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Monthly Archives: July 2011

  • Jamie Reid: Ragged Kingdom

    In what is being billed as his first full-scale installation in 30 years, one of the pioneers and world-renowned artists of punk art has an exhibition in London. Jamie Reid is world renowned for his work with the Sex Pistols, but there is so much more to him as a person and as an artist than thi....
    In what is being billed as his first full-scale installation in 30 years, one of the pioneers and world-renowned artists of punk art has an exhibition in London. Jamie Reid is world renowned for his work with the Sex Pistols, but there is so much more to him as a person and as an artist than this. Reid’s collaboration on the Suburban Press (1971-1975) was an early coalescing of his political convictions and artistic intuition. His output after the implosion of the Sex Pistols extended his artistic drive through many genres - music, publishing and performance. After a long creative residency at the Strongroom Studios in Shoreditch and three years as visual art director for Afro Celt Sound System, he has, for the last ten years, immersed himself in a daily painting practice to explore and reveal the Aspects of the Eightfold Year (www.eightfoldyear.org). The exhibition, titled ‘Ragged Kingdom’, will manifest as a peace camp in our midst - a place to pow-wow. Eight custom-made tipi’s with magical adornments will be drawn up into a protective circle with a ritual space at its axis. Tipi’s traditionally represent shelter, wonderment, harmony, peace, beauty and community. For Ragged Kingdom, each tipi will be a world in itself, internally representing eight aspects of Jamie Reid’s career to date – Suburban Press, The Cat Book, Sex Pistols, How To Become Invisible, Afrocelt/Visual Stress, Strongroom, a Festival of Sleeves and the Eightfold Year. The exterior of the exhibition, held at the Londonewcastle Depot in Islington will feature a giant montage of selected posters, glyphs and symbols produced by Jamie Reid. The exhibition will run for the whole of July. If you are interested in this article and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works and artists we have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section $test =
  • artrepublic to release exclusive Dave White print

    artrepublic is to release a fantastic new Dave White limited edition next Thursday (28th July 2011). The print will be a UK exclusive to artrepublic and will be unveiled at 6pm at our artrepublic Soho gallery in London.  If you would like to attend the evening, please email soho@art....
    artrepublic is to release a fantastic new Dave White limited edition next Thursday (28th July 2011). The print will be a UK exclusive to artrepublic and will be unveiled at 6pm at our artrepublic Soho gallery in London.  If you would like to attend the evening, please email soho@artrepublic.com to be added to the guest list. The print will also be added to the Dave White collection on our website, the same evening. $test =
  • artrepublic customers board the Peter Blake Art Bus

    artrepublic arranged for Sir Peter Blake to attend a dinner and informal Q & A session for our customers in London recently. The event included a reception aboard his spectacular Art Bus.  To hear about future artrepublic events, sign up to our email list. ....
    artrepublic arranged for Sir Peter Blake to attend a dinner and informal Q & A session for our customers in London recently. The event included a reception aboard his spectacular Art Bus.  To hear about future artrepublic events, sign up to our email list. $test =
  • BBC and PFC launches the 'Your Paintings' website putting thousands of the nations paintings online

    The BBC and The Public catalogue foundation have just released the first 63,000 artworks of an epic six year project to catalogue and make available online the 200,000 paintings that belong to the nation. The project will open up access to public owned works that may be held by museums and not b....
    The BBC and The Public catalogue foundation have just released the first 63,000 artworks of an epic six year project to catalogue and make available online the 200,000 paintings that belong to the nation. The project will open up access to public owned works that may be held by museums and not be on display or be in offices, town halls, schools, hospitals and even a lighthouse. The aim is to have an image of each piece as well as a description about the work. The site also includes collections held by national organisations such the National Trust, English Heritage, the Government Art Collection and Arts Council England. The collection includes works by some of the greatest painters of the last 700 years including Francis Bacon, John Constable, Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol to name but a few, as well as paintings by thousands of lesser known artists. It offers a remarkable insight into the history, landscape and culture of the United Kingdom. The public is also being encouraged to get involved in the project with a tagging project open to all. In order to help analysis and searching of the collection the public can go online and tag what they can see in the paintings. Find out more.  Despite the huge scale of the task the project is focusing on paintings only in either oil, tempera, or acrylic. If they were to include watercolours and drawings the number of items would stretch in to the millions.  The Government Art Collection has also just launched a series of exhibitions of its holding at the Whitechapel art gallery. Read our review here. This is just one of any projects worldwide that are utilising the internet to improve our access to art. Google has recently launched Art Project, which applies its Streetview approach to the world's most famous galleries. This allows users to take a virtual stroll around the likes of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam or New York's MoMA. View the Your Paintings website artzine your guide to everything that’s happening in the art world $test =
  • Charming Baker: Every Thing Must Go

