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  • How to display art in your home

    We here at ArtRepublic constantly keep up to date with the latest in the art world and on our travels, have come across an info graphic created by Made.com on how to properly display art in your home. ....
    We here at ArtRepublic constantly keep up to date with the latest in the art world and on our travels, have come across an info graphic created by Made.com on how to properly display art in your home. $test =
  • Coming soon... new Marc Quinn limited editions

    artrepublic are very excited to be stocking a new range of Marc Quinn limited editions, due to hit the site in a matter of weeks. In preparation, we take a look at the artist and the blossoming of his exceptional career over the last twenty-five years. Marc Quinn is a veritable polymath of artistic....
    artrepublic are very excited to be stocking a new range of Marc Quinn limited editions, due to hit the site in a matter of weeks. In preparation, we take a look at the artist and the blossoming of his exceptional career over the last twenty-five years. Marc Quinn is a veritable polymath of artistic form: give him bread and he can sculpt it into a hand; ten pints of blood and he’ll whip up a bust of himself; solid gold becomes the world’s best-loved super model; animal flesh into abstract images; DNA creates portraiture - the list goes on. As he has expressed, “art is an engagement with the material world and its continuous transformative energy, as well as the immaterial world of emotions and ideas” and nothing could be a more consummate manifestation of this claim than Quinn’s long-spanning and impressive oeuvre. Marc Quinn projected himself onto the art scene in the early 1990s, as a member of the now well-established group known as the YBA, or Young British Artists. Having earned a degree in history and history of art from the University of Cambridge, Quinn became an assistant to sculptor Barry Flanagan and quickly went on to make a name for himself, exhibiting his first solo show in 1988 at the Jay Jopling/Otis Gallery. A stream of significant exhibitions followed, from the Sydney Biennale in 1992, to a representation in Young British Artists II at the Saatchi Gallery in 1993, and another solo show at London’s Tate Gallery in 1995, to name a few. What sets Quinn’s work apart from his contemporaries is his boundless fascination with the material, in any possible guise it might take. Indeed, every artist works with substance, but Quinn turns material into the very subject of his work, probing the scientific, philosophic and political with the fundamental question of what materiality is, at its heart. That which is produced from this nexus is invariably compelling, both aesthetically and intellectually. Quinn’s work never ceases to stun, shock, and inspire, through its visual vagaries and exceptional (and often grotesque) use of substance. His various self portraits - cast in bodily fluids from blood to faeces - are inimitably captivating but they also ask questions that lie at the root of what it means to be human: questions that much modern art has begun to lose touch with. Yet while this material-meets-existential preoccupation underlies Quinn’s work, it is hard to imagine a contemporary artist more diverse or multifarious. There is certainly continuity across Quinn’s oeuvre, but his vigorous drive to explore form keeps his output constantly fresh and evolving. Most often associated with the art of sculpture, Quinn began his career with a series of bread sculptures, creating classical-style busts, Giacometti-esque figures, and a series of distorted hands (his own, traced onto the dough) which would set the tone for his thought provoking aesthetic. The resultant pieces are not only visually compelling, but rich with thematic profundities: basic need and human survival, consumption, ritual, and chance are all explored and contemplated through these organic sculptures. Within a few years of the bread sculptures Quinn had begun work on what must surely be his most well known and captivating piece: ‘Self’. This three-dimensional self portrait, cast from ten pints of Quinn’s own, frozen blood, is an intensely powerful expression of the self in modern art, using the literal self as the material with which to produce the symbolic self. In so doing, Quinn has created something unequivocally profound, an extraordinary expression of existentialist reflection that comments on themes of life and death, dependency, ephemerality and the passing of time, while holding its viewer enthralled with its inimitable aesthetic. In a surprising shift of tone (though not entirely of theme), Quinn had turned his attention to horticulture by the end of the decade, producing the first of the flower sculptures - a series that (like ‘Self’) would become a continuous project over the following years and up to today. This time, Quinn favoured the readymade, but cleverly subverted the manmade Duchampian model, turning, instead, to nature, for what he has described as “the purest and most magical transformation of reality into art.” Returning to the frozen silicone technology used in ‘Self’, Quinn has captured the peak of efflorescence, holding each flower in an eternal image of itself, as it dies within its state of icy preservation. This really is art at its fullest: aesthetically bewitching, materially innovative and intellectually stimulating, with its essential question