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  • The Unforgettable Art Yard Sale 2015

    The last Sunday of May saw artrepublic’s inaugural Art Yard Sale take place in Brighton’s Jubilee Square. Despite the initial bad weather the day was a roaring success, with legions of art fans attending the event to grab themselves a bargain. Early on the artists had to batten down the hatches as rain and high winds threatened to blow away a few gazebos. However this didn't deter the public with long cues forming from the onset, for people wanting to exchange their cashfor the specially designed artrepublic currency in order to make purchases.

    Luckily the rain didn't last for long, making way for clearer skies and the perfect environment to peruse the artists stands. It was fascinating viewing how the artists had displayed their work and chose to customise their stall. Pure Evil had an ingenious piece of buyable interactive art with his limited edition scratch cards. For just £10 you got a print with a nightmareified Elizabeth Taylor on one side and Ava Gardener on the other, you could then scratch off one of the silver panels for the chance to win an original Pure Evil canvas of Marilyn Monroe. Pure Evil was living up to his name, encouraging people to “Gamble on the Sabbath!”. He tagged his gazebo with his signature vampire bunnies and was kind enough to give it away to two adoring fans at the end of the day.

    Brighton based Eelus had the largest crowd surrounding hisstall through out the day and definitely had his work cut out for the duration of the Yard Sale. Not content with just releasing a new limited silkscreen, Eelus live printedand spray-customised each one of the new edition, much to the amazement and adoration of the on looking art fans.

    Another local artist, the graffiti supremo AROE had a very popular stand, offering his services with the spray can by painting bespoke letters for the public. The colourful works could be seen drying on the dashboard of the artrepublic van, ready to be taken to their new homes.

    It’s very rare to see so many big names in one place and the public clearly loved the chance to have a chat with their favourite artists. Old favourite RYCA brought with him a bevy of Star Wars inspired, affordable work with a hearty dose of his acid-house fuelled fun.

    We were super excited to have our top artists together bringing their work directly to the public. We’d like to say a massive thanks to everyone who came and to our artists and staff for their hard work in what was a very memorable day. Be sure to keep an eye out for future artrepublic events and we hope everyone who was lucky enough to get something are enjoying their new artwork!

  • Exclusive Q&A with Eelus

    An artrepublic exclusive Q&A with the man of the moment Eelus regarding his latest artrepublic.com exclusive print release 'Where They'll Never Find Us' which will be available to purhcase from 1st July.

    What is your greatest inspiration when creating your work?

    Inspiration comes from every day life and the things and people I choose to surround myself with. So I watch a lot of movies, and I also read and collect books. I love old books and buy a lot that have interesting covers, mainly horror and sci-fi.

    I adopted a staffie from Battersea Dogs home a few years ago and that gets me out of the house and into the open a lot. That’s where I do a lot of thinking and idea generating; but I also balance that out with going on walks where I try my best to do as little thinking as possible, giving my mind time to relax and re-charge.

    I try and meditate at least once  a day. Now and then I’m rewarded with random ideas and visions that will appear in my subconscious, seemingly from nowhere. I always make a note of these and follow them up at some point, transforming them into a painting or whatever.

    I think the company you keep can also be really inspiring. Wether it’s another artist friend or not, I’m always inspired by hard working people who don’t wait for their break to be handed to them. I’m excited by people who have the balls to put themselves out there in and just get stuff done, in their own time, on their own dime, answering to nobody but themselves.

    What made you start as an artist?

    The common tale of uninspired graphic designer turned street artist. I needed an outlet for the energy and ideas that weren’t right for the day job and so I started painting my own stencils in and around London before putting them onto canvas and turning them into screen print editions. After a good few years of hard work and a spoonful of luck, I was fortunate enough to quit the day job and attempt to make a living from the work I was making. Eight years on and I’m still here, clueless as ever, fumbling around in the dark.

    How would you describe your work?

    I hate describing my work, and try to do it as little as possible.

    What is the story behind the new piece?

    It’s a tale of 2 imaginative young dreamers. Taking refuge high above the burdens of the real world, hiding from the awkward truths of adolescence.

    THNFU

     

    Which other artists do you admire?

