posts

  • Spotlight on Jean-Michel Basquiat

    We have just added some amazing new prints from graffiti artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Jean-Michel Basquiat worked in the worlds of New York street graffiti and the fine art gallery. His short but prolific career began in the 1970’s with his SAMO tagged graffiti images. By the 1908’s he was showi....
    We have just added some amazing new prints from graffiti artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Jean-Michel Basquiat worked in the worlds of New York street graffiti and the fine art gallery. His short but prolific career began in the 1970’s with his SAMO tagged graffiti images. By the 1908’s he was showing in main stream commercial galleries and even collaborated with Andy Warhol. His career was bought to a tragic end when he died of a heroin overdose in 1988. His work often incorporated text and featured his signature three pointed crown. He also used found objects such as wood panels as a canvas for his art enhancing the raw feel of his work and linking with his origins as a street artist.  Jean-Michel Basquiat was fascinated by the greys anatomy book his mother gave him as a child and many of his works feature images of the body and its workings. These high quality prints of his amazingly strong and colourful images make a great statement on any wall. View all Jean-Michel Basquiat prints
  • Hey There Polar Bear!

    We have just got in four fabulous new prints from Louise McNaught. 'Hey There, Polar Bear’ is available in four great colours or as a set of four. Louise McNaught’s original pencil drawing really captures the majesty of the Polar bear as well as it’s fragility. The melting polar ice caps have ....
    We have just got in four fabulous new prints from Louise McNaught. 'Hey There, Polar Bear’ is available in four great colours or as a set of four. Louise McNaught’s original pencil drawing really captures the majesty of the Polar bear as well as it’s fragility. The melting polar ice caps have made the Polar bears hostile northern home even more hostile and their numbers are dwindling. Louise has said the drips of florescent colour in this image are a hint at the impact of the melting ice on the majestic and enigmatic polar bear. Each giclee print on Somerset Velvet 330gsm paper then has a silkscreen of the colour added and is part of a signed limited of only 25. If you love this bear Louise has created a whole menagerie of animals check out the rest of her wild creations here.
  • Our top five paintings of snow

    Artists have always been fascinated by snow and the challenges it poses. The impressionists even painted outside in the snow in their attempts to capture the way it changes the light. Here are our top five paintings of snow. Snowstorm at Brighton by Edward Bawden This dynamic print by Edward Bawden....
    Artists have always been fascinated by snow and the challenges it poses. The impressionists even painted outside in the snow in their attempts to capture the way it changes the light. Here are our top five paintings of snow. Snowstorm at Brighton by Edward Bawden This dynamic print by Edward Bawden was innovative in its use of extensive over-printing of a lighter colour on a darker first print. This technique combined with the use of bold and angular cuts really brings the atmosphere of the snow storm to life. Halstead in The Snow - 1935 by Eric Ravilious Eric Ravilious beautifully captures the falling snow in the Essex town of Halstead. The tracks on the road will soon be covered by the falling snow from the dark brooding sky. Gray Hares (Winter Bunnies) by Kozyndan This is the last in Kozyndan’s 'Seasons of the Bunny' series of prints and is taken from Hiroshige's 'Evening Snow Kanbara'. It features the artists themselves growing old together. The Magpie 1869 by Claude Monet The Magpie was created during the winter of 1868–1869 and is Monet's largest scale snowscape. It is one of this first examples of Monet's use of coloured shadows. It shows a magpie on a fence in a stone wall with a house in the background. The whole landscape is covered in snow. Winter Landscape by Caspar David Friedrich German romantic painter Caspar David Friedrich uses this ominous snow scene to convey a message of the hope for salvation through the Christian faith. The original can be seen in the National Gallery in London.
  • Monet’s garden brings an early spring to the Royal Academy

    Opening on 30 January Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse at the Royal Academy of Arts, London explores the garden as a subject in the development of early 20th century art. Monet was both a famous painter and gardener with his gardens at Giverny sill drawing 100’s of visitors every year....
