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  • How to display art in your home

    We here at ArtRepublic constantly keep up to date with the latest in the art world and on our travels, have come across an info graphic created by Made.com on how to properly display art in your home. ....
    We here at ArtRepublic constantly keep up to date with the latest in the art world and on our travels, have come across an info graphic created by Made.com on how to properly display art in your home. $test =
  • Coming soon... new Marc Quinn limited editions

    artrepublic are very excited to be stocking a new range of Marc Quinn limited editions, due to hit the site in a matter of weeks. In preparation, we take a look at the artist and the blossoming of his exceptional career over the last twenty-five years. Marc Quinn is a veritable polymath of artistic....
    artrepublic are very excited to be stocking a new range of Marc Quinn limited editions, due to hit the site in a matter of weeks. In preparation, we take a look at the artist and the blossoming of his exceptional career over the last twenty-five years. Marc Quinn is a veritable polymath of artistic form: give him bread and he can sculpt it into a hand; ten pints of blood and he’ll whip up a bust of himself; solid gold becomes the world’s best-loved super model; animal flesh into abstract images; DNA creates portraiture - the list goes on. As he has expressed, “art is an engagement with the material world and its continuous transformative energy, as well as the immaterial world of emotions and ideas” and nothing could be a more consummate manifestation of this claim than Quinn’s long-spanning and impressive oeuvre. Marc Quinn projected himself onto the art scene in the early 1990s, as a member of the now well-established group known as the YBA, or Young British Artists. Having earned a degree in history and history of art from the University of Cambridge, Quinn became an assistant to sculptor Barry Flanagan and quickly went on to make a name for himself, exhibiting his first solo show in 1988 at the Jay Jopling/Otis Gallery. A stream of significant exhibitions followed, from the Sydney Biennale in 1992, to a representation in Young British Artists II at the Saatchi Gallery in 1993, and another solo show at London’s Tate Gallery in 1995, to name a few. What sets Quinn’s work apart from his contemporaries is his boundless fascination with the material, in any possible guise it might take. Indeed, every artist works with substance, but Quinn turns material into the very subject of his work, probing the scientific, philosophic and political with the fundamental question of what materiality is, at its heart. That which is produced from this nexus is invariably compelling, both aesthetically and intellectually. Quinn’s work never ceases to stun, shock, and inspire, through its visual vagaries and exceptional (and often grotesque) use of substance. His various self portraits - cast in bodily fluids from blood to faeces - are inimitably captivating but they also ask questions that lie at the root of what it means to be human: questions that much modern art has begun to lose touch with. Yet while this material-meets-existential preoccupation underlies Quinn’s work, it is hard to imagine a contemporary artist more diverse or multifarious. There is certainly continuity across Quinn’s oeuvre, but his vigorous drive to explore form keeps his output constantly fresh and evolving. Most often associated with the art of sculpture, Quinn began his career with a series of bread sculptures, creating classical-style busts, Giacometti-esque figures, and a series of distorted hands (his own, traced onto the dough) which would set the tone for his thought provoking aesthetic. The resultant pieces are not only visually compelling, but rich with thematic profundities: basic need and human survival, consumption, ritual, and chance are all explored and contemplated through these organic sculptures. Within a few years of the bread sculptures Quinn had begun work on what must surely be his most well known and captivating piece: ‘Self’. This three-dimensional self portrait, cast from ten pints of Quinn’s own, frozen blood, is an intensely powerful expression of the self in modern art, using the literal self as the material with which to produce the symbolic self. In so doing, Quinn has created something unequivocally profound, an extraordinary expression of existentialist reflection that comments on themes of life and death, dependency, ephemerality and the passing of time, while holding its viewer enthralled with its inimitable aesthetic. In a surprising shift of tone (though not entirely of theme), Quinn had turned his attention to horticulture by the end of the decade, producing the first of the flower sculptures - a series that (like ‘Self’) would become a continuous project over the following years and up to today. This time, Quinn favoured the readymade, but cleverly subverted the manmade Duchampian model, turning, instead, to nature, for what he has described as “the purest and most magical transformation of reality into art.” Returning to the frozen silicone technology used in ‘Self’, Quinn has captured the peak of efflorescence, holding each flower in an eternal image of itself, as it dies within its state of icy