Monthly Archives: November 2009

  • artrepublic and Streetsmart launch 'Street Art' at The Ivy Loft

    Last Thursday 26th November saw artrepublic team up with the homeless charity StreetSmart to invade the sumptuous Ivy Loft Club and officially launch the competition ‘Street Art’, and what a grand night it was. If you don’t already know about Street Art, it is a national art com....
    Last Thursday 26th November saw artrepublic team up with the homeless charity StreetSmart to invade the sumptuous Ivy Loft Club and officially launch the competition ‘Street Art’, and what a grand night it was. If you don’t already know about Street Art, it is a national art competition open to everyone. All you have to do is create an original ‘Street Art’ image that makes a positive contribution to the urban environment and raises awareness of the homeless situation in the UK. The entries are all being judged and mulled-over by global street art names and legends Inkie, Pure Evil, Static and Ben Eine. The winning applicant, in addition to having their work pasted up in a huge scale in both London and Brighton, will see their piece made into a limited edition print to go on sale with all proceeds going to the Streetsmart charity for the homeless. Thursday 26th was the official launch and it was certainly done so in style. The Ivy was completely packed full of supporters of the cause, art appreciators and those who simply just wanted to have a cheeky drink and meet with the judges.On the night raffle tickets were sold to enter into a draw to win a limited print kindly donated by gallery friend Pete Doherty. On the night we easily raised well in excess of £1000 for the charity, so in all it was very successful and both artrepublic and Streetsmart were delighted with the outcome. The journey has just began however, for we are calling all artists to submit an artwork or design for the competition and as well as supporting a very worthy cause the winner will be handed a great opportunity and a leg-up toward getting their name and work out into the public’s conscious. Find out more about our Street Art competition, including how to enter If you are interested in street art and would like to know further information or to enquire about the works and artists we have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section $test =
  • Whitney McVeigh: Is 2010 Her Year?

    Her work has been a feature at artrepublic since 2007 and with an apparent renaissance emerging in figurative painting is 2010 going to be the year of Whitney McVeigh…find out more.  At a moment when figurative art is enjoying something of a renaissance, Whitney McVeigh has produced a ser....
    Her work has been a feature at artrepublic since 2007 and with an apparent renaissance emerging in figurative painting is 2010 going to be the year of Whitney McVeigh…find out more.  At a moment when figurative art is enjoying something of a renaissance, Whitney McVeigh has produced a series of works that combine the expressive immediacy of gestural abstraction with the psychological depth of portraiture. With yet more good publicity for McVeigh, after her prominent feature in a BBC documentary exploring the state of British art in 2009, McVeigh was interviewed by art historian Dr Gus Casely-Hayford. The film, set against the backdrop of a contemporary art bubble that has burst, explored what British artists are making now, where they are making it and how things have changed. Its focus: the shift in contemporary art away from sensationalism and hype to more traditional techniques and subject matter. McVeigh is something of a slow burner when discussing her in terms of the art market, but it is exactly this that has made her a strong, solid candidate for success in a post recession art market. Her work is researched meticulously and over a very long period of time, culminating in an explosion of artistic output that seems to just overspill out of her when her mind seems ready. The result is two avenues of work: The Heads series and The Transformation series. The ‘Heads’ paintings are mainly executed in acrylic inks on paper or canvas and are not portraits in the conventional sense. They adopt certain formal aspects of portraiture merely as a starting point for a more inventive take on human individuality. McVeigh has spoken of her interest in what she calls “the internal landscape: our make-up,” seeing her ‘Heads’ as representative of “a frailty beneath the complex surface of us all.” Alongside the ‘Heads’ is McVeigh’s Transformation series which displays in the form of abstract black monoprints. In comparison to the ‘Heads’ there is more of a physicality to these works; each one is made on the floor through pressing and folding the paper. The use of black is important to McVeigh as there is no reduction process; everything is there in its force and the light filters through in the spaces in between. Whitney McVeigh was born in New York in 1968 and moved to the UK in 1976 where she studied at Edinburgh College of Art. She has exhibited nationally and internationally in New York, Beijing and Mexico. She currently lives and works in London. If you are interested in Whitney McVeigh and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works and artists we might have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section $test =
  • A Closer Look At: K-Guy

