Monthly Archives: May 2008

  • The Unstoppable Ben Allen

    Press Release May 2008 Currently enjoying being part of the Urban Art show in Chiswick until May 15th, Ben Allen is designing wallpaper for an upmarket restaurant in the O2  stadium. The artist's work is often found in the VIP areas of London and Brighton’s hippest hotels and bars, as well....
    Press Release May 2008 Currently enjoying being part of the Urban Art show in Chiswick until May 15th, Ben Allen is designing wallpaper for an upmarket restaurant in the O2  stadium. The artist's work is often found in the VIP areas of London and Brighton’s hippest hotels and bars, as well as adorning the walls of various celebrities – Sir Richard Branson kitted out his latest venture in Verbier with artwork from Ben - and he recently painted a massive mural for British actress Patsy Palmer in her Brighton home.  Big brands want him to design for them and he’s even branching out into bespoke soft furnishings and furniture  as well as having exhibited in London, Brighton and LA. Ben’s style is not static but constantly evolving as he takes in the world around him. Not a graffiti artist himself but inspired by the vibrancy of Brighton’s street art scene, it’s Ben’s love of animals that rides most prominently through his  work.  If there’s one theme that sets the work of Ben Allen apart from his contemporaries it’s that. Leaping tigers, striking zebras and gentle birds, the artist  captures their beautiful, natural patterns, their textures and characters and  then off-sets them in industrial or cityscape-like environments.  Ben Allen makes his prints and silkscreens at BIP and is a totally self-taught artist.  Catch a piece of him at artrepublic at the galleries in London and Brighton or online at www.artrepublic.com  3-2-1-Go - Giclee signed limited edition of 75 Lucky  7 - Giclee signed limited edition of 75 ENDS  About artrepublic artrepublic established its first gallery in 1992 in the heart of Brighton’s North Laines. Its second gallery ‘artrepublic at tomtom’ is in the heart of London’s Soho. artrepublic features rare, collectable, cutting-edge art prints, limited editions, silkscreens and giclees from contemporary artists such as Banksy, Jamie Reid, James Cauty, Sir Peter Blake and Jamie Hewlett alongside popular artists such as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. www.artrepublic.com has an extensive choice of art prints all available with free delivery worldwide. The gallery also offers a bespoke framing service with a huge choice of mouldings and expert advice on hand and the website offers a large selection of quality frames delivered free throughout the UK. $test =
  • Blek Le Rat, loved by Banksy and featured at artrepublic

    Press Release 28th May, 2008 Anyone who knows their stuff about street art will hold the Parisian graffiti artist, Blek le Rat in the highest regard. Born in 1951 in Paris, he is considered by many to be the grandmaster, the creator ‘absolu’ of stencil graffiti as we know it today.&....
    Press Release 28th May, 2008 Anyone who knows their stuff about street art will hold the Parisian graffiti artist, Blek le Rat in the highest regard. Born in 1951 in Paris, he is considered by many to be the grandmaster, the creator ‘absolu’ of stencil graffiti as we know it today.  In 2005, the British graffiti artist Banksy, whose canvases today command six figure price tags, quoted that every time he thought he’d painted something slightly original, he found out that Blek Le Rat had already been there, done that. “Only 20 years earlier.” Banksy’s work is often a homage to that already done by le Rat. The Rat invasion Blek Le Rat created the stencil scene in the early 80’s on the streets of Paris and has been pushing the boundaries of graffiti art ever since. Inspired by New York’s graffiti scene in the 70’s and by WWII propaganda, where Italian fascists would stencil pictures of Mussolini, Blek Le Rat (real name Xavier Prou) moved away from traditional tags and started out with a simple rat stencil, of which he painted thousands on the city’s streets. From there he moved into figurative work documenting homelessness, poverty as well as mixing up styles and genres, with works such as David with Kalashnikov and Space Cowboy. Getting Through The Walls Just released to celebrate the publication of his new book ‘Getting Through The Walls’ – the first and only collection of his work extensively photographed by his wife, Sybille Prou - and a major exhibition of his work in London, artrepublic has two new Blek le Rat prints that have already sold out with the publishers, available at both their London and Brighton galleries. Dancer This stunning monochrome print of a dancer is a sleek, modest and graceful piece that captures the essence of the artist’s stencilling ability. Running Man A rare 3 colour silkscreen on Moulin de Gue paper, showing the clean simple lines that form part of Blek le Rat’s superb iconography. A not-to-be-missed piece. artrepublic  13 Bond Street Brighton BN1 1RD Mon – Fri 9.30 - 6.00 Saturday 9.00 - 6.00 Sunday 11.00 - 5.00 Bank Hols 10.30 - 5.30 tel: 01273 724829 email brighton@artrepublic.com artrepublic at tomtom 42 New Compton Street London WC2H 8DA Mon – Sat 11.00 - 7.00 tel: 020 7240 7909 email soho@artrepublic.com  ENDS A little bit more about Blek le Rat Creating his name from a cartoon strip he used to read as a child, ‘Blek le Roc’, about an American animal trapper fighting the invasion of the British Army, he changed the ‘le Roc’ to ‘le Rat’ because his first stencil was a rat - and because you can find art in ‘rat’. After having to pay substantial fines in the early 90’s for his graffiti, he moved onto paper and has spent the last 10 years He was tried in France in 1991 for 10 years worth of graffiti – lest we forget it’s still illegal – and had to pay substantial fines. The only walls he now paints are part of organised group events such as London’s recent Can Festival in May, 2008 alongside many other names from the scene. Blek le Rat lives in a remote 10th Century castle somewhere in the French countryside with his wife and teenage son. A little bit more about artrepublic artrepublic established its first gallery in 1992 in the heart of Brighton’s North Laines. Its second gallery ‘artrepublic at tomtom’ is in the heart of London’s Soho. artrepublic features rare, collectable, cutting-edge art prints, limited editions, silkscreens and giclees from contemporary artists such as Banksy, Jamie Reid, James Cauty, Sir Peter Blake and Jamie Hewlett alongside popular artists such as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. www.artrepublic.com has an extensive choice of art prints all available with free delivery worldwide.  The gallery also offers a bespoke framing service with a huge choice of mouldings and expert advice on hand and the website offers a large selection of quality frames delivered free throughout the UK. $test =
  • Street Art at Tate Modern

