “a way of doing art differently. Klimt was reinterpreting himself over a period of time — and street artists are quite the same.”  We are looking forward to seeing some contemporary interpretations of Klimt’s rich and imaginative eroticism.  Image credit: Mode 2 at work on his painting in a public garden in London, www.guardian.co.uk View all Gustav Klimt prints View all Graffiti $test =
  • Q&A with Carne Griffiths

    Find out more about Carne Griffiths and his beautifully original style in our Q&A session with him. What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? A desire to explore through drawing and daily visual inspirations is generally what informs my work.  I take a lot of inspiration f....
    Find out more about Carne Griffiths and his beautifully original style in our Q&A session with him. What or who are the main inspirations behind your work? A desire to explore through drawing and daily visual inspirations is generally what informs my work.  I take a lot of inspiration from nature, natural forms, and have researched sacred geometry.  Some of the work focuses on chaos and order, I suppose it is an analogy for both the subject and the process of what I do. There is a lot of destroying, involving chance and then rebuilding that goes on within each piece of work. How do you approach the actual making of a piece? Quite often starting with portraiture, I use it as an anchor to then allow the drawing to build itself.  Many of the pieces I create convey a feeling of awe or wonderment. I try and draw the viewer into the portrait and not just through the surface of the work.  My constant aim is to lose myself in the process of creating.  If I can be totally unaware of large sections of the work I am creating then I consider that a successful part of the process.  What’s your medium? I work with ink and liquids, mainly tea but sometimes with alcohol too. What are you currently working on? I am working towards a series of portraits which look at ancestry, genetics, heritage … that kind of thing.  I have a new visual symbol that has crept into the work over time and I want to explore ways to use it.  It’s interesting how things appear during the drawing process, I am often fascinated by the way people habitually doodle when they are on the phone, they invent a library of shapes and symbols that have a lot more to do with the unconscious mind than they do with the conscious.  I suppose I am trying to balance the two in my work.  What themes do you pursue? Nature is the thing I return to over and over again - particularly floral forms. Does the impact of the viewer influence your work and if so how? Interaction with the viewer is a huge part of the work for me, as is sharing the process and the journey of creating work.  Primarily my work is a personal exploration, but it is important that it connects not only with me but in some way with the viewer.  I suppose the thing that I hold back on with the work is a more abstract exploration of the line.  What memorable responses have you had to your work? I am constantly driven forward by the response to my drawings, and it doesn’t really matter where this comes from.  I feel that there are parts of the work I create that connect with different people, and in different ways, it is a consequence of making the work rather than something I set out to achieve, but I believe that if there is a tiny part of the work that comes from the unconscious, then this is what people are able to tap in to. Describe an average day for you. My days are usually split between studio time and local arts projects.  The studios I am based in have just brought together an exhibition of 35 artists in the common parts of the building, I enjoy co-ordinating these kinds of events.  It’s always great to see a show come together quickly in this way and to use the energy of the artists involved. What led you to become an artist? A burning desire to find out what was inside, I had worked for 12 years as an embroidery designer - drawing every day, but wanted to know what a year’s worth of work would look like and where it would take me.  After a year, I now wonder what is possible with a lifetime’s work, it’s the journey of work that I find the most intriguing and how it aligns to life. What jobs have you done other than being an artist? I served a 2 year apprenticeship as an embroidery designer followed by 10 years working my way up to the position of creative director, most importantly I was drawing every day.  When you took all the admin away and the, management of orders, and design on computer it was perfect!  I have always kept up to speed with technology, I did an MCP after leaving college and have always believed it to be necessary to keep an eye on what is going on in the digital world.  Creatively though I am very traditional although this may change in the future. What makes you angry? A day of being unable to draw When are you happiest? When I am lost in the work What’s the one thing you can’t live without? My Family What superpower would you have and why? Invisibility - I could work anywhere without distraction, the studio can be a pretty lonely place.  To be able to lose yourself in the company of others would be an amazing thing. In another life (if you weren’t an artist) what would you be doing? I would be a scientist, maybe discovering something extraordinarily small that would make a huge difference to the world. Name three artists you’d like to be compared to and why. Andre Masson, Antonin Artaud, Henry Darger. They each have a unique personal world, both beautiful and destructive, but honest.  I would be happy to be compared to any or all of these artists. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? To follow your dreams. If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com  View all Carne Griffiths prints available to buy today from artrepublic.com Return to our Brighton section $test =
  • Export Bar on Placed on Picasso Painting