    As artrepublic have just taken stock of the new release from the terrific up-and-coming street artist K-Guy, what better excuse to take a closer look at the artist and all he has to offer. In a nutshell K-Guy is a moralist, a printmaker and a pop artist. He uses familiar British icons a....
    As artrepublic have just taken stock of the new release from the terrific up-and-coming street artist K-Guy, what better excuse to take a closer look at the artist and all he has to offer. In a nutshell K-Guy is a moralist, a printmaker and a pop artist. He uses familiar British icons as frames that encapsulate considerations about the society we live in. He’s one of the few street artists that talks about religion. Over the past couple of years K-Guy has decorated the streets and galleries with his hard-edged graphic style, often using discarded trash and found objects as the basis or medium of his work. Throughout this period, he has brought a poignant, relevant and thought provoking slant to the street art scene tackling challenging and sometimes controversial subjects that manifest themselves into what he would describe as visual rants. He says: "I am not an angry young man. I am just a bit ranty. My work is more militant than I am." K-Guy, like most street artists, change their subject matter piece by piece depending on changing news and current affairs. Coherently throughout however is always the thread of anti-establishment. K-Guy is firmly sticking two fingers up at the culturally elite and he likes nothing more than to expose society’s dysfunction and the things people automatically sweep under the grey matter. “We are all Prostitutes and Junkies! Remember that when you’re trudging through the rain to work supping your skinny Latte”. K-Guy’s new work is a witty double entendre featuring two iconic ad brands Coca-Cola and Kate Moss. These have completely sold out from the artist and artrepublic now only have one or two of the limited edition available with two very special, hand-sprayed, one-off pieces also available. If you are interested in K-Guy and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works and artists we might have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section $test =
  • Introducing The Art Of Jo Peel

    Through the door of our London gallery this week walked the very talented illustrator-come-street artist Jo Peel and she had with her some rather lovely new works. Find out more… Sheffield bred and London based illustrator Jo Peel spends her time documenting in great detail her fascination w....
    Through the door of our London gallery this week walked the very talented illustrator-come-street artist Jo Peel and she had with her some rather lovely new works. Find out more… Sheffield bred and London based illustrator Jo Peel spends her time documenting in great detail her fascination with everyday scenes and scenarios. From abandoned east London construction sites, found objects and piles of garbage to the streets of India and Thailand, all are captured in her well observed and uniquely executed style. As well as drawings, paintings and prints Jo has designed and produced t-shirts for cult clothing label Rogue Chimp, stocked in select outlets in Tokyo and London, created bespoke murals and logos on street walls and within interiors, as well as designing and illustrating sets for photo shoots. After recent success with a new series of artworks at a pop up exhibition based on Carnaby St, Jo’s currently working on a new range of products and experimenting with scale and perspective to twist the reality she is so fond of. Recently, as well as exhibiting her new works in our London space, Jo has been invited to participate in a group exhibition based solely around the Shinebox, where she will feature alongside 99 other international artists later on this month in Brooklyn, New York. She has also been involved in a number of other exhibitions throughout London. Jo’s work, coupled with the manner in which she captures her subject, is very reminiscent of many post-war British artists who sought to capture the everyday scenarios of the places they worked and lived. Her work hints at the traditional, but it does so in a very modern way. If you are interested in Jo Peel’s work and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works and artists we might have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section $test =
  • Spotlight on Brad Faine