preservation. This really is art at its fullest: aesthetically bewitching, materially innovative and intellectually stimulating, with its essential question of the delicate relationship between humanity, technology and nature at its core. Quinn’s next series of projects saw a return to classical style, using history’s most conventional of sculptural materials: marble. Yet Quinn is an artist who - time and again - powerfully resists any label of conventionality and the choice of substance for his next project was no exception. Ironically named, ’The Complete Marbles’ consists of a series of pure white marble figures, in the style of neoclassical antiquity. Yet Quinn has chosen, for his subjects, not the Gods and Goddesses, heads of state, or Venus’ and Adonis’ of times gone by but, rather, real, everyday people with one thing in common: physical disability. The series - and its title - makes reference to the incomplete Elgin marbles which, over the years, have lost limbs, heads and other peripheral parts. By contrast, Quinn’s marbles do not portray loss or incompleteness but - in a beautiful celebration of difference and disability - the fullness of bodies which diverge from narrow conventions of normality and perfection. The series culminated with Quinn’s exceptional sculpture of artist Alison Lapper, which sat proudly atop Trafalgar Square’s fourth plinth from 2005-2007. Self, the body, and materially have remained consistent themes in Quinn’s work. If ten pints of his own blood was an impressive choice of material substance, Quinn’s collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery in 2000 took self-as-self-portrait to new heights: this time, Quinn used the DNA of his subjects - amongst whom was Nobel prize winner Sir John Sulston, responsible for sequencing the human genome - to represent them. From there, Quinn returned somewhat to his formal roots, using meat and animal carcasses cast in bronze, to create a series of abstract sculptures in what was surely an homage to existentialist painter Francis Bacon and his memorable oil painting ‘Figure with Meat’. Quinn’s career exploded in the early 2000s with project after project, each unlike the next but all bound together by their provocative themes and compelling aesthetics: ‘Evolution’ depicted nine stages of the human embryo, each hewn from pink marble and huge in stature, like the towering Moai heads of Easter Island; ‘Big Bang Pop’ blew up pieces of popcorn to an impressive scale and cast them in bronze to represent the “co-existence of the banal and the sublime, and everyday miracles” at the forefront of so much of his work; for ‘History Painting’, Quinn shifted unexpectedly to oil painting and Jacquard tapestry to present snapshots of global catastrophe in the media, from the iconic mushroom cloud, to the riots of 2011. Recent works have seen a gravitation towards canvas painting and a maturing of style: Quinn has departed somewhat from his Bacon-esque, existentialist roots, towards something a little more hopeful and celebratory, still probing the fundamental questions of life, death and humanity, but in a way which is optimistic, moving, and full of the sublime. Meat, for example, remains a key theme but, in his 2011 series of ‘Flesh Paintings’, Quinn has used ribbons of red and white flesh to create strikingly beautiful, almost abstract oil paintings, full of the vibrancy of life, rather than the overtones of death exposed in ‘The Meat Sculptures’. Similarly, botany and horticulture has remained a strong trope in Quinn’s work, but the flowers on canvas have shed the underlying despondency of the dying, frozen casts, retaining the tremendous beauty of perfect bloom. Enormous bronze casts of shells, aluminium sculptures of Bonsai trees, and stainless steel ocean waves, frozen in dynamic movement, have comprised Quinn’s recent work, all tributes to the beauty of the natural world and its profoundly important relationship to art. Most recently, Quinn has turned his hand to fashion, creating a series of bags for Dior, all splashed with his exuberant, hyper-real flower displays. Quinn has also included, for the Dior range, his iris images, from the 2009 series ‘Irises’. These are not, as you might expect, images of the flower, but of the “window to the world” - the human eye - in all of its exquisite detail. Quinn is enthralled by “all of the mystery and uncertainty of life” contained within the eye, and describes it as “a very profound expression of the ambiguity which is at the heart of our existence.” Quinn’s irises are breathtakingly beautiful: glassy round shots of intense pigment, coalescing in a way that reminds us of the spectacular power of nature and humanity, each one a “microscopic map of the individual’s identity.” In a poignant way, these too are readymades: Quinn has done nothing more than transplant the existing object onto canvas creating, through a process of enlargement, awe-inspiring pieces of near-abstract art. The new editions to arrive at artrepublic will feature a selection of the iris images, as well as a stunning series of orchid prints and a handful of woodcuts and etchings. Expect high impact, bold aesthetics and intensely thought-provoking pieces from this master of contemporary art. Watch this space… View all Marc Quinn editions $test =
  • Art Yard Sale 2016 – What a day!