    Charming Baker has had a string of international sell-out shows and amongst his legions of fans is a certain Mr Damien Hirst. Central London is the place to be this week as we gear up for the latest offering from the formidable self-governed artist and bonafide hot art ticket. ....
    Charming Baker has had a string of international sell-out shows and amongst his legions of fans is a certain Mr Damien Hirst. Central London is the place to be this week as we gear up for the latest offering from the formidable self-governed artist and bonafide hot art ticket. His work is figurative, painterly and traditional, yet even with the prettiest, pink-bowed bunny there resonates such unease. What can appear to be tiny bubbles floating around the rabbit's neck for example are in fact the imprints of shrapnel. Baker's reputation as an 'urban artist' is probably down to his preferred use of a shotgun in many of his original works, but also his use of mark-making, inspired by the boards retrieved from skips, often drilled with holes, that he painted on before he could afford canvases. In all fairness however, Charming Baker’s work is not ‘urban’ as we would associate the term with, say, graffiti art, but it does have a very raw essence to it. Something that reverberates even more so given that it is fine art painting, and very good painting at that. For his new exhibition Every Thing Must Go, we are sure to see not only a sell-out of all works, but undoubtedly a new benchmark set for his prices. They are on the up and they don’t appear to be slowing. The show will be like walking into a sweetshop, he says. 'I want it to be charming, reminiscent of old fashioned cartoons.' Baker's juxtaposition of nostalgia with sex and death is grown-up and playful, his work hauntingly beautiful and intentionally bothersome. 'There's an impulse to understand' he says, 'but there's also a simplicity I love about a painting; there it is, so simple and with so much meaning. There's a lot of death in this show.' Why? 'Because it's looming. I see my parents getting old. Of course death poses the question of whether it's worth doing anything, but the answer is yes, because the moment is intensely important: the present transcends all knowledge of dark stuff.' Baker certainly takes risks, not only painting dogs and boats and rabbits that could be ridiculed, but with the new darkness that pervades his latest work. In Not All The Things I Have Are All The Things I Want, he has painted two dead 'junky lovers' taken from forensic photographs posted online as warnings by bereaved parents. Charming Baker works outside the gallery system, with a team of managers and promoters, but says he has no problem with galleries. Pat Magnarella, one of America's most successful music managers (Green Day; Goo Goo Dolls) has been behind Baker since 2009, promoting him in the same way he promotes bands. Shows are publicised like a record campaign, via fly posters, postcards and emails, and the private views are rock and roll: hip venues, club DJs, a proper bar and the beau monde in attendance.  Every Thing Must Go is open to the public from the 8th July on Mercer Street, only a stone’s throw from our London gallery, in the heart of Covent Garden. Click to view our current available Charming Baker editions If you would like further information of available works or to enquire about other works and artist’s we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section artzine your guide to everything that’s happening in the art world $test =
  • American abstract expressionist Cy Twombly dies aged 83

    US artist Cy Twombly who was known for his abstract works using oil paint, pencil and crayon has died in Rome.   Edwin Parker Twombly Jr was born in Virginia, USA in 1928. He studied in New York when abstract expressionism was at its height. This is where he met Robert Rauschenber....
    US artist Cy Twombly who was known for his abstract works using oil paint, pencil and crayon has died in Rome.   Edwin Parker Twombly Jr was born in Virginia, USA in 1928. He studied in New York when abstract expressionism was at its height. This is where he met Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns and became part of group of emerging young American artists. In 1957, he moved from America to Rome. Here Twombly turned to the traditional sources of Western art: Greek and Roman antiquity and the Renaissance which surrounded him in the city. During this time he began exploring the techniques of free association and spontaneity developed by the Surrealists by practising drawing in the dark. He then started to add words and verse into his paintings with graffiti-like scribbles which became a hallmark of his work, as did the scratches, over-painting, drips and rubbings-out.  Cy Twombly once said the process felt more like "having an experience than making a picture". Twombly's work has been dismissed as second rate and described by one detractor, Bernard Levin, simply as 'silly scribblings'. Yet Twombly has a major international reputation, with his paintings changing hands for huge sums.  He continued to work through out his life and in 2010 was the first artist since the 1950’s to paint to a ceiling in the Louvre. The Dulwich Picture gallery is currently running an exhibition featuring Twombly and Poussin which examines how, although separated by three centuries, these two artists nonetheless engaged with the same sources and will explore the overlapping subjects that the two artists have shared. Read more about Cy Twombly in our artists Biography Read our review of Twombly and Poussin: Arcadian Painters $test =
  • New silkscreen limited edition from Hush