    Gustav Klimt, Henry Fuseli, Arnold Böcklin, Vincent van-Gogh, Matisse, Felician Rops, H.R. Giger, Frank Frazetta, the list goes on. I obviously have to mention Banksy as he was my main inspiration to start stencilling back in 2002.

     How long did this piece take you?

    Just over a week to get it out of my head and the finished artwork ready for the screen printer. The idea itself had been stewing and maturing in my head for a while though. I think it’s important to allow ideas to grow inside your head for a while before you commit to getting them out there.

     What kind of environment do you like to work in?

    I’m a solitary creature. I need my own private space with a door to close, surrounded by my books and other junk. But it’s nice to challenge that now and then by getting outside and painting the odd wall, chatting with folk.

    What would you say are the main themes you pursue?

    I’m interested in light and dark and the struggle and balance between the two. Literally, in terms of colour, and figuratively, in terms of the ideas and feelings behind the work. These themes are usually represented through works that have slight sci-fi, horror of fantastical ideas.

    Which of your works are you most proud of?

    I painted a wall in east London last year as a tribute to a baby daughter my girlfriend and I lost last May. She was stillborn just after 24 weeks due to some complications and it had a huge impact on my work and thinking at the time. For a good few years prior to that, I’d shied away from any kind of street art due to a huge lack of confidence and fear of failing in the public eye. Once it was over, I realised I’d gone through a brutal lesson in what fear really was, and that put real perspective on everything.

    So I decided life was too short not to do things because of possible failure or what others thought, and I got back out there and started painting outside again. So I guess I’m proud of that particular piece because of it’s personal significance, and also because It was my first freehand piece, painted without any stencils. Technically it was a mess, but that’s not too important to me these days. My focus is more about the journey and process and what I can learn from it rather than the finished piece.

     

  • Keith Haring remembered 25 years on

    Today marks the 25th anniversary of the death of Keith Haring; one of the most influential and iconic artists to emerge from the 20th Century. Haring was among the first artists to cross the boundaries from street art/graffiti into the more established world of fine art and gallery representation. 

    He made his name on the streets of New York in the 1980s, drawing and spraying gloriously simplistic images, which carried strong messages of hope and unity. The radiant baby became Haring's symbol and was quickly drawn in chalk onto the empty advertising hoarding of the cities subways. Haring established close friendships with a number of notable artists of the time including Jean-Michel Basquiat, whom he credited with inspiring him to pursue graffiti, Kenny Scharf and Futura 2000, as well as partying with hottest musicians such as Boy George and Madonna. 

    Haring believed that art was for everybody and during his life devoted much time to raising awareness for socio-political themes, such as the AIDS epidemic, apartheid in South Africa and drug addiction, through his artwork. His uncomplicated style and skilful draughtsmanship enable Haring to create work that communicated on a very basic human level. As a result his paintings and illustrations were accessible and transcended notions of race, gender or social status. Almost like modern day hieroglyphics Haring's work could speak volumes with only a few brush strokes. 

    His output was prolific and increased furthermore when he was diagnosed with AIDS in 1987. Sensing his own mortality Haring pushed even further with his art, producing increasing ambitious work as quickly as possibly. Many of our current crop of artists cite Haring as a major influence with practitioners such as Pure Evil, Shepard Fairey and Banksy all paying tribute to the profound impact of he had on them. Haring died tragically young at the age of just 31 but the legacy of his work and message burns brightly 25 years on. 

  • Valentine's Day at artrepublic

    Love is in the air in our Brighton gallery as Valentine's Day approaches so we thought it appropriate to feature some breath-taking works of art to get in you in the mood for romance. Here are a few of our heartfelt highlights to suit any budget.

    VeeBee is the new name for HYBRID, one of our most popular and ellusive, experimental artists. VeeBee has released 3 original clockwork heart pieces, which have each been hand finish with liquid glass for a glossy, slick look. Heart II has authentic vintage sheet music collaged onto it, while the incredible Heart I featured a mosaic of real butterflies. Just the thing to set hearts a-fluttering. 

    The STATIC guys have been very busy recently with their project painting walls around East London but have made the time to create their latest print ‘Game On'. Inspired by the cult video game space invaders, this signed, 10 colour silkscreen is from an edition of 100 and comes in at a very wallet friendly £48. The print was inspired by a huge street mural the duo have recently completed. Perfect for any retro gamers out there! 

