Monthly Archives: March 2008

  • Urban Art

    Urban Art is a term which gained popularity in the late 20th century. It was used mainly by the art establishment to encompass art and artists who were originally involved in street and graffiti art. The term achieved further endorsement when major auction houses such as Bonhams used it to categoris....
    Urban Art is a term which gained popularity in the late 20th century. It was used mainly by the art establishment to encompass art and artists who were originally involved in street and graffiti art. The term achieved further endorsement when major auction houses such as Bonhams used it to categorise these types of prints. Artists associated with the Urban Art genre, include Keith Haring, Banksy, Dan Baldwin, D*Face and Pure Evil. The movement began life as an ephemeral art form disappearing as fast as it appeared. Now many of the works that were created with spray-paint and stencils and began life as street graffiti are being transferred to canvas and limited edition prints, completing its transition from underground subculture to mainstream art movement. $test =
  • Silkscreen

    Screen printing or serigraph Many of our limited edition silkscreen prints have been hand made and hand printed by the artists themselves. Silkscreen prints are usually printed on heavy papers around 300gsm, like hand printed on 100% rag papers. These papers are selected for their colour, grain and....
    Screen printing or serigraph Many of our limited edition silkscreen prints have been hand made and hand printed by the artists themselves. Silkscreen prints are usually printed on heavy papers around 300gsm, like hand printed on 100% rag papers. These papers are selected for their colour, grain and suitability to take ink quantities that give high density colour. The process of making a print A gauzy fabric (traditionally silk) is stretched taut onto a frame to form the screen. Then either a stencil is cut or prepared digitally. The screen is treated with a light reactive substance and exposed to create a positive stencil. Paper is placed on the press then the screen on top and ink is then forced across the screen, it will pass though any of the open (unexposed) areas of the screen onto the paper. An individual screen has to be prepared for each colour in the final print. So the more colours in a silkscreen the more work has gone into creating the final print. History Silkscreen printing is an ancient art with origins in Japanese fabric dying dating back thousands of years. In the 1960s Andy Warhol began using it to produce iconic images such as his Campbell Soup Tins and his portraits of Elvis and Marilyn Monroe and in doing so brought the practice to the attention of the art world. It was not immediately accepted by the art critics and museum curators of the day, but quickly gained popularity among the pop art fraternity. Over the years it has developed into a popular medium for producing high quality art prints, as the artist is able to retain control of the end result throughout the print making process.   $test =
  • Rare and Collectable posters

    Rare and collectable posters generally cover original exhibition posters, promotional posters and open edition prints that are no longer being printed. All these prints although normally not specifically limited to small numbers become scarce once they are no longer being produced. As time passes it....
    Rare and collectable posters generally cover original exhibition posters, promotional posters and open edition prints that are no longer being printed. All these prints although normally not specifically limited to small numbers become scarce once they are no longer being produced. As time passes it is harder to get hold of these prints in mint condition and they can rise in value. Rare and collectable posters are a great way to get something a bit different from your standard print or poster, and they often have images of artist’s work that may be hard to come by. They can also be an open edition of prints that are signed by the artists, normally only a set number of them are signed although this could be several hundred. $test =
  • Giclee

    The word Giclee comes from the French for "to spray". Giclee prints offer high-resolution imaging and long term colour fidelity through the use of light-fast high quality archival inks. The process of making a Giclee print involves images being generated from high resolution digital scans and p....
    The word Giclee comes from the French for "to spray". Giclee prints offer high-resolution imaging and long term colour fidelity through the use of light-fast high quality archival inks. The process of making a Giclee print involves images being generated from high resolution digital scans and printed with archival quality inks onto various surfaces including canvas, fine art and photo-base paper. The giclee printing process provides better colour accuracy than other means of reproduction. Giclee prints are typically created using professional 8-Color to 12-Color ink-jet printers. The history of Giclee The earliest prints to be called Giclee were created in the early 1990s on Iris printers. The technique was originally developed to produce pre-press proofs from digital files for jobs where colour matching was critical such as product containers and magazine publication. The introduction of archival inks to the process meant that it could be used to produce high quality long lasting images ideal for artists creating limited editions. Artists are also attracted by the flexibility of Giclee, allowing them to produce a wide variety of sizes, on a variety of mediums and the ability to print on demand. $test =
  • Artist Proof