    We’d like to say a big thank to everyone that attended last Sunday’s Art Yard Sale and to all the artist’s for providing fantastic, inventive and affordable artwork on what was a truly memorable day. After last year’s wet and windy event we were due some good weather and low and behold we....
    We’d like to say a big thank to everyone that attended last Sunday’s Art Yard Sale and to all the artist’s for providing fantastic, inventive and affordable artwork on what was a truly memorable day. After last year’s wet and windy event we were due some good weather and low and behold we got it, with a day of endless sunshine. There was a palpable buzz around town from early on the Sunday morning with eager art fans queuing up outside our Brighton gallery tochange their cash for artrepublic currency. As the clock struck 11am the Yard Sale was open with excited collectors running (yes running) into the bazaar of contemporary and urban art, eager to hunt down some bargains. This year’s expanded format saw the inclusion of nearly double the amount of artists compared to the 2015 event, with newcomers including the likes of Ben Eine, Magda Archer, Seb Lester and Louise McNaught. Like a repeat of last year stencil and spray paint maestro Eelus was inundated with visitors keen to pick up his low run print editions and new works. With the help of the Private Press Eelus created brand new prints live on the day, expertly hand-finishing the editions before the eyes of the enthralled public. Typographic street artist Ben Eine had a ‘Brighton Rock’ edition for sale that had been printed onto posters bearing The Argus newspaper’s uniquely quirky headlines. The street art supremo was also creating customised prints using a set of A-Z letter stamps made with his signature circus font. Star of last year’s event Pure Evil held a daylong work with children attending the Yard Sale, who were invited to customise his iconic bunny tags on paper with a selection of coloured pens. Parents were then able to buy the works, each a unique collaboration with the one of the world’s biggest street artists. Lucy Sparrow well and truly embraced the car boot spirit by creating a wonderful stand of felt VHS tapes, magazines and evens tins of spam. The felt queen was also on hand all day to customise her creations by dedicating them to the buyers.   RYCA aka Ryan Callanan was spreading his acid house inspired happiness on the day with a double stand of new, affordable works. Many visitors snapped up his wood painted smiley faces, with members of the artrepublic team all sporting his gold Biggie Smalls and silver Andy Warhol necklace pendants. His art toys also went down a storm with the public. So there we have it the 2016 Art Yard Sale, another roaring success and we’ve already begun looking forward to next year’s instalment. In the meantime watch this space for more artrepublic events to take place. View art yard sale prints available to buy now $test =
  • Happy Birthday Damien Hirst