    Opening on 30 January Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse at the Royal Academy of Arts, London explores the garden as a subject in the development of early 20th century art. Monet was both a famous painter and gardener with his gardens at Giverny sill drawing 100’s of visitors every year. Taking his amazing impressionist images as a starting point this exhibition will walk you through gardens captured by Renoir, Cezanne, Manet, Sargent, Kandinsky, Van Gogh, Klimt and Klee. If you are inspired by these painters to get some fresh florals in to brighten up your room we have a fantastic selection of floral prints from Claude Monet’s waterlilies through Klimt’s sunflower to Warhol’s Daisy. View all our Floral Prints Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse Royal Academy of Arts 30 January — 20 April 2016 Image Credit: Claude Monet, Nymphéas (Waterlilies), 1914-15. Oil on canvas, 160.7 x 180.3 cm. Portland Art Museum, Oregon. Museum Purchase: Helen Thurston Ayer Fund, 59.16. Photo © Portland Art Museum, Portland, Oregon
  • Bowie - An Artist In Every Sense

    The sad passing of music legend David Bowie ignited the radio playlists all day yesterday - and as I sat at my desk, I had fond memories of teenage years, listening to his records in my bedroom (I even had the obligatory poster on my wall)...move over George Michael...I'm not really a Wham kinda gir....
    The sad passing of music legend David Bowie ignited the radio playlists all day yesterday - and as I sat at my desk, I had fond memories of teenage years, listening to his records in my bedroom (I even had the obligatory poster on my wall)...move over George Michael...I'm not really a Wham kinda girl. A massive talent and an icon of our time. An incredible musician, actor, and painter....who also collected art and inspired it too. He was a fan of 20th Century British artists - and chose his art based upon what was important to him at the time, or what typified a certain decade, rather than honing in on the big names! Bowie also attended art school and exhibited some of his own paintings - his style suggested a fondness for Picabia, Surrealism, Marvel Comics and Egon Schiele. He saw painting as therapy - a good way to solve problems and creative obstacles which helped him create musical masterpieces. Such a colourful character also inspired the works of other artists including; Martin Richardson, Clive Sefton, Russell Marshall, Pure Evil and Terry Pastor and many more - and I am are sure he will continue to to inspire for many years to come....gone but never forgotten.  
  • Going For Gold – Joe Webb’s ‘Gold – Embrace’ sells for £2k in Auction

    2015 saw Joe Webb go for gold with his sell-out ‘Embrace – Gold’ edition and 2016 has seen the release of artrepublic exclusive ‘Embrace – Platinum’ plus the beautiful ‘Echoes – Blue’. As well as being another fantastic year with sell-out print editions, numerous art events and ex....
    2015 saw Joe Webb go for gold with his sell-out ‘Embrace – Gold’ edition and 2016 has seen the release of artrepublic exclusive ‘Embrace – Platinum’ plus the beautiful ‘Echoes – Blue’. As well as being another fantastic year with sell-out print editions, numerous art events and exhibitions, 2015 saw Joe Webb alongside artist such as The Connor Brothers, Nancy Fouts and Dan Baldwin take part in the Peace One Day, Charity Auction at Pall Mall. The ‘Peace One Day’ charity seeks to campaign for unanimous adoption by all UN member states for a day of ceasefire and non-violence and work to institutionalise the day to make it self-sustaining. The auction all in all raised £150,000 and Webb’s ‘Embrace – Gold’ sold for just under £2,000. Following the sell-out of Webb’s ‘Embrace’ release which was available in a rainbow of colours; blue, pink, red and gold, it seemed only fit that the artist released a perfectly platinum version which is now available here and only here at artrepublic. To go alongside this beauty we also have artrepublic exclusive ‘Echoes – Blue’ which features a silhouette of a man with shining slicked back hair and a silhouette of a woman against him. This gorgeous piece of art tells the beginning of a thousand stories – whether that be love, companionship or your own personal story. Both ‘Embrace – Platinum’ and ‘Echoes – Blue’ by Joe Webb are available to purchase right here at artrepublic – but hurry, catch them whilst you can!