of the delicate relationship between humanity, technology and nature at its core. Quinn’s next series of projects saw a return to classical style, using history’s most conventional of sculptural materials: marble. Yet Quinn is an artist who - time and again - powerfully resists any label of conventionality and the choice of substance for his next project was no exception. Ironically named, ’The Complete Marbles’ consists of a series of pure white marble figures, in the style of neoclassical antiquity. Yet Quinn has chosen, for his subjects, not the Gods and Goddesses, heads of state, or Venus’ and Adonis’ of times gone by but, rather, real, everyday people with one thing in common: physical disability. The series - and its title - makes reference to the incomplete Elgin marbles which, over the years, have lost limbs, heads and other peripheral parts. By contrast, Quinn’s marbles do not portray loss or incompleteness but - in a beautiful celebration of difference and disability - the fullness of bodies which diverge from narrow conventions of normality and perfection. The series culminated with Quinn’s exceptional sculpture of artist Alison Lapper, which sat proudly atop Trafalgar Square’s fourth plinth from 2005-2007. Self, the body, and materially have remained consistent themes in Quinn’s work. If ten pints of his own blood was an impressive choice of material substance, Quinn’s collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery in 2000 took self-as-self-portrait to new heights: this time, Quinn used the DNA of his subjects - amongst whom was Nobel prize winner Sir John Sulston, responsible for sequencing the human genome - to represent them. From there, Quinn returned somewhat to his formal roots, using meat and animal carcasses cast in bronze, to create a series of abstract sculptures in what was surely an homage to existentialist painter Francis Bacon and his memorable oil painting ‘Figure with Meat’. Quinn’s career exploded in the early 2000s with project after project, each unlike the next but all bound together by their provocative themes and compelling aesthetics: ‘Evolution’ depicted nine stages of the human embryo, each hewn from pink marble and huge in stature, like the towering Moai heads of Easter Island; ‘Big Bang Pop’ blew up pieces of popcorn to an impressive scale and cast them in bronze to represent the “co-existence of the banal and the sublime, and everyday miracles” at the forefront of so much of his work; for ‘History Painting’, Quinn shifted unexpectedly to oil painting and Jacquard tapestry to present snapshots of global catastrophe in the media, from the iconic mushroom cloud, to the riots of 2011. Recent works have seen a gravitation towards canvas painting and a maturing of style: Quinn has departed somewhat from his Bacon-esque, existentialist roots, towards something a little more hopeful and celebratory, still probing the fundamental questions of life, death and humanity, but in a way which is optimistic, moving, and full of the sublime. Meat, for example, remains a key theme but, in his 2011 series of ‘Flesh Paintings’, Quinn has used ribbons of red and white flesh to create strikingly beautiful, almost abstract oil paintings, full of the vibrancy of life, rather than the overtones of death exposed in ‘The Meat Sculptures’. Similarly, botany and horticulture has remained a strong trope in Quinn’s work, but the flowers on canvas have shed the underlying despondency of the dying, frozen casts, retaining the tremendous beauty of perfect bloom. Enormous bronze casts of shells, aluminium sculptures of Bonsai trees, and stainless steel ocean waves, frozen in dynamic movement, have comprised Quinn’s recent work, all tributes to the beauty of the natural world and its profoundly important relationship to art. Most recently, Quinn has turned his hand to fashion, creating a series of bags for Dior, all splashed with his exuberant, hyper-real flower displays. Quinn has also included, for the Dior range, his iris images, from the 2009 series ‘Irises’. These are not, as you might expect, images of the flower, but of the “window to the world” - the human eye - in all of its exquisite detail. Quinn is enthralled by “all of the mystery and uncertainty of life” contained within the eye, and describes it as “a very profound expression of the ambiguity which is at the heart of our existence.” Quinn’s irises are breathtakingly beautiful: glassy round shots of intense pigment, coalescing in a way that reminds us of the spectacular power of nature and humanity, each one a “microscopic map of the individual’s identity.” In a poignant way, these too are readymades: Quinn has done nothing more than transplant the existing object onto canvas creating, through a process of enlargement, awe-inspiring pieces of near-abstract art. The new editions to arrive at artrepublic will feature a selection of the iris images, as well as a stunning series of orchid prints and a handful of woodcuts and etchings. Expect high impact, bold aesthetics and intensely thought-provoking pieces from this master of contemporary art. Watch this space… View all Marc Quinn editions $test =
  • Happy Birthday Damien Hirst

    Today is Damien Hirst’s birthday so with that in mind we thought we would highlight some of the amazing works produced by the Birthday boy. ‘The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living’ This tiger shark preserved in formaldehyde was exhibited in the first of a series ....
