Monthly Archives: September 2009

  • artrepublic nominated for Best Independent Retailer at the BAHBAs

    We are very proud to announce that artrepublic has been nominated as a finalist in the 2009 Brighton and Hove Business Awards (BAHBAs).  We have been nominated in the category of Best Independent Retailer. Now in its sixth year, the BAHBAs were set up to celebrate those Brighton ba....
    We are very proud to announce that artrepublic has been nominated as a finalist in the 2009 Brighton and Hove Business Awards (BAHBAs).  We have been nominated in the category of Best Independent Retailer. Now in its sixth year, the BAHBAs were set up to celebrate those Brighton based organisations that help raise the profile of the city. Our nomination was based on the huge choice of hard-to-find prints available in particular at our Brighton gallery in Bond Street. We also promote a number of Brighton based artists within our range, including Lidia de Pedro, Hutch and Graham Cater. In addition there have been a number of events and promotions this year for our customers including a visit from Peter Blake’s Art Bus and free stays at MyHotels. The awards will be announced in October 2009. $test =
  • Modern Toss at The Ivy

    On the 24th September, after the briefest of summer intervals, artrepublic Soho returned with a bang to The Loft Club at The Ivy to showcase the totally brilliant Modern Toss and a preview of their new film. If you have somehow managed to avoid Modern Toss thus far we might question where you’....
    On the 24th September, after the briefest of summer intervals, artrepublic Soho returned with a bang to The Loft Club at The Ivy to showcase the totally brilliant Modern Toss and a preview of their new film. If you have somehow managed to avoid Modern Toss thus far we might question where you’ve been for the past few years. Having said that the world doesn’t completely evolve around us nor does it around ‘The Toss’.  So if you are unaware, in a nutshell, Modern Toss is a British series of cartoons, books, a television series and  a soon to be released film all aimed at adults. Jon Link and Mick Bunnage are the Writers, Cartoonists and Animators behind the ultra stylish and hilarious comic and TV series that has over the last year or so rapidly risen to attain a cult status. They have written, designed and directed two Rose d'or nominated series of their own Modern Toss (6 x 24 minute episode) cartoon sketch show, broadcast on UK 's Channel 4 in 2006 and 2008. A mixture of edgy, scratchy, blunt talking animated characters with bizarre and surreal live action. The second series was broadcast in the U.S on the IFC channel in March 2009.  In 2008 they wrote, designed and directed a highly acclaimed 13 minute Animation Short - "Work Experience'"- for E4 based on cartoons they draw regularly for the Guardian newspaper. They have produced 5 best selling books of their cartoons, published by Macmillans in the UK and the US. In addition to all of this Jon and Mick produce artwork that accompanies their illustrated and animated work featuring their most recognisable characters. They have had work printed by the now iconic print studios POW and have featured in galleries and ‘art shops’ literally everywhere, but chiefly in London and their native Brighton. Aslo available are their amazing and rather stylish range of bags. An update on their brilliant new film will shortly arrive no doubt in the coming month after its debut on the BBC. If you can’t wait and want to know more about Modern Toss or to enquire about other works and artists we might have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section $test =
  • Spotlight on Bridget Riley