  • Spotlight On...Graham Carter

    An award winning illustrator and print maker, Graham Carter is one of the most exciting talents in the UK today and he has worked at the forefront of the industry for the last 16 years. Graham's client list is extensive and he has enjoyed successful campaigns with Aviva, Bupa, Orange, Waterstones, V....
    An award winning illustrator and print maker, Graham Carter is one of the most exciting talents in the UK today and he has worked at the forefront of the industry for the last 16 years. Graham's client list is extensive and he has enjoyed successful campaigns with Aviva, Bupa, Orange, Waterstones, Visa and Monster.co.uk. His illustrations can also be spotted in a wide variety of editorial publications such as The New Scientist, The Guardian and The Sunday Times. His illustration style has evolved over the last 8 years, using printmaking to produce stunning silkscreen and giclee print editions that are exhibited in galleries all over the world. He sometimes starts the process with a simple sketch and scans it in and the work flows from there, however, mostly he starts with a finished screen print in mind, but as the artists himself says; "it’s nearly impossible to plan everything. There are always surprises or obstacles!" Carter often takes inspiration from simply walking through town or by the sea in his Sussex hometown of Seaford…clearly fresh air suits him to get those creative juices flowing - and he admits to often finding exciting compositions, colours or narratives in the mundanities of everyday life. Well however you're finding your inspiration Graham...we're loving your work! OUR PICKS! GET PERSONAL WITH THE ALPHABET SERIES These cute and quirky prints are bursting with personality and Carter has created unique characters for each animal. What’s more, he has kindly offered to add a name or word of your choice, at no extra cost. To order a personalised version of one of the prints, simply purchase your chosen letter, then email support@artrepublic.com to confirm your chosen name / word (referencing your order number in your email). Please Note – the image and colour will remain the same, only the text will be unique to you FIND OUT MORE>> CURATORS PICK....King O’ The Highlands A gorgeous Silkscreen finished with Varnish and Enamel detail and from a Limited Edition of 50 - just £250 This piece encompasses the beautiful creature the ‘Stag’ but in giving it Carter's unique style and twist making for a truly eye-catching piece of art. This print is signed and numbered by the artist. VIEW HERE >>
  • Exclusive Q&A with Eelus

    An artrepublic exclusive Q&A with the man of the moment Eelus regarding his latest artrepublic.com exclusive print release 'Where They'll Never Find Us' which will be available to purchase from 1st July. What is your greatest inspiration when creating your work? Inspiration comes from every day....
    An artrepublic exclusive Q&A with the man of the moment Eelus regarding his latest artrepublic.com exclusive print release 'Where They'll Never Find Us' which will be available to purchase from 1st July. What is your greatest inspiration when creating your work? Inspiration comes from every day life and the things and people I choose to surround myself with. So I watch a lot of movies, and I also read and collect books. I love old books and buy a lot that have interesting covers, mainly horror and sci-fi. I adopted a staffie from Battersea Dogs home a few years ago and that gets me out of the house and into the open a lot. That’s where I do a lot of thinking and idea generating; but I also balance that out with going on walks where I try my best to do as little thinking as possible, giving my mind time to relax and re-charge. I try and meditate at least once  a day. Now and then I’m rewarded with random ideas and visions that will appear in my subconscious, seemingly from nowhere. I always make a note of these and follow them up at some point, transforming them into a painting or whatever. I think the company you keep can also be really inspiring. Wether it’s another artist friend or not, I’m always inspired by hard working people who don’t wait for their break to be handed to them. I’m excited by people who have the balls to put themselves out there in and just get stuff done, in their own time, on their own dime, answering to nobody but themselves. What made you start as an artist? The common tale of uninspired graphic designer turned street artist. I needed an outlet for the energy and ideas that weren’t right for the day job and so I started painting my own stencils in and around London before putting them onto canvas and turning them into screen print editions. After a good few years of hard work and a spoonful of luck, I was fortunate enough to quit the day job and attempt to make a living from the work I was making. Eight years on and I’m still here, clueless as ever, fumbling around in the dark. How would you describe your work? I hate describing my work, and try to do it as little as possible. What is the story behind the new piece? It’s a tale of 2 imaginative young dreamers. Taking refuge high above the burdens of the real world, hiding from the awkward truths of adolescence. Which other artists do you admire? Gustav Klimt, Henry Fuseli, Arnold Böcklin, Vincent van-Gogh, Matisse, Felician Rops, H.R. Giger, Frank Frazetta, the list goes on. I obviously have to mention Banksy as he was my main inspiration to start stencilling back in 2002.  