    Today is Damien Hirst’s birthday so with that in mind we thought we would highlight some of the amazing works produced by the Birthday boy. ‘The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living’ This tiger shark preserved in formaldehyde was exhibited in the first of a series of Young British Artists shows at the Saatchi Gallery (and purchased by Charles Saatchi) which established Damien Hirst and other YBA’s. He won the Turner prize in 1995 and his piece Mother and Child Divided being the focal point of the exhibition again featuring animals preserved in formaldehyde. If you love this shark you can have it on your wall at home with this amazing lenticular. The 3D properties of the lenticular are used to enhance the life like appearance of the shark. Spot paintings The spot paintings are amongst Hirst’s most widely recognised works and first appeared at his 1988 Freeze show painted directly onto the warehouse walls. The largest series of these paintings take their titles from the chemical company Sigma-Aldrich’s catalogue ‘Biochemicals for Research and Diagnostic Reagents’, a book Hirst stumbled across in the early 1990’s. We have a great selection of spot paintings in a variety of sizes, styles and colours as well as a variety of printing methods. Image Credit: Courtesy Other Criteria. © Damien Hirst & Science Ltd. Pharmacy Following on from the Pharmaceutical names of his spot paintings Damien Hirst has used a variety of Pharmaceutical l objects in his work including the recreation of an entire pharmacy in his 1992 installation. He has since created oversize pill sculptures, images and even wallpaper. He also has had two restaurant interiors designed around his pharmacy works. We have a great selection of oversize pill sculptures from his Schizophrenogenesis exhibition as well as the series of pill Silkscreens. Butterflies Butterflies are another big theme in Damien Hirst’s works, both live butterflies in his installations as well as ones stuck on canvases. Hirst has had a career-long fascination with the beauty, fragility and symbolism of butterflies. We have some great examples of Hirsts Butterflies including the Sanctum series of butterflies arranged in the style of stained glass windows, individual butterfly etchings and the book of his amazing foil block Souls butterflies. For The Love of God The 2007 piece ‘For the Love of God’ is one of Hirst’s best known works a diamond encrusted platinum cast of a human skull. Costing £14 million to produce, the work was first shown at the White Cube gallery in London. The base for the work is a human skull bought in a shop in Islington. It is thought to be that of a 35-year-old European who lived between 1720 and 1810. The teeth in the work come from this original skull. We have a beautiful frame lenticular of this work capturing the 3D nature of the original and set on a dramatic black background. Still haven’t seen the Damien Hirst work you are looking for? View more here     $test =
  • Spotlight on lenticular printing

    Lenticular images give the illusion of depth (3D), movement or merge two different images. They do this by taking images and splicing them into strips these are then interlaced with other images. Over the top of the image is a magnifying lens this is broken up into lenticules which show the view....
    Lenticular images give the illusion of depth (3D), movement or merge two different images. They do this by taking images and splicing them into strips these are then interlaced with other images. Over the top of the image is a magnifying lens this is broken up into lenticules which show the viewer a different image as the image is viewed from different angles. It is a highly specialised process and requires the highest quality precision printing to create a perfect image. Artists such as Peter Blake and Damien Hirst have bought their works to life using the Lenticular printing method. Other artists like Martin Richardson and Julian Opie specialise in producing art that moves or appears 3D David Bowie - Experimental Portrait by Martin Richardson This type of printing has a fascinating history, from seventeenth century Royal portraits, to early corporate advertising, and kitsch memorabilia. In 1692, French painter Bois-Clair discovered he could achieve a multi-dimensional effect on canvas by interposing a grid of vertical lathes between the viewer and the painting. He has been held to be the inventor of two-way paintings but there is evidence that he had been following even older traditions. ‘Turning Pictures’ were known of in the seventeenth century and are referred to by Shakespeare. You can make one of these simple lenticulars using folded paper. The first images to be described as ‘lenticular’ were produced in the 1930s by Victor Anderson. By the late 1940s, Mr Anderson’s company, ‘Vari-Vue’, was producing millions of simple lenticular images a year for everything from postcards of women winking to Cracker Jack prizes, political campaign buttons, and magazine inserts. The technology for lenticular printing gained popularity in the 1960’s and 1970’s featuring on postcards, book covers, rulers and all sorts of printed products. Notable lenticular prints from this time include the limited-edition cover of the Rolling Stone’s album and Roy Lichtenstein’s art work ‘Fish and Sky. In 2004 Chris Levine to created a lenticular portrait of Her Majesty The Queen. Chris’s 21st century work, 'Lightness of Being', was the first ever 3D portrait of The Queen. To create his lenticular print Chris Levine and a technical team took over 10,000 images and 3D data-sets during two sittings at Buckingham Palace, but the portrait is made up of just nine them. Now we have amazing new lenticular from Magnus Gjoen and Eelus with more to come so watch this space for some fantastic moving works of art. View all Lenticular prints $test =
  • Live with the art you love a guide to own art

    At artrepublic we are passionate about making art accessible to all and own art is an amazing way of doing just that. Created by Arts Council England the Own Art scheme enables you to spread the cost of hundreds of limited editions and original works of art. What is Own Art? Own Art is a fantastic....