    We have just got this amazing new print in from graffiti artist Hush. Twin Light is an amazingly detailed nine colour silkscreen with a gold metallic layer and 3 varnish layers, and as if that wasn’t enough it has also been hand finished with spay paint and acrylic. An edition of just 1....
    We have just got this amazing new print in from graffiti artist Hush. Twin Light is an amazingly detailed nine colour silkscreen with a gold metallic layer and 3 varnish layers, and as if that wasn’t enough it has also been hand finished with spay paint and acrylic. An edition of just 100 we think these will be flying out the door so get yours quickly. View all Hush prints $test =
  • Sell art in the city by the sea

    The artrepublic Brighton gallery is currently looking to hire a Senior Sales Consultant.  If you would like to sell art in one of the most culturally thriving cities in the UK and live and work by the sea, find out more. ....
    The artrepublic Brighton gallery is currently looking to hire a Senior Sales Consultant.  If you would like to sell art in one of the most culturally thriving cities in the UK and live and work by the sea, find out more. $test =
  • Spotlight on Eric Ravilious's paintings of chalk figures

    Eric Ravilious was a talented watercolourist, wood engraver, lithographer and designer. He adored the Sussex Downs and tirelessly recorded its changing rural scene. He visited Sussex and the Downs regularly staying at his friend Peggy Angus cottage Furlongs. Eric Ravilious painted his chalk figure....
    Eric Ravilious was a talented watercolourist, wood engraver, lithographer and designer. He adored the Sussex Downs and tirelessly recorded its changing rural scene. He visited Sussex and the Downs regularly staying at his friend Peggy Angus cottage Furlongs. Eric Ravilious painted his chalk figures series in the period before and after the outbreak of the Second World War and they can be interpreted as symbols of Englishness and defiance, as well an evocation of the man-made in a natural setting. As with so many of Eric Ravilious’s landscapes they are devoid of humans but filled with the impact of humans in the landscape such as fences, trains and even the chalk figures themselves, which should soon vanish without regular maintenance. Eric Ravilious’s first chalk figure was a woodcut used for the Lanston monotype almanack in 1929 featuring the Long Man of Wilmington. Ten years later he came back to the Wilmington Giant and began panting a series of watercolours featuring chalk figures whilst on leave from his war work at Castle Hedingham. His series also included the Uffington White Horse, the Cerne Abbas Giant, and the Weymouth and Westbury horses. The Westbury Horse features in two watercolours one of the horse with a train in the background and one entitled ‘Train Landscape’ where the chalk figure is glimpsed thought the carriage window. Interestingly this piece had originally featured the Wilmington Giant, but Ravilious was unhappy with the composition and added the new image over the top. The white horse of Uffington is the oldest chalk figure painted by Ravilous and has been dated to the Bronze Age, circa 1000 BC. The Wilmington Giant and Cerne Abbas Giant are of a more in determinate age. Some say the Wilmington Giant is of great antiquity, and represents a Celtic god, similar to the Roman god Janus, who stands at the doorway to the celestial year. However, recent excavations at the foot of the hill suggest a much more recent date in the late 16th or early 17th century.  Both the Weymouth and Westbury horses are more contempory and date from the eighteenth century.   No matter how old they may be the chalk figures still have a huge impact on people who see them and the purpose of many still remains a mystery to this day.  The Uffington white horse has inspired the art of Henry Moore and the poetry of Chesterton and even appeared on the Nirvana In Utero album cover. Eric Ravilious had intended to use his chalk figures as a children's book for series of Puffin Picture Books, but sadly this project was never realised as he died in 1942. artzine your guide to everything that’s happening in the art world $test =

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