    The British Government have announced today that a temporary export bar will be put on ‘Child with a Dove’, an early work by Pablo Picasso, in an attempt to keep it in the UK.  The painting was purchased by an unnamed foreign buyer from Christie’s auction house earlier this yea....
    The British Government have announced today that a temporary export bar will be put on ‘Child with a Dove’, an early work by Pablo Picasso, in an attempt to keep it in the UK.  The painting was purchased by an unnamed foreign buyer from Christie’s auction house earlier this year. Now Culture Minister Ed Vaizey has restricted the exportation of the work, which has been displayed in public galleries since the 1970s, in a bid to keep in the country.  The oil painting is an important work from Picasso’s Blue Period painted in 1901, when the master was only 19 years old. There are only five early oil paintings by Picasso in UK public permanent collections and ‘Child with a Dove’ has been declared a work of outstanding significance for the study of Picasso’s early works and artistic development, and British collecting of European avant-garde in the early twentieth century.  Vaizey announced today that the decision on the export licence application would be deferred until the 16th of December. It is hoped that British cultural institutions may collectively be able to raise the funds to keep the painting within the public domain. The painting is estimated to be worth £50 million. $test =
  • Adolf Hitler Golf Art

    The acclaimed art duo Jake and Dinos Chapman have created their latest controversial art work, an effigy of Adolf Hitler. The work is on display at the Grundy Art Gallery in Blackpool as part of the gallery’s ‘Doug Fishbone & Friends Adventureland Golf’ exhibition. The statue of the Fuh....
    The acclaimed art duo Jake and Dinos Chapman have created their latest controversial art work, an effigy of Adolf Hitler. The work is on display at the Grundy Art Gallery in Blackpool as part of the gallery’s ‘Doug Fishbone & Friends Adventureland Golf’ exhibition. The statue of the Fuhrer is one of the crazy golf course installations and as golf balls pass through the sculpture it salutes and screams “Nein!” The show is inspired by Blackpool’s tradition of popular entertainment. Visitors can putt their way around nine ‘holes’, including an animated Saddam Hussein by Doug Fishbone, a desert island by Brian Griffiths, a boarded-up library courtesy of Jonathan Allen, and a ‘builder’s bum’ by Gary Webb.   The Chapman creation has scandalized both Jewish organizations and local residents. Michael Samuels, from the Board of Deputies of British Jews, told The Guardian that the Chapman work was “tasteless” and of “absolutely no artistic value whatsoever.” The gallery has defended the piece claiming that it is a reference to the British wartime spirit of making humour at the Nazi dictator’s expense.  This is not the first work by the Chapman brothers to feature Adolf Hitler. In a 2008 show, titled ‘If Hitler Had Been a Hippy How Happy Would We Be’, the pair exhibited watercolours painted by Hitler himself and transformed with painted rainbows, psychedelic skies, floating love hearts and smiley faces. At the time the brothers said that they were expecting angry actions to the work but denied that the work was offensive or that they were profiting from Hitler’s notoriety.  Image credit: Grundy Art Gallery $test =
  • Elvis Presley continues to inspire art 35 years on

    This week we will be remembering the King of Rock and Roll Elvis Presley, as the 35th anniversary of his death approaches. The iconic figure not only changed the face of music but was the inspiration behind many artistic creations. Since his death in 1977, artists are continuing to create ....
    This week we will be remembering the King of Rock and Roll Elvis Presley, as the 35th anniversary of his death approaches. The iconic figure not only changed the face of music but was the inspiration behind many artistic creations. Since his death in 1977, artists are continuing to create Elvis inspired art. Artists such as Peter Blake, Andy Warhol, Simon Dixon and Trafford Parsons, pay homage to the King of rock n roll through their individual creations of Elvis themed works. Each with such distinctive styles and execution, Elvis Presley continues to motivate art for so many. Peter Blake is well known for his admiration of icons and musical heroes, creating some of the most recognised images in popular culture. His limited edition Elvis inspired pieces are highly regarded and ever so popular.  The passing of a cultural icon has had such an impact on the art world leading to many respected Elvis pieces being produced. Elvis Presley’s legacy lives on and the anniversary of his death could see more works being created. View all Elvis inspired art        $test =

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