    At artrepublic we are passionate about making art accessible to all and own art is an amazing way of doing just that. Created by Arts Council England the Own Art scheme enables you to spread the cost of hundreds of limited editions and original works of art. What is Own Art? Own Art is a fantastic scheme enabling you to spread the cost of a wide variety of phenomenal signed limited edition prints and original artworks both framed or unframed. Own Art has been running for over 10 years and has helped many people start collecting contemporary art or simply get an amazing piece of art they love hanging in their home. What can I buy? Own Art loans are available for the purchase of contemporary art and craft of any kind in any media. The works must be by a contemporary artist; meaning the scheme can support today’s living artists through sales of their work. The art must be an original, not a reproduction, and from a limited edition of 150 or less. The idea is to encourage people to invest in the highest quality art where the artist has had a definite creative involvement. Own Art loans allow you to borrow from as little as £100 up to a maximum of £2,000 for the purchase of selected limited edition prints or original art works. There is no limit to the number of times you can use Own Art to build your own art collection. There are also no charges if you decide to pay off the loan early, and you change the date of your monthly direct debit if needed. Artists such as Magnus Gjoen, Peter Blake and Pure Evil are amongst hundreds of sensational artists who have selected prints eligible for purchase with Own Art. Get some great art for as little as £10 a month on Own Art for eligible limited edition prints in the opening price bracket of £100, from amazing artists such as Static , Donk and Joe Webb. If you are buying something more valuable than £2,000 you will be pleased to know that you can use an Own Art loan as a part payment (as long as it is eligible). Please do note that you cannot apply for multiple Own Art loans to cover the costs of a single purchase. You can view hundreds of eligible works of art in the own art section of the website. Who is eligible? Own Art is remarkably easy to use. The only criteria are that you must be – Over the age of 18 A permanent UK resident Working at least 16 hours a week (employed or self-employed) If you’re not working but married to or living with a partner who does have a full time job, you can still apply as long as your partner is happy to have their employment details included on your application. How do I apply? You can apply and even sign you agreement all on line simply select pay by finance from the own art tab on the product page or when you are in the checkout. You can choose exactly how much you want to borrow from Own Art, adjusting the price with the sliding bar. If you are using the scheme as a part payment you then need to pay the remaining balance and follow the prompts to complete the loan application. It is surprisingly easy, but if you do need a hand you can always call us on 0345 646 1234 or email us at support@artrepublic.com.  It can all be done online in a matter of minutes and once we have received your application and it has been approved we will expertly pack your art and send it off to you. We are adding new work to our site all of the time so channel your inner Charles Saatchi or Peggy Guggenheim and have a browse of our current favourites...   $test =
  • Performing for the Camera at Tate Modern

    Performing for the Camera examines the relationship between photography and performance, from the invention of photography in the 19th century to the selfie culture of today. Bringing together over 500 images spanning 150 years, the exhibition engages with the serious business of art and performan....
    Performing for the Camera examines the relationship between photography and performance, from the invention of photography in the 19th century to the selfie culture of today. Bringing together over 500 images spanning 150 years, the exhibition engages with the serious business of art and performance, as well as the humour and improvisation of posing for the camera. Amalia Ulman Excellences & Perfections (Instagram Update, 8th July 2014),(#itsjustdifferent) 2015 Courtesy the Artist & Arcadia Missa The exhibition begins by considering the documentation of important performance works such as Yves Klein’s Anthropometrie de l’epoque blue 1960, a live painting event using the bodies of naked women, as well as key 60s performances by Yayoi Kusama, Marta Minujín and Niki de Saint Phalle. Drawing on an extensive collection of images by Harry Shunk and János Kender, two of the most important photographers to have worked with performance, the exhibition features iconic images and many rarely seen studies, including those revealing how the photomontage of Yves Klein’s famous Leap into the Void 1960 was made. By charting how performers and photographers have also worked collaboratively, the exhibition examines live events that happened solely for the camera. Beginning with some of the earliest works in the exhibition, photographs from Nadar’s studio in 19th century Paris show the famous mime artist Charles Deburau acting out poses as the character ‘Pierrot’. Later works drawing on this same idea include Eikoh Hosoe’s Kamataichi, a collaboration with the choreographer and founder of the Butoh movement Tatsumi Hijikata. This seminal 1969 work is one of the first to have given equal authorial credit to the performing subject and the photographer. Masahisa