How long did this piece take you? Just over a week to get it out of my head and the finished artwork ready for the screen printer. The idea itself had been stewing and maturing in my head for a while though. I think it’s important to allow ideas to grow inside your head for a while before you commit to getting them out there.  What kind of environment do you like to work in? I’m a solitary creature. I need my own private space with a door to close, surrounded by my books and other junk. But it’s nice to challenge that now and then by getting outside and painting the odd wall, chatting with folk. What would you say are the main themes you pursue? I’m interested in light and dark and the struggle and balance between the two. Literally, in terms of colour, and figuratively, in terms of the ideas and feelings behind the work. These themes are usually represented through works that have slight sci-fi, horror of fantastical ideas. Which of your works are you most proud of? I painted a wall in east London last year as a tribute to a baby daughter my girlfriend and I lost last May. She was stillborn just after 24 weeks due to some complications and it had a huge impact on my work and thinking at the time. For a good few years prior to that, I’d shied away from any kind of street art due to a huge lack of confidence and fear of failing in the public eye. Once it was over, I realised I’d gone through a brutal lesson in what fear really was, and that put real perspective on everything. So I decided life was too short not to do things because of possible failure or what others thought, and I got back out there and started painting outside again. So I guess I’m proud of that particular piece because of it’s personal significance, and also because It was my first freehand piece, painted without any stencils. Technically it was a mess, but that’s not too important to me these days. My focus is more about the journey and process and what I can learn from it rather than the finished piece.  
  • Louis-Nicolas Darbon: Artist Interview

    Louis-Nicolas Darbon takes inspiration from his travels, fashion and celebrity culture to create vibrant and dynamic images, packed with exuberance and colour. He is a leading voice in the domain of men's fashion and presides over a very influential blog on the world of gentlemen style. Louis....
    Louis-Nicolas Darbon takes inspiration from his travels, fashion and celebrity culture to create vibrant and dynamic images, packed with exuberance and colour. He is a leading voice in the domain of men's fashion and presides over a very influential blog on the world of gentlemen style. Louis very kindly took some time out during a trip to Miami to answer some questions for us and give some fascinating insight into his life and art. What is the significance of the icons and celebrities that feature in your work? We live in a world where we are surrounded by celebrities and to me Kate Moss is the most incredible super model of our times in my opinion, Cara Delevigne is the new Kate without a doubt and Kendall is the biggest celebrity phenomenon of our times- both with incredible social media status.With regards to icons, Basquiat of course is a huge inspiration and Steve McQueen is my favourite fashion icon of all times. I would however never paint anyone that I don't find incredible just because they are super famous or have amazing social media following, I will only paint people that I find inspirational. Destroy You have a very well respected, popular fashion blog and work within the industry. Does the world of fashion inform your art or do you see it as a separate entity? Well, thank you very much, I am honoured! Art and fashion are very much part of the same world for me, I take inspiration from the fashion world to my artworks and vice versa. I definitely think that I've become braver in dressing and mixing colours thanks to the art and fashion trends are a big inspiration for some of my works  and of course luxury brand's logos! How would you describe your work? Fun and liberating bursting with energy and colours! What is your fashion tip for us at artrepublic for the upcoming spring season? A military army jacket, a scarf with a great print and some fun slippers and you are set for the season. Destroy Do you listening to anything in particular whilst working? It can be anything from classical music to pop and house, I can’t work in silence it stresses me. Where did you grow up? Were you a creative child and how did your upbringing influence your art? Destroy  I grew up in Versailles and Paris, and I have been painting since, well forever. I think I was only around 2 when I held a paintbrush