    The iconic river façade of Tate Modern has been transformed by the work of six internationally acclaimed artists, whose work is intricately linked to the urban environment.  Street Art at Tate Modern opened on 23 May and is the first major public museum dis....
    The iconic river façade of Tate Modern has been transformed by the work of six internationally acclaimed artists, whose work is intricately linked to the urban environment.  Street Art at Tate Modern opened on 23 May and is the first major public museum display of Street Art in London.  All six artists are represented in major collections around the world and regularly shown in gallery exhibitions and biennales but their work began in public urban spaces and remains indebted to Street Art and graffiti traditions. The artists are: Blu from Bologna, Italy; the artist collective Faile from New York, USA; JR from Paris, France; Nunca and Os Gemeos, both from Sao Paulo, Brazil and Sixeart from Barcelona, Spain.  Street Art at Tate Modern brings to the fore an important aspect of current art practice and one that has influenced acclaimed artists, including Basquiat and Picasso. Although the term Street Art has been used since the late Seventies, the work, by its very nature, is in constant flux and hard to categorise. Broadly speaking the term has come to define the more visual and engaging urban art as opposed to text-based graffiti and tagging. Blu (Bologna, Italy) works primarily with drawing, albeit on a large scale. His images often portray a mildly macabre fascination with death and the inner workings of the human body. His work begins as a sketch before being transferred directly on to walls using many traditional painting techniques. Blu’s inspiration, like many Street Artists, stems from the desire to transform ordinary decaying places into beautiful and interesting environments.  The artist collective Faile, from New York (formed 1999) take inspiration from the detritus of the city wall, which often includes deteriorating advertising and flyposting, to present their own take on traditional comic book imagery. These instantly recognisably pop culture images have allowed them to diversify into other areas including sculpture, design and music but their work remains heavily indebted to printmaking and stencilling traditions.  The work of photographer JR (Paris) is driven by a strong political and social impetus. His work often features dramatic close-range black and white portraits of young people which, when pasted in particular areas, provide political meaning. A project in Paris saw such full frame portraits of people from run down deprived outer suburbs of Paris pasted up in areas which had become more affluent. During a recent project in Israel and Palestine he photographed inhabitants living in embattled locations to reveal the human side of conflict.  The work of Nunca (Portuguese for Never, Sao Paulo) is heavily influenced by the geometric patterns and colours found in the indigenous artwork and culture of South America. By placing images of native rural people from South America within the urban context of Sao Paulo his work comments on the history and culture of the city and country. His work also includes carvings, installations, sculpture and works on canvas.  Os Gemeos (Portuguese for The Twins, Sao Paulo) are twin brothers Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo. They started painting graffiti in 1987 and gradually became a major influence in the local scene helping to define Brazil’s own style. Their dreamlike subjects, often depicted in bright yellow, range from family portraits to commentary on Sao Paulo’s social and political circumstances as well as Brazilian folklore.  The work of Sixeart (Barcelona) mixes psychedelic abstraction with comic book inspired figuration. His work pays visual reference to Surrealist artists such as Joan Miró. Similar to Miró, Sixeart’s work has a childlike innocence that is combined with a almost hallucinogenic sense of second sight. His gestural and painterly works are often large scale although he does also work in sculpture, on canvas and with screen prints.  Street Art at Tate Modern opend at the same time as Tate Modern’s four day festival of art and performance, UBS Openings: The Long Weekend and fits with the theme for this year’s event – States of Flux.  Street Art has been curated by Cedar Lewisohn of Tate Media.  Image Credits: Image 1: Street Art, Installation View 2 2008, © Tate Photography Image 2: Street Art at Tate Modern, Installation View 2008, © Tate Photography Image 3: Blu, Zaragoza 2006, Courtesy the artist and the Lazarides Gallery © The Artist Image 4: JR, Courtesy the artist and the Lazarides Gallery © The Artist Image 5: Sixeart, Untitled 2007, Galeria N2. 2007 Barcelona, Spain © Sixeart, Acrylic on Linen cloth130 x 97cm artzine your guide to everything that’s happening in the art world $test =
  • Robert Rauschenberg Obituary

