Monthly Archives: May 2010

  • Stars on the Rise: Prefab77

    The unique work of Prefab77 has been championed by artrepublic for the last few years and after selling out every print they’ve produced it’s time to spread the word on their fantastic, very anti-establishment, art. Prefab77 are a collective of artists based in the North East of England, lea....
    The unique work of Prefab77 has been championed by artrepublic for the last few years and after selling out every print they’ve produced it’s time to spread the word on their fantastic, very anti-establishment, art. Prefab77 are a collective of artists based in the North East of England, leaving New York in 2001 just as the dust was settling from the fallout of 9/11 and relocating to Newcastle upon Tyne. The area they are now based is steeped in a volatile history of unions, struggles and movements which heavily influences their work creating fast, hard-edged, stripped down artwork; often political, anti-establishment and always beautiful. They weave small bites of modern popular culture, vintage NME headlines, pure British rock 'n' rebellion into traditional iconic British imagery. Through their art Prefab77 seem to have done what few other 21st century post-punk artists have achieved; creating an aesthetic that is inherently punk, harking back to the movement that produced art from the likes of Jamie Reid et al, without actually mimicking the look of the work from that era. Their work could easily be described as neo-punk and where as artists such as Banksy led the way with a staunch antiwar, anti military occupation message (mainly in response to current affairs at the time) Prefab77 are creating images that respond equally to today’s affairs: that of our domestic political situation and general disillusionment towards being British and exactly what this means. They found that they had something profound to say that they couldn’t do through the time tested exchange of design/money/food that is the design industry, so PREFAB was born, a voice to their desires, frustrations and grumpiness. Prefab’s work offers a reflection on all our popped aspirations of achieving wealth. Our houses are barely worth the price of the lawn feed we bought for them. No more cheap goods, no more cheap oil, no more sunny summers and no more cheap fuel…welcome to the world of Prefab77. If you are interested in this article and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works and artists we have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com $test =
  • New Ways of Seeing: A Debut Solo Exhibition from Static

    It’s official, artrepublic Soho have teamed up with the dynamic art duo Static from 28th May for three weeks to proudly present their debut art exhibition ‘New Ways of Seeing’ to the public at our London gallery in New Compton Street.. ‘New Ways of Seeing’, is the eagerly awaited fir....
    It’s official, artrepublic Soho have teamed up with the dynamic art duo Static from 28th May for three weeks to proudly present their debut art exhibition ‘New Ways of Seeing’ to the public at our London gallery in New Compton Street.. ‘New Ways of Seeing’, is the eagerly awaited first solo exhibition from Static and features an entirely new body of work from the artists. View the works on display at the 'New Ways of Seeing' show. Static became artists in residence for a week whilst they completely customised and transformed every square inch of the two-floor gallery space, creating not only the perfect backdrop in which to show the work, but also offering a completely unique experience that will transport the viewer into the world in which the work is set. The title of the show is taken from the highly regarded book and TV series 'Ways of Seeing' by John Berger circa 1972. Its aim is to demystify the art world and unveil the tricks used by advertisers to encourage us to buy their products. The series and book looks to criticise traditional Western cultural aesthetics by raising questions about hidden ideologies in visual images. Static’s work has always been in response to current affairs and this show will be no different as it responds to and reworks themes that were explored through the original text, inviting us all to re-evaluate our perception of the society we are part of and the hypocrisy that surrounds us on day-to-day basis. One of Static’s most recognizable images to date is of the Chinook Chandelier, created in response to the Ministry of Defence’s £500 million purchase of 8 MK3 Chinook helicopters that were not fit for purpose and described by an official auditor as "one of the most incompetent procurements of all time". Static utilisation of the gallery space will essentially be split into two main themes: -    The 'Fight for the Right' series which will uphold their satirical approach to history by focusing on the eternal struggle of society to be seen and heard when confronted with social, political and economic injustice; raising a laugh as well as a few question marks.  -    'The Luxury Vandals' collection explores the idea of street art’s desirability and commercialisation within the consumer market context. Including beautifully crafted leather cased aerosol cans and glass caskets containing Static's personal collection of hand painted spent cans. The mix of fine art and street style has never looked so good. Static’s prowess on the art world was amplified this year with the ‘Luxury Vandals (Anarchy)’ original more than doubling its expected sales price at the recent Dreweatts Urban Contemporary Art Auction causing frenzy amongst London’s elite buyers. If you are interested in this article and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works and artists we have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section See all the works in the show $test =
  • Spotlight On: Stik

    For the first time since his debut print release this year we focus our attention on an artist whose simple yet multi-dimensional figure work has tied comparisons to Julian Opie: this is Stik. Stik, in essence, is a muralist and he’s been painting walls in East London for the last 1....
    For the first time since his debut print release this year we focus our attention on an artist whose simple yet multi-dimensional figure work has tied comparisons to Julian Opie: this is Stik. Stik, in essence, is a muralist and he’s been painting walls in East London for the last 10 years. Stik started out by spotting likely looking walls, sketching and planning his ideas for them and then getting the job done as quickly as possible before the police found him. That was then, these days the savvy owners of bookshops, galleries, cafes and social centres in both London and Bristol are commissioning him to paint their walls. For the first time he’s started to rent a studio and to sell canvases and sculptures through galleries and is walking through the door Banksy opened a few years back; that which leads to the art world proper. Click here to see Stik painting a wall just behind our London gallery. Stik’s deceptively simple, yet expressive trademark stick people seem almost to have been shaped by the constraints of his working environments. They are defiantly human, reflective and introspective when contrasted with their noisy urban habitat. “Quite often, simple images are the most noted. If I’ve got too many lines, I kind of lose track of what’s going on. I like to have very few things going on, but a lot of data compression in that. This arm’s got three bends in it and I think about the way it conveys movement. Beauty is in movement. That’s what it’s about.” Stik has stashed heaps of sketch books ‘in the back of the cupboard’ simply filled with ideas until he sees the perfect wall or commission for them. This suggests a long process of rumination, and yet the conditions he works in mean that all his planning has to culminate in a lightning fast execution.“ I get a separate hardback sketch book for each project and fill it full of ideas, notes and anything I can glean. On the day, I gather up all my spray paints and my sketchbook and go. When I paint, I leave as little to chance as possible, but the bits I do leave to chance often define the piece.” Stik has an almost Zen like preparation and planning process and has trained his mind so that he is often able to take advantage of chance factors in his environment. In London this March during the snow he was able to create large scale temporary works whilst the surface of the roads was still pristine. If you are interested in this article and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works and artists we have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section $test =

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