Monthly Archives: July 2010

  • A closer look at David Hockney

    Description With a touring exhibition of David Hockneys’s 1969 etchings illustrating the 6 fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm starting this month we thought we should take a close look his long and ever evolving career. David Hockney, a giant of the 20th century art landscape,  rose to p....
    Description With a touring exhibition of David Hockneys’s 1969 etchings illustrating the 6 fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm starting this month we thought we should take a close look his long and ever evolving career. David Hockney, a giant of the 20th century art landscape,  rose to prominence in the 1960’s, and has remained at the forefront of the art world ever since.   He was a pivotal figure in the early Pop Art movement alongside contemporaries such as Peter Blake and Richard Hamilton. Hockney is perhaps still best known for his seminal piece A Bigger Splash (1967), however his work in landscape painting, portraiture and elsewhere has been celebrated for much of the last 50 years.  His work has embraced a rich tapestry of influences from cubism and impressionism, through to photography and computer technology as well as his investigations into the techniques used by the Old Masters as presented in the 2001 television program and book Secret Knowledge. More recently, his relocation from Los Angeles to West Yorkshire, his birthplace and home during in his formative years, has inspired a return to landscape painting.  Utilizing his famous ‘joiners’ technique he has created work on a grand scale such as Bigger Trees Near Warter Or/Ou Peinture Sur Le Motif Pour Le Nouvel Age Post-Photographique exhibited to much acclaim at the Royal Academy’s Summer Exhibition in 2007.   This most recent work portrays the West Yorkshire landscape with breathtaking depth of compassion and perspective, and arguably will eventually take its place among the finest landscape paintings in  history.  This new, reinvigorated phase in his career is certain to cement Hockney’s place among other luminaries of European art such as Pablo Picasso and Francis Bacon.  At over 70 he continues Hockney’s prolific output of work and shows no signs of slowing down. He is currently working toward a mammoth show of landscapes for the Royal Academy in London, to open in January 2012. The touring show of David Hockeny’s etchings illustrating the 6 fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm is organized by the Hayward gallery and will be at the following venues 18 July - 5 September 2010Royal West of England Academy, Bristol, 11 September - 10 October 2010, Lime Tree Gallery, Fort William, 16 October - 14 November 2010, North London Collegiate School, Edgware. $test =
  • Spotlight on Copyright

    As we have some new very small editions and beautiful one off originals by Copyright, we thought we would take a close look at the artist and how he creates his work. Copyright went to art school but he was studying photography and got into painting by using other students materials.  His sty....
    As we have some new very small editions and beautiful one off originals by Copyright, we thought we would take a close look at the artist and how he creates his work. Copyright went to art school but he was studying photography and got into painting by using other students materials.  His style combines graffiti art and more traditional styles, using spay paint, stencils, collage and paintbrushes to create his beautifully detailed and textured originals. He even extends this to his limited editions where the silkscreen prints are often hand finished with spray paints and or acrylic.  Copyright’s early works with female figures often featured Kate Moss, but now he says they are no longer based on one person. He creates the composition and pose he wants using an archive of images of body parts that he has built up, rather than having a singe person model. He started putting up pink roses, which still feature even now in his work when he moved to London. “The pink roses are a really quick, really simple way to make a shitty wall look nicer. In that way they just symbolise beauty in the darkest places.” Copyright Copyrights paintings represent ideals from the modern world and culture, portrayed within classic imagery of simple beauty, often depicted by butterflies, flowers and beautiful women. He wants to convey the contradiction of idealism and unattainable visions of beauty found in fashion, music and popular culture. His work has now made the transition form ephemeral street works to works you can take home and keep on your walls forever. Watch this space for more exciting things to come from Copyright. All pictures Copyright © C R Thomas 2005-2010. All rights reserved $test =
  • Ben Eine gets his work into the Whitehouse

    Twenty First Century City by Ben Eine was among the official gifts to Barack Obama from David Cameron on his first trip to Washington as prime minister, and has catapulted the artist into the media spotlight. The work, Twenty First Century City was hanging in our London gallery until th....
    Twenty First Century City by Ben Eine was among the official gifts to Barack Obama from David Cameron on his first trip to Washington as prime minister, and has catapulted the artist into the media spotlight. The work, Twenty First Century City was hanging in our London gallery until the Ben Eine came to pick it up last week. Even Ben did not know exactly who the recipient would be but was asked if he would be interested in David Cameron having one of his paintings to give to a powerful American man as a gift.  It was a recent collaboration with Anya Hindmarch on a designer bag that first bough his work to the attention of Samantha Cameron. As a result of the gift Ben Eine has received a huge amount of media attention and increased interest in his work Ben Eine last came to the media's attention when he persuaded the shopkeepers of Middlesex Street in Spitalfields to allow him to paint the entire alphabet, in his trademark vibrant, cheerful colours, on their closed security shutters. His work can also be seen in Tokyo, New York, Los Angeles and Paris, as well as Brighton and Hastings, where he now lives. Ben Eine is not just a master graffiti artist though he is also the man behind the printing of some of the most iconic works to come out of the Pictures on Walls studio over the last five years. Eine’s screen printing skills have helped produce some of street arts most sort after prints from arguably the greatest street artist on the planet including Banksy, Faile and his own work. In exchange President Obama gave David Cameron a signed lithograph by Ed Ruscha, a major American Pop Artist who recently had a retrospective exhibition and the Hayward gallery. See all Ben Eine works available from artrepublic Read about Ben Eines L.A. show The A-Z of Change Read about Ben Eines World Record Attempt Read about Ben Eines show at the ink_d gallery Return to our Brighton or London sections $test =
  • Start Your Art Collection