    With a major retrospective of her work opening at the Walker Art gallery in Liverpool this week we though we would take a closer look at the life work ok of Bridget Riley. Since the mid-1960s Bridget Riley has been celebrated for her distinctive, optically vibrant paintings which actively engage....
    With a major retrospective of her work opening at the Walker Art gallery in Liverpool this week we though we would take a closer look at the life work ok of Bridget Riley. Since the mid-1960s Bridget Riley has been celebrated for her distinctive, optically vibrant paintings which actively engage the viewer’s sensations and perceptions, producing visual experiences that are complex and challenging, subtle and arresting. Bridget Riley began her exploration of abstract painting in the 1950s, when she was inspired by the optical effects in the works of the 19th-century pointillist Georges Seurat. 'Movement in Squares' created in 1961 is a seminal piece and Bridget Riley credits the work as the beginning of her breakthrough into abstraction. In Movement in Squares, a sequence of shapes - squares in this case – proceeds from left to right. Their height remains constant while their width is diminished. This structural contraction creates the sensation of a temporary disturbance. Disrupting a regular progression in this way has an emotional resonance. Riley saw her intention as making a statement about ‘stabilities and instabilities, certainties and uncertainties.’ Cantus Firmus 1972-3. The title is a musical term describing a regular metric and harmonic theme upon which variations of melody and rhythm, voices or instruments are based. Here the proportions and positions of the colours - the blacks, whites and even the greys - are repeated in the same order throughout. Only the greys vary in moving from a light tone, close to the colour bands on both sides, to a deeper, nearly black shade just off-centre. This subtle movement and the displacement of balance give a surprising sense of depth to an otherwise flat space.  Nataraja 1993. Riley often alludes to her impressions of foreign cultures in her paintings. In 1981 she travelled to India. Nataraja is a term from Hindu mythology meaning 'Lord of the Dance'. It refers to the Hindu God Shiva in his form as the cosmic dancer, who is usually depicted with many arms. In this painting, vertical bands of colour are cut across by diagonals, creating a sense of dynamic movement through intricate rhythm and counter-rhythm.  As a result of the 1965 ‘Responsive Eye’ exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York Riley’s Op Art reached wide audience and also had a profound influence on fashion and wider visual culture. Riley however was upset by the commercialisation of Op Art. In the early 1970’s along with fellow artists Peter Sedgley she set up SPACE (Space Provision Artistic Cultural and Educational) to provide studio space for artists in London which is still going strong after 40 years. Now in her 70’s Bridge Riley is still producing new works and is said to be one of the most important painters working today. $test =
  • Spotlight on David Spiller: Art, Music and Culture

    David Spiller has quickly established himself in the print market since his work arrived at artrepublic. With more exciting work on the way, coupled with an exhibition at a prestigious West London gallery this September, we examine the artist and his work. In this world of mish-mash of cultures,....
    David Spiller has quickly established himself in the print market since his work arrived at artrepublic. With more exciting work on the way, coupled with an exhibition at a prestigious West London gallery this September, we examine the artist and his work. In this world of mish-mash of cultures, the clash of money and beggary, brutality and fashion, slogan and soundbyte, David Spiller and his art might come across as seemingly aware, canny and certainly of the moment for all he harks back to is an earlier pop ethos as opposed to drawing inspiration from contemporary culture. This ethos is one that stems from his East London roots. An ethos that is very ‘British Pop Art’ and one that is mirrored with Brit artists that have come before him such as Peter Blake. At first sight Spiller’s work seem very simple: huge, stencilled capital letters that spell out the lyrics of popular songs alongside long-familiar cartoon characters; Van Gogh’s Sunflowers passed through the sieve of contemporary Graffiti Art. The more you look at and think about his work, the less simple it all becomes. There is one key element to Spiller’s work and that is music, specifically the relationship it has to art and other forms of popular culture. His paintings are planned to have the same subliminal effect that certain kinds of music produce. Music can enhance our sense of emotional and physical well-being without our being fully aware of the fact and Spiller uses his art to echo this effect.  The shock here, perhaps, is that Spiller is a devotee, not of classical masterpieces as is often referenced in art, but of pure pop music. His body of paintings and prints show quote lines from songs written by, or associated with, singers and song-writers such as Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, Frank Sinatra and Buddy Holly, as well as David Bowie, Lou Reed and The Troggs. Spiller says these songs are the soundtrack to his life. They continually run through his head, whether he wants them there or not. The focus is very much on David Spiller at current, his one-man show on Cork Street, London coupled with a dual print release due out very soon. We can certainly expect more of the same and we wouldn’t want or expect anything else. If you are interested in David Spiller and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works and artists we might have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com *'I've Been Loving You A Long Time' and 'Felix' are previous sold out edition and are not available for sale. Return to our London section $test =
  • Secret Wars in Brighton at White Air 2009

