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Monthly Archives: December 2010

  • Sir Peter Blake's Auction Prices Rocket

    Peter Blake is once again the talk of the British Pop Art World, this time for the amazing price achieved at auction for his original artwork: 'Loelia, World's Most Tattooed Lady'. The original painting, which was produced by Blake in 1955 while a student at the Royal College of Art began procee....
    Peter Blake is once again the talk of the British Pop Art World, this time for the amazing price achieved at auction for his original artwork: 'Loelia, World's Most Tattooed Lady'. The original painting, which was produced by Blake in 1955 while a student at the Royal College of Art began proceedings at Christie’s auction house, London with an estimate of £100,000-£150,000 and ending up with an astonishing hammer price of £335,000. The piece displays motifs and methods that would become central to Blake's art: his fascination with fairground, circus and folk art, the inclusion of popular magazine-style illustrations and old-fashioned typography. Blake's biographer Marco Livingstone, who wrote the book ‘One Man Show’, describes the piece as 'a multi-layered proto-Pop painting which occupies a key position in the history of British Pop Art'. This is undoubtedly an iconic piece by the artist, but in fetching more than double its estimate marks an increasing interest in 20th Century British artworks. It has often been said that British Pop artists are massively undervalued compared to their American colleagues, historically this has certainly been true for Sir Peter Blake. However, it seems that collectors are waking up to the importance of the British Pop art movement. In recent times there has been a huge disproportion in prices achieved by Blake in comparison with Andy Warhol for example, encouraging collectors to buy up British Pop Art at an 'affordable' price. This resurgence of interest has been gathering momentum over the last few years and such activity is gradually inflating prices. It is therefore perfectly sensible to expect equality in market value as this activity increases. It would certainly appear that collectors are realising the investment potential of British Pop Art. artrepublic has one of the largest collections of Peter Blake limited editions for sale. To view our entire range of Peter Blake artworks click here. If you are interested in Peter Blake and/or British art and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section $test =
  • £50million Unseen Picasso's Discovered in a Garage

    A huge cache of canvases painted by Pablo Picasso nearly 100 years ago were unveiled for the first time by a French man who claimed the art works were gifted to him by the legend. The collection of 271 paintings, drawings, sketches and lithographs, many of which were previously unknown, dates fro....
    A huge cache of canvases painted by Pablo Picasso nearly 100 years ago were unveiled for the first time by a French man who claimed the art works were gifted to him by the legend. The collection of 271 paintings, drawings, sketches and lithographs, many of which were previously unknown, dates from 1900 to 1932. The extraordinary works of Picasso, worth more than 50 million pounds, were found at the home of a retired French electrician. The revelation came when Pierre Le Guennec an electrician in his 70s, approached the office of the Picasso Administration, which manages the artist’s legacy, seeking certificate of authenticity of the artefacts. There he produced a 175 different works including two notebooks containing 97 previously unseen drawings, along with 59 photographs of other pieces that, he claimed, were by Picasso. The artworks include nine cubist collages worth at least 40 million euros, a painting from his celebrated blue period, drawings and models for some of his most important works and portraits of his first wife, the Russian ballerina Olga Khokhlova. Experts said many of the paintings are from the period between 1900 and 1932, when the young and penniless Picasso arrived in France from Barcelona to the beginning of his recognition as one of the world’s greatest artists. The electrician said Picasso had given him the pieces after he installed alarm systems at the painter’s various homes, including the mill at Notre Dame de Vie in Mougins, where Picasso died in 1973. Claude Picasso, the late painter’s son, who represents the artist’s heirs and estate, said the collection has a “historic importance” as it was produced during a “crucial period; a revolutionary movement in art”. Want to see Picasso's more familiar work...click here. Return to our London section $test =
  • The Comic Book in Art

    Inspired by the latest limited edition release from Sir Peter Blake ‘A Convention of Comic Book Characters’ we take a brief look at the genre of ‘comic book’ in contemporary and urban art. Coupled with the prominent rise of street art into mainstream culture over the last decade has been....
    Inspired by the latest limited edition release from Sir Peter Blake ‘A Convention of Comic Book Characters’ we take a brief look at the genre of ‘comic book’ in contemporary and urban art. Coupled with the prominent rise of street art into mainstream culture over the last decade has been the re-emergence of comic book art and design as both subject and inspiration to the cutting-edge art scene. An aspect that has provoked something of a trickle-up effect in contemporary art with the likes of Peter Blake now releasing work centred on his own playful take on the subject. In essence the primary link between the genres of comic book and cutting-edge art is that the basis in both is a narrative centred on social, political or economic events, fed of course by daily news. American comics were first printed in the colour supplements of Sunday newspapers more than 100 years ago. The people who created them became immensely successful and reached a larger audience than any other medium at the time something true of the modern day limited edition. Even from the earliest days, their images were sophisticated and often multilayered in meaning - able to entertain child and adult alike. This is a key similarity between comic books and cutting-edge art – the ability to cross cultures and age groups to reach a much wider audience. Contemporary art and street art has naturally adapted its position from that of 100 years ago, now often referring to overt shock tactics and imagery that must grab attention, instantly. Ultimately, it was street art‘s emergence within galleries where the relationship between the comic book strip and the mainstream art world have combined so well. The huge popularity and culture of comics and graphic novels has naturally spawned into limited editions. The current generation of artists and collectors is one whose childhood was fuelled in part by the heroes and villains that originally starred in comic books, so as a subject it has a resonance with current society. For the commercial artist the comic book must now be seen as more a source of inspiration and subject matter rather than that of the street artist who arguably still adopts a similar ethos as that of the original comic artists: reflecting upon and telling their momentary version of the current news. If you are interested in graphic art and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works we have in the gallery please call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com (images featured by artists D*Face, Pure Evil, David Spiller, Miss Bugs and Peter Blake) Return to our London section $test =

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