in my hand for the first time and since then I was always painting. My mother has quite a creative hand, so it’s definitely from her I got the creative gene. My parents were always supportive and got me a little studio in the house where I could paint with no one disturbing, it’s been kept like that since then and I love going through some old stuff from when I was a kid. What made you become an artist? I always painted on the side of University or work, but always kept it as a passion on the side. When I met my girlfriend she was the one who pushed me into taking it a step further to really evolve and supported me to produce more artwork. Step by step since about two and a half years ago, I could never have dreamt of where I am today, it is like a dream come true. Destroy Where and what is your studio? In the heart of Notting Hill, only a few steps from Portobello Road, which for me is the most inspiring part of London. How do you approach the actual making of your work? When I have an image in mind or the vision of the final work, I am always so anxious to get it down on a canvas, or piece of cardboard or wood – whatever it is that I am creating it on! As I go along I discover what works and what doesn’t, if I want to work with a collage or some other material, what will be a stencil and what will be hand painted – it all kind of happens naturally. What would you say are the main themes you pursue? Icons, luxury fashion brands and a bit of irony of our world today. Destroy How do you choose your subjects? It really varies, the other day I got an amazing piece of fabric of the American flag and I knew straight away I wanted to paint on it and then it suddenly hit me what I wanted to create. Sometimes it’s a great photograph of someone very iconic – it really depends. Destroy Where do you find inspiration? It can be anywhere or anything, I can find inspiration at every corner – from fashion, vintage fabric markets to exhibitions I see. I find a lot of inspiration from travelling especially in Miami or LA – or just around the corner in my neighbourhood in Notting Hill. Destroy What are you currently working on? I’m always working on several pieces at the same time, sometimes I start on one piece and then when it doesn’t feel 100% I have to leave it and I start on something else. I am currently producing the pieces that will be in my first solo show later this spring – watch this space. Which of your works are you most proud of? The melting Chanel No5 neon bottle that I created on wood was one of my first ever pieces that got included in an exhibition, it was part of the “NewSchool2” exhibition at Graffik Gallery and I had no idea it would get so much attention and that it later would become one of my signature pieces. Do you care whether people like your work? Of course, in the end of the day I wouldn’t be where I am today if it wasn’t because people liked my stuff and actually wanted a piece for their home. But then again not everyone will like my stuff because they have a different taste and sometimes its good to get feedback from people who are not into your works. Destroy Who would you say buys your work? Anyone who loves pop colours, fashion and iconic portraits! You might think that my art has a certain age group but I’ve met many of my buyers and they are all so very different and I have collectors in all ages which I find really inspiring! You can never get too old for a ‘Scrooge’ or a great neon Chanel No5 bottle. What’s the most memorable piece of advice you’ve received in regards to your art? To always evolve and experiment with new techniques, work with new materials and mediums. Destroy If you weren’t an artist how do you think you would you express yourself creatively?  Probably as a menswear fashion designer. Is there an art form you don’t relate to? I am not a huge fan of landscape or sculptures of old kings – they even kind of freak me out. Destroy Which artists do you most admire? Warhol of course, Russell Young, RETNA for his amazing murals, Kobra (I love his street art piece of Basiquat in Wynwood Miami) just to name few. Finally when would you say are you happiest- creating the work, exhibiting, finishing it? Tough question, creating the work is always inspiring, exciting and challenging as I can change my mind along the way and the piece will come out looking completely different than what I would have imagined and that’s always exciting! Finishing it always has that satisfaction element to it and when you get really attached to the piece, exhibiting it has that mixed feelings of excited and nervous at the same time! artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   image credit: www.louisnicolasdarbon.com View all Louis-Nicolas Darbon prints available
  • Dan Hillier: Artist Interview

    Destroy We are thrilled to have the work of Dan Hillier with us at artrepublic. Dan's unique artistic practice sees him engaging with the craft of the past by bringing Victorian imagery into the 21st century. He was thrust into the general public's attention last year when his stunning image ....