    Secret Wars the knock out artists duel is coming to Brighton. After a number of one-off exhibition battles, which have seen python-sized queues and one of comic art and graffiti's biggest legends 'Mark Bode' take part Secret Wars has joined forces to set up a Brighton-based tournament on....
    Secret Wars the knock out artists duel is coming to Brighton. After a number of one-off exhibition battles, which have seen python-sized queues and one of comic art and graffiti's biggest legends 'Mark Bode' take part Secret Wars has joined forces to set up a Brighton-based tournament on the world famous Madeira Drive, at Europe's biggest extreme sports and music festival - White Air 2009! Secret Wars is the world’s premier live art battle – working in similar ways to Fight Club, Secret Wars battles are set up / promoted through word of mouth. It started in March 2006 as a testing ground for artists to show the public what they can do, the idea quickly evolved into a knockout cup style contest that now attracts regular crowds of over 400 people. These live art battles are being hosted in the darkest corners of each city, sometimes you might stumble across one in the basement of a bar in the East end of London or even in a deserted meat factory in Malmo Sweden.  The Rules are; 90 mins on the clock. Two artists work side by side with an invisible line between them, they can only use black paint on white walls, no sketches no pencils. They are then judged using a 3 point system with 2 guest judges and a crowd vote registered using a decibel meter. With a host of local artists and others who have taken part in the live art tournament from across the country Secret Wars looks set to put on a show that won't be forgotten.  As well as showcasing artist’s talents, a special mini tournament will be set up and scheduled through the course of the festival. There will also be mini-workshops and 'have a go' areas where the public can have a try. It doesn't matter if you're new to it or a pro. There's a spot for you to do your thing. The schedule 18th September 1/4 finals  1st battle – 12:00 – 1.30pm – Limbo Vs Mr Nord 2nd battle – 1pm – 2.30pm Artist 74 Vs TBC 3rd battle – 2pm – 3.30pm Mist Vs Spit Sega 4th battle – 3pm – 4.30pm Oliver Harud Vs JOJENK 19th September Semi-Finals 1st battle 3pm – 4.30pm ? Vs ? 2nd battle – 4.30 – 6pm ? Vs ? 19th September Final @ Jam Bar 8pm – 3am Middle Street, Brighton BN1 1AL Secret Wars website White Air 2009 website $test =
  • Collection of Warhol silk-screen prints stolen

    Art taken from the L.A. home of businessman Richard Weisman included 10 pieces created by Warhol in the late 1970s depicting famous athletes, including Muhammad Ali and OJ Simpson.  A $1m reward has been offered for information leading to their recovery. The silkscreen pieces, commis....
    Art taken from the L.A. home of businessman Richard Weisman included 10 pieces created by Warhol in the late 1970s depicting famous athletes, including Muhammad Ali and OJ Simpson.  A $1m reward has been offered for information leading to their recovery. The silkscreen pieces, commissioned by Mr Weisman, are valued at several million dollars. Among the sports stars depicted in the series of the pieces were tennis champion Chris Evert, Los Angeles Lakers basketball great Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Olympic skater Dorothy Hamill.  Police said that the artworks - each one 40 inches (101 cm) square - had been taken on the 2 or 3 September. Their disappearance was discovered by a domestic employee, who found the dining room walls bare and alerted the police.  Andy Warhol is one of the most famous members of the Pop Art movement. Some of his best known woks are replications of popular icons such as Elvis Presley, Elizabeth Taylor and most famously Marilyn Monroe. Warhol began to replicate a range of mass-produced images in the 1960’s, including soup can’s, coca-cola bottles and celebrities such as the sports personalities series.  He worked more and more on a signature style, slowly eliminating the hand-made from the artistic process.  The medium of silkscreen printing which had formerly only been used for commercial purposes was ideal for doing this. Photographic images were transferred to silkscreens. These screens could then be printed onto canvases that were hand-painted with colours that Warhol thought matched the depicted image such as skin tones and vibrant magenta eye shadow. In his studio ‘The Factory’ Warhol had several assistants who produced his silk-screen multiples, following his directions to make different versions and variations. Warhol loved celebrities and his works depicting them have developed a duel value over the years appealing to both collectors of work by Andy Warhol and to fans of the celebrities pictured. A portrait of the late Michael Jackson by Andy Warhol sold at auction in New York for over $1m earlier this year. $test =
  • A Closer Look at Sir Peter Blake's Sergeant Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band