    Today is Damien Hirst’s birthday so with that in mind we thought we would highlight some of the amazing works produced by the Birthday boy. ‘The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living’ This tiger shark preserved in formaldehyde was exhibited in the first of a series ....
    Today is Damien Hirst’s birthday so with that in mind we thought we would highlight some of the amazing works produced by the Birthday boy. ‘The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living’ This tiger shark preserved in formaldehyde was exhibited in the first of a series of Young British Artists shows at the Saatchi Gallery (and purchased by Charles Saatchi) which established Damien Hirst and other YBA’s. He won the Turner prize in 1995 and his piece Mother and Child Divided being the focal point of the exhibition again featuring animals preserved in formaldehyde. If you love this shark you can have it on your wall at home with this amazing lenticular. The 3D properties of the lenticular are used to enhance the life like appearance of the shark. Spot paintings The spot paintings are amongst Hirst’s most widely recognised works and first appeared at his 1988 Freeze show painted directly onto the warehouse walls. The largest series of these paintings take their titles from the chemical company Sigma-Aldrich’s catalogue ‘Biochemicals for Research and Diagnostic Reagents’, a book Hirst stumbled across in the early 1990’s. We have a great selection of spot paintings in a variety of sizes, styles and colours as well as a variety of printing methods. Image Credit: Courtesy Other Criteria. © Damien Hirst & Science Ltd. Pharmacy Following on from the Pharmaceutical names of his spot paintings Damien Hirst has used a variety of Pharmaceutical l objects in his work including the recreation of an entire pharmacy in his 1992 installation. He has since created oversize pill sculptures, images and even wallpaper. He also has had two restaurant interiors designed around his pharmacy works. We have a great selection of oversize pill sculptures from his Schizophrenogenesis exhibition as well as the series of pill Silkscreens. Butterflies Butterflies are another big theme in Damien Hirst’s works, both live butterflies in his installations as well as ones stuck on canvases. Hirst has had a career-long fascination with the beauty, fragility and symbolism of butterflies. We have some great examples of Hirsts Butterflies including the Sanctum series of butterflies arranged in the style of stained glass windows, individual butterfly etchings and the book of his amazing foil block Souls butterflies. For The Love of God The 2007 piece ‘For the Love of God’ is one of Hirst’s best known works a diamond encrusted platinum cast of a human skull. Costing £14 million to produce, the work was first shown at the White Cube gallery in London. The base for the work is a human skull bought in a shop in Islington. It is thought to be that of a 35-year-old European who lived between 1720 and 1810. The teeth in the work come from this original skull. We have a beautiful frame lenticular of this work capturing the 3D nature of the original and set on a dramatic black background. Still haven’t seen the Damien Hirst work you are looking for? View more here     $test =
  • The artrepublic Art Yard Sale

    We are very pleased to announce the return of our annual artrepublic Art Yard Sale, a day where you can buy art directly from your favourite artists. Following the huge success of last year’s inaugural event, the forthcoming Yard Sale promises to be bigger and better than ever. Market stalls man....
    We are very pleased to announce the return of our annual artrepublic Art Yard Sale, a day where you can buy art directly from your favourite artists. Following the huge success of last year’s inaugural event, the forthcoming Yard Sale promises to be bigger and better than ever. Market stalls manned by more than 30 of our favourite artists will transform Brighton’s Jubilee Square, creating a day-long treasure trove for contemporary and street art fans. We've got some of the biggest names in the art world taking part this year including Ben Eine, Copyright, Magda Archer, Eelus, Lucy Sparrow, Joe Webb, STATIC, Ryan Callanan and Pure Evil, who will be holding an interactive kids workshop. There will also be a very strong contingent of locally based artists taking part with the likes of Bonnie & Clyde, Maria Rivans, Sara Pope, Veebee, AROE, Mike Edwards and more, giving further merit to the city’s position as an important artistic hotspot. Founder and curator Lindsay Alkin said: “We’ve been looking forward to this event since last year and can’t think of a better way to close Brighton Fringe. Even with bad weather, the first Art Yard Sale was a roaring success, with over a thousand people braving the elements to see the artists in action and grab themselves unique artworks. “As well as the best local talent, this year we’ve got some big international artists confirmed. It’s a really fantastic opportunity to meet the artists and even commission your own piece of art for a snip of its true value.” Each of the artists taking part will be creating unique, one-off pieces and commissions from their stands. With all art on sale priced between £25-£250, the Art Yard Sale aims to make art more accessible and affordable for all. PLEASE NOTE: All purchases on the day will be made with specially designed ‘artrepublic money’. These vouchers can be purchased from the artrepublic gallery in Bond Street, between 9am and 11am on Sunday 5 June. From 11am, the vouchers will then be available to buy at the event itself. Any unused artrepublic money can be changed back for cash on the day at the artrepublic market stall. This year’s Yard Sale poster has been designed by Brighton based collage artist Bonnie & Clyde, prints of which will be available on the day with proceeds going to a local homeless charity. The Art Yard Sale will take place from 11am-5pm on Sunday 5 June at Jubilee Square, New Road, Brighton - a short walk from our Bond Street gallery. Last year’s event saw a frenzy of limited edition works quickly selling, so get down early to avoid missing out. We can’t wait to see you there for what promises to be a truly unforgettable day! $test =
  • Gemma Compton Heads To Upfest