    Finally for a slightly darker themed February 14th we have the latest offering from the master of digital manipulation Magnus Gjoen. ‘Everything Ends with Flowers' is a stunning giclee print on photorag paper, taken from an edition of 80. Gjoen's previous editions featuring skulls have always proven to be very sought after, with his ultra-desirable ‘Roses Are Dead' edition selling out very quickly. Gjoen's latest print would make for a truly unforgettable Valentines Day! 

  • Presenting Warren J. Fox, Lidia de Pedro and Richard Duardo works at artrepublic (January 2015)

    2015 is set to be a very big year for the artist/megastar Damien Hirst. The former enfant terrible of the art world celebrates his 50th birthday later this year and to celebrate his half century of hell raising he will be releasing an eagerly anticipated tell-all autobiography, which is due to be published by Penguin in autumn. 

    This year will also see Hirst open his new art complex in Vauxhall South London, which will display his vast personal collection of modern and contemporary art as well as natural history objects (perhaps a shark of two for good measure?). Hirst has been an avid collector since his early Goldsmiths days and owns notable works from artists including his hero Francis Bacon, fellow YBA's Tracey Emin, Sarah Lucas and The Chapman Brothers and pieces by his luxurious contemporary Jeff Koons. The new gallery will span the length of an entire street in the area as Hirst sets out to challenge his former collector Charles Saatchi for the most outrageous way to share his huge assortment of art. 

    At artrepublic we have just got in Damien Hirst latest print edition ‘The Cure' which is a set of 30 silkscreens of two-tone pills printed onto different vibrant coloured backgrounds. The new print is fresh from Hirst's most recently exhibition of new work ‘Schizophrenogenesis', which present his art based on the minimal aesthetic of the medicinal pill and pharmaceuticals. All of the prints are signed and numbered by the artist and are from a very small edition of just 15, making them incredibly collectable and sought after. ‘The Cure' is certainly our favoured remedy for banishing those pesky January blues!

  • 2015 the year of Hirst

    2015 is set to be a very big year for the artist/megastar Damien Hirst. The former enfant terrible of the art world celebrates his 50th birthday later this year and to celebrate his half century of hell raising he will be releasing an eagerly anticipated tell-all autobiography, which is due to be published by Penguin in autumn. 

    This year will also see Hirst open his new art complex in Vauxhall South London, which will display his vast personal collection of modern and contemporary art as well as natural history objects (perhaps a shark of two for good measure?). Hirst has been an avid collector since his early Goldsmiths days and owns notable works from artists including his hero Francis Bacon, fellow YBA's Tracey Emin, Sarah Lucas and The Chapman Brothers and pieces by his luxurious contemporary Jeff Koons. The new gallery will span the length of an entire street in the area as Hirst sets out to challenge his former collector Charles Saatchi for the most outrageous way to share his huge assortment of art. 

    At artrepublic we have just got in Damien Hirst latest print edition ‘The Cure' which is a set of 30 silkscreens of two-tone pills printed onto different vibrant coloured backgrounds. The new print is fresh from Hirst's most recently exhibition of new work ‘Schizophrenogenesis', which present his art based on the minimal aesthetic of the medicinal pill and pharmaceuticals. All of the prints are signed and numbered by the artist and are from a very small edition of just 15, making them incredibly collectable and sought after. ‘The Cure' is certainly our favoured remedy for banishing those pesky January blues!

  • Man punches million pound Monet

    A man who punched a hole in an £8million Claude Monet painting has been jailed this month for 6 years and subsequently banned from all art galleries and museums. Way back in 2012 Andrew Shannon calmly strolled into the Nation Gallery in Dublin and viscously attacked the 1874 painting ‘Argenteuil Basin with a Single Sail Boat' by the French Impressionist artist. Shannon initially said his motive was “to get back at the stateâ€ but during the trial he changed his story, saying that he had felt faint and accidentally fell into the artwork.

    Shannon was carrying a can of paint stripper with him at the time and had previously been eyeing up the ‘Taking of Christ' by Caravaggio before settling on the Monet. The artwork was ripped apart with a devastation three-branch tear being made by Shannon's fist. The painting has just gone back on display after an epic restoration process, which took nearly two years to complete.