    With the Beatles releasing their entire discography on CD this week coupled with the inaugural launch of the groundbreaking game ‘The Beatles: Rock Band’, the fab four are suddenly everywhere. What better way to jump on the bandwagon than big-up one of the most iconic album covers of all time:....
    With the Beatles releasing their entire discography on CD this week coupled with the inaugural launch of the groundbreaking game ‘The Beatles: Rock Band’, the fab four are suddenly everywhere. What better way to jump on the bandwagon than big-up one of the most iconic album covers of all time: Peter Blake’s Sergeant Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band. Sgt. Pepper's was the eighth studio album by The Beatles and came to be the defining album in the emerging psychedelic rock movement; it has since been recognised by prominent critics and publications as one of the most influential albums of all time. Recorded over a 129-day period beginning in December 1966, Sgt. Pepper’s sees the band exploring experimentation, making use of orchestras, hired musicians and innovative production techniques. The album is loosely based on a concept that the Beatles are performing as the fictitious band of the album's title. The album’s famous cover was devised by an amalgamation of talent. Art-directed by Robert Fraser, designed by Peter Blake and his then wife Jann Haworth, and photographed by Michael Cooper. The look of the album, the colourful collage of life-sized cardboard models depicting more than 70 famous people on the front of the album cover and lyrics printed on the back cover, was the first time this had been done on an English pop LP. According to Blake, the original concept was to create a scene that showed the Sgt. Pepper band performing in a park. This gradually evolved into its final form, which as seen, shows the Beatles as the Sgt. Pepper band surrounded by a large group of their heroes rendered as lifesized cut-out figures. Also included were wax-work figures of the Beatles as they appeared in the early '60s, borrowed from Madame Tussauds. In keeping with the park concept, the foreground of the scene is a floral display displaying the word "Beatles" spelt out in flowers. There are also several affectations from the Beatles' homes including small statues belonging to Lennon and Harrison, a small portable TV set and a trophy. A young delivery boy who provided the flowers for the photo session was allowed to contribute a guitar made of yellow hyacinths. It has long been rumoured that some of the plants in the arrangement were cannabis plants. At the edge of the scene is a Shirley Temple doll wearing a sweater in homage to the Rolling Stones (who would return the tribute by having the Beatles hidden in the cover of their own Their Satanic Majesties Request LP later that year). The highly collectable limited edition silkscreen print is still available and comes hand-signed and numbered by Peter Blake and features the embossed logo of the Beatles’ record label, Apple Records. BUY Limited Edition prints by Sir Peter Blake $test =
  • Monet's Water-Lilies

    With a major exhibition of Monet’s Water-Lilies opening at MoMA in New York this month we thought we would take a closer look at some Claude Monet’s most iconic works. Monet’s monumental Water-Lilly paintings fill their canvases, and the surface of the pond becomes a world in itself, inspiri....
    With a major exhibition of Monet’s Water-Lilies opening at MoMA in New York this month we thought we would take a closer look at some Claude Monet’s most iconic works. Monet’s monumental Water-Lilly paintings fill their canvases, and the surface of the pond becomes a world in itself, inspiring a sense of immersion in nature. His observations of the changing patterns of light on the surface of the water lead to these works becoming almost abstract. Claude Monet is now best known for the works he produced in his latter years.  However after his death art historians and collectors were only interested in his earlier Impressionist work. The work of the 1910s and 1920s depicting his garden at Giverny was considered far too unstructured, and much of the work left in his studio after his death was thought to be unfinished.  It was not until after WWII that contemporary art movements such as Abstract Expressionism transformed people’s attitudes toward Monet’s late works. Now Monet’s ‘Water-Lilies after 1916’ hangs alongside ‘Summertime’ time by Jackson Pollock and ‘Untitled 1903-1970’ by Mark Rothko in Tate Moderns Abstract Expressionism room. Monet devoted the last 25 years of his life to the portrayal of the pond and its surroundings in Giverny, and you can still visit the garden Monet created in Giverny today. He began work on the gardens in 1883 both designing and planting the gardens before representing them on canvas. Giverny remained his home until he died in 1926 and he painted many of canvases of the same subject such as the Water-Lilies and the Japanese bridge in different lights and at different times of the day and the year. The Orangerie Museum in Paris is probably the other best know place to see Water-Lilies by Claude Monet.  It re opened in 2006 after an extensive renovation which restored the giant Water-Lily canvases to their original setting in the centre of the building, which they have occupied since their installation in 1927 and re-opened the glass roof, which had been covered since the 1960’s. $test =
  • Hot up and coming artists…..