    A few weeks ago, artist Gemma Compton, along with her partner Copyright, took on an art project of a different nature…spray painting a VW ahead of Upfest, Europe’s largest street art festival to be held in Bedminster, Bristol between 23rd and 25th July 2016. Gemma has been selected as the festiv....
    A few weeks ago, artist Gemma Compton, along with her partner Copyright, took on an art project of a different nature…spray painting a VW ahead of Upfest, Europe’s largest street art festival to be held in Bedminster, Bristol between 23rd and 25th July 2016. Gemma has been selected as the festival’s 2016 artist - and she is also their first ever female festival artist. As one of her projects for the festival, the transformation of a regular VW Transporter is incredible – as you can see for yourself. Talented artists travel from 25 countries and across the UK to paint live on 30,000 sq ft of surfaces in front of 25,000 visitors. The affordable art sale, music stages and art workshops round off a visually spectacular weekend! For more information head to: www.upfest.co.uk More Projects... Gemma is currently working with a talented bunch of film makers from Friction Collective who are making a mini documentary about her work. The van was her first project with Copyright and they have been filming the duo over the past few weeks to get to know the artist behind the work. Find out more at: http://www.frictioncollective.com/   $test =
  • Shakespeare in art

    It’s the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death so here are our top Shakespeare inspired works of art. 'William Shakespeare' is a limited edition giclee from British photographic artist Mark Vessey. A beautiful line up of batter copies of Shakespeare’s 37 plays including many of the classic ....
    It’s the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death so here are our top Shakespeare inspired works of art. 'William Shakespeare' is a limited edition giclee from British photographic artist Mark Vessey. A beautiful line up of batter copies of Shakespeare’s 37 plays including many of the classic orange penguin paperbacks. Ophelia from Shakespears Hamet has inspired artists again and again over the ages. The best known image is Pre-Raphaelite John Everett Millais version of the tragic heroin. Millais’s treatment of the model for the painting has become infamous, as he forced the young Elizabeth Siddal to lie fully clothed in a tub of cold water while he completed his work. It also inspired other Pre-Raphaelite artists like Arthur Hughes. This image was used on The Jesus and Mary Chains 1992 album Honey’s Dead. Finally we have this new ethereal limited edition Ophelia from Rosie Emerson Swiss artist Henry Fuseli painted a series of images inspired by Shakespeare plays including the Withes from Macbeth and Titania from midsummer night’s dream. John Singer Sargent painted the famous artist Ellen Terry in one of her most famous rolls as Lady Macbeth. $test =
  • Happy 90th Birthday to Queen Elizabeth II

    The Queen turns 90 today! So here are our top regal prints featuring the queen in a number of guises. These two amazing pop art images are part of a series of silkscreens Andy Warhol produced in the 1980’s of reigning Queens. We love this winking Queen from British street art duo Prefab77, finis....
    The Queen turns 90 today! So here are our top regal prints featuring the queen in a number of guises. These two amazing pop art images are part of a series of silkscreens Andy Warhol produced in the 1980’s of reigning Queens. We love this winking Queen from British street art duo Prefab77, finished with beautiful metallic gold paint and from a signed edition of 100. One of the most iconic unofficial images of the queen is Jamie Reid’s reworking of the Cecil Beaton Silver Jubilee portrait of the Queen with a safety pin through her nose, for the cover for Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols. The ‘Republic Box Set’ features black and white images of the Queen each in different compositions. This is an unusual portrait of the by Magnus Gjoen queen drawing from her image on the postage stamp it combines one of his recurring themes the skull. AME72 creates a great image of the Queen and Prince Phillip as Lego figures, with the Union Jack in the background. ‘Beauty on Beauty – 'Queen’ is a gorgeous limited edition print from Dirty Hans, featuring Her Majesty the Queen, adorned in a floral motif. View all Queen prints $test =
  • Our best garden inspired prints for national gardening week