    Now is a great time to begin collecting art. It is just one of the most fun experiences you could have and as you’ll see it doesn’t have to cost a fortune to get going so start you art collection today. Not only can art be an investment but it can also in be an enjoyable experience in the fo....
    Now is a great time to begin collecting art. It is just one of the most fun experiences you could have and as you’ll see it doesn’t have to cost a fortune to get going so start you art collection today. Not only can art be an investment but it can also in be an enjoyable experience in the form of collecting, watching artists flourish and attending exhibitions and art fairs; buying art is an experience and not one that ends quickly. Couple this with financial incentive schemes such the Art Council’s Own Art and suddenly wanting can be transformed into the reality of owning a piece of affordable contemporary art; even with the purse strings tightened. Here is artrepublic Soho’s current pick of great, affordable starter pieces if you are looking to put something aside, begin a collection or just do something fun and more interesting with your money that is not too much of a gamble. There is only one strict rule to abide by…only buy it if you like it. Imbue – Heart of Gold (original) & Pinky – Love (original) If you are looking to begin a collection and do not want to jump straight in at the financial deep end, then purchasing younger, up-and coming artists originals can be a great way to start. Originals will always be in demand because of the often unique nature of them. The sky is limit with originals…even Picasso sold his paintings for peanuts at some stage. It is the element of time that is on your side. These pieces, for example, from Imbue and Pinky are part of a new body of work, some of which has already sold, that is affordable, attractive and are well made.  Damien Hirst – Small Butterflies Most Hirst works can set you back a sizable sum, which is fine, he is an established artist. This is the perception that is attached to Hirst’s name. Not so with these. They are only £2250 (£2000 is eligible for Own Art scheme), hand signed and there are only 75 produced of each colour butterfly in the world. These are beautiful little pieces from one of the biggest contemporary artists on the planet. Peter Blake Blake is truly a legend in the art world, especially the British scene, and this brings us to another element to investing and/or collecting in art: the name. Whereas purchasing up-and-coming artists is relatively cheaper (you are paying for a more unknown) a name is often more of a guarantee for the work to hold its value. Blake is probably the best artist on the market for this. His work is very popular, people just want to have it on their wall and he is a very well established artist. We have a huge range or work by Peter Blake in our London gallery to suite a variety of budgets. In all, if you buy what you like and hang it on your wall because you like it then as a collector you cannot go wrong. As a well established gallery for nearly 20 years we are well placed to offer advice and help make an informed decision. If you are interested in this article and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works and artists we have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section $test =
  • Spotlight on Peter Blake

    Sir Peter Blake has been producing some amazing new pieces recently so we thought we would highlight just some of the gems you can find in our Brighton gallery. Sir Peter Blake is one of the leading figures in British pop art. Best known for the iconic album cover for the Beatles ‘Sergeant Pep....
    Sir Peter Blake has been producing some amazing new pieces recently so we thought we would highlight just some of the gems you can find in our Brighton gallery. Sir Peter Blake is one of the leading figures in British pop art. Best known for the iconic album cover for the Beatles ‘Sergeant Pepper’, Blake’s work is inspired by his love affair with icons and the ephemera of popular culture.  His career spans from the birth of pop art in the 1960’s up until the present day. Here is a close look at just some of the great new pieces by Peter Blake you will find in or Brighton gallery. ‘I Love You’ are four amazing prints first previewed during the Brighton festival when the Art Bus came to Brighton and Peter Blake delivered a lunch time talk. Made up of a variety of different letters they reflect Peter Blakes love of collecting all sorts of ephemeral items which he then selects and combines into many of his eclectic works. Each one of these amazing is created with 15 colour silkscreens plus gold and silver leaf and embossing.  Two of the prints are also finished with diamond dust for that extra touch of glamour. We have one set of all four prints with matching numbers and a great pair of framed diamond dust white and black I Love You’s on the wall of our Brighton gallery. Destroy ‘The Motif Suite’ is a wonderful new collection of four stunning digitally printed tin plates. The four motifs are Rainbow, Heart, Target and Star each one singed by Peter Blake and in an edition of 25. The images are classic Peter Blake and are produced by the same publishers as the more affordable ‘I Love London’ and ‘I Love Recycling’. These bold and colourful pop art images will brighten up any home long after the summer has gone. Destroy The final set of works we are highlighting is the Star series. Featuring a range of stars from Kate Moss to the Beatles these are incredibly detailed and each one is in a singed edition of 100. The background of worn wood has been reproduced with such a detailed silkscreen that looks just like the real thing!  On top of this is the photo of the star and then underneath the diamond dust covered star. UK customers can also spread the cost of these new pieces with Own Art. Destroy For further details or to purchase any of the pieces featured in this article please call the Brighton Gallery on 01273 724829. See all works by Peter Blake available on artrepublic.com Read our Peter Blake biography Return to our Brighton section $test =
  • Peter Kennard: Photo-Op

