Photography

  • Photographs that Changed The World

    Today (Saturday August 19th) is World Photo Day – a global event aspiring to create positive change in the world through photography. World Photo Day seeks to champion the flow of photographs around the globe – borne of the belief that each of us has a responsibility to affect positive chang....
    Today (Saturday August 19th) is World Photo Day – a global event aspiring to create positive change in the world through photography. World Photo Day seeks to champion the flow of photographs around the globe – borne of the belief that each of us has a responsibility to affect positive change in the world and can do so through the photographs we take and share. To celebrate we’ve asked three of our favourite photographers to nominate and discuss a photograph they believe changed the world.   David Pexton Photos that changed the world, to me, are subjective and personal. Photos of conflict might be the first images people think of but, for me, it’s an image that made me realise my insignificance in this universe; The Pale Blue Dot. Taken not by a human, but by the voyager space probe in 1990. This photo isn’t as famous as the photo of Earth Rise taken by William Anders in 1968 that depicts the earth appearing over the moon’s horizon. I didn’t see the Pale Blue Dot photograph until 15 years after it was taken until I watched a video of it on YouTube with the narration of Carl Sagan (who instructed NASA to turn the Voyager probe around one last time to take one more final image of the Earth after its mission had been completed). It is an image that put a lump in my throat and caused my eyes to well-up. If you’ve never seen the video, find a quiet moment to watch it without any interruption. Carl Sagan says it all really, but just seeing this tiny, tiny blue pixel hanging in the vastness of space is incredibly humbling. We are so insignificant to the rest of the universe and it makes me so sad that we can send a probe to the outer reaches of space, but most of our time and effort is spent in conflict here on Earth. I would like to think that images of conflict, of Earth Rise, and this, The Pale Blue Dot can bring us together collectively as one so that we can work towards a better cause; our future.   Richard Heeps Phan Thị Kim Phúc or ‘Napalm Girl’ by Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photographer Nick Ut, published when I was seven years old. Taken in Trang Bang, the photograph shows nine year old Phan Thị Kim Phúc fleeing a South Vietnamese napalm attack after being severely burned. It evokes such strong memories of my childhood growing up during the Vietnam War, when it dominated the nightly news. The picture had so much impact then and is still moving today. That photograph pretty much stopped the war, the power of the photograph changed the world.   Matt Henry With the invention of the first motion-picture camera at the turn of the nineteenth century, moving pictures very quickly adopted the language of fiction. Not so with photography, which despite various experiments with ‘staging’, remained a medium whose dedicates prized the ‘decisive moment’ and the preservation of the ‘real’ over constructed scenes, also known as tableau vivant. The tableau was deemed an amateur attempt at mimicking painting by critics like Beaumont Newhall. If photography was to be considered an art form in its own right, it needed to focus on its essence; its absolute purity as a medium of reproduction. It wasn’t until the 1960s that various postmodern theoretical approaches began to take apart the idea of the photograph as a pure, objective representation of reality. The operator and the viewer must also play their part. This freed up artists to play with the ambiguity of the medium and paved the way for staged photography as a genre, emerging in the 1980s with artists like Cindy Sherman and Jeff Wall. Although many of Wall’s shots were recreations of actual events that he had witnessed, I’ve chosen ‘Mimic’ (1982) as one of many images that he made that have proved crucial in making constructed photography a celebrated form of photographic practice. View our full range of Photography Prints $test =
  • The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from Elton John’s Collection

    Tate’s current exhibition The Radical Eye, curated from Elton John’s peerless Modernist Photography collection, celebrates photography’s coming of age as an art form as well as it’s increasing popularity among the public. The Radical Eye presents once-in-a-lifetime chance to see one of the....
    Tate’s current exhibition The Radical Eye, curated from Elton John’s peerless Modernist Photography collection, celebrates photography’s coming of age as an art form as well as it’s increasing popularity among the public. The Radical Eye presents once-in-a-lifetime chance to see one of the world’s greatest private collections of photography, drawn from the classic modernist period of the 1920s–50s. An incredible group of Man Ray portraits are exhibited together for the first time, having been brought together by Sir Elton John over the past twenty-five years, including portraits of Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, and Breton. The Radical Eye demonstrates the Tate’s ongoing commitment to the art of photography, which the institution began seriously collecting in 2009. In 2012 a major donation of photographs, ‘The Eric and Louise Franck London Collection’ doubled Tate’s photography collection overnight. Photo credit: Man Ray 1890-1976, Glass Tears (Les Larmes) 1932Photograph, gelatin silver print on paper229 x 298 mm Collection Elton John© Man Ray Trust/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2016 This exhibition introduces a crucial moment in the history of photography – an exciting rupture often referred to as the ‘coming of age’ of the medium, when artists used photography as a tool through which they could redefine and transform visions of the modern world. Technological advancements gave artists the freedom to experiment and test the limits of the medium and present the world through a new, distinctly modern visual language. This exhibition reveals how the timeless genres of the portrait, nude and still life were reimagined through the camera during this period, also exploring photography’s unique ability to capture street life and architecture from a new perspective. Though invented in the 1830s, it wasn’t until the 1920s that photography came into its own as an artistic medium. Photographers began to embrace its social, political and aesthetic potential, experimenting with light, perspective and developing, as well as new subjects and abstraction. Coupled with movements in painting, sculpture and architecture, these works became known as ‘modernist photography’. The Radical Eye features over 70 artists and nearly 150 rare vintage prints on show from seminal figures including Brassai, Imogen Cunningham, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Tina Modotti, and Aleksandr Rodchenko, Elton John has been collecting photography since 1999 and his collection has around 8000 prints. Other notable collectors of photography include ex Goldman Sachs partner Artur Walther, actress Jamie Lee-Curtis and John and Lisa Pritzker. John Pritzker is from the family behind the Hyatt Hotel chain and last year the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art opened the John and Lisa Pritzker Center for Photography, which is now the largest dedicated photography exhibition space in the US. James Bond film producer Michael Wilson is considered to be the world’s leading collector of 19th century photography. His collection of 11,000 photographic artworks resides in the Wilson Center for Photography which is attached to his London home. Last summer wealthmanagement.com noted that prices for iconic photographs by stalwarts of Modernist photography, such as Man Ray, Irving Penn, and Edward Weston, have seen prices rising precipitously, indicating growing confidence in this sector of the market and a greater appreciation for the rarity of exceptional prints by these artists. Although Contemporary photography continues to dominate the top-tier of the photography market. Works by Richard Prince, Ai Wei Wei, and Andreas Gursky have all broken the $1,000,000 threshold at auction as collectable photography prices continue to rise. The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from The Sir Elton John Collection is on at the Tate Modern London until 21st May. View contemporary photography available to buy at artrepublic.com     Enjoyed this article? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest art news Submit $test =

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