Fukase From Window 1974 © Masahisa Fukase Archives. Courtesy Michael Hoppen Gallery. The photographic image went on to become an arena within which to act, distinct from the live stage of theatrical or artistic performance, in works by artists like Charles Ray, Carolee Schneemann and Erwin Wurm. These artists often perform for their own cameras, either physically as in Paul McCarthy’s Face Painting – Floor, White Line 1972 or more conceptually through ideas of self-image and fantasy as in the work of Boris Mikhailov. The construction of self-identity and posing is explored through iconic works by Claude Cahun, Man Ray and Cindy Sherman, as well as more recent projects like Samuel Fosso’s African Spirits 2008, in which the artist photographs himself in the guise of iconic figures like Martin Luther King Jr and Miles Davis. The exhibition looks at the innovative and performative approaches taken to self-portraiture by Lee Friedlander, Masahisa Fukase and Hannah Wilke. Identity and self-image were also important for artists like Jeff Koons and Andy Warhol in their own marketing and promotional photographs, and in more playful works like Mike Mandel’s Baseball Photographer Trading Cards 1974 in which photographers pose as ‘collectable’ baseball players. The world of social media is addressed in a key recent work staged on Instagram by Amalia Ulman. The exhibition shows not only that photography has always been performative, but that much performance art is inherently photographic. Performing for the Camera 18 February – 12 June 2016 Tate Modern Opening Hours: Daily 10.00 – 18.00 Fri & Sat: 10.00 - 22.00 $test =
  • Botticelli Reimagined at the V&A museum London

    500 years after death of Sandro Botticelli this major exhibition at the V&A will explore the variety of ways artists and designers from the Pre-Raphaelites to the present have responded to his artistic legacy. Venus, 1490s by Sandro Botticelli, Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin Preu....
    500 years after death of Sandro Botticelli this major exhibition at the V&A will explore the variety of ways artists and designers from the Pre-Raphaelites to the present have responded to his artistic legacy. Venus, 1490s by Sandro Botticelli, Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Photo: Volker-H. Schneider Botticelli is now recognised as one of the greatest artists of all time. His celebrated images are firmly embedded in public consciousness and his influence permeates art, design, fashion and film. However, although lauded in his lifetime, Botticelli was largely forgotten for more than 300 years until his work was progressively rediscovered in the 19th century. Telling a story 500 years in the making, Botticelli Reimagined will be the largest Botticelli exhibition in Britain since 1930. Including painting, fashion, film, drawing, photography, tapestry, sculpture and print, the exhibition will explore the myriad of ways that artists and designers have reinterpreted Botticelli. It will include over 50 original works by Botticelli, alongside works by artists such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris, René Magritte, Elsa Schiaparelli, Andy Warhol and Cindy Sherman. Botticelli Reimagined will be divided into three major sections, entitled: Global, Modern, Contemporary; Rediscovery and Botticelli in his own Time. Rebirth of Venus, 2009 by David LaChapelle, Creative Exchange Agency, New York, Steven Pranica / Studio LaChapelle, (c) David LaChapelle Global, Modern, Contemporary will show how Botticelli’s imagery attained its present level of acclaim. This section is dominated by The Birth of Venus, depicting the naked Venus emerging from a shell on the seashore, which cannot leave its permanent display in the Uffizi Gallery, Florence. Andy Warhol’s Details of Renaissance Paintings (Sandro Botticelli, Birth of Venus, 1482) (1984) accommodates the face and flowing hair of Botticelli’s icon in his signature flat style and bold palette, while Yin Xin’s Venus After Botticelli (2008) reinterprets Venus with an Asian appearance. The familiar pose of Botticelli’s figure can be seen in David LaChapelle’s saturated and artificial Rebirth of Venus (2009), and Reineke Dikjstra’s Beach Portraits (1992) show adolescents as monumental figures against the water’s edge. A dress and trouser suit of patchwork panels from The Birth of Venus from Dolce & Gabbana’s S/S 1993 collection will be shown with two Elsa Schiaparelli evening dresses (1938) ornamented with embroidered foliage, inspired by Pallas and the Centaur. Botticelli’s influence on film includes the sequence of Ursula Andress emerging from the sea clasping a conch shell from Dr No (1962) and an excerpt from The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988) in which Uma Thurman re-enacts The Birth of Venus. Functioning like the large-scale frescoes he studied in Italy, Bill Viola’s Going forth by Day is a digital image cycle inspired by Botticelli’s inventions. In 5th surgery performance - Operation opera (1994) ORLAN has plastic surgery to mimic Botticelli’s Venus as part of a performance series rewriting Western art through her own body. This section will also include Tamara de Lempicka’s trompe-l’oeil Painting with a Botticelli (1946) which presents Botticelli as the key to art, as well as key works by Robert Rauschenberg, René Magritte and Maurice Denis. La Ghirlandata, 1873 by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, © Guildhall Art Gallery 2015, Photo: Scala, Florence/Heritage Images Rediscovery will trace the impact of Botticelli’s art on the Pre-Raphaelite circle during the mid-19th century. Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Ruskin and Edward Burne-Jones all collected Botticelli’s work, and his aesthetic was reinterpreted in Rossetti’s La Ghirlandata (1873) and Burne-Jones’ The Mill: Girls Dancing to Music by a River (1870-82). The Florentine master’s celebrated Primavera haunts this section, as is shown by William Morris’ The Orchard (1890), a tapestry depicting medieval ladies in a bountiful scene, Evelyn De Morgan’s Flora (1894) illustrating the nymph of flowers, and the only surviving film of Isadora Duncan dancing (c.1900). Copies of The Birth of Venus by Edgar Degas and Gustave Moreau (1859) as well as Etienne Azambre’s Two Women copying Botticelli’s fresco of Venus and the Graces (1894) demonstrate the vogue for copying his work. Botticelli’s European influence is manifest in major paintings by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Arnold Böcklin and Giulio Aristide Sartorio. Pallas and the Centaur, c.1482 by Sandro Botticelli, © Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence, 2015, Photo: Scala, Florence - courtesy of the Ministero Beni e Att. Cultura The final section of the exhibition arrives at Botticelli in his Own Time. This will show that Botticelli was both a supremely skilled artist and a designer of genius who ran a highly successful workshop. Exhibits will include his only signed and dated painting The Mystic Nativity (1500), three portraits supposedly of the legendary beauty Simonetta Vespucci, and the exquisitely detailed Pallas and the Centaur (1482), travelling to London for the first time. A number of variations on the Virgin and Child thematic in different formats will illustrate Botticelli’s creativity as a designer, while a spectacular group of his rare graphic corpus including five of his drawings of Dante’s Divine Comedy reflect his skill as a draughtsman. The show will close with two monumental fulllength paintings of Venus, reprising the heroine of The Birth of Venus, and will also feature the V&A’s Portrait of a Lady known as Smeralda Bandinelli (c. 1470-5), formerly owned by Rossetti and restored especially for this exhibition. Victoria and Albert Museum London Opening Hours: Daily: 10.00 – 17.45 Fri: 10.00 – 22.00 $test =
  • Vogue 100: A Century of Style is at the National Portrait Gallery

    Vogue 100: A Century of Style is at the National Portrait Gallery, London, from 11 February – 22 May 2016, sponsored by Leon Max. This major new exhibition at the National Portrait gallery celebrates 100 years of cutting-edge fashion, beauty and portrait photography by British Vogue. Linda Ev....
    Vogue 100: A Century of Style is at the National Portrait Gallery, London, from 11 February – 22 May 2016, sponsored by Leon Max. This major new exhibition at the National Portrait gallery celebrates 100 years of cutting-edge fashion, beauty and portrait photography by British Vogue. Linda Evangelista by Patrick Demarchelier, 1991 ©The Condé Nast Publications Ltd Vogue 100: A Century of Style will showcases the remarkable range of photography that has been commissioned by British Vogue since it was founded in 1916, telling the story of one of the most influential fashion magazines in the world.Theamed by decades the exhibitions explores British Vogue’s unfaltering position at the forefront of new fashion, its dedication to the best in design, and its influence on the UK’s wider cultural stage. Exquisite vintage prints from the early twentieth century, ground-breaking photographs from renowned fashion shoots, unpublished work and original magazines will be brought together in this first retrospective survey of the celebrated magazine. Fashion is Indestructible by Cecil Beaton, 1941 ©The Condé Nast Publications Ltd Included in the exhibition are works by many of the leading twentieth-century photographers, including Cecil Beaton, Lee Miller, Irving Penn and Snowdon as well as more recent work by celebrated photographers David Bailey, Corinne Day, Patrick Demarchelier, Nick Knight, Herb Ritts and Mario Testino. I the photographs You can also see many of the faces that have shaped the cultural landscape of the twentieth century, from Henri Matisse to Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and Damien Hirst; Marlene Dietrich to Gwyneth Paltrow; Lady Diana Cooper to Lady Diana Spencer; and Fred Astaire to David Beckham. Also featured in the exhibition will be the fashion designers that defined the looks of the century, including Dior, Saint Laurent and McQueen. Highlights of the exhibition include the entire set of prints from Corinne Day’s controversial Kate Moss underwear shoot, taken in 1993 at the pinnacle of the ‘grunge’ trend; Peter Lindbergh’s famous 1990 cover shot that defined the supermodel era; a series of exceptional Second World War photographs by Vogue’s official war correspondent, Lee Miller; a rare version of Horst’s famous ‘corset’ photograph from 1939, which inspired the video for Madonna’s hit song Vogue; and vintage prints by the first professional fashion photographer, Baron de Meyer. The National Portrait Gallery, London Opening Hours: Daily 10.00 – 18.00 Turs & Fri: 10.00 – 21.00 $test =
  • Jackson Pollock at MoMA

    Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954 This exhibition covers Jackson Pollock’s work from the 1930s until his 1956 death at the age of 44. The works are taken from the Museum of Modern Art’s unparalleled collection of Jackson Pollock’s works. 50 works representing every phase of t....
    Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954 This exhibition covers Jackson Pollock’s work from the 1930s until his 1956 death at the age of 44. The works are taken from the Museum of Modern Art’s unparalleled collection of Jackson Pollock’s works. 50 works representing every phase of the artist’s career and the wide range of materials and techniques that he employed are on show in the exhibition. Jackson Pollock (American, 1912-1956). One: Number 31, 1950. 1950. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 8′ 10″ x 17′ 5 5/8″ (269.5 x 530.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection Fund (by exchange), 1968. © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Over the course of two decades, Pollock’s work progressed from mythical, primal figures and scenes; to imagery that combines elements of representation and abstraction; to the radical “drip” paintings that mark the climax of his career. With these culminating works, which envelop the viewer through their monumental scale and all over markings, Pollock emerged at the forefront of the post-World War II movement known as Abstract Expressionism. His innovations helped make this the first American art movement to wield international influence. They had an explosive effect on the traditions of painting and opened up new avenues for sculpture and performance art as well. Jackson Pollock (American, 1912-1956). The She-Wolf. 1943. Oil, gouache, and plaster on canvas, 41 7/8 x 67″ (106.4 x 170.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1944 © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York In addition to One: Number 31, 1950 (1950)—arguably Pollock’s greatest masterpiece and one of his largest canvases—the exhibition also features drawings and exceedingly rare and little-known engravings, lithographs, and screenprints, highlighting an underappreciated side of one of the most important and influential American artists of the 20th century. Bringing these works together underscores the relentless search for new expressive means and the emphasis on experimentation and process that were at the heart of Pollock’s creativity. Now until Sunday, May 1 The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) New York Opening Hours Daily 10:30 – 17:30, Friday 10:30 – 20:00 View all Jackson Pollock prints available on artrepublic.com $test =
  • PatnDon: Artist Interview

    PatnDon are an artist duo that share a unique vision and way of making art, communicating their idea in variety media including print, text, video, painting and photography. Their practice manifests in a number of different ways with contrasting themes: from paying homage to the costumes of T....
    PatnDon are an artist duo that share a unique vision and way of making art, communicating their idea in variety media including print, text, video, painting and photography. Their practice manifests in a number of different ways with contrasting themes: from paying homage to the costumes of The Prince of Pop, Michael Jackson to creating a number of bespoke cabinets containing detritus and ephemera collected over a lifetime. We caught up with the pair to find out more about what they do and their past. Who exactly are PatnDon? P: PatnDon are Patricia and Donald. The ‘n’ represents the way in which we pronounce ‘and’. D: We like to think that it’s Yorkshire dialect but really it’s just slovenly and common and can’t really be attributed towards slang. How would you describe your work?  P: We have, with a varying degrees of success, incorporated painting, sculpture, screen printing, text video, utter nonsense and ‘cheap stand up’ in our exploration and yearning for Artistic endeavour. D: I suppose that it is quite typical to describe our work as autobiographical, but it is the most appropriate term for it. But then I suppose that all artist’s work can’t be anything other than autobiographical! P: We believe that our work carriers comprehensive pretensions, but we are just as satisfied if our work merely makes the viewer smile. What would you say are the benefits of working as part of an artistic duo? P: To a lesser or greater extent everyone strives to make their mark on this world. We just find that by working as a collaborative duo lessens the burden.  D: Our styles certainly complement each other.  P: I tend to paint things.  D: And I tend to build stuff. What is the story behind your Michael Jackson inspired series of images?   P: For quite a while we had yearned to produce a series of abstract paintings. We had devised various formulas to create colourful compositions but everything that we tried seemed too forced, predictable and tiresome. We were beginning to get disillusioned. And then Michael Jackson died and we were suddenly inundated with images in newspapers and magazines of the ‘King of Pop’ and his rather questionable fashion. We suddenly had our source material.  D: The vast majority of the pieces featured glittered and highly glazed elements to represent the glitz and glamour of the man. Out of respect and necessity we set about producing 100 paintings based on the diverse costumes that Michael Jackson once wore. The series included his significant pieces as well as some of his other less obvious creations. Do you listen to anything in particular whilst working?  