    We thought it was high time we took a look at some of the great up and coming artist we are featuring in our Brighton gallery. Mr Brainwash is defiantly one to watch this year every time we have got any work in from this hot US artist it has sold out within days. He has now designed the a....
    We thought it was high time we took a look at some of the great up and coming artist we are featuring in our Brighton gallery. Mr Brainwash is defiantly one to watch this year every time we have got any work in from this hot US artist it has sold out within days. He has now designed the album cover and pronominal material for Madonna’s huge greatest hits album, and is planning his own solo show in London later this year, so he is certainly and artist with a real buzz around him. It’s been a great year for Graham Carter fans with a solo show currently in London and some really beautiful print releases. Ever Red released earlier this year has now sold out and his Giant prints are likely to go the same way soon. With each new print you can fall in love with his work all over again. Zachary Walsh and Nick Ruston have both just released their first limited edition prints. Zachary’s release was for his solo show ’Greek Street’ at the ink-d gallery in Brighton and is a beautiful giclee of the Greek goddess Venus with a spot varnish. Nick Ruston know for his scratch paintings depicting and subverting contemporary popular culture has released a stunning print finished with the flavouring MSG on the lips so she tastes as good as she looks. Local Brighton artist Screen Prince has come back with some amazing artists proofs of his Donna Summer print in so many beautiful colour combinations you be spoilt for choice. Last but by no means least is Spanish artist Lidia de Pedro. After a stunning solo show at the ink-d gallery her limited edition prints have been flying out the door. Following on from her earlier works about her family her latest prints deal with all sorts of modern social issues and are amazingly eye-catching to boot. Of course new work is coming in all the time so nothing beats a visit to our Brighton gallery in person to see the latest releases as well as the treasure trove of older prints you might have thought you’d missed out on. Return to our Brighton Section $test =
  • AME72 Set To Make Art History This Autumn

    artrepublic Soho resident artist AME 72 is set to make art history this autumn with a massive landmark show titled Let’s Go in Tel Aviv, Israel. The show, which come the opening night will have been in preparation for well over 5 months, will set a record as AME 72 will be the first British ur....
    artrepublic Soho resident artist AME 72 is set to make art history this autumn with a massive landmark show titled Let’s Go in Tel Aviv, Israel. The show, which come the opening night will have been in preparation for well over 5 months, will set a record as AME 72 will be the first British urban artist to ever put on a solo show in Israel.  It is to be held at a prominent gallery in Tel Aviv and will focus on AME72’s most famous series of work: the Lego men. There will be a variety of works in the exhibition executed in numerous mediums including canvas, wood, card and plastic. Mr Ame will also be showcasing his latest foray into light art, video art, animatronics installation and even sand sculpture.  It certainly promises to be something that Tel Aviv has not seen before. There are also plans for a print to be released, but details on this will be announced by the artist closer to the time. The Middle East has seen an increased attention towards urban and street art over the last couple of years with the likes Banksy, Paul Insect and co famously setting up a derivative of the popular Christmas pop-up shop Santas Ghetto in Bethlehem. AME 72 has been active in the street art scene since 1985. Over the last 24 years he has created pieces worldwide, but is best known for his use of Lego men in his stencils which has earned him the nickname ‘the Lego guy’. He has created works in various countries around the globe such as the UK, USA, Spain, Thailand, Israel, Egypt, Bulgaria, Switzerland and Australia. He prefers spray paint but has been known to create works from sand, snow, plastic and even bullets.  www.ame72.com If you are interested in AME 72 and would like to know further information or to enquire about other works we might have in the gallery call +44 (0)20 7240 7909 or email soho@artrepublic.com Return to our London section $test =

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