    At the opening of Tate Britain’s latest exhibition 'Rude Britannia', which takes a retrospective view on British Comic Art, artrepublic Soho’s radar went off as we noticed, taking pride of place, Peter Kennard's classic image ‘Photo-Op’.  Destroy Time....
    At the opening of Tate Britain’s latest exhibition 'Rude Britannia', which takes a retrospective view on British Comic Art, artrepublic Soho’s radar went off as we noticed, taking pride of place, Peter Kennard's classic image ‘Photo-Op’.  Destroy Time for our own look back at an artwork that will prove a defining piece of British history… Peter Kennard (born 17 February 1949) is widely considered to be the leading exponent of photomontage. Seeking to reflect his involvement in the anti-Vietnam War movement, he turned from his earlier love of painting to photomontage to better address his political views. Destroy He is best known for the images he created for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND) in the 1970s-80s and subsequent politically-infused art culminating in Photo-Op as arguably his best known piece to date. His work is displayed as part of Tate Britain's permanent collection. Destroy What is Photo-Op: It shows Tony Blair, in shirt and tie, grinning hard, as he takes his own photo. But behind him the scene is entirely filled with the smoke and fire of a massive explosion, blowing the desert apart. Its detonation seems to be simultaneous with Blair's snap. The figure of a self-snapping Blair was extracted from a news photo (originally, what he had behind him was a group of children and naval cadets). The picture is a great coup. It catches Blair at his most Blairite – the casually contemporary guy, the publicity narcissist, in full grimace. And the whole scene is very nearly believable. It delivers a brilliant insult, in the way that it manages to condense a lot of suspicions about Blair's character and priorities. And it plays a neat pictorial practical joke (which even a viewer who didn't share those suspicions might enjoy). In all ‘Photo-Op’ has to be the best and most adept critique of a prime minister and conflict, all rolled into one, that we have come across in the post 9/11 years. Destroy Our selection of Peter Kennard’s artwork and his collaborations with Cat Picton-Phillipps are becoming increasingly rare. There are still some signed Photo-Op limited editions remaining however. Enquire with the gallery for more information. If you are interested in this article and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works and artists we have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com. Return to our London section $test =
  • Spotlight on Ophelia by John Everett Millais

    As researcher Barbara Webb reveals she has pin-pointed the location where John Everett Millais painted the background for Ophelia we take a closer look at this iconic and enchanting Pre-Raphaelite painting. After 18 months of detailed research, Barbara Webb has revealed that Six Acre Meadow on the....
    As researcher Barbara Webb reveals she has pin-pointed the location where John Everett Millais painted the background for Ophelia we take a closer look at this iconic and enchanting Pre-Raphaelite painting. After 18 months of detailed research, Barbara Webb has revealed that Six Acre Meadow on the west bank at the bottom of the Manor House garden in Old Malden was the spot where Millais did his detailed studies for the background of Ophelia. Ophelia still remains one of the most popular paintings in the Tate collection, and the story of its creation has captured the imagination as much as the final paintings beauty. Destroy Shakespeare was a popular subject for Victorian painters and Ophelia is a character in Hamlet. She is driven mad when her father, Polonius, is murdered by her lover, Hamlet. She dies while still very young in grief and madness. The events shown in Millais's Ophelia are not actually seen on stage. Instead they are referred to in a conversation between Queen Gertrude and Ophelia's brother Laertes. Gertrude describes how Ophelia fell into the river whilst picking flowers and slowly drowned, singing all the while. Most of the flowers in Ophelia are included either because they are mentioned in the play, or for their symbolic value. Millais observed these flowers growing wild by the river. Because he painted the river scene over a period of five months, flowers appear next to those that bloom at different times of the year. Millais always painted direct from nature itself with great attention to detail. The flowers are real, individual flowers and he has shown the dead and broken leaves as well as the flowers in full bloom. The pre-Raphaelite brotherhood like other art movements of the time would work outside and produce sketches, which they would then take back to their studio and use as reference to create a larger finished painting, and this is how Millais created the amazingly detailed background.   The model for Ophelia was Elizabeth Siddall, who featured in several Pre-Raphaelite paintings and became Dante Gabriel Rossetti muse and wife.  She posed for Millais in a very fine silver embroidered dress (bought by Millais from a second-hand shop) and lay in a bath full of water to create the effect of Ophelia lying in the river. To keep the water warm some oil lamps were placed underneath unfortunately on one occasion Millais was so engrossed by his painting that he didn't notice the lamps went out. As a result of this rather extreme modelling Elizabeth became quite ill. Elizabeth's father was furious that his precious daughter had treated this way and ordered Millais to pay the medical bills. However she recovered quickly. Sadly Elizabeth Siddall died in 1862 of a laudanum overdose. Millais's image of the tragic death of Ophelia has continued to enchant the public from the day it was first shown to today. $test =

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