P: We gravitate towards music that has a story. In the sense that it can be categorised into a beginning, middle and end. Music that allows you to embark on a journey. A climax and an anti-climax. An experience. Songs that haave layers. We are not loyal to any one specific style. We think that Hip-Hop has a lot of merit. How sampling is a marriage of styles. A homage. D: The work that we are producing at the time has a direct correlation with thetype of music that we favour. It seems to be a rather unconscious decision.Ironically, when we spent almost a year creating the Michael Jackson paintings we couldn’t bare to listen to even one of his songs. It would have been overwhelming. Pink Floyd are wonderful. Trent Reznor is a genius. Tom Waits and Nick Cave are incredible storytellers. Where did you both grow up?  P: We grew up in Goole, East Yorkshire. The town is significant for previouslyhaving the honour of being Europe’s largest exporter of wood. And of course it’siconic water towers that closely resemble Salt and Pepper pots .D: The town is now inundated with supermarkets and charity shops. Where did you train? What did training teach you? P: We completed our Foundation course at Selby College. It was an intense and avery humbling experience. It was the first time that we were amongst people who had willingly chosen to be students. We learnt so much. D: Our Tutors at Leeds University were a revelation. They wouldn’t allow you tobe dismissive of anything. Everything could be justified and rationalized. Theyreally steered our practise in a very conceptual direction. Our final piece was toproduce a manual, which the reader, our subject, was invited to use as a guide torealize our work for us. To realize language in a physcial form. To expose andexploit assumptions. It was incredibly well received. What would you say are the main themes you pursue? P: Nothing is particularly off limits. And we think that this is true with the majority of Artists. We all seem to pursue and explore the same main themes.Love, Life and Death are obvious. We do feel that humour is quite understated and generally overlooked in Art. But yet, consider the premise of a joke with most of the Art that you observe and you’ll soon happen upon a punchline. Albeit, it a dark humour in many cases. D: We certainly have a fondness for language and how language can be explored.Especially in the way we use everyday expressions. We all use expressions withlittle or no real consideration but if you were to interpret them literally you would conjure up some wonderful imagery. Which of your works are you most proud of? P: That’s like being asked to choose your favourite Child! We are proud of how all of our ‘projects’ have turned out. We are particularly fond of our on-going Collection Box series. This is by far our rawest and most honest creation. We make bespoke display cabinets and fill them to capacity with items that we haveacquired throughout our life’s. They were initially inspired by disappointingMuseum displays and over cluttered charity shop windows. D: When you begin to consider the designers involved in each item, or theindividuals involved in the packaging of said items, or the amount of peopleinvloved in the distribution of each item then it becomes an incredibly considered project. There are arguably thousands of people indirectly involved in the manufacture of the Collection Box series. What’s the biggest myth about artists? P: I can recall with anger and frustration the time when a relative asked what Iwas studying at University. After my response he proceeded to ask if the windows were clean. D: Even though this was a witty retort, the pre-conception that Artists don’t do alot with their day is incredibly annoying. Being an Artist is not a 9-5. And there iscertainly no such thing as an overnight success. You can trace any Artists successback by years. What’s the best advice anyone ever gave you? P: If in doubt, make it big. Make lots of them. And give it a fancy name. D: That, the cat sat on the mat is not a story. The cat sat on the dogs mat is! What is the greatest threat to art today? PnD: Damien Hirst. P:- IIya & Emilia Kabakov, Fischli & Weiss, Martin Creed, Angus Fairhurst. D: We admire Artists that just seem to do what they want. Individuals who appear carefree and uninhibited in the type of Art that they produce and don’t particularly conform to any assumed type. What work of art would you most like to own? P: A Thousand Years by Damien Hirst. It’s the perfect metaphor for life. I like the imagery of it being the focal point in the lounge and everyone having to live their lives around it. D: Autumn Rhythm (number 30) by Jackson Pollock. I believe that it is withoutquestion the most striking image that I have ever experienced. It’s a knockout. It is arguably the most energetic ‘still’ painting out there. A juxtaposition. It’s passive aggressive. It’s also a reminder that an Artist with a relatively simple, yet original idea can completely change the perception of Art. Finally please describe for us an average day in the life of PatnDon… P: We’ll discuss, deliberate and disagree before finally settling on something to do. There is alot of dialogue between us because we made the bold decision at University to discard our sketchbooks in favour of the actual realization of work. D: Having no tangible plan leads to all many of nonsense. It’s easy to startsomething. But it’s hard to go on. And it’s very difficult to finish. We hate endings.That is a start! artzine your guide to everything that's happening in the art world   View all PatnDon prints and original work available $test =

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