    It’s national gardening week this week so we have pick some of our best prints to bring the outside in and get inspired to get out into the garden. First up we have Marc Quinn’s amazing floral compositions. He creates a still-life arrangement in his studio using flowers and fruit bought in Londo....
    It’s national gardening week this week so we have pick some of our best prints to bring the outside in and get inspired to get out into the garden. First up we have Marc Quinn’s amazing floral compositions. He creates a still-life arrangement in his studio using flowers and fruit bought in London on a particular day. Since most of the flowers and fruit in these compositions would never bloom at the same time, or even be found together in the natural world, they show us the way in which human desire has created new seasons - bringing together in one geographical location things that nature would not assemble. The paintings depict a frozen moment of 'unnatural' time. Often large in scale and dramatically coloured, their beauty belies a sinister subtext: the relentless human desire to control nature. Titled after freaks of ecology the works offer up a corrupt beauty that suggests our possible future. Claude Monet was not only a great artist but an amazing gardener. He created his masterpiece in his gardens in Givenchy France and these then inspired his most famous Water Lilly paintings. Eric Ravilious painted some beautiful garden views including this watercolour inspired by the green houses at Firle House in Sussex. You can just smell the ripening tomatoes. Gustav Klimt produced lots of floral paintings inspired by his summer holidays in in Villa Oleander, in Kammer on Lake Attersee. This one is a riot of flowers and foliage yellow sunflowers as well as red pink blue and white blooms. Bruce McLean produces beautiful strong and bold abstract flora works that are a riot of colour. The artist has hand painted onto this beautiful silkscreen print, giving it texture and depth, as well as making each one unique. The use of collaged elements adds an extra tactility to the surface. View all floral prints   $test =
  • Runners and riders in our top horse prints

    With the Grand National on today we thought we would give you our top equine inspired artworks from past and present. First up is Whistlejacket 2015 by Nick Smith. Based on George Stubbs painting of the race horse Whistlejacket each of the 1450 individual colour blocks that make up the image are nam....
    With the Grand National on today we thought we would give you our top equine inspired artworks from past and present. First up is Whistlejacket 2015 by Nick Smith. Based on George Stubbs painting of the race horse Whistlejacket each of the 1450 individual colour blocks that make up the image are named after a different race horse many grand national winners and runners. An incredible image of an incredible animal. Next is Picassos Cheval a beautiful silkscreen print of a horse on heavy weight paper of one of Picasso’s line drawings of animals. His single line drawings are so simple but at the same time so powerful, as they create so much meaning from one single unbroken line. Picasso loved animals and kept a huge variety over his life-time, many of which appeared in his work, and particularly in his line drawings. Vichy- Horseshow is a great collection of riders bought together by Pop art icon sir Peter Blake. Chaucer’s pilgrims ride alongside medieval knights cowboys and English gentlemen in this eclectic collage horse show. A beautiful silkscreen print with glazes signed and numbered by Peter Blake. Horse racing was one of Sybil Andrews’s favourite themes and this her most popular. She captured the excitement and movement of the horses as they approach and clear the hedge. She also crated images of the spectators in wet race meeting. Lyrical by Wassily Kandinsky captures the movement of horse and man together in a beautiful expression of the experience of riding. Kandinsky sought a synthesis of the arts, in which meaning was created through the interaction of, and space between, text and image, sound and meaning, mark and blank space. The horses in Eric Ravilious’s works tend to be cut out of the hillside in chalk but they are no less majestic. There is also a horse on his Saddlers and Harness makers in his high street series. The Only Thing I'm Sure Of Is That I'm Sure Of Nothing and It Is My Heartfelt Desire To Improve But I Never Do by Charming Baker are two detailed silkscreens featuring horses heads. This fun piece from Magda Archer kitsch master features a fun and frisky pony with the text ‘Hormonal and Lovin It’ Borrowed Freedom by Marion Mcconaghie shows the freedom and sprit of the horse through her use of loose and sketchy strokes with careful fine lines creating a delicate yet energetic work. Heather J Ferguson is an artist who specializes in Equestrian themed art MELODIC MELODY is a striking giclee print that really captures the power and muscle of the race horses physique. View all horse prints $test =

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