    Destroy We are thrilled to have the work of Dan Hillier with us at artrepublic. Dan's unique artistic practice sees him engaging with the craft of the past by bringing Victorian imagery into the 21st century. He was thrust into the general public's attention last year when his stunning image Pachamama was used by local Brighton band Royal Blood on the cover of their chart topping debut album. We caught up with Dan in his Stoke Newington studio to discuss his creative process, the Peruvian psychedelic drink ayahuasca and the influence of Bjork amongst other things, in our latest artist interview. Can you describe for us at artrepublic your style of art? A hotchpotch. They're collages made from bits and pieces of old Victorian prints, which I source from 1800s woodcuts, engravings, anatomical drawings and various illustrations. I scan them into Photoshop and then play around layering them up to make new images. What I do has been called Surrealism and Neo-Victoriana in the past. Steampunk is another title that gets put on it but I’m not really keen on that. People like it because the work looks quite modern whilst also being of Victorian times. It looks like it comes from a while back in time but has that modern flavour, I think that largely comes about because there is a lot of white space rather than having an overcrowded background. What I’ve realised over the years is what I’m seeking to make is my own kind of iconographical work, much like the church icons you get of the mother and child or Buddhist and Hindu cosmological deities. It’s something along those lines, and generally what happens is as I try to make those, something else will come through. Destroy So you don’t rigidly plan what the images will look like?  With the main way I work, I will start with one element or an idea of what I want to move towards making. I’ll often start with a face, animal or bit of scenery, then go through and seek out what I think will work well with that and let the picture build itself. I did a talk recently where I was comparing the creative process with the shamanic process. Both of those things, as far as I’m concerned, involve getting yourself out of the way and letting the creative through fare build the picture. Both of them are bringing the formless into form and are about channelling something, without being too grand about it. When I work it it’s very much about letting the pictures put themselves together and just being around the edges tapping them into place. Destroy There’s also that interesting thing that the people you use had their own separate life before entering your world…  With the elements I’m using they were real people who existed and their likeness is being used for something that had probably nothing to do with their worldview. My pictures are quite psychedelic and unusual; some have very clear faces that have been used for the masks or central elements in pictures. Destroy So we must touch upon the album artwork you created for Royal Blood, how did that project come about? The band got in touch and commissioned me to make a new picture for them, which I did. Then Mike (lead singer) saw Pachamama and decided he wanted that because he was looking for something really feminine. I had to have a think about it because she’s quite precious to me, I really love that picture. I’m very glad they did use it as it’s great to get it out there. It works as a good counterpoint to the music, which is very masculine. It’s not this perfect match of art and music but it’s good to have that contrast there. I met up with the guys, we talked and got on well and they just asked for a picture without any sort of guidance, which really suits me. People are more aware of my work now and when I’m showing at fairs they will stop and recognise the image. It’s definitely brought more interest my way and I’ve had a really good reaction to the album. A lot of people have got in touch to say they’ve got into my work through the band and said how much they’ve enjoyed seeing something that’s had a lot of thought and time and love go into it. Destroy In your personal life you’ve mentioned how taking the psychedelic medicinal drink ayahuasca has had a profound impact on you. Have these spiritual experiences manifested in your art? I’m making more work now and about to release the first work I’ve made since I’ve been drinking it. I came back from my first trip to Peru and thought my work is really aligned with what happens in ayahuasca ceremonies and that mythical, visionary state of mind that one can get into. I’ve been meeting a lot of people in ayahuasca circles who have quite a unanimous reaction in that they recognise their experiences with the medicine in my work. I don’t know how much it’s going to change the style or how it looks, but it’s definitely knocked my focus into line in terms of what I’m doing with my work and simplified it. I used to struggle when people asked me what my work is about and it wasn’t something I thought about in huge amounts. The thing with ayahuasca is that it’s just opened my mind and heart further to mystery, wonder and amazement. That’s essentially what I’m trying to put out in my work. Destroy What artists do you look to for inspiration? Max Ernst is probably the first influence I’ve got to mention. He did a book called ‘A Week of Kindness’ which I first saw when I was 19. It’s a book of collages he made back in the 1930s where he spliced together images using bits and pieces of illustrations from encyclopaedias and novels. It’s a really interesting and dark romp through the days of the week. Each day has a theme, its quite a methodically thought out thing but it’s so open to interpretation. A lot of Freudian analysis has been done on the pictures. He’s definitely a big influence in what I do. When I started making these pictures in 2004, I remembered this stuff by Ernst I had seen and went back to it. Destroy Where and what did you study?  