    We have just got a fantastic new print by Brad Faine into our Brighton gallery so we thought it was time to look in a bit more depth at the amazing pieces he has produced. Faine’s latest conceptual works create an interplay between visual and textual layers of meaning and are structured around....
    We have just got a fantastic new print by Brad Faine into our Brighton gallery so we thought it was time to look in a bit more depth at the amazing pieces he has produced. Faine’s latest conceptual works create an interplay between visual and textual layers of meaning and are structured around complex geometric layers of words, numbers, images and symbols that reflect their underlying philosophy. In each work Brad Faine displays a huge dose of both visual and linguistic wit, as well as taking a caustic swipe at the underbelly of the English establishment. Art Malarkey is divided up into a chequerboard structure, whose squares contain layered sections from images of modern masterpieces by abstract artists such as Rothko, Mondrian and Pollock. These images are placed over an underlying alphabet sequence that forms the basis for the composition. The top tier of meaning is delivered by another sequence of letters covering the whole pictorial space, spelling the names of famous artists. Faine creates a visual conundrum between the art images he quotes and the names that lie on top of them. The viewer is left to identify the images and then decipher the artist's names. The effect of the piece is to de-mystify the rarefied air of the upper echelons of the art world and have a bit of fun playing around with the modern masters.  Classic Malarkey expands on the themes and ideas explored in Art Malarkey again layering letters and images in a chequerboard format, to create a composition packed with information that challenges the viewer to unlock the text whilst also testing their knowledge of the old masters. Brand Faine’s skill as a contemporary artist, using modern geometric compositions and cutting-edge silkscreen techniques, is combined with the subject of old master paintings from Velasquez’s Rokeby Venus to David’s Death of Marat. Each square of the grid contains a letter, the alphabet winding around the composition in bold modern shades finished with a gloss glaze to give them emphasis. Each letter represents the surname of an old master, whose work can be found somewhere in the piece. The smaller letters also spell these names, and the viewer is challenged to find them all and reconcile them with the correct image, making Classic Malarkey an entertaining puzzle as well as a stunning piece of art.  The Red and The Black refers not only to the famous novel of the same name by Stendhal, but to the state of our bank accounts - making it particularly pertinent in the current climate. The composition is divided into a chequerboard of red and black numbered squares, reminiscent of the random layout of a roulette wheel and hinting at the risks we all take when investing our money. The squares are numbered, the figures' lack of colour making them stand out to the viewer, reminding us that the world of banking and finance all comes down to digits often featuring a large zero. Each square is also layered with a different currency symbol, reflecting the global nature of economics. Running across the whole composition are a sequence of letters, which upon closer examination can be seen to spell phrases such as 'extortionate expenses' and 'debased derivatives'. Finally Faine breaks up the gloss finish of the piece leaving matt another sequence of larger letters that fill a circular space in the centre of the image, spelling 'RUSSIAN ROULETTE' If you are interested in Brad Faine and would like further information about his works or framing options please call the Brighton gallery on +44 (0)1273  724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com $test =
  • Spotlight on Tamara De Lempicka

    With BBC4 having a season of programs dedicated to the glamour of the 1920’s and 30’s we thought we would take a closer look at one of the icons Art Deco glamour Tamara De Lempicka. Art Deco as an art movement was based much more in the design of interiors fashion and furniture and  Tamar....
    With BBC4 having a season of programs dedicated to the glamour of the 1920’s and 30’s we thought we would take a closer look at one of the icons Art Deco glamour Tamara De Lempicka. Art Deco as an art movement was based much more in the design of interiors fashion and furniture and  Tamara De Lempicka was one of the few artists who captured this style so perfectly in the medium of painting and in particular portraits. She never gained the critical acclaim of other 20th century artists although her work has remained popular with the wider public and celebrity collects such as Madonna.She remained distant from the Parisian Avant-garde art scene of the 1920’s and often just went out to be seen and did not speak. Tamara De Lempickahe began painting after fleeing the Russian revolution and moving to Paris in order to make money to live on having sold all her jewellery. Her early style was influenced by artist André Lhote and the cubism movement. Her works beautifully bought together the glamour and sensuality of Art Deco as well as its industrial lines and shapes.  As with renaissance artists she painted portraits of society figures who were her patrons, such as Pharmacist Doctor Boucard and the Duchess of La Salle. This close association with bourgeoisie patrons and her luxurious life style further distanced her from the other Parisian Avant-garde artists. She closely managed her image setting herself up in a showcase art Deco home and claimed to have made a million by the time she was 28 years old. She flaunted her money and extra martial affairs with both men and women living a very ostentatious champagne and cocaine life style. The strength of her style was also her downfall and as Art Dec fell out of fashion so did her work. After moving to America in the 1940’s she experimented with abstract works still lives and religious portraits but is still her works form 1925- 1935 that attract the most attention. $test =

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