    Before the damaged painting was removed from the gallery conservators examined the area for any signs of loose or flaking paint with the fragments being collected from the floor. The fragments were then examined at a microscopic level to determine what paint Monet had used. The broken fibres of the canvas were then painstaking aligned with the use of high-powered microscopes and glued back together. Over 100 miniscule piece of paint measuring between 0.3mm and 1mm were delicately reinserted into the painting, returning the masterpiece to its former glory. Its not the first major work to be vandalised and subsequently restored, earlier this year a famous Rothko painting that had be tagged went back on display at the Tate Modern after undergoing a similarly lengthy process. 

  • The Eagle has landed: Dave White’s majestic new edition

    Dave White's latest limited edition print has just swooped down in our gallery. The most recent offering from the master painter is a stunning 30-layer silkscreen of a magnificent golden eagle, which has been finished with an exquisite, sparkling, diamond dust background. The print begs to be viewed in the flesh to fully appreciate its shimmer brilliance so make you sure you pop in the Brighton gallery to see it for your self. The dignified bird continues from Dave White's ‘Albion' series, where he has looked to native British wildlife for inspiration, painting a number of endangered species. 

    In this latest body of work Dave White has encouraged the public to reconnect with the creatures that inhabit our countryside. By featuring well known as well as more obscure animals in the series he highlights the sheer span of indigenous wildlife on these shores. However it is not the first time an Eagle has cropped up in Dave White's work. Back in 2011 artrepublic exclusively released his first eagle print, which originated from his ‘Americana' show. Much like all of his editions it quickly sold and was very well received when it was launched in our London sister gallery. 

     2014 has been an incredibly successful year for the artist with two major exhibitions and a number of highly anticipated print editions being released. Back in June of this year Dave White had his debut solo show in Los Angeles further confirming his international appeal and reputation. ‘Apex' featured a number of oil paintings of great white sharks, brilliantly capturing the dynamism and elegance of the predator. Dave White has long been one of our most popular artists at artrepublic for good reason and we cannot wait to see what 2015 holds in store for the gifted painter. 



  • Grande Dame has blown us away with her exciting new hot releases down at the Brighton Gallery...

    Welcome Grande Dame to artrepublic, otherwise known as Tiff McGinnis, a self taught multimedia artist, passionate about creating animations, writing music, and a creator of audio/visual storytelling.Her work is joyful, psychedelic and energetic and we can’t get enough of it down at our Brighton gallery!

    Grande Dame is originally from the Deep South of Columbus, Georgia, but has been based in the UK since early 2001 and is currently living locally in Hastings. Ever since Tiff can remember, she has been afflicted with synaesthesia – an acute sensitivity to sound, which in her case creates colourful images in her mind upon hearing music. 

    Her work printmaking kicked off after producing prints from her music video 'The Shakes'. She recently showcased her work at our sister gallery Ink_d which was a great success. These wonderful vibrant prints are all limited edition runs, signed and numbered. Don’t miss out on these wonderful limited editions!

  • David Walker drops 'Alana' at artrepublic

    At artrepublic we are all thrilled about the arrival of David Walker’s hot new edition ‘Alana’, which comes fresh from his sensational London show. The exhibition titled ‘A Blank Canvas is a White Flag’ was held by our sister gallery Lawrence Alkin Gallery in a pop-up space in London’s uber cool Shoreditch. The event was hands down the street art hit of season and saw the Berlin based artist return to his native East London to show work in the capital for the first time in nearly 3 years. 

    In the show Walker debuted his brand new way of displaying paintings, where he divided the canvases into different section exploring colour theory. His explanation for this new method was, ‘The different sections of each painting showcase different approaches and colour logic, and in turn for the viewer to see both the individual and the whole”. 

    The painting Alana was the main lead image for the show so it is rather fitting that it has beautifully transformed into a limited edition giclee print. The show was incredibly well received and generated a lot of interest on blogs and social media, drawing in huge number of street art followers. The new edition comes in three variations, one has a silver metallic silkscreened layered and the other two are hand finished with gold and copper leaf. The subjects of the portraits are all people David knows personally and there is an underlying theme of different forms of creativity. He has painted fellow artists, musicians and dancers amongst others. Many of the print edition sold along the originals at the show so if you’re as captivated by ‘Alana’ as we are don’t sleep on it because she won’t be around for long! 

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