Destroy I did Graphic Arts and Illustration at what is now called Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge. I just basically partied and mucked about for the first year and got more serious in the second and third years. In the final year I got into collage and worked a lot with a photocopier. I didn’t use computers in college but there were a couple of people beginning to use Photoshop for their graphic design. After that I spent a few years doing henna tattoos, painting murals and travelling. In 2006 I started making this stuff. You began by selling your work at a market… It was at the Sunday Up Market in Brick Lane, held inside the old Truman Brewery. I still sell work there now but have a mate of mine run the stall. It’s really good to be able to go down there, chat to people and have that face to face interaction going on. I sold the work myself down there for years and really enjoyed forming some good friendships with people. I also do the Other Art Fair twice a year, again with a couple of people helping sell my work. Destroy What would you say is the biggest threat to art today? Probably commercialisation and the commercial market forces, in lots of different ways. We’re so bombarded with imagery and advertising. There is so much to look at; we’ve reached a point of information overload. People don’t necessarily spend time looking at art or engaging with it in the way I think is really beneficial. That speed and overload that we get is one part of that commercialisation but I also think appropriation by market forces is one of the biggest threats to art. I’m not sure where my line is on it all.  As soon as someone does something interesting, whether it’s music or art, the advertisers move in and use that artistic output to flog things we don’t need with huge sums of money involved. I really respect The Beastie Boys for their standpoint on their music being used for commercial gains and chasing people down who tried to exploit their intention. When would you say you are happiest and most content regarding your art? I think throughout really. The beginning of making a picture is really exciting, when I’m getting the ideas together. There’s a point during the process where it can often get a bit difficult or it just goes through straight away and that’s wonderful. There’s a point where a picture clicks into place, I realise what it is and then it’s just a case of finessing it. The pictures are never really complete or finished, I just have to stop at some point and send it to the printer. I like putting lots of detail in my work to be found by people who look at it for a long time. Destroy You’ve gained a lot of attention for the Royal Blood album cover, do you listen to music while you work?  I do, pretty much all the time. It’s been a lot of Bjork recently. She’s amazing and a huge inspiration for me. Just the freedom of her creativity is astonishing. I’ve seen her live 3 times and always come away charged up. She is constantly moving on and changing what she’s doing, I love her. There’s also another guy called Loscil who does really nice minimal electronica. He makes deep and hypnotic ambient stuff; he’s a big favourite. A guy called Krishna Das who makes call and response Kirtan music. Always Phillip Glass. I listen to some noisy music occasionally as well, like Slayer but not so much while I’m working. Destroy How long does a piece take you to complete? The ones I’m doing now have been on the boil for about a year but it really depends. Sometimes I can go and make a picture in a few days but other times it can be a year, with them fizzing around until the right time to put them out. Some of the very early stuff I made in a matter of hours but they were a lot simpler back then. I take my time with it more now. Destroy Finally describe for us an average day in the life of Dan Hillier… There isn’t an average one, but on a good day probably getting up at about 6, meditating for 45 minutes, going to yoga, having some breakfast, starting work by 9, working for a few hours then having lunch, and after that just keep on going until about 5 or 6. But really I don’t have an average day, it just changes all the time. What I’m trying to do now is set the scene so I can have those perfect working days where I get up early, do my morning stuff then spend the entire day working with music on, getting stuck into it with out all the other distractions. artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   View all Dan Hilier prints Read our Dan Hillier biography image credits: nme, www.danhillier.com

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