    An artists proof is part of a limited edition run of prints. Normally low in number they can be marked either just AP or AP/7 and can be signed or unsigned. These prints are produced before the limited edition run as test prints and are used by the artists to ensure the print is just how they want i....
    An artists proof is part of a limited edition run of prints. Normally low in number they can be marked either just AP or AP/7 and can be signed or unsigned. These prints are produced before the limited edition run as test prints and are used by the artists to ensure the print is just how they want it so they may vary slightly from the limited edition run. Artist proofs are often seen as more valuable as they are fewer in number and can be more unquie. $test =
  • Limited Edition

    A limited edition is a series of identical prints which are limited in quantity by either the artist or the publisher.  Prints can also be limited because the printing plate used to produce the image, eventually wears out. If an edition is limited by either the artist or publisher the printing pla....
    A limited edition is a series of identical prints which are limited in quantity by either the artist or the publisher.  Prints can also be limited because the printing plate used to produce the image, eventually wears out. If an edition is limited by either the artist or publisher the printing plates or screens are destroyed at the end of the edition. The image can either be an original image or a re-working of an original painting or sketch by the artist. Limited Edition prints come in a variety of mediums including silk-screens, Giclee’s, Etchings, and photographic prints. Limited Edition prints can be either numbered or signed and numbered, some editions have a certain quantity signed and numbered and then the remainder are only numbered.  Limited edition prints are numbered in the following way Number one of an edition of fifty would be 1/50. $test =
  • Art Nouveau

    Art Nouveau is characterised by an elaborate ornamental style with sinuous linearity and flowing organic shapes based on plant forms. It can be seen most effectively in the decorative arts, for example interior design, glasswork and jewellery. However, it was also seen in posters and illustration a....
    Art Nouveau is characterised by an elaborate ornamental style with sinuous linearity and flowing organic shapes based on plant forms. It can be seen most effectively in the decorative arts, for example interior design, glasswork and jewellery. However, it was also seen in posters and illustration as well as certain paintings and sculptures of the period. The movement took its name from La Maison de l'Art Nouveau in Paris, a shop keen to promote modern ideas in art. It was influenced by the Symbolists most obviously in their shared preference for exotic detail, as well as by Celtic and Japanese art. It was brought to a wider audience in 1900 with the Exposition Universelle in Paris. Art Nouveau style is exemplified in the Paris Metro station entrances by Guimard, Tiffany glass, Mackintosh chairs and his Glasgow School of Art, and book designs of Beardsley, Charles Ricketts and followers such as Arthur Rackham. Other exponents of Art Nouveau include Gustav Klimt, Antonio Gaudí and René Lalique. Art Nouveau was highly successful all around the world, until it was killed off by the First World War. $test =
  • Art Deco

    Art Deco began in Europe particularly Paris in the early years of the 20th century, but didn’t really take hold until after World War I. It was popular both in Europe and the US until the outbreak of World War II.  View all our Art Deco prints Its style was influenced by the changing ....
    Art Deco began in Europe particularly Paris in the early years of the 20th century, but didn’t really take hold until after World War I. It was popular both in Europe and the US until the outbreak of World War II.  View all our Art Deco prints Its style was influenced by the changing times, with the increase in travel it took inspiration from both the places people were travelling too e.g. Egypt and Africa as well as the transport, planes, curse liners and cars. Despite using lots of industrial images and geometric lines Art Deco also oozes a sense of glamour. Destroy Art Deco takes its name from The International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts held in Paris in 1925. The Art Deco look was spread through all forms of art and design. It was influenced by and influenced modern architecture, in particular the Bauhaus and architects such as Le Corbusier and Miles van de Rohe.  Tamara De Lempicka is probably the best known Art Deco artist and her works captured everything that was Art Deco. However she was so much a part of this style that as Art Deco fell out of favour so did her work. Art Deco is now an iconic style with continuing appeal. $test =

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