    Robert Rauschenberg Pop Art pioneer, whose wide-ranging work time and again reshaped art in the 20th century, sadly died on 12th May, aged 82, at his home in Captiva Island, Florida. artrepublic reflects on the life of this innovative artist. He embraced a huge range of artistic express....
    Robert Rauschenberg Pop Art pioneer, whose wide-ranging work time and again reshaped art in the 20th century, sadly died on 12th May, aged 82, at his home in Captiva Island, Florida. artrepublic reflects on the life of this innovative artist. He embraced a huge range of artistic expression from painting and collage to photography, printmaking, stage design and performance. His works are held in nearly every major public and private collection of modern art in Europe and America, in particular the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Rauschenberg's innovative technique included being the first artist to incorporate silk-screen printing on canvas. Transferring images from newsprint and silks-screening photographs from many sources permitted him to incorporate just about anything into his paintings and drawings. Rauschenberg extended well-established conventions of collage and the found object, to produce what he called "combines" - hybrids of painting and sculpture. His studio was a junk heap, containing items as varied as cola bottles, clocks, radios and fragments of clothing which would eventually be integrated into his work. One of his most famous works, 'Monogram' (1955-1959) featured a stuffed goat with a rubber tyre surrounding his middle and splashed with paint in a style reminiscent of Action painting. All this was inspired by an assignment set by his tutor Joseph Albers during his time at and Black Mountain College to find objects that could be deemed aesthetically interesting. Milton Rauschenberg was born in 1925 in Port Arthur, Texas, part German and part Cherokee Indian. He became interested in art after a chance visit to a gallery while serving in the US Navy as a mental hospital nurse in the final years of World War Two. He only changed his name to Robert later in life as he felt is sounded more like the name of an artist. Discharged in 1945, Rauschenberg studied art at a number of institutions including the Kansas City Art Institute, the Academie Julian in Paris, the Art Students League in New York and Black Mountain College in North Carolina. During this time He married fellow artist Susan Weil and had his only child, Christopher who is now 56. In late 1953, he met fellow Pop artist Jasper Johns. The two artists had neighbouring studios, regularly exchanging ideas and discussing their work, until 1961. In 1970, Rauschenberg established a permanent residence and studio in Captiva, Florida, where he lived until his recent death. From 1984 through 1991, he ran the Rauschenberg Overseas Cultural Interchange (ROCI). Through this Rauschenberg and his assistants travelled the world and worked collaboratively with artists and craftsmen of many nationalities. artzine your guide to everything that’s happening in the art world $test =
  • The Cans Festival, London

    Destroy If you were in London over the Bank Holiday weekend (3rd – 5th May) you may have caught a glimpse of the Cans Festival. A disused road tunnel in south London was turned into a giant exhibition space, for some of the worlds top graffiti artists. The in a half-mile stretch of the t....
    Destroy If you were in London over the Bank Holiday weekend (3rd – 5th May) you may have caught a glimpse of the Cans Festival. A disused road tunnel in south London was turned into a giant exhibition space, for some of the worlds top graffiti artists. The in a half-mile stretch of the tunnel in Leake Street, Waterloo, was transformed from a dark forgotten corner of London onto a cutting edge exhibition space with stencil graffiti on the walls and 3D art installations.  Artists who took part included C215, Blek le Rat, Faile, Pure Evil, Logan Hicks, Eelus and Banksy, as well as members of the public who were also invited to join in. Destroy Click here to view all Graffiti prints available from artrepublic artzine your guide